By on September 21, 2016

Ford F150 assembly line

It seems as though you can’t turn around on the streets of Atlanta or the suburbs of Austin or the outskirts of Albuquerque without seeing a Ford F-Series pickup truck.

For 34 years running, Americans have registered more copies of the F-Series than any other pickup truck. A wide-ranging model lineup (just like its competitors) and top-selling rivals that split their sales between brands means Ford consistently and overwhelmingly sells more full-size pickup trucks than any other automobile brand in the United States. At the current rate of growth, Ford will sell more than 800,000 F-Series pickups in 2016, more than at any point since 2005.

While it’s impressive that Ford owns 30 percent of the American pickup truck market, perhaps the more daunting figure shows that 1 out of every 22 new vehicles sold in the U.S. is a Ford pickup truck.

But don’t be so easily impressed. Look northward, where the Ford F-Series is far more popular than it is in the United States.

In Canada, the Ford F-Series owns 39 percent of the pickup truck market and accounts for 1 out of every 15 new vehicle acquisitions.

While the Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra, America’s second- and fourth-best-selling pickups, have on many historic occasions combined to outsell the Ford F-Series in the U.S. — including just last year — the Ford F-Series outperforms the combined efforts of the second and third-ranked pickups in Canada, the Ram P/U and GMC Sierra.

Ford F150 towing boats and plowing snow

No other new vehicle nameplate in the history of the Canadian auto industry has ever reported 100,000 sales in a full calendar year. The Ford F-Series has done so in each of the last four years. 2016 is different, however, because after averaging roughly 118,000 annual sales between 2011 and 2014, and peaking at 126,277 units in 2013, Ford Canada is on track to report 150,000 F-Series sales in calendar year 2016.

In fact, with four months to spare, Ford Canada has already reported more than 100,000 F-Series sales this year.

That’s more total sales than every brand except Toyota, Honda, and Hyundai.

In August, as F-Series sales rocketed to an all-time monthly high of 14,197 units — the third time this year the F-Series broke its own record — Ford’s pickup truck lineup outsold the entire Hyundai brand, too.

These are mighty numbers for any vehicle competing in the relatively small Canadian market. New vehicle buyers in the United States will drive away from automotive dealers with more than 17 million vehicles in 2016, nine times the Canadian total. Yet Ford F-Series sales in the U.S. are only five times stronger than in Canada.

2017 Ford F350 King Ranch

True, the Canadian full-size pickup truck market is larger than the U.S. full-size pickup truck market when adjusted for the scale of the respective overall industries. But at six-to-one, it’s not as inordinately strong as the F-Series’ figures, specifically. And don’t forget, the F-Series’ inordinate Canadian strength explains much of Canadian full-size truck market’s disproportionate clout.

Despite the overwhelming success of the company’s best-selling model in Canada, the Ford Motor Company and the namesake Ford brand itself do not dramatically overperform compared to Ford’s achievements south of the border. Ford and Lincoln combine to own 15.2 percent of the U.S. market; Ford and Lincoln earned a 15.6-percent share in Canada in 2016’s first eight months. The Ford brand’s 14.6-percent market share is topped in Canada with a 15.2-percent share.

Why isn’t the F-Series’ success channeled into greater success for the overarching Ford Canada empire, admittedly an empire that generated more new vehicle sales than any other automaker in the first eight months of 2016?

Much as you may think that in America the F-Series is Ford, the Blue Oval relies on the F-Series for only 31 percent of its U.S. volume. That figure jumps to 49 percent in Canada. Ford sells 15 times more cars in the U.S. than in Canada, for instance, and 18 times more Explorers, succeeding on the breadth of its lineup in ways Ford Canada does not.

No, it’s in Canada where the F-Series is Ford. And there’s a reason.

Use the 2016 Ford F-150 XLT 4×4 SuperCrew 3.5 EcoBoost as an example. Priced in the U.S. market at $44,140 including destination, Ford’s advertised incentives bring the F-150 down to $41,140. For a 2016 Ford F-150 XLT 4×4 SuperCrew 3.5 EcoBoost in Canada, the $48,149 MSRP is incentivized with a $4,750 delivery allowance and a $5,409 Employee Pricing Discount, dragging the price down to $37,990. At current exchange rates, Ford Canada’s $37,990 XLT 4×4 SuperCrew 3.5 EcoBoost is worth USD $29,000.

That explains a lot.

“We price against the competition and to the Canadian market,” Ford Canada’s product marketing manager for trucks, Mike Sinuita, told TTAC when asked about the aggressive incentivizing. “We’re not concerned with how the truck is priced in the U.S.”

“We’re a natural-resources-driven economy,” Sinuita said. As a result, Ford doesn’t shy away from positive fleet business that’s good for the bottom line. “We’ve got a lot of strong fleet customers in logging, mining, and the oil fields.”

Unfortunately, Ford, like General Motors and FCA, is unwilling to break down light and heavy-duty pickup truck sales, so we’re not able to completely decipher which aspects of the F-Series overperform north of the border.

Sinuita also acknowledged that, much as Ford is willing to tout the overarching F-Series’ capability and the F-150’s all-around appeal, the market is to credit for some of the F-Series enviable results. As recently as 2008, passenger cars accounted for 54 percent of the Canadian market. Light trucks now account for 65 percent of the market and, says Sinuita, “We’ve ridden that wave.”

The hope at Ford Canada is that the wave won’t soon break. Yet to its credit, the Ford F-Series has ridden higher atop that wave than its rivals. Canadian F-Series sales are up 27 percent this year; its rivals are collectively down 1 percent.

And Ford wants more. “We’re continually investing in the truck,” Sinuita said in referencing the 2017 F-150’s available 10-speed automatic transmission. Asked if Ford hopes for a direct correlation between advancements and sales success, Sinuita said no. “We just want to make the truck better.”

Seems like for Canada, it’s good enough already.

[Images: Ford]

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

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130 Comments on “You Think The Ford F-Series Is Popular In Its ‘Murican Homeland? You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Hey Matthew Guy, what would the “Ace of Base” on the F150 look like?

    Although that would assume you could find a single base model on the dealer lot that wasn’t part of someone’s fleet order.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      My local Ford dealer always has a selection of base model regular cab pickups in 4×2 and 4×4. They are popular with young single guys and older guys. (Anecdotally – that is who I see driving them). Another reason for a selection of base model trucks is the fact that not every work truck is purchased in volumes large enough to count as a fleet sale.
      We do have large companies and government agencies that will order hundreds of base model 4×4’s at a time.
      I got an interest in them since my son is approaching driving age and the question of what sort of vehicle to buy him is surfacing. A base model Jeep is on par with a base model F150 (at least in Canada).

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Stop already with your BS that a vehicle must be purchased in volume or by a customer with a FIN to be considered a fleet sale, that just isn’t true.

        Yes there are benefits of qualifying for a FIN, and it does give you access to things you can’t get w/o it, but that doesn’t mean you need a FIN to have your purchase counted as a fleet sale. You are beginning to sound like BAFO and his 75% of pickups are daily drivers.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Scoutdude – A lot of guys out their buy pickups for work that don’t qualify as a fleet purchase unless you can explain the contrary.
          I know guys that run heavy equipment for a living but the pickup they buy to get to and from the job site counts as a personal use vehicle. That is no different than me driving to where I work.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Scoutdude,
          I did produce links, actually quite old links from over 20 years ago that showed 60% of pickups were private daily drivers a while back on TTAC. These were not business related vehicles.

          Also, most business tax write offs are vehicles. This is an added bonus of having a business.

          Yes they are on “paper” as business, but they are what the wife drives, you drive, etc.

          A few friends of mine have businesses on the East Coast and guess what?

          They all have pickups. The work trucks are plain Jane vehicles and their pickups are pretty hairdresser models.

          And guess what, they don’t do any work, but yet they are a tax write off.

          You seem to have this nostalgic distorted view of pickups as this Savior vehicle in America.

          They ain’t. 75% are daily driving vehicles, just like a car.

      • 0 avatar
        nrd515

        A standard cab truck around here is almost always driven by a 60+ year old man, with the rest 16-20 year olds, like a friend of mine’s kid who got his 2010 Silverado from his parents as a first vehicle. My friend found it in Texas, the original owner had died and his daughter was selling it. It was 5 years old with 4500 miles on it, with a spray in bedliner, a bed lid, and nice rubber floor mats. And it was spotless, inside and out. And CHEAP. The kid about crapped his pants when they gave it to him. There’s only one problem. They have 4 big dogs and 400 pounds of dogs will not fit into a reg cab truck so when it’s vet time, the kid has to take his dad’s Ram 1500 Quad Cab. A bonus is no hair gets into his ride. I get him going by saying, “You’re all set, you can keep it until you age into it in 40+ years!”. That upsets him. Every time.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Those pleeb white trucks with steel wheels in the headline photo are hurting my eyes. Please apply two-tone and copious chrome and leathers and color-key hard bed cover.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      It don’t sound like you chew tabakky.

      Them’re fine, honest trucky-trucks!

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Extended-cab 4×4 ain’t no plebe truck, son. I bet it even has AC and a radio!

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        CD changer and sat nav or it can get away from me!

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          Apparently CD changers are no longer a thing–dad’s new pickup only has a single, and it’s kind of hidden away. Too many people were losing CDs when they put six in and tried to play them all. And with the advent of Bluetooth and other tech to just connect your personal music device, there was no reason to tout an old medium as a feature.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I’ve just realized I am not sure if either of my cars with CD players is a single or multi.

            The last CD I purchased was by Shaggy I think.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            Holly bolly choo shaa laa lawanawaaaay shoolee bonn monn hoo shamaalanawoooo.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Lol, good grief! At least you could understand the part from the other guy singing with him.

            But she caught me on the counter.
            Wasn’t me.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            There’s a 10 disk changer in the trunk of the ES, something I know I’ll never ever use. My brother and I are hoping to plumb in an aux-in instead to somehow play USB-sourced MP3s through the factory stereo. I don’t want to upset the factory 1990s Lexus zen with a gaudy lit up aftermarket headunit.

            My understanding is that CDs in general might be going the way of the tape deck very soon, I think some new cars no longer even have CD slots in factory stereos.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            The only thing less intelligible than Jamaicans singing dancehall is when Canadians do it:
            youtube.com/watch?v=B0yGvypBwyA

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        All XLs have A/C, IIRC. And a radio has been standard since at least 1997.

        As for the extended cab, it could still be (and probably is) a fleet model. More and more fleets that previously had only RCLBs have figured out they’d rather have an extra 1.5′ of in-cab storage (that’s all it is, nobody ever sits back there) than 1.5′ of bed. I’d rather have a SuperCab/8′ bed and get both, but that’s a loooong truck.

        And 4×4 is in some places a luxury, in some places a necessity.

        (Yes, I just made a serious reply to a joke comment.)

        • 0 avatar
          dukeisduke

          Storing stuff behind the seat makes it a little easier to steal, at least for the casual thief.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          Drzhivago138 – in Canada anything other than a reg cab fleet truck is considered a taxable benefit if the operator is allowed to drive it home.
          My brother always spec’s crewcab trucks but he doesn’t care. The actual extra taxation is still considerably less than buying a vehicle. The last vehicle he purchased new for himself was 1987. An extra couple of grand a year forked out in taxes is no big deal for him.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            Interesting. Here, no one would wanna take the fleet truck home no matter what the cab is–not because of any taxes, but because they know how they and other users have treated the vehicle. And they’ve probably got their own pickup anyway. Even most farmers have at least two pickups.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Lou_BC,
            In Australia anyone who is able to drive a vehicle home and use it for private use is taxed.

            The tax is called a “Fringe Benefit Tax”. From memory it’s around 15% of the value of the benefit (however they work that out). I think it’s based on miles used.

            Many of these taxable vehicles are “semi” business. Add these to the 75% and your daily driver pickups increase again.

            But, I think that would be unfair. As I’d say they are more or less (anecdotal) used 1/4 of the time as a personal daily driver.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Big Al from Oz – a lot of fleets demand that their trucks end up in the company yard at the end of the day. That tends to be the case for many companies especially with the regular workforce. Where my brother works, all of the guys who get to take “their” trucks home are classified as management. Some are required to be “on call” especially during fire season.
            Another issue is geographical area. My brother’s office used to be based 75 km out of town. Others have areas assigned to them that are a long ways from the office. Forcing them to leave the truck “in the yard” would reduce productivity.
            I suspect that for once, government took a realistic approach at “personal use” of corporate vehicles. Regular cab pickups tend to be impractical for most people so it makes it rather simple just to tax extended and crew pickups for “personal use”.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    Plowing snow with an F-150? Or for that matter, any half-ton not made by IH? OK…

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      +1 Actually everyone know the Scout II XLC was the ultimate snow plow truck. 1 ton rating but small for better maneuverability.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      The plow in question looks like a 6-footer for clearing your driveway.

      • 0 avatar
        RHD

        The road behind the truck is still covered with snow, too.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          With a light sheen of snow/ice, yes. Actual deep snow, no. You can’t and shouldn’t drop the blade so low as to shave off every ice particle and leave bare pavement, no matter what the machine is.

          Then again, the F-150 isn’t so much plowing as it is clearing powder off the shoulders.

          • 0 avatar
            True_Blue

            Also would appear to be a testing/promotional vehicle for the plow manufacturer, Boss. Lots of guys here will do their driveways with a 150/1500 truck, but for commercial applications you really should be in an HD vehicle.

            (I was told the only F150 “plow package” offerings came with the Coyote and were not available on either the base six or either of the Ecoboosts.)

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            Probably not on the base V6 because “not enough power” and definitely not on the EcoBoost because it blocks the intercooler. At least, that was the explanation for the previous model.

    • 0 avatar

      Dodge had a plow package on half ton’s until 93 as I recall. When I lived in Maine I would see all of the big 3 halfton’s with plows. At the time I had a neighbor who’s father owned a Ford dealer in the state, he advised they made an agreement (this was in the early 2000’s) that F150’s in Northern New England could be ordered with a snowplow prep, but that had deliver each truck with a letter stating it was for residential use only. Of course being a dealer this may be all BS.

      • 0 avatar
        mikeg216

        It’s true the plow package is only available with the 5.0 and without the heated seat package. The restriction is due to the electrical draw of the plow and lights, also the plow blocks the cooling ducts on the eco boost

    • 0 avatar
      mikeg216

      I’m sure as you know front axle ratings and cargo weight ratings are up significantly. A 2016 150 with HD plow package and towing and cargo is the equivalent of a one ton of ten years ago

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        Ten years ago? Equivalent to a 2006 F-350 Super Duty? Not quite. Twenty years ago is much more plausible, especially considering that pre-Super Duty 1996 F-250HDs and 350s were only rated for 10K lbs. of towing max. The first Super Duties were quite a jump up–over 14K on a ’99 F-350 4×2 V10.

        • 0 avatar
          mikeg216

          A gas engine f-150 will absolutely haul and tow what a gas 350 of ten years ago did

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “A gas engine f-150 will absolutely haul and tow what a gas 350 of ten years ago did”

            Tow? Maybe.

            Haul? Not without being overweight.

            The max payload of a current F-150 is 3,270 on a reg cab, long bed 5.0L 4×2 with the optional Max Payload package and no added weight options.

            On a 2006 F-350 SRW that configuration had a max number of 4400. 5800 for DRW and 3200 for the F-250.

            With crew cabs the difference is even greater because there is a 2,910 max on today’s F-150 SCrew and the 2006 SDs didn’t drop much from 4400-5800 as the cab grew.

        • 0 avatar
          mikeg216

          2005 Ford f-350 v-10 4×4 crew cab max towing 12,500

          2016 f-150 4×4 crew cab max tow 12,200..

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            Close, but not quite. And an F-350, even an older one, will pull that load without a hiccup, while the Heavy-Duty Payload Package/Max Tow F-150 (as much as I love them) will definitely feel 12K lbs. of trailer behind it. Also consider the longevity: How often can 12K lbs. be towed by an HD F-150 compared to an older Super Duty?

            And how about that hauling (payload) figure, then? Let’s see those numbers, please.

          • 0 avatar
            mikeg216

            No dude.. Once again apples to apples 2005 Ford f-350 4 door v-10 4×4 Max tow is 12,500 and Max cargo 2880

            2016 Ford f-150 4 door 5.0 v8 4×4 Max tow is 12,200 and Max cargo is 3250

            So the 350 can tow 500 more but the 150 can haul 370 more I call that dead even

            I would end up with the 150 at the end of the day because it’s going to be more comfortable over the long haul.

            Just as how ford engineers spent hundreds of millions of dollars dollars and millions of miles to certify the 2005 they did exactly the same with the 2016

            Now the curb weight of the 05 is is 6600 the 2015 is 5200 but as you know the 2015 is all high strength steel and aluminum

            The 05 has Max torque of 450 and a 4 speed, 2015 max torque of 385 but a six speed and half a ton lighter.. So again it’s a dead even wash

            To add another fly to the ointment.. The 2005 is not j2807 certified.. The 2016 is.. Now can you you put a bigger plow on a 350..absolutely but me personally.. I prefer new age stuff like stainless or poly versus heavy ass iron.. Regardless of what front end you have its not a good idea to hang a bunch of weight off the front end, less is more here.

            Which one would last longer? I’m writing to bet that they’ll both be equally long lived all things considered, because I’m not a ford engineer. But if they are willing to stake their reputation on it.. It will tow and haul it all day long.

            I did a lot of research because I’m looking for a new camper but I use a suburban to haul that and I have a separate truck to plow with and I want to consolidate to one vehicle. My conclusion? I need an excursion… But a 2500 suburban will have to do

            If you are plowing more than a strip mall with a truck you don’t need a bigger truck you need a bobcat, seasonal leases of bobcats and loaders are where it’s at for snow removal. I can move snow all day and night in a bobcat.. Heat and defrost and front and rear wipers and a radio.. So much fun

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            mikeg216,
            While I agree the “on paper” data supports your argument, I’d say the old 350 is a much more stable platform to work from.

            It would have a stronger drivetrain better suited to work.

            Remember, when designing a pickup the amount of work or time they work would be taken into consideration.

            I’d say since many 1/2 ton pickups are used very infrequently to tow or move the weights you are talking I doubt the 150 is engineered to be as durable.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            Where are you getting your numbers from?

            “Once again apples to apples 2005 Ford f-350 4 door v-10 4×4 Max tow is 12,500 and Max cargo 2880”

            That is incorrect according to several sources I’m reading, including this one from a Ford website.

            fleet.ford.com/truckbbas/non-html/2005/vs_pdf/05fseriessd-exlbb.pdf

            Page 5. F-350 SRW Crew Cab 4×4 with 6.8L has max payload of 4200lbs.
            _______________________________

            “2016 Ford f-150 4 door 5.0 v8 4×4 Max tow is 12,200 and Max cargo is 3250”

            I’m also not seeing this. For the current F-150 the max payload on a SuperCrew 4×4 5.0L is 2,660 with the max payload package.

            ford.com/trucks/f150/specifications/payload/

            The highest number I see listed for any 4×4 truck is a regular cab, long box 5.0 with 3,040 if you get the maximum payload package.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      We don’t tend to use 1/2 ton pickups to plow snow. I see the odd one for personal use but a 1/2 ton isn’t physically heavy enough. My local municipality has an F450 with a dump body and plow but it gets used only in smaller areas. One can buy a used Bobcat, backhoe or front end loader for plow duty for the price of a F150 and all of those will do more work and be able to pile snow or load a dump truck.
      Quads and UTV’s seem to be popular for light duty plow work. A plow is a lot cheaper than a snow blower and for many people, they have the quad anyway.

  • avatar
    DevilsRotary86

    I recently got a Mustang; I know, I won’t shut up about it. When I was waiting alone in the salesman’s office another salesman came in to pick something up from from the shared printer.

    Salesman: “You here to get a new F-150 sir?”

    I should have just said “no sir” and left it there but for some reason I said:

    “No sir, I don’t like trucks. I’m here about a Mustang”

    By the expression in his face you would think I had just said that I despise puppies.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      “What are ya’, some kinda Communist?”

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      Congrats on the new ‘Stang.

      • 0 avatar
        DevilsRotary86

        Thanks!

        I actually wanted a Subaru BRZ, but my wife thought that the seat was a medieval torture device. So I went with my next pick, a ’16 Mustang Ecoboost Premium. It’s a bigger car than I wanted, but my wife is much happier in the Mustang’s seats.

        And over the months; the more I drive it the happier I get with the more comfortable ride (over the BRZ and the RSX-S that I owned before those). And yes, the ride is comfortable. I managed to find an Ecoboost with a stickshift, with Premium, with the Shaker audio package, and without the performance pack. So it has the softer struts and fatter 50 profile tires on 17″ rims. That combination was NOT easy to find! Heh, 50 profile is the “fat tire” option, what a world we live in.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          @DevilsRotary…

          Please say that it isn’t Guard Metallic… or you are going to make me SO JEALOUS.

          • 0 avatar
            DevilsRotary86

            Shadow Black :( I wanted Triple Yellow, but I would have had to wait and order a 2017 Mustang for about $34k. They offered the shadow black car for $30k. I decided that the color yellow wasn’t worth $4k.

          • 0 avatar
            mikey

            Mine is a 15 Eco Boost Premium package …..and it is guardian green metallic…….No stick though : (

        • 0 avatar
          True_Blue

          What makes up the Shaker audio package? Is this similar to the “Mach” pack that was available on the New Edge cars?

          I was lucky enough to get my FX4 with the optional subwoofer – and now the 360W 11-speaker setup in my 300M is sounding positively anemic, even for talk and sports radio.

          Congrats on the new ‘Stang. I’m sure the dealer was merely surprised at you not in for a truck, not condescending towards your pony.

          • 0 avatar
            DevilsRotary86

            “Congrats on the new ‘Stang. I’m sure the dealer was merely surprised at you not in for a truck, not condescending towards your pony.”

            I don’t think it was either. In Texas, it’s not surprising to see someone not drive a truck; there are plenty of cars around. It’s a little surprising to just not like trucks. I really don’t, I think they’re awful to drive.

            The Shaker Package is actually equipment group 201A. It gives an 11 speaker + sub woofer 390W sound system, heated/cooled front seats, driver seat memory, and blind spot sensors.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      “Of course I’m not here to get an F-150.

      I’m here to get an F-450, because I’m not a Communist.”

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      What you really should have said is “No son, I’m comfortable with the size of my manhood”. The salesman is the one that should be calling you sir, not the other way around.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        “No son, I’m comfortable with the size of my manhood”.

        Translation:

        Yup, after years of therapy and an accepting “partner”, I’m comfortable with the size of my manhood”.

      • 0 avatar
        DevilsRotary86

        Too confrontational for me. He really was trying to be friendly, and I understand why he thought it. I am young-middle aged (34), married, father, live in Dallas. He has probably sold F-150’s to a few dozen clones of me that week. I don’t like trucks, but I can vaguely understand why people do. Big, body on frame, four door, big ‘trunk’, they really are the full size sedans of today.

        And that really is how I talk. I address all strangers as ‘sir’ and ‘ma’am’. You can’t solve all situations being polite; but it rarely makes things worse. I find that it’s a good foot to start out on with anyone I meet.

  • avatar
    Driver8

    Well all that air ain’t gonna haul itself.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      You drive a Smart I take it? Or an iQ?

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        Pickup drivers get SO sensitive.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          Who brought it up in the first place? And why did they feel it was necessary?

          (Not that John’s reply was necessary either. It’s always best to ignore these types of things.)

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            It’s a joke. If we can’t laugh at ourselves once in a while, the world becomes a tough place to live in.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @VoGo – truck driving non-SJW’s are a sensitive breed.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            It’s a tired joke. It’s like saying, “what’s the deal with airline food?” when there’s actually a reason for airline food to be that way.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Wait. Is there a dating site where I can find pickup driving single jewish women?

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            In all seriousness, I take these SJW remarks personally, because I really am trying to be of service to my community.

            Last week, I was thinking about how I could make a difference in the lives of the homeless, and realized there are 4 things missing in their lives:
            1. They don’t have anything to store their stuff in (being homeless and all)
            2. The could use a home cooked meal (am I right?)
            3. They need some wheels so they can get a job. Then they can afford a home…
            4. They need more fun in their lives!

            So I brainstormed for hours until I came up with an idea that would solve all the challenges our homeless suffer from today. I went around town and bought lots of nondescript backpacks, pressure cookers and bags of ball bearings. I put the pressure cookers into the backpacks, and loaded them with ball bearings.

            Then, I placed these backpacks – dozens of them – all around my city in places where people congregate, so the homeless can find them. It’s like a treasure hunt for homeless people, and the prize is that they get a backpack to hold their stuff in, a pressure cooker so they can cook a nice meal, and ball bearings to help them with their transportation issues.

            I’m so proud of myself!

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            it’s so overused that the pejorative “SJW” has basically degraded into meaning “I hate you because you won’t let me treat other people like s**t.”

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            VoGo – backpacks, pressure cookers and ball bearings!
            You live in Boston?

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    What surprises me about the Canadian truck market is how well the GMC does and how poorly the Chevy does. I get the Ram’s performance since Canadians are known to favor low priced vehicles. What is the pricing of a GMC vs comparably equipped Chevy in Canada? Is GMC sold on price north of the boarder?

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      To make a guess, I’d say it’s the dealer networks. Back in the day, it was pretty common for one town to have a Chevy dealer, the next town over would have a Pontiac/GMC dealer, the next town would have a Fargo, next would be a Mercury, etc.

      • 0 avatar
        IHateCars

        Maybe 50 years ago…now most GM dealers here carry Chev, Buick and/or Cadillac. Some of the same also used to carry Pontiac, Olds and Saturn….had to cover all the bases in a small market.

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      GMC Sierra Crew Cab Short Box 4×4 5.3L: $40,720
      Chevrolet Silverado Crew Cab Short Box 4×4 5.3L: $40,085.

      Essentially identical.

      These vehicles sit alongside one another at GM dealers in Canada, and a dealer that may have 40 Sierras has 35 Silverados. It’s the way the product positioning was decided long ago.

      In the U.S., I suspect if GM thought it could and wanted to, the best way to increase Sierra sales would be to put more GMC grilles on Silverados. It’s not merely an issue of supply, but these are very similar pickups. In the U.S., GM has decided to push Silverado, thus, there are more Silverados to be had. In Canada, the Sierra consistently outsells the Silverado, but not by much. It’s more about marketing strategery than the collective Canadian consumer’s desire to prefer GMC in Canada.

      • 0 avatar

        GMC in Canada is perceived as a better truck than Chevrolet. Goes back to the days of Pontiac that was slightly better than a Chevrolet, and slightly more money.

        In addition the Buick-GMC dealers need a volume seller, compared to the Chevrolet dealer.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Last I checked, the Sierra outsells the Silverado in Mexico and both are outsold by Ram.

      • 0 avatar
        Timothy Cain

        CANADA
        August 2016 YTD
        F-Series: 100,015
        Ram: 63,592
        Sierra/Silverado: 65,664 (including 30,963 Silverados)

        MEXICO
        July 2016 YTD
        Ram: 12,194
        Silverado/Sierra: 9,705 (including 8,320 Silverados)
        F-Series: 9,067

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Scoutdude – nope. same price and in many cases sold side by side on the same dealer lot. That could be a big factor. More dealers selling both.

      I see a ton (no pun intended) of HD Denali’s around. I suspect that the higher quality of trim sells more Sierra’s than Chevy’s.
      I don’t think we are as hung up on “Chevy” as many in the USA are.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        In the US there are far more Chevy dealers than Buick dealers so if you are out in the middle of no where your choice is drive to a big city to find the Buick dealer or purchase a Chevy locally.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          Scoutdude – makes sense.
          One advantage to having Sierra and Silverado at least for me is that I usually like the looks of one over the other and that changes each time they come out with a new generation.

  • avatar
    RHD

    If Ford would break F-Series sales down by model, the numbers would be much less impressive. There are at least 8 different F Series trucks.
    This isn’t to denigrate their popularity, but to show how grouping many models under one heading makes for bigger headlines and bragging rights.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Do they count all the way to Class 7 trucks (F-750s)? Where’s the cutoff?

      • 0 avatar

        I thought they stopped after F450 with the sales numbers.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        I believe in the US the line is drawn between the 550 and 650. And it is not like it is Ford’s fault that GM dropped out of the class 4 and up market. Dodge figured years ago out there was a place for them in at least the class 4 segment and now Ram manages to move a few more trucks by playing in class 4/5.

        Of course after an extended hiatus GM is getting back into the MD truck segment by selling last year’s F650 and F750 with a GM cab.

        • 0 avatar

          I was reading a thread on a new Ram 5500 RV coming out. The builder has some interesting comments on the thread apparently they had issues with the suspension on the 550 so are trying the 5500.
          http://www.forestriverforums.com/forums/f240/new-isata-5-series-diesel-class-c-94260-2.html
          I see alot of the 5500 Rams as Wreckers Lately.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            The F-450/550 are only about 5% of F-series and no telling how much they cannibalize F-350s. It makes no sense GM won’t build similar competing MD trucks on a pickup platform, piggybacking most of the engineering/investment and lessons learned from pickups, not to mention common pickup parts and same day availability from 3,000+ locations. Coil front springs are a huge plus. Best of both worlds!

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            I find it hard to believe that they claim to have had to spend $5-6K on the suspension of the F550 to make it acceptable. It is just 4 leaves 4 shocks and a couple of sway bars. I’ve rebuilt complete MD truck suspensions with custom upgraded springs for half that price though there were no sway bars involved.

        • 0 avatar
          Sigivald

          Also the “F450” sold to the non-commercial market (at least) is really a class 3, legally, last time I checked the GVWR.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Not anymore, the pickup version started out as a proper class 4 vehicle but then people complained about the low setting of the speed limiter required by the 19.5″ MD grade tires. So it became a glorified f350 for a few years and again people complained and it is back to a proper class 4 truck.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Sigivald
            GM is turning to Isuzu for MDT’s and Navistar, which could could be brought outright by MAN/Scania by the time they get to build the trucks for GM

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            GM MDTs made by VW? That’s almost as good Rams by Fiat! But with any luck, VW will build them in Mexico for truly International trucks!!

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            Correct. At 14000 lbs. GVWR, the current F-450 pickup is actually a heavy Class 3. The version sold from 2008-10 was a Class 4, though (GVWR 14,500).

            Edit: I see Scoutdude explained it better.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        They stop at F450. Ram counts 4500 as a pickup sale. Both do not count class 5 or larger under pickups. GM obviously doesn’t currently market anything bigger than 3500.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      F-series alone outsells all of Chevrolet. I’m impressed.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      RHD,
      I don’t really think it matter so much. Canada does have interesting auto news.

      Canada’s auto industry is almost entirely dictated to by its neighbour to the south. I find this a pity as I would like to see Canada have a little more independence in it’s auto industry.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @ Big Al from Oz,
        Applies to RV’s as well compared to Australia and New Zealand, very few Canadian manufacturers. Canadians do make Truck Campers, some nice small Class C and B units. In the French part a few small manufacturers.

  • avatar
    RS

    IMO, the Aluminum body helps sell Fords in the snow areas.

    And owning a 4×4 truck where it snows and roads don’t get plowed right away is definitely an advantage.

    • 0 avatar
      True_Blue

      Yessir, it was a positive for me. Salt kills vehicles, plain and simple. My rural road may see a plow once a day, and when you get snow for 5 months a year, ground clearance and real 4WD come in awfully handy.

      I tried doing it for 3 years in an Evo, and high-centered it three times in a month, just getting it *in* my driveway. The plows leave behind a compacted and mighty berm when they pass at 60 MPH.

      Legit four-wheel drives in the country aren’t always fashion statements, they’re genuine requirements.

    • 0 avatar
      Fordson

      Yes. Interesting that the author did not address this possibility…with some coastal exceptions…very few…Canada is probably 95% snow country. I live 25 miles north of Buffalo, on the Canadian border. The lure of a vehicle that won’t rust is tremendous here.

      Within a year or so, we’re going to start seeing aluminum F150s on the used lots, and we’ll see just what kind of price premium they will command over used steel trucks.

      You’re living in Buffalo or Minneapolis, and you’re in the market for a 3-year-old pickup. Are you seriously going to give equal consideration to steel and aluminum trucks?

  • avatar
    86er

    It’s true, you can’t swing a dead cat without hitting a Ford truck.

    I noticed it really took off around the time of the 2009 refresh.

  • avatar
    PenguinBoy

    ““We’re a natural-resources-driven economy,” Sinuita said. As a result, Ford doesn’t shy away from positive fleet business that’s good for the bottom line. “We’ve got a lot of strong fleet customers in logging, mining, and the oil fields.””

    Ford’s sales success is even more impressive in this time of low resource prices. Both the fleet business, and retail sales to employees of resource companies, are likely to be impacted.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Oil has hurt truck sales in Alberta so I’ve been told. I haven’t seen any impact in BC since we aren’t as heavily reliant on oil. it might be different in the “Peace” region where oil and gas is big.

  • avatar

    Ford in 2015 had a serious shortage of pick ups in Canada, due to the aluminum transition. Earlier this spring Ford dealers had an impressive inventory of pick ups, primarily F150’s and you could just sense that Ford was on a mission to catch up on lost ground from 2015.

    The F150 is the best selling vehicle in Canada, its that simple. Factor in the Alberta market which is soft this year and a pick up haven, and it even more remarkable.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    Can anyone ID that antique gravity box wagon behind the F-250? Really adds to the authenticity of the press photo IMO. It may have had any logo or remains of a logo erased.

  • avatar
    redmondjp

    I’m not in Canada, but my dad has a recent F150 crew cab 4×4 ecoboost. It replaced his Taurus AWD ecoboost.

    I visited with my dad last weekend, and he commented about how much he likes his truck and he will never own another car.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    The difference between an aluminium F-150 and 450 is quite large.

    So, in GMs case I would add it’s midsizers in with their pickup figurres.

    It seems to me there is a lot of smoke and mirrors used in the US pickup market when giving out data.

    So, how many C Series sedans and wagons does Toyota sell? A Corolla is not different than a Camry? Right?

    It seem GM is the largest seller of pickups in the US, not Ford.

    Bragging rights and manipulation to gain these rights is quite humourous.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      All GM fullsizers are the same ‘platform’, the same with Rams up to 5500s. Starting with 2017 F-series, all will share the same platform.

      Sorry if the way sales figures are grouped, they favour Ford. It’s GM’s fault for dividing up their truck sales. I’m sure they sell more pickup trucks having 2 brands and often at 2 dealers dealers in the same small town though, so really cares or needs “bragging rights”?

  • avatar
    dwford

    It would be interesting to have an article about how many vehicles are exported from the US. We always talk about what the automakers sell here, but how much of what is built here gets exported?

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      dwford – when ever the difference in the dollar is huge between Canada and the USA we see an exodus of vehicles and machinery to the USA. 25-30% difference on the dollar makes it worth while to buy in Canada. I used to see US buyers show up at Canadian machinery auctions and clean house.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      We have to be losing about half of US pickups to/through Mexico alone. Figure what’s on the road doesn’t ever come close to what the approx 2 million sold every year should give us.

  • avatar
    Tinn-Can

    So what you are saying is I should offer the US dealer $30k for the $44k sticker truck? I know they say you can haggle a lot on trucks but I never know just how much. I see the MSRP then I turn 360 degrees and walk away…

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      I don’t know about 30 but if you pay a dime more than 33 on that truck right now you’re doing it wrong.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      >turn 360 degrees and walk away

      I see someone is hip with the memes…

      In all seriousness, go ahead. I’m not sure what the sticker price was on my dad’s new XLT Sport, but I built a similar one online and it came out to about $47K. (In Minnesota, you don’t straight-up ask a guy what the sticker price was on his brand-new vehicle. You let him tell you if he wants to share, but to be so direct on such matters as money is seen as confusingly rude.) Between rebates, dealer incentives, and a $10K trade-in from his ’06 pickup (this is where it’s gonna be the most dependent on what you have to trade in), the brand-new one cost him about $29.5K, and they installed a trailer brake controller and Line-X bedliner gratis. His budget when he had started looking for a “gently used” ’11-14 model was something like “no more than $33K.”

  • avatar

    Seriously? TTAC seems to be focusing way more heavily on Canada as of late…while I appreciate automotive news from all sectors of the world, it seems peculiar to me that there is such a heavy focus on our friendly neighbor to the North…

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