By on September 8, 2016

2015 Lancer Evolution Final Edition

The calendar says it’s closer to 2017 than 2015, but last year’s Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution Final Edition hasn’t finished bleeding media ink.

The last Evo FE to roll off the assembly line is currently up on eBay, placed there by its parent company. A southern California food bank stands to benefit from the online auction, while a deep-pocketed Evo fanboy will gain untouchable bragging rights.

A total of 1,600 2015 Evolution FE’s made their way onto dealer lots before Mitsubishi axed the high-performance Lancer variant. Sporting 303 horsepower, 305 pounds-feet of torque and a decade-old design, this particular car has 11 miles on the odometer and (we assume) very few food crumbs in the folds of the 5-speed shifter boot.

Just to prove that the eBay Evo isn’t an impostor, a center console plaque installed by the automaker reads “US1600.” Listed with a starting bid of $46,200, the Evo’s auction wraps up one week from today. So far, that bid hasn’t budged.

Now, would-be buyers can engage in a bidding war, confident in the knowledge that they’re helping needy families served by Feeding America Riverside/San Bernadino Counties, or… they could buy one of the hundreds of Evo Final Editions currently populating vehicles sales sites. It’s a personal choice.

A quick Autotrader search turns up boatloads of 2015 Lancer Evo FEs (at least 252), as does a Cars.com database query. It’s rare in a production sense, but certainly not unobtainable.

Mitsubishi pulled the plug on the Evo amid falling sales and plans to do the same for its long-in-the-tooth vanilla brother, preferring instead to focus on crossover and electric vehicle development.

[Image: Mitsubishi Motors]

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22 Comments on “The Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution’s Last Hurrah...”


  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Im one of the few people that wouldnt mind a final, if very dated by now EVO, even if its a stick. Might be the last cool 4 wheeled thing by Mitsubishi for a long time.

  • avatar
    VoGo

    Weird that the market for $40K+ econoboxes appealing only to 17 year olds could not sustain the Evo long term.

    • 0 avatar
      TonyJZX

      The Lancer still solders on in our market. Here’s the multiple problems… the Lancer fwd econo c-segment car dates back to 2006… so it tries to survive in the “$18,990 drive away” class.

      The Lancer Evolution is in the “$59,990 drive away” class for 50 y.o. guys who should know better. It also has some awesome insurance premiums as its older brothers used to be famous for being used in bank robberies and the like.

      Both arent a growth market. Both markets are getting eaten by more contemporary cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Drew8MR

      For a $40k car it had a damn good run. I paid $42k out the door for an MR in late 2004. Limited appeal, but zero competition within that limited segment, because a Evo guy isn’t buying an STi ever.

      • 0 avatar
        TonyJZX

        The Evo 7 to 9 is a car that I truly love but its in a strange place. Because I live in an RHD country there is an endless supply of import Evos for not a lot of money, even the weird ones… you want a Evo 7 GTA? You got it? You want a base model with no AYC or Aircon? You got it.

        That model is already a legend. The 10 (“X”)? Hmmm…

  • avatar
    True_Blue

    Strange how the X was not “evolved” over it’s nine-year span. The CT9A got the VII, VIII, and IX iterations before being replaced by the CZ4A.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Good grief, am I glad it’s over. Tired of hearing about the endless little fettles they gave it over the past years to keep it inching along.

    It’s tired and dated and too expensive. Time to go.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    Hmm, I wonder what the Xtreme Xperience folks will use for a ride along vehicle once their fleet of Evos get all shagged out?

  • avatar
    James2

    In related news, I saw a classified ad in the Wall Street Journal that Mits is selling its Normal, Illinois site.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      Mitsubishi has already sold the plant. There is a new owner that would like to flip it.

      http://herald-review.com/mitsubishi-plant-sold-under-value/article_66ae3631-e23a-5063-9c3d-55983e029ea9.html

      • 0 avatar
        indi500fan

        It’s an interesting world…

        The median sales price of a home in Chicago’s Lincoln Park neighborhood is $1.9m and 169 homes listed in the area above $2.5 million.

        This 2.5 million sq foot plant sold for $2.5 million.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          A huge facility in a marginal location that is useless for virtually all users, which is surely contaminated with pollutants, is not going to be worth much of anything.

          It may even have negative value. Even at $1 per square foot, the buyer may have paid too much for it.

          And this is the value during a commercial real estate boom. During a market crash as we had in 2009 with the GM and Chrysler bankruptcies, no one would have touched it.

          • 0 avatar
            indi500fan

            I’d be surprised if this is an EPA superfund site or similar. This factory has only been around since 88. Most of the problem plants went back to WW2 or before.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            You’re not going to simply replace a heavy manufacturing plant with a housing tract without some sort of remediation, no matter how new it may be.

            There just isn’t much use for the facility in its present form, and it isn’t exactly cheap to demolish it and haul it away, either. There is a reason why half of all auto plants are not repurposed after the production lines are shut down.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    It’s like the Mini Wheats of automobiles with a twist:

    “The kid in me loves the idea of a turbo AWD car that has a ton of performance”

    “The adult in me hates the part that is the normal Lancer, which I have to live with all of the time”

    As a former Lancer Sportback owner, I’d really have to love the frosted side to buy one. And never new. See also, to a lesser extent, Subaru WRX. Though at least Subie is more livable and arugably a more comfortable car, especially now.

    • 0 avatar
      True_Blue

      Definitely not an all-the-time car – even though I dailied a IX for three years before retiring it to weekend warrior. They are ludicrously good fun in all conditions and realistic though; having four real doors, a usable trunk, and decent mileage.

      • 0 avatar
        gearhead77

        It could work, it’s on my consideration list in a year or so. Minus is that the wife doesn’t drive a stick and she does need my car occasionally. Other than that, it could work for me, but a tough sell to the spouse. I’d be able to sell her on a GTI much easier, though it’s not the same league as the raw Evo.

    • 0 avatar
      tnk479

      The WRX is a fun car but I’d hardly call it comfortable. Compared to what?

      • 0 avatar
        gearhead77

        Compared to the Evo. I’ve always read, though I’ve no personal experience, that the WRX is a bit softer than the Evo. Not that it’s a malaise Cadillac, but just not as harsh as the Evo and more livable day to day.

  • avatar
    DevilsRotary86

    The Lancer Evolution X. The only sports sedan that made me pause and think “well, could I live with a four door car?”

    No, no I can not. So one is not in my garage. But it did make me think about it.

  • avatar
    Noble713

    I’m surprised at the disdain for the Evo in general, and the X in particular here. My daily-driven 2008 Evo X MR is by far my favorite car I’ve ever owned. Distant runner up: 1997 Toyota Chaser Tourer-V (up until I put it through a fence drifting). My first car in Japan was a 1997 Evo IV, which despite the low weight was comparatively gutless due to a clapped-out and abused engine.

    I plan to buy another early-model Evo X here in Japan within the next 18 months or less, and sell both of my Toyotas (2003 Mark II iR-V and 1993 NA 5-speed JZA80 Supra). You can get them ~$18k now.

    Aggressively styled, AWD traction (useful in perpetually-rainy Japan), room for your wingman and 2-3 females, and can reliably deliver 400+ whp with affordable mods. Oh, and the 2.0L engine probably has lower road taxes than the 2.5L 1JZ or 3.0L 2JZ engines in my Toyotas.

    For now, the only other daily driver I’d consider is a Toyota Mark X 350S Gs, which has a slushbox instead of a DCT and definitely nowhere near the same sort of tactile steering as an Evo (I’ve test driven one in Tokyo). Still, it’s pretty much the only option if you want a reliable, light, decently-affordable sedan without a boxer engine.

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