By on September 6, 2016

2017 Genesis G90, Image: © 2016 Steph Willems/The Truth About Cars

As it tries to carve out a foothold in the premium field, Genesis has priced its full-size G90 luxury sedan in an intermediate zone between its established German competition and new American range-toppers.

The G90 comes laden with standard features, so the price range of the four available configurations isn’t wide. With a starting price of $69,050 (including freight) for a rear-wheel-drive twin-turbo V6 model, the son-of-Hyundai hopes its flag bearer has enough value to get noticed.

That base price lands a buyer 365 horsepower from the automaker’s twin-turbo 3.3-liter V6, coupled to a silky 8-speed automatic. Adding H-TRAC all-wheel drive pushes the price to $71,550. Rear-drive V8 models — billed as the 5.0 Ultimate (rather than the 3.3T Premium) — come in at $70,650, rising to $73,150 for the AWD version.

The naturally aspirated 5.0-liter V8 offers 420 hp, but its torque rating (383 pounds-feet) only tops the V6 by 7 lb-ft.

At last month’s G90 media introduction, Canadian Genesis brand head Michael Ricciuto said the model’s pricing must have a value aspect to it. With an automaker best known for its economy cars as a parent company, it’s easy to see why Genesis execs feel this way.

Compared to the Germans, the G90 looks like a bargain. The BMW 740i starts at $82,495, and the Audi A8 launches at $83,450. The vehicle Genesis happily compared the G90’s dimensions to  — the Mercedes-Benz S-Class — starts at a lofty $97,525 (but comes with a sterling, decades-long reputation).

On the other side of the coin (and Atlantic), the Cadillac CT6 starts at $54,490, while the resurrected Lincoln Continental (in brow-furrowing front-wheel-drive guise) starts at $45,485. Japan’s top luxury sedan, the Lexus LS460, tops the Genesis range ever so slightly, starting at $73,495.

The automaker says dealers will receive the G90 by the end of the month.

[Image: © 2016 Steph Willems/The Truth About Cars]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

81 Comments on “Genesis G90 Pricing Splits the Difference Between Americans, Germans...”


  • avatar
    Felix Hoenikker

    Nothing against Hyundai, but $69 K seems aspirational given that the deprecation curve may look like a cliff. $300 a month for a lease would be tempting.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I don’t think a $300 lease price is very realistic for this caliber of car, although it would certainly be a no-brainier.

      But you make a good point…which is that Genesis would do well to capture people with attractive lease rates.

      As for the steep depreciation curve…well, that seems to be the norm for luxury sedans in general. The Equus and Genesis (the model) have depreciated quite sharply, but maybe a dedicated luxury badge will help their values to stay afloat to at least the same levels as their competitors.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Wow that MSRP makes me worry that the sub $30,000 CPO Genesis is a thing of the past.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          This is the Equus replacement, the G80 is the Genesis replacement (alpha-numerics are so awesome! /S).

          The G80 is getting a slight price bump compared to the current Genesis sedan, but I don’t think you have much to worry about.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            The G80 did get a price-bump, but it also comes with more standard features versus the Hyundai Genesis. When a loaded one costs well under $55K with a V8 (which gets you a sparsely-equipped 528i) it’s a bargain.

            The smart-money, though, is probably going to be a ’16 Hyundai Genesis that the company will be heavily motivated to clear off of the lots.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        The national lease term for a base G80 is $415 with $4k due at signing, so talk of a $300 lease deal is simply asinine.

        The $69k starting price (with delivery) was a bit higher than I was expecting for the G90, but I wasn’t expecting Hyundai to make basically all the latest tech/safety features standard.

        Here’s all the tech/safety features that come standard:

        Automatic Emergency Braking (AEB) with Pedestrian Detection
        Driver Attention Alert (DAA)
        Smart Blind Spot Detection (SBSD) with Rear Cross-Traffic
        Alert RCTA)
        Lane Keep Assist (LKA) and Lane Departure Warning (LDW)
        Dynamic Bending Light (DBL) and High Beam Assist
        Pre-safety seat belt and nine airbags
        Smart Cruise Control with Stop/Start
        Electronic Parking Brake with Automatic Vehicle Hold
        Multi-view and forward-view cornering camera
        Front and rear parking sensors

        That’s probably $4-5k worth of options on tech alone.

        Other things include 3 years of maintenance, valet service, SiriusXM, mapping upgrades, etc. as well as boutique Italian leather being the standard leather.

        For the Germans, on most models, leather is an option and the base leather is rather course (have to pay extra $$ for the good stuff).

        Taking that all into account, the $69k price-tag with delivery seems more than fair.

        The question is more whether Hyundai USA made the correct choice in not offering a less equipped model as the base trim at a lower price.

        But buyers these days want the tech/safety features – which is why Hyundai USA added a slew of them to the base model of the G80 which raised the price by $2,600 from the base Genesis sedan.

      • 0 avatar
        statikboy

        Kyree,

        Not a reference to this comment in particular, I would like to say that I greatly appreciate your thoughtful, well-reasoned insight. I often plan to comment on an article only to find that you have already said what I intended, only better and more elegantly.

        Keep up the great work with both comments and moderation!

        Stu

      • 0 avatar
        Eyeflyistheeye

        The Genesis never had great resale value, and the K900 is the resale value equivalent of Krusty the Klown’s bet on the Washington Generals. Hyundai will probably subsidize the living hell out of the leases.

        Anyways, while the Genesis and K900 are fine as far as automobiles go, I have no respect for them as luxury cars. Even though Acura, Lexus and Infiniti never had much of a pedigree, I think one thing that makes a luxury car brand authentic is that each of them can at least say they tried to build the best car in the world. The LS400 and NSX make a strong case, and while the Q45 ended up being the Terry Malloy of Japanese luxury cars, it still coulda been a contender.

        Now, Hyundai and Kia are just setting out to sell cars in the category that arguably match the competition and undercut them on price. What I hate about the H-K philosophy is that they’ll make cars that are good enough, but never the best or anything groundbreaking. Like when Albert Biermann (Hyundai’s new performance guru) talked about not wanting to make a hot hatch to go against the Focus ST, claiming Hyundai clientele wouldn’t know what to do with such a powerful car. Uh-huh.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          What was so “best” about the LS460?

          Much less something like the ES?

          Not going to see “tarted up” Toyota-based FWD models in the Genesis lineup.

          And a number of reviewers (including Alex) have stated that the G80 reminds them of the original LS400 (which many Lexus owners still regard as having the best combination of ride and handling among the generations of LS models).

          What’s so ground-breaking about the W222 S Class?

          Sure it has some extra tech stuff (like a scent dispenser), but unlike the 7 Series and CT6, the S Class doesn’t have a state-of-the-art, lightweight platform, but buyers don’t care as they would rather have the more plush interior of the S Class (which is where MB spent more of its $$).

          Don’t need to be groundbreaking – just need to make something that is a credible entry in the segment.

          Car and Driver ranks the G90 ahead of the CT6, XJ, Quattroporte and LS460 – and it has gotten pretty favorable reviews by other auto publications, so mission fulfilled.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Reading comprehension, bd2,
            If you are going to criticize what eyeflyistheeye wrote, then spend the time to actually read it.

            He wrote LS400, not LS460.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            My RC ability is totally fine; I’m perfectly aware that Eye referenced the LS400.

            The LS400 was class leading in many ways b/c at the time the Germans (well, MB and BMW) were fat and content and asleep at the wheel.

            My point in referencing the LS460 is that there was nothing that really stood out about the LS460 as times has changed and the Germans are the ones pushing the envelope (and even they really aren’t that much ahead of anyone else).

            The successor to the LS460 should be a big improvement in many areas, but it’s not going to “revolutionary” over the likes of the 7 Series, the upcoming A8 or even the plder S Class (which will be getting its refresh).

            Likewise, did the current GS stand out against the other midsize RWD sedans when it launched?

            Things have gotten so competitive these days – whether it is the mainstream compact or midsize sedan segments or for crossovers or for the luxury market, that it is difficult to stand out.

            As usual, you’re 2 steps behind…

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Equs Ultimate 5.0l is $15,000 off msrp on cargurus.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Perfect buy for livery drivers. I saw an Equus in use as an UberBlack the other day and it looks appropriate, and is very well suited, in that role.

        • 0 avatar
          TonyJZX

          Yep. That side profile. Feel the length as the chinese would say.

          Bit of an expensive ask for a service car isnt it?

          Also an unknown as far as reliability goes.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Well, they buy giant fleets of new Escalades and Navigators, and if they can afford those they can certainly afford a few (far more comfortable) Equuses as well.

            The days of the cheap Town Car are almost over. Which is probably one reason (along with ridesharing in non-fancy cars) that black car service has gotten a little bit more expensive.

    • 0 avatar
      Hemi

      The cars it competes with (S550, 750 and A8) have 3 types of owners I see in NYC.

      1) They lease the nicest and fanciest for 2 to 3 years, dump it for the next new model. Wouldn’t be caught dead in an older luxury car.

      2) The people who take advantage of number 1 and buy the car off lease when it’s worth 40 percent or less of the MSRP.

      3) The third type will buy it for well under $20k and still give the illusion they own a $100k car and will go around flaunting original MSRP. This person can barely afford maintenance and will only fix things that break and won’t allow car to be driven. This is the person who has mismatched tires, can’t fix failing window regulators and door locks. They do however love to show they drive a “insert luxury brand”.

      Hyundai and Kia do not appeal to any of the 3 buyers above and so will not do well.

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      A decade from now, if I’m still alive (p=.5), will I be reading Tavarish writing about working on one of these?

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    The CT6 and Continental are kind of tweeners. They are sort of stretched versions of the companies’ respective midsizers, without the substance of a big flagship. The Continental, with its design and feature set, actually makes a compelling case for itself, but it still doesn’t add up to anything in the S-Class league.

    This G90, OTOH, seems to feel as substantial as the big-league cars from what I’m reading. So I’m not surprised that it costs a lot more than the Continental and CT6. And really, when you look at the standard features on the G90, that price delta is a lot smaller…probably less than $10K.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      When you compare apples to apples – the price difference with the CT6 lessens considerably, if not go in favor of the G90.

      While the CT6 starts at $54.5k, that’s for the turbo 4.

      The TTV6 CT6 starts at $65.5k, but doesn’t come with all the goodies that the TTV6 G90 does.

      A fully loaded 3.0 CT6 tops $80k, so the G90 is actually the bargain of the 2.

      • 0 avatar
        Jaeger

        Exactly correct. And thank heavens there’s no 4-pot in the G90.

        The “starts at” metric is a bit misleading, particularly when comparing pricing with the Germans. The G90 basically comes fully loaded. The Germans make you add pricey option packages to their luxury vehicles – for such exotic toys like leather and a backup camera. Loaded up, they are very nice rides – but priced WELL beyond the G90.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I’m a bit concerned this will end up just like the Equus when it comes to sales figures. The price is too high – the people buying the A8 and S-Class don’t care about $8,000. They spend that much each month on yacht maintenance.

    And those wheels lack dignity and look non-premium as well, need to do something about that.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I don’t think their market *is* traditional S-Class buyers. Rather, it’s going to people moving up the Hyundai / Kia pipeline, people new to the luxury market, and people who want to be different.

      Whether or not that’s a profitable niche…remains to be seen. I rather think that more of Genesis’ profits will come from any SUVs / crossovers they build, as well as the planned compact sedan and coupe…than from the G90. But they would have inevitably made this car anyway, for their domestic market, and it makes sense to sell it here, under a luxury brand.

      • 0 avatar
        Jaeger

        Yes, they’ll pull more owners of Lexus, Infiniti and Acura in terms of conquest sales than they will from the Germans. Then again, there are more than a few ex-Audi / Mercedes owners now driving the Genesis Sedan / G80. But it’s likely a harder sell at the very top of the range.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The Equus did fine despite not having available the all-important AWD for RWD sedans.

      The best sales yr for the Equus was in 2012 when it sold nearly 4k; for 2013 and 2014, the Equus sold around 3,500.

      The best year for the A8 and XJ was in 2013 where the former sold 6,300 and the latter, 5,400.

      So despite being under a mainstream brand and lacking AWD, the Equus in its best year did 63% of what the A8 did in its best year and 74% of what the XJ did in its best year.

      Just the addition of AWD should improve G90 sales by a good margin (for instance, the 2G Genesis was seeing a 30-35% increase in sales over the prior model which lacked AWD).

      Can see the G90 doing something around 5-6k in sales.

      Nothing earth-shattering, but certainly respectable.

      Would have helped if the G90 had more striking sheetmetal, but that should come with the next G90.

      The more drastic improvement in sales will likely be seen for the next gen Kia K900 – getting all new sheetmetal and AWD will help, but so will the addition of the GT to slot underneath the K900 to “set the table” so to speak for the K900 as the Genesis did for the Equus.

      Can see the next gen K900 do 2,500-3k in sales, so the 2 doing 8-9k in sales would be pretty good for upstarts.

  • avatar
    energetik9

    You can argue options all you want, I’d still opt for an Audi A7 at the same MSRP. Even better a BMW 535 that comes in under this.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Not the same class of vehicles.

      The direct competitor to the A7 would be the upcoming production model of the Kia GT – the TTV6 model full equipped probably going for less than $50k.

      • 0 avatar
        energetik9

        I’m not trying to argue class, nor am I trying to compare what the everyday shopper will look at. My only point is that for that price, I would much prefer an A/S7 or a well equipped BMW 535, and maybe a few others. This car does not resonate to me in any way for that price. Since the GT is pure concept and I have not seen any move towards production, it seems irrelevant. If it will be produced then great, but it certainly isn’t available now.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    I doubt the MRSP is a big deal, I am sure most of these will be leased as are much of their competition is. I do not see spending 70K on this car but if they can get folks to good for them.

  • avatar
    Dan R

    Looks like a Chrysler 300 with a kit.
    You have to be joking.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Are those prices in USD, or CAD? Somehow I can’t see people spending $69K USD for a Hyundai. I don’t see that many Genesis sedans (or Equus) as it is, and I still haven’t seen a Kia K900. And this is in the DFW area, not out in the sticks.

    I see this being about as successful as the VW Phaeton.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Doesn’t really matter how they price it or even how many they sell. The point is to get decent press, get a few cars out there, and get awareness of the Genesis badge going. That way two things can happen: the G70 can look like a higher-end product, and maybe the next G90, or the one after it, can be taken seriously. Today, no buyer in this category wants a Genesis badge.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    Doesn’t it most matter how these new luxury wannabees are received in China? Anybody know how well they’re doing there?

    TTAC needs a Beijing Desk.

  • avatar
    jmo

    You can’t be taken seriously as a luxury car maker without an S rival flagship. Just look at Acura, Infinity, Lincoln and Cadillac vs Audi, Jag, BMW and of course Mercedes. It may not make sense from a strict dollars and cents perspective but in terms of long term brand building it’s vital.

  • avatar
    carguy

    Expect this to be a slow seller for a number of reasons:

    1. Value shoppers will prefer a CPO Lexus LS for reliability and depreciation cost.

    2. Many shoppers in this segment would never consider a Hyundai as a luxury purchase.

    3. Luxury sedans are not a growing segment. Maybe a luxury SUV would have been a better choice?

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      Nouveau riche Chinese probably negate all three of those.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        And amazingly their money is (green?) too. That’s the shortsightedness of armchair market analyzers.

        A ggod friend was disappointed when all the flashy cars in the Hamptons looked like mostly nouveau riche drivers. The old money was driving the aged Land Cruisers and Volvo wagons. The correlate therefore is the nouveay riche was adding more to the automotive economy.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Yes, but you see, it is no longer a Hyundai.

    • 0 avatar
      jmo

      Re: #1 – I assume this is where the 10 year 100k mile warranty comes in.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      As already stated, just as much of a “Hyundai” as the LS460 is a “Toyota.”

      Hyundai has 2 luxury crossovers in the works.

      And Hyundai needed to develop this for its domestic market anyways – where the G80 and G90 having been doing around 5k a month in sales (likely more than what Toyota sells of the GS and LS in Japan).

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    There is a market for these cars, the question is, is it enough to make it profiteable. Were it my $, I would give the car a serious consideration. At this point, I could care less about a car’s badge, and the subtle not in your face anonymity offered by the G90 means I can enjoy the finest in automotive comfort and luxury without drawing undo attention to myself, which is an appealing prospect. Furthermore, it has the potential to earn a sort of secret handshake appeal, as the only people who actually recognize it are those “in the know” about what it is. I enjoyed that with my e46 330i zhp. Not being as flashy or as recognized as an M3, most people seemed to overlook and ignore it since it generally resembled all the other 4 door 3 series out there. However, every once in while, I’d have someone come up and ask if it was a real zhp. It was a neat way to identify and strike up some fun conversations with people who were genuine enthusiasts who really knew their stuff. Not that a Genesis is likely to have the same sort of fan following as a zhp, but it is the sort of car that will only be recognized by those in the know.

    • 0 avatar
      notwhoithink

      “There is a market for these cars, the question is, is it enough to make it profiteable.”

      How many years have they been selling the Equus? Because this is just the rebadged/updated Equus, which apparently sells very well in Korea.

  • avatar
    SMIA1948

    The problem with all of these cars is that their trunks are too small for large sedans. The Lexus LS460 and BMW 740 are not too bad, at 18 cubic feet, but the G90 and Mercedes S550 have only 16 cubic feet, which is the size of a Honda Accord’s trunk. The Cadillac CT6’s trunk is only 15 cubic feet, and the Audi A8 only a pathetic 13 cubic feet.

    If anyone wonders why big SUVs are supplanting big sedans, the Range Rover’s 32 cubic feet of cargo space should answer the question.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      The S class is 16 cubic feet with the optional fridge installed. Having spent plenty of time working inside the trunk of an S class, I can say that the trunk is very large.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        That’s legitimately impressive with the fridge.

        The LS has a nice trunk (18 cu. ft) with a very usable shape … unless you get the 4-zone climate control option, which is required for the fridge. With 4-zone climate control the LS is limited to 15 cu ft, and the space becomes very shallow top-to-bottom and hard to use.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        Not to mention, these cars use their length to provide excessive leg room for rear seat passengers. In most of the world, the people who buy these cars are riding in the back, not the front. I’m not sure about this car, but the previous Equus had enough space in the back for reclining seats and a footrest that could be raised from under the seat.

        I don’t think people are dodging these cars because they need a $100K Range Rover for Home Depot runs. There’s more than enough space for luggage in one of these barges.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          yep. That’s why so many makes offer long-wheelbase versions of their cars for China. Audi for example has an A4L, A6L, and A8L on offer over there, while they only sell the A8L here.

          The people who can afford these cars also can afford to hire a driver.

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          “In most of the world, the people who buy these cars are riding in the back, not the front.”

          But what happens to a car’s SOUL when it’s ignored like that?

          I know… Godless bastards couldn’t care less.

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      This, IMO, is because of the RWD designs. This simply forces loooonng hoods and short rears.
      Another reason I get upset when I see “the resurrected Lincoln Continental (in brow-furrowing front-wheel-drive guise)”.
      There is a REASON we went with FWD designs.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      People in the market for these cars have a big luxury SUV as well, in most cases. VERY, very few S-class, 7-series, or A8 owners have only one car.

  • avatar
    Alexdi

    My problem with this car is that my definition of value changes as the price goes up.

    At 50K, I’m interested in features. Things like electromagnetic dampers, high-power engines, and self-driving modes you can’t get in more mass-market cars. I like feeling like my car does more for the money.

    At 80K, that stuff is a given. I start looking for brand prestige, dealer experience, and generally take a more holistic view of the car.

    This G90 seems very much in the first mold, a continuation of the original Genesis, but does not stand out from the competition like that one did. Combined with a brand that has no weight, I don’t see the value.

  • avatar
    stevelovescars

    I saw a lot of these driving around Monterey during car week in August. Hyundai must have been chauffeuring press around all week. The cars look impressive in the flesh.

    I agree on the prestige issue, however. Over $40-50k, buyers are more concerned about what their neighbors will think than they are about features for the $$. Heck, even Cadillac can’t get past their brand image.

    Lexus undercut Mercedes prices by a substantial margin when they first came to market. They also had a dedicated dealer network with a cost-no-object attitude toward customer service. This doesn’t seem like enough of a discount to get people to spend $70k+ on a Hyundai, great car or not.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      The dealer network is a huge, huge deal. I just don’t think they will succeed if they stay within Hyundai dealers, even with separate areas, staff, and procedures. The culture needed for a successful luxury car dealership is just too different.

      The dealer network is also, IMO, part of the reason Cadillac has struggled to turn around. Lexus really got this one right; at first, they opened only a few dealerships in major wealth centers, but they were almost all good dealerships.

      • 0 avatar
        tonycd

        Lexus did the dealership part right because they approached it as a non-negotiable priority. All the dealerships were from scratch, and all had to agree to a stiff financial commitment and an agreement to a demanding set of customer service requirements.

        I don’t know what Hyundai is doing in this regard, but since Lexus, that’s the price of viable entry.

        As for the pricing, I smell future cash on the hood all over these cars.

        • 0 avatar
          tjh8402

          Hyundai is doing everything they can to make dealer trips unnecessary. They have announced plans to offer valet pick up and drop off for service and I know with the Equus, they initially offered something similar for test drives and delivery, so I would imagine G90 customers at least can expect something similar.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Lexus still undercuts Mercedes by quite a margin.

      And people need to stop discounting Cadillac.

      Last month the CT6 (1,242) outsold the 7 Series (1,230) making it the 2nd best selling luxury flagship sedan after the S Class (yes, the CT6 starts at a lower price-point, but most were doubting that the CT6 will make any noise in the segment regardless).

      Take CT6, CTS and XTS sales last month, Cadillac FAR outsold Audi and Lexus when it came to sedans at the mid-upper price segments.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        I’ll believe in the CT6 when GM breaks out retail vs. fleet sales.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        I have a VERY hard time seriously considering the CT6 as a competitor to the Germans. “Starts at a lower price point”?? It starts at just barely over HALF what an S-Class costs, and tops out $10K less than the cheapest one. It’s barely an E-Class competitor, regardless of how overly stretched it is.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          Was the LS400 not a competitor?

          It too had an MSRP that was barely over half of what the S Class of time cost.

          Granted, the CT6 was meant to be Cadillac’s answer to the SWB flagships with the LWB flagship competitor to be the CT8 (which is on hold).

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            In my opinion, no. The original LS400 stole more sales from the E class than the S. And WAAAAY more from Cadillac and Lincoln than Mercedes at all. Very few people who can afford an S class care one whit about a “bargain”, since that is completely not the point.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            I agree with you on that, but that didn’t stop all the talk about the LS400 being in the same (flagship) segment as the S Class, and hence, a competitor.

  • avatar
    jacob_coulter

    I have to think is just about having a sedan that costs $73k and hoping it brings up the prestige for the whole brand.

    I don’t know who in the world actually makes this decision, even if you can show it’s a better value by going through the options. It’s simply too close in price to established luxury brands.

    Just not the same parallel as when Toyota introduced Lexus and the LS400, it was arguably a better car than the Mercedes S Class at close to half the price. The Genesis can’t show that value or that they have a product with dramatically higher quality than the competition.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    I find it rather entertaining all over the internet people expect car companies to give their product away, yet some of them spent 700 bucks on an phone that they will keep for one year. I am not saying this car is worth 69k I am just saying its worth more than 50k, and it amazes me that folks what them to sell it 30k. THese are the same people who will just buy an Accord and be happy, which is just fine.

    • 0 avatar
      Hemi

      Because these people can’t afford the $70k cars. Look at most people who need and have the latest phones. Very few are rolling around in fancy cars.

      If these same people could, they would be leasing a S class or 7 series.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Given how much I use my phone, I get far more value from the money I spend buying and upgrading flagship phones than I do from any amount of money spent on a car beyond that necessary to get reliable basic transportation.

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    Basically anything that isn’t an S-Class Mercedes sells like crap in this segment. If BMW is going to MAYBE sell 15k 7-series* and Audi MAYBE 8k A/S8s*, this thing is going to barely crack 4 digits.

    Which if Hyundai is happy with that, fine, but you gotta wonder if it’s worth it.

    *extrapolated from Left-Lane.com 2016 YTD sales figures

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    “the resurrected Lincoln Continental (in brow-furrowing front-wheel-drive guise)”

    Oh, man! Can we PLEASE stop this biased RWD crap?
    There are REASONS for FWD, especially with luxury cars and BIG ONES at that.

    These are not hill corner carvers. They are luxury. And the really good ones have AWD…a great way to control and apply power.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      But still, can’t deny that FWD-based luxury sedans have to be priced at a lower price-point – so this RWD bias isn’t really “crap.”

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        what?
        why does a front wheel drive car gotta be priced less?

        • 0 avatar
          tedward

          Traditional feel, proportions and plain old car culture inertia. That doesn’t make the rwd preference wrong. You are right as far as back seat experience goes, but most flagship buyers here do their own driving, and in my experience those buyers do know some details about their vehicles construction. We’re pretty far off the ignorant masses buying appliances dynamic here. Might as well throw the same fwd question at mustang buyers.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          B/c FWD luxury sedans can’t command the higher price that RWD luxury sedans do.

          Look at where the full-size FWD-based sedans like the XTS, RLX, S80 and the new Continental are priced.

          Despite being full-size FWD sedans, they are priced alongside the RWD midsize sedans.

          The one exception would be Audi, but Audi has a longitudinal layout (as opposed to transverse) and even Audi prices their sedans lower than what BMW and MB do (and despite that, have far lower sales, esp. as you go up in price-point).

          And for their higher end models like the A7 and A8, Audi only offers them in Quattro as they know FWD just wouldn’t fly.

          Can also see the clear hierarchy within brands that have a mix of FWD and RWD.

          Despite being the smaller sedan, the CTS is priced a little higher than the XTS and goes much higher up in price with the CTS-V.

          The old Infiniti FX was a smaller crossover than the JX and yet not only had a higher price, but upon the change in nomenclature, was given the higher designation.

          FX > QX70
          JX > QX60

          The Lexus ES is larger than the GS and yet, unlike the XTS, is not only priced lower than the GS, but an entire segment lower, being at the entry-level price-point with the IS.

          When it comes to luxury sedans – RWD just allows for more classic proportions (long hood with shorter overhangs), better handling and allows for higher amounts of power w/o having to resort to AWD.

    • 0 avatar
      stereorobb

      a luxury car shouldn’t ever be FWD. the Lincoln Continental is beautiful but im bitterly disappointed they went with FWD.

      as far as these Korean luxobarges go, they are trying to play the lexus game. don’t get me wrong they are beautiful cars, but they really lack the fit and finish of a Lexus or a three pointed star. as far as reliability? truth is, we don’t know yet.

  • avatar
    justinx

    I wished it had a more distinctive front end, not just something you can see on an Elantra

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Pete Zaitcev: I’m pretty sure the manual is going to come on B48 only.
  • slavuta: redapple sorry. I have to come back to Ukraine. I am listening this Ukrainian news channel as I do some work...
  • Corey Lewis: Noticed that picture and the text. Such a clear indicator of how the lexicon evolves rather quickly.
  • ToolGuy: @MitchConner, When put through google translate, your text comes back as “I’m jealous”...
  • ToolGuy: Regardless of your opinion of the current President, I think it’s helpful sometimes to get an...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Jo Borras
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber