By on August 22, 2016

2017 Mirage G4, Image: Mitsubishi

A funny thing has happened on Canada’s Atlantic Coast — and maybe in Canada as a whole.

You see, we have a fairly small automotive press corps on Canada’s eastern coast (and I say we because I just moved from Atlantic Canada). As such, we have an equally small press fleet.

Each week, a very nice man moves all the press cars around for us journalists as if we’re important in some way. This very nice man probably logs somewhere near 500 kilometers each week moving cars around for us. It’s a ton of driving — specifically, a ton of driving that Tim and I and other journalists don’t need to do, making this a pretty sweet deal for us. We sit on our respective buttocks (buttockses?) and the very nice man shows up at our home with a brand new car. In return, we do basically nothing and give the very nice man the keys to the previous car, which we are thoroughly bored of by that time anyway.

However, when the Mitsubishi Mirage G4 came to our fleet, it stopped neither at Tim’s house nor mine.

The Mirage hatchback debuted to enormous praise profound condemnation for the 2014 model year. It’s the only vehicle in recent memory that’s been compared to a bus pass or hitchhiking — and not just by one reviewer.

For its part, Mitsubishi USA took all the criticism on the chin like the good sport it is; it didn’t retaliate against journalists for telling the truth.

However, north of the border, those criticisms landed time after time against Mitsubishi Canada’s glass jaw.

Since then, Mitsubishi Canada’s public relations department has gone out of its way in attempts to control any negative message about its Mirage in a manner that’s far beyond what’s deemed acceptable. We are not above correction. If we as journalists make a factual mistake, we have a duty to correct that mistake and tell you about it as openly and honestly as possible. However, Mitsubishi Canada has multiple times attempted to amend the content of Mitsubishi stories post-facto so as to completely change the tone of those stories to shed better light on Mitsubishi in general and the Mirage in particular.

Most of this happened in 2013 and 2014 during and after the launch of the Mirage hatchback. Since then, the drama has quieted down a fair bit. That is until this summer.

This year, Mitsubishi doubled down and decided the Mirage hatchback needed a sedan sibling. The Mirage G4 was born.

Over the last few months, I’ve heard multiple rumors regarding Mitsubishi Canada being very selective about who it’s granted access to the Mirage G4. And, to be honest, I thought the rumors were highly exaggerated. However, there’s always a kernel of truth in a rumor, and Tim and I are now proven examples of that.

The Mirage G4 drove right by our houses. It had no intention of dropping in to say hello. We have reason to suspect — erm, reasons to suspect — Mitsubishi Canada told our very nice man fleet manager not to book us in the Mirage G4.

Let me say this, just to make it a bit clearer: Mitsubishi Canada is being picky about the journalists that it allows to cover its product. The product, in this case, is a three-cylinder sub-compact sedan that retails for $16,048 CAD plus taxes. The G4 is no Roller, only to be handled with white-gloved hands. It’s an entry-level consumer product.

So, because of Mitsubishi Canada effectively blocking our access to the car, TTAC was resigned to not publish a Mirage G4 review.

But then fate happened.

In the near future, we will have a review of the Mirage G4 sedan, whether Mitsubishi Canada wants us to review it or not. And it will be a treat, too.

Thank you, Mitsubishi Canada, for providing the car.

(Sorry. Not sorry.)

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114 Comments on “Thank You, Mitsubishi Canada...”


  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “It’s an entry-level consumer product.”

    And that’s why they’ve parked it just outside a prison lobby.

    (I get what they were going for there – industrial chic. But it didn’t really work.)

  • avatar
    Jason

    If you said Photoshop had been used on the wheels / tires to make them hilariously tiny for the intent of mockery, I’d believe it.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    As a company with an interest in protecting its pockets, Mitsubishi has an inherent and understandable motivation for preventing bad press.

    As a journalist with a set of scruples and an editor of a car site that needs clicks to survive, you have an inherent and understandable interest in both providing the truth and making it interesting to read so we come here.

    Making these two realities intersect is the difficult part. This car is easy, easy for Huffman et al. to glibly slam without risk–no autojourno’s gravy train will be derailed by being on a Mitsubishi blacklist. On the other hand, the Mirage really doesn’t seem redeemed by its low price point and good God if this is all you can offer the North American market then just leave.

    Show us how a real journalist achieves this balance, Mark!

    • 0 avatar

      The Mirage has multiple problems and they’re all sitting on the lots of competitors. The Nissan Micra, Chevrolet Spark, and Hyundai Accent all play at similar entry prices, offer an extra cylinder, and arrive wrapped in somewhat attractive sheet metal. Aside from having the best fuel economy of the lot (I think that’s still the case) and a stellar warranty, the Mirage has no upsides on paper.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      But their PR and advertising people don’t understand the modern world.

      I keep seeing “native ads” on Green Car Reports saying “everybody can’t stop talking about Mitsubishi’s…”

      That’s the kind of headline you could write before social media existed. It’s laughably out of touch now, because nobody’s talking about it and I can show you my Facebook, Twitter, and Disqus feeds to prove it.

      Same with controlling the press message. That might work in a pre-2000 Rovian media hell. But, customers *can* talk to each other and share notes on a nationwide and worldwide scale, creating an important check & balance on the media. Controlling the media message just doesn’t go as far as it used to.

      That said, I feel like basic transportation should exist. I’ve been in circumstances where just getting to work/school mattered more than how it happened. I owned a 1989 Ford Tempo, and have harrowing tales of mechanical woe. A low-end Mitsubishi could have been better in those circumstances, if it were cheap enough. But it would have had to be really cheap to get me out of the Tempo.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I mean, in the U.S., the Mirage is a take-it-or-leave it product…and as Mitsubishi has learned, most people would rather buy a used compact than a new Mirage.

    In Canada, Mitsubishi has a lot more to lose.

    I’m not sure what you did to secure one outside of Mitsubishi’s press fleet, but TTAC, by its very name, has never been known to hold back (such as the 2010 Camaro that everyone else now hates as much as you all originally did)…so I look forward to this review.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    In defense of the Mirage, its volume is carrying Mitsubishi right now.

    It’s also the #62 best-selling car on Tim’s list, meaning it outsells *many* other venerable nameplates which receive more praise in the press – but not in sales – including the Golf GTI.

    This is the car some enthusiasts always say they want – manual everything, stripped of options, cheap to operate, and long warranty.

    So there you have it.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      And “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” outgrossed “Citizen Kane.”

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      SCE of AUX,
      I’ve seen a few Mirages in Australia on the roads. I can understand why some will buy them. Like you stated long warranty, they are cheap on fuel and for a retired person living in an Old Farts Village, this would suffice or is probably more than they require and cheap to buy and maintain.

      Young kids will buy these as well. A guy at work even drives a Hyundai Getz to work everyday, but his other vehicle is a 200 Series Cruiser.

    • 0 avatar
      mikey

      @ shaker. ……If you are going to insult us , get the name straight ….”the Shwa ” ……as far as being dirty??? Who knows ??? $ 600,000 homes are being snapped up , before they put a shovel in the ground.. If I put my house up for sale tomorrow morning, It would be sold by noon.

      I guess buyers seem to prefer dirt

      • 0 avatar
        Maymar

        Mikey, don’t take it so personally – you can’t deny Oshawa has a dirty side. It’s just also got decent Go Train access, it’s not soulless and awful like York Region or Mississauga, and everyone who can’t afford Toronto (and prefers commuting to a condo) has to go somewhere.

        • 0 avatar
          mikey

          @ shaker …..We’re good : ) …

          • 0 avatar
            shaker

            @ mikey:

            I grew up in a steeltown in SW Pennsylvania, and we adapted the old joke to it:

            Guy and girl in the front seat of a parked car – definitely at the “heavy petting” stage; the girl suddenly gasps – “Kiss me where it stinks! Kiss me where it stinks!”

            So he drove her to Homestead.

          • 0 avatar
            mikey

            LOL….Yeah there was a time , when here, in parts of the Shwa ,you didn’t hang your sheets on the clothes line. They came out dirtier than they started.

            Today, using a clothes line, would upset the neighbours , or the H.O.A

      • 0 avatar
        Trucky McTruckface

        Granted, my understanding of the Canadian real estate market is exclusively informed by junk food programming on HGTV, but for the life of me I can’t understand why anybody is willing to put up with those sort of prices in Southern Ontario. Half a million dollars or more for the privilege of living in some cramped, Eastern Bloc-looking shack in an overcrowded metro with a climate that’s incrementally worse than U.S. rust belt hell holes like Detroit, Cleveland and Buffalo.

        I’ve never been to Toronto, maybe it’s super awesome and wages are great, but it sure looks like you folks are getting screwed.

        • 0 avatar
          ect

          It’s called the law of supply and demand. The GTA has net inbound migration of 70,000-100,000 people every year, which creates demand for 45,000-70,000 new housing units every year. In the City of Toronto (where most people prefer to live), the number of new single-family homes built every year is around 1,500 – almost all of them replacements for houses that get torn down.

          One advantage for us of living in the City is that we only need 1 car. the money we save on that means we can pay more for a house, so we replace an expense with an investment.

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            Aren’t there any nice, chilly and isolated places in Canada where a person with reasonably current skills could find happiness?

            Am I describing Nova Scotia?

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            @Kenmore,
            Why would the rural jobs picture be any different in Canada than it is in the US?

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            Because the climate might keep the nearby towns fresher and cleaner than corresponding US ones (cold discouraging parasites)?

            Because Canada never bought into slavery and doesn’t now need to house its progeny? Sometimes they get hold of cars and go do bad things in the boonies, especially near highways that link bigger cities.

          • 0 avatar
            ect

            Rural jobs?

            Urbanization is a global trend, as major cities become become magnets for jobs and investment, while secondary centres decline and rural areas experience relative depopulation.

            It has important ramifications for car companies. My wife is a real estate broker,many of her Millennial clients don’t own a car at all and have no interest in car ownership. They are, however keen to own real estate in the city, where they can easily get around on transit and Uber.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Sheep to the slaughter.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        Stories like this make one wonder why Canada is so intent on retaining unprofitable automotive plants. Are the vampires who suckle off of autoworkers as powerful there as they are here?

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          “vampires who suckle off of autoworkers”

          Not delicious imagery.

          And stop demonizing smarties who were able to utilize the New Economy in ways we weren’t. You just hemorrhage jealousy.

      • 0 avatar
        shaker

        mikey: I took it (but misspelled it) from a post that you made – Was being “snarky” – don’t know the place at all.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Maybe Bits’n’Pieces (Aussie slang for Mitsubishi) Canuckistan has real reason to be a little more protective of it’s tiny car.

    Canuckistanians tend to buy smaller cars than their cousins south of the border.

    I don’t know what numbers as a percentage this vehicle earn for Mitsubishi Canada, but it might be more significant than the US Mirage.

    I do know here in Australia the Mirage is not rated very high.

    Oh, I can’t believe the price Canadians are paying for one of these. Here the Mirage Hatch is just below 13 grand AUD. I don’t think we get the Mirage with the boot out the back.

    • 0 avatar

      Price for the Mirage hatchback in Canada is about the same as in Australia.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Mark,
        Thanks. I might look at what the vehicle costs are between Canada and Australia. I think our currencies are roughly the same against the USD.

        I always thought Canadian vehicles would be cheaper than Australian vehicles.

        I just checked the currencies. The Loonie will buy $1.01 Aussie. That’s right now, not later as currencies tend to move.

        • 0 avatar
          Jagboi

          Is GST included in advertised prices in Australia? It isn’t in Canada.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Jagboi,
            Yes, GST is included as is all charges, vehicle registration, 3rd Party Inusrance (3rd Party Insurance is public insurance), delivery.

            This is retail, with a vehicle this cheap I don’t think you will get more than $1 500 off.

            If I went out to buy one I’d expect to pay between $11-$11 500AUD ($8 750-$8 875USD). This price is what we call “No More to Pay, Drive Away”.

            I just read a review and the power per kg is quite low. 64 Watts per Kilogram! This vehicle ain’t no rocketship!

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Jagboi,
            I forgot, it’s illegal in Australia to display a price that is not the price to be paid, ie, all taxes, etc must be included in the price of anything.

            I do notice in the US you must always work out the State Tax, this should be included in the advertised price.

            What you pay is what counts.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Mark,
        We do have the Mirage Sedan here. Hmmm?

        I just “built” one on the Bit’n’Pieces Aussie site and a sedan with no added inclusions and a 5spd manual is $15 990 Drive Away.

        http://www.mitsubishi-motors.com.au/shopping-tools/pricing/v/mirage-sedan/bs/4-door-sedan/m/la1m41/po/4306/in/02/u/private/c/white/o/-/a/-

        The Mirage Hatch is $13 990 on the Bits’N’Pieces site;

        http://www.mitsubishi-motors.com.au/shopping-tools/pricing/v/mirage-hatch/bs/4-door-hatch/m/la1m44/po/4306/in/02/u/private/c/white/o/-/a/-

        Oh, the prices are “Recommended Retail”, with no horse trading and bullsh!t haggling to lower the price.

        Aussie Bits’N’Pieces specials;

        http://www.mitsubishi-motors.com.au/shopping-tools/special-offers#!all

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      Big Al,

      Canadians do buy more small cars, but they also buy more crossovers and more pickups. The reason for that is that cars don’t last as long in our conditions, so the used selection isn’t as deep.

      Cars like this Mitsubishi are a blast to drive in the snow. The light weight makes them more reactive, and the FWD gives them great traction. Experience has taught us that big and heavy SUVs wind-up in the ditch. Once you lose traction on those (and you will), it’s never coming back.

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      The Mirage accounts for 24% of Mitsubishi’s U.S. volume; 15% of Mitsubishi Canada’s.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Thanks Tim. I’m quite surprised the US has a bigger stake.

      • 0 avatar
        Paragon

        You know, I actually saw a new or late model Mirage being driven on the freeway in the past week in the Columbus, Ohio area. Have seen a few others from time to time, too. The Mitsubishis I do tend to see in Columbus and Indianapolis are new or late-model crossovers or small SUVs. But, seeing any Mitsubishi on the road is a rather rare sight, in a sea of Accords, Civics, Camrys, Corollas – and for the domestics, there are lots and lots of current model Fusions.

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          How did Mitsu become the Weak Man of Japan? Why did the old MITI, now METI, allow that?

          In da oldt days MITI would’ve forced an incorporation of Mitsu’s automotive assets with one of the strong 3.

          I guess the Old Guard always loses grip in a generational environment of casual, unearned prosperity and slacking nationalism.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            Mitsubishi’s automotive arm is one fairly small part of the keiretsu, and for a long time it was more or less propped up by the other components. Nissan’s recent stakehold may be the beginning of an eventual takeover.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Kenmore,
            They got tied up with Chrysler. That alone will diminish any credibility you have.

            Joking ……. well sort of.

  • avatar
    Jagboi

    Mitsu is advertising hard on the radio in Canada now. 2 cars for $25k, and one model (I forget which) for $9,998.

    • 0 avatar

      Base hatch is $9,998 with incentives.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Jagboi,
        Now that’s quite cheap, one for grandad and one for grandma.

        Or maybe FormerFF could of bought his two daughters two new Mitsubishis with long warranties.

        • 0 avatar
          FormerFF

          They’d have been pretty well upset with me, and my wife would have been furious. She’s concerned about how well that small of a car would fare in a crash here in the land of large vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      Cobrajet25

      There are a few leftover ’15 manual hatches near me for about US$8,000.

      NEW CAR. EIGHT THOUSAND DOLLARS.

      • 0 avatar
        Paragon

        So, a new car – which comes with a warranty – for the low, low price of only $8,000! And it gets great gas mileage! At that price, you’d think they’d be gone before you could get there for a test drive. I mean, people spend more than that to lease a car for three years, at which time they have to turn it in. Unless they decide to purchase it. I guess, without a full line of vehicles, like they used to have, people aren’t as likely to check out Mitsubishi’s remaining automotive offerings.

        • 0 avatar
          Cobrajet25

          Well, the ones that are left are mostly ‘Plasma Purple’ manual trans cars…which I am not sure why they BUILT!

          I am sure you can get a better deal than $8,000. That is the advertised price. If I could get one for $7,000, I might just buy a spare! Who CARES if it’s purple.

  • avatar
    RedRocket

    I suspect Mitsu Canada figured the chances of it getting even a middling review from those who trashed its sibling were slimmer than the odds of winning Powerball, so what’s to lose?

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

    With the G4, they have managed to make a version even less appealing to me.

    When I was in an Orlando suburb, I saw many of the little hatches running around. I actually found myself thinking “well, if the dealer has a manual on the lot, what would it hurt to test drive it?”

    Luckily I moved away before I caved, lol.

    A manual hatch would be the ONLY version I’d remotely consider farting in the seat of. Add a trunk and/or a CVT and the miniscule amount of desire I have for it totally dries up.

    Budget, Avis, etc will love the G4, and I’ll feel bad for the poor soul forced to take one when all the Versas are depleted from the lot.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Make a Versa look like a Rolls Royce and a Sonic look like a rocket ship.

    • 0 avatar
      Pete Zaitcev

      I don’t think so, Dan. (Versa) Note turned out to be a surprisingly bad car. Ironically, I managed to rent it 3 times in a row, and really started to wish they’d give me a Yaris.

      The worst problem is the climate control. It’s powerful enough to make ice on windows when it rains (this was tested in New York). However, it can’t deal with our heat in New Mexico. I had to keep the fans way up, and it was barely bearable then. BTW, this was tested on several examples, so it’s a generic vice of Versa Note.

      Second worst problem is that something is not right with suspension, or possibly the computers. Versa Note absolutely cannot take minimal braking and turning together, it starts plowing heavily. Yeah, I know — learn to drive. But it wasn’t a problem in Yaris (and remember how much Jack Baruth hated the poor thing for its suspension).

      Finally, the stereo really sucked. The speed sensitivity was the worst part. Its inertia made sure the volume was either too great and caused distortions, or too quiet and impossible to hear. I had to disable it. Even then it was pretty much impossible to listen to anything except AM radio. Never had such a disaster even in cheap cars before. In fact, pre-Note Versa seemed to work better.

      The drivetrain was great, if we forget about the CVT’s life expectancy for a moment. But that’s about the only good thing about Versa. I don’t think Mirage can make it seem like a Rolls.

  • avatar
    SoCalMikester

    they really should offer the hatch with a 4cyl, turbo, either or both. double the horsepower. keep it cheap, or at least the cheapest $ to hp available.

    call it the colt turbo.

    • 0 avatar
      EAF

      Truth.

      At $14k I would buy the G4 if:

      1. Change wheel offset so it doesn’t resemble a hovercraft
      2. Add an intercooled turbocharger

      • 0 avatar
        Paragon

        Yes, I gotta agree with you guys that it would have more budget enthusiast appeal if it had an available turbo. The Colt Turbo was one of the affordable new cars of the 1980s that was very tempting to me at the time. But, I never bought a new car as I stuck with used cars. OK, I actually put a deposit down on a 1981 Dodge Challenger, which we all know was a “captive import” actually made by Mitsubishi. Had to cancel the sale when I realized I couldn’t afford it after I went home and better analyzed my financial situation. And, especially in light of new-car insurance being considerably more than that of an old, used car. But, a close friend did buy a sharp, new Mitsubishi Cordia.

  • avatar
    Trucky McTruckface

    The only thing Mitsubishi deserves thanks for is when the day comes that they finally stop polluting North American shores with their lowest common denominator products.

    Until then, they’ll continue to sucker credit criminals buying their wares over a Korean/Chevy subcompact or a superior used car, I’ll continue to be forced to look at this crap on the highway. At least the godawful Galant is finally gone, so the worst thing I can get stuck with in my preferred “full-size” category at the rental counter is a last-gen Malibu or Altima with plastic hubcaps.

  • avatar
    ShoogyBee

    I pretty much assumed that Mitsubishi dealers would slowly fade away over time here in the States. I was genuinely surprised to learn that a new one recently opened on the far north side of Milwaukee. Highly unexpected.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    I wish they’d introduce a modern CUV (short yet tall).

    I’d trust cheap, spartan and Japanese.

  • avatar
    ydnas7

    its a cheap car, Mitsubishi won the best micro car of the year awards here http://www.mynrma.com.au/motoring-services/reviews/best-car-australia.htm but that understands that its market is very price sensitive. $1.5k in price difference may not mean that much in a more expensive new car segment, buts its a major factor in the micro car segment.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Mirage is from Thailand. Mitsu Canada is run by a military junta.

  • avatar
    Whittaker

    It’s almost as if Mitsu is banning people from free use of their property unless those people write the way Mitsu wants them to write.

    The nerve!

  • avatar
    Cobrajet25

    “The G4 is no Roller, only to be handled with white-gloved hands. It’s an entry-level consumer product.”

    Maybe if TTAC had shown this kind of reason and objectivity with the previous Mirage, instead of just being catty and abusive towards the little car, Mitsubishi would throw them the keys to the G4…which is an improved product.

    I don’t blame Mitsu for not strapping their own car to the whipping post again so TTAC could generate clicks. There are LOTS of social media reviews of the Mirage/G4 (if you have a semi-popular blog you will have no trouble getting a test car), and most are at least ‘fair’. Many are actually quite positive…

    Personally, I love my Mirage. And yes, I am a ‘car guy’.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      But the fact that other entry level cars are far better means they were judging it in the correct context. Go drive a Fit, Sonic or Fiesta. Sure they’re a bit more expensive, but not so much so that they are not competing with Mirage.

      I don’t recall them citing the 0-60 times of an SHO or Charger R/T when complaints about its harsh and gutless 3 cylinder were expressed.
      They didn’t bring up Acura or Audi when discussing the drab interior.
      They neglected to mention the Miata or Mustang when describing its poor driving dynamics.

      It was being compared to other entry level cars, and against them, it failed spectacularly.

      Let me be clear, though: I’m happy you like your Mirage, and I mean that with all honesty. I’m not trying to personally attack you or your choice in buying it, not in the least. To each, his/her own. I mean, I’m in no position to judge you or anyone else. Although I love it, my 20-some-odd year old Taurus certainly doesn’t light many fires in the hearts of my fellow B&Bers.

      • 0 avatar
        Cobrajet25

        “Sure, they are more expensive…”

        That is where you and TTAC both fail when it comes to judging this car. This car has natural limitations because it is EXCEEDINGLY inexpensive. In similar trim, the Sonic, Rio, and Fit are 30-40% more expensive. That is real money to real people shopping this end of the market. Other than the Versa, there really isn’t much to compare the Mirage to. That may be part of the problem when it comes to reviewing it. Reviewers need to compare it to…well, SOMETHING, and that something is always going to be significantly more expensive (and thus refined).

        The Mirage is a puzzle piece that really doesn’t quite fit anywhere in the market, so it’s easy to dismiss it as ‘simply terrible’. But for what and who it is designed for, it really isn’t. Honestly, I think Mitsubishi actually showed some real cajones by bringing it here. Reviewers often wail about how we can’t buy those small, simple, super-efficient little econo cars they sell in Europe. But when one comes here, they SAVAGE it for not being enough like a Civic. What do you think this does to the odds of VW bringing the Up! here? Nissan Micra? Kia Picanto?

        I have always had a strong suspicion that if the EXACT same car were being sold with Honda or Toyota badges on it publications like TTAC would be far kinder to the Mirage. We’d read something like:

        “Yeah, we here at TTAC wouldn’t buy one…but it’s a new $12,000 Honda, right? Maybe that alone makes it good enough.”

        But hey, who in the automotive world doesn’t like kicking Mitsubishi when they are down, eh?

        • 0 avatar
          heavy handle

          Most reviewers weren’t kind to the Yaris hatch either, so it’s not just the Mitsubishi badge that bothers them.

          Makes sense if you consider “the lifestyle to which they are accustomed.” It’s a far cry from the fully loaded SUV they reviewed last week, or the premium sedan they will review next week.

    • 0 avatar
      Pete Zaitcev

      The TTAC’s review of Renegade was highly dubious as well, but there was no retaliation by FCA thus far, was there?

    • 0 avatar

      “Maybe if TTAC had shown this kind of reason and objectivity with the previous Mirage, instead of just being catty and abusive towards the little car, Mitsubishi would throw them the keys to the G4…which is an improved product.”

      What?

      For one thing, if a car isn’t up to par, it isn’t up to par. Full stop. I am not going to apologize for Mitsubishi’s mistakes.

      Another thing, Sajeev was incredibly fair when he reviewed the Mirage. https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2014/07/review-2014-mitsubishi-mirage-es/

      However, this isn’t about TTAC. If it was just TTAC being treated this way by Mitsubishi, I wouldn’t have written the story. Instead, Mitsubishi is treating all the journalists in Canada this way. Of the nine journalists, of which a couple of them write for newspapers for national reach, only two people were given access to the Mirage G4: a relatively new journo, and the fleet manager’s wife. We’ll have more on that, and other details, later.

      • 0 avatar
        Cobrajet25

        Well, define ‘par’. That is my whole point.

        What is ‘par’ for a US$13,000 new car with a 5/60-10/100 warranty that gets 50 mpg and comes standard with all major convenience features? I mean, how good does a $13,000 car need to be in order to be respected…AS a $13,000 car?

        Does it really need to be a US$18,000 car that is simply sold for $13,000? Must it be 9/10ths of a new Corolla LE?? Most auto journalists compare the car to more expensive cars since there really are no other $13,000 cars to compare the Mirage to. Adjusted for inflation, the Mirage is cheaper than a Yugo or a Chevette was new.

        As I stated above, Mitsubishi has no real vested interest in tying it’s own product to the whipping post for you when there are other ‘alternative media’ reviewers that would give the Mirage more of a fair shake (as a $13,000 new car). I get why they are a little reserved.

        The Mirage gets lumped into the ‘affordable car’ category which pretty much includes everything under $25,000. Yes, I understand that the tester Mitsu sent you MSRP’d for over US$17,000. That was certainly THEIR mistake. I’d be curious to read a review of the base manual car on TTAC.

        Maybe if more cars like this appear in the market a new category should be created for them? Perhaps “sub-entry level”?

        I mean, 20 years ago people weren’t directly comparing Ford Contours to Geo Metros, though both were considered ‘affordable’ by the standards of the day.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          “Adjusted for inflation, the Mirage is cheaper than a Yugo or a Chevette was new.”

          No offense to your car, but…you’re not setting the bar very high there.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            When I was driving through rural Ohio last week, I passed a farm which had FIVE red Chevettes out in the side yard. All were the same color, lined up precisely. All were falling to pieces and sinking into the ground.

            I suspected mental illness.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Chevantastic.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I drove a Chevette once…as a rental. It was so bad I brought it back and demanded something different. They put me into a Cavalier, which felt like a freakin’ Benz by comparison.

            Chevettes were horrid little piles even in their heyday.

            And I actually SOLD Yugos once…literally. As in, I had ONE person interested. The dealer was offering $500 to anyone who could sell it, on top of the usual commission, so I figured what the f**k. Took the thing out, and turned on the A/C (which hung under the dash like a 1960s Buick), and the engine stopped dead.

          • 0 avatar
            Cobrajet25

            The point is, did the Chevette come standard with seven airbags, power everything, and automatic climate control?

            How about 4-wheel ABS and stability control?

        • 0 avatar

          “What is ‘par’ for a US$13,000 new car with a 5/60-10/100 warranty that gets 50 mpg and comes standard with all major convenience features? I mean, how good does a $13,000 car need to be in order to be respected…AS a $13,000 car?

          “Does it really need to be a US$18,000 car that is simply sold for $13,000? Must it be 9/10ths of a new Corolla LE?? Most auto journalists compare the car to more expensive cars since there really are no other $13,000 cars to compare the Mirage to. Adjusted for inflation, the Mirage is cheaper than a Yugo or a Chevette was new.”

          But you can get a Spark for less. You can get a Fiesta sedan for $15/month more than the Mirage based on current OEM financing rates over 84 months. There are already a lot of alternatives in this space. And there are many, many alternatives in the 2- to 3-year used market.

          If it’s a warranty and the best fuel economy you want, by all means, go buy a Mirage. If you want virtually anything else, buy one of its competitors. It’s as simple as that.

          • 0 avatar
            Cobrajet25

            Hopefully, the redesigned Spark is a better car than the old one. You know, the ones that drank a quart of oil every 500 miles when new and had AC that didn’t work? Go to any Spark forum and poke around for awhile…see if they are still a better car.

            There are incentives on the Mirage, too. Right now, they are offering a $1,250 rebate here in the States.

            That makes a car that retails for $13,800 about $12,500.

            I don’t know if anyone shopping this market qualifies for the OEM low-rate financing, and if they did it would usually make more sense to take the rebate instead anyway.

            Don’t get me wrong…I don’t hate the Spark. It was on my ‘short list’. But it still has too much Daewoo DNA for me.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    hey I like this someone who owns said car ( cobra jet25)defending it to the B&B in a very fair balanced article, not a car for me but they are not offending anyone so good for them and a good amount of folks would be better off in a new cheap car like this w a warranty vs a beat up used car that will need tires, brakes ….

    He makes a very good point about some folks stating they want a basic car w/o the useless goodies well here is your car.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Basic is OK. But there’s no shortage of other basic cars…like a Ford Fiesta, which comes with all the hairshirt equipment (manual, crank windows, plastic hubcaps, etc). With incentives, you can pick one up for around $11,000.

      Now, I haven’t driven the Mirage, but I have driven a Fiesta, and it’s a damn nice car in its’ own right, whatever the price is. I drove a Scion iA, which you can pick up for around $14,500 around here, and it’s even better.

      Can we say the same about the Mirage? Unknown…but given that it’s a three-banger, I’d have my doubts. It does 0-60 in like 13 seconds per C/D – that’s FOUR SECONDS SLOWER than a Fiesta. I can’t imagine it being much fun.

  • avatar
    Funky

    I can recall (and had the opportunity to drive way back then) the likes of the Pontiac T1000/Chevy Chevette, Dodge Colt, the Ford Fiesta and Festiva. The only one of this bunch that was decent to drive was the Dodge Colt (which, I think, was made by Mitsubishi). Maybe the Mirage and G4 have some promise/potential if some of those roots are present. I haven’t yet had a chance to drive the new Mirage and G4 but I plan to as soon as I have a chance to do so.

  • avatar

    A well written review of the Mirage
    https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2014/07/review-2014-mitsubishi-mirage-es/

  • avatar

    Count me in with Cobrajet25 as one of the few defenders of the Mirage on here.

    For years, car enthusiasts have clamoured for a basic, honest-to-goodness car that brings us to the bare essentials of driving. No nannies. Nothing unnecessary. Where is the original Mini? Well….here is the car, and it gets pounded in car reviews for that reason.

    Unlike Cobra, I don’t own a Mirage. But I have spent plenty of time in them as rentals (probably 2k+ miles total), and have written my own car review on them on my blog.

    Is it fast? No, it’s a $13k car. Does it have the luxuries of a Rolls Royce, or even a base Lexus? No, it’s a $13k car. The logical part of me likes this car for being cheap to buy and operate, being seemingly durable (unlike the aforementioned Yugos and Chevettes) and offering the peace of mind of one of the best warranties in the business.

    But the emotional part of me likes it too. Driving the little three-cylinder and eeking the power out of it, especially with the manuals I’ve test driven, is a hoot. Due to being so light, the car has a flingable, almost go-kart nature to it. It’s comfortable to sit in the driver’s seat (impressive for my 6’4’’ frame), can accommodate four adults better than many small cars (looking at you, Fiesta!), and even in base form, is pretty well equipped. There’s just an honest nature to this car that is lacking in many modern vehicles. Nothing tacky, nothing silly. Even the smooth, jellybean styling is a refreshing change and stands out in a world full of bloated and bland Civics, Camrys, and Accords.

    Is it perfect? No. It’s a $13k car. Sure, the steering feel is a little vague and the suspension is made of marshmallows (pays off in dividends on rough roads)

    I seriously considered buying one when I eventually purchased a Chevy Sonic. The value is there (sure the Versa and Spark are the same price, but the Spark is cramped in comparison and Versa was really stripped of features), it was nice enough to drive on American highways, promised longevity, and didn’t have anything I didn’t need. I eventually bought the Sonic mainly because it was made in the U.S. and I liked its quirky styling. But the Mirage was a strong contender, and I too, am a car guy.

    Unlike many commenters, TTAC has driven the Mirage and was blatantly biased about it being a cheap, no-frills car without considering what buyers really are looking for in this segment. Hence why the Mirage has been a surprise sales success in many journalist’s eyes.


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