By on August 18, 2016

2016 Ford Focus EV Plug, Image: © 2016 Jeff Voth/The Truth About Cars

Earlier this year, Ford Motor Company claimed 100 miles of electric range was just fine, then turned on a dime and said no, no, that’s not right at all. 

The about-face on EV range came from CEO Mark Fields, who couldn’t have helped but notice the insane demand for Tesla’s Model 3 after it launched at the end of March. Now, the automaker wants to get serious about electrics with a two-car Model E line, Autocar reports.

According to the publication, Ford will launch two electric vehicles with a 200-mile range in 2019. Both will carry the Model E moniker, which Ford trademarked after wrestling it from Tesla’s grip (using legal action) in 2013.

Like Ford’s sole existing electric, one of the future models will be based on the Focus compact. The other will take the form of a small SUV. Both models will also come in hybrid and plug-in hybrid variants.

The Ford Focus Electric has languished on the EV market for years, offering a paltry 76 miles of range, though the automaker recently upgraded that number to an even 100 miles. Still, that’s only half the range of what the public and industry deem acceptable for U.S. consumers. 200 miles is the new benchmark, with General Motors, Tesla, Nissan and others all striving to offer such a vehicle at a reasonable price.

Model E is a clean name, but there’s something about it that seems familiar. When it launches, will Ford proclaim an “E-Day”?

[Image: Image: © 2016 Jeff Voth/The Truth About Cars]

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51 Comments on “Ford Will Battle the Model 3 with the Model E: Report...”


  • avatar
    Vulpine

    And Tesla continues to drive the market on EVs, even if they don’t ‘own’ the market. Sound familiar?

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      yes. despite my various opinions, I will to the day I die freely admit that Tesla changed the market overnight.

      • 0 avatar

        Tesla made it a bigger market. But it’s still a niche market. And it will remain so until charing times are way down for the multitudes and charging stations are all over the place.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          Tesla has also created unrealistic expectations for that niche consumer, who will demand to have the benefits of a big battery but won’t be willing to pay enough for that battery so that it can be provided at a profit.

          Major automakers have stayed away from 200-mile batteries because they add weight and costs that cannot be recovered. Thanks to Tesla, the market is now demanding that it gets the battery that it wants at a loss to the party that is providing it.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            @pch101: Major automakers have stayed away from 200-mile batteries because they add weight

            That may not be true of all battery manufacturers. One method that is being used to increase power density in lithium batteries is to remove inert material from the battery. The inert material adds a lot of weight and you end up with greater power density for the same weight. Manufacturing processes are also making progress, so costs may be coming down as well even with raw material price increases.

          • 0 avatar
            ilkhan

            I hear there is a new company getting ready to open a giant new battery plant right here in the US with lots of capacity and a super low cost, and contingency plans for even more battery plants as needed. Maybe they can help bring down the cost of those mongo battery packs.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “Both models will also come in hybrid and plug-in hybrid variants”

    So it’s a bit like the Hyundai Ioniq / Kia Niro cars, which will offer up to 3 different drivetrain options. This will inevitably hurt the EV-only version, since pragmatic (hesitant) customers will opt for the hybrid. There won’t be many takers for the plug-in hybrid.

    Then there is the question of long-range charging on the road. None of the non-Tesla entrants have the Supercharger network available to them.

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      are the supercharging locations restricted to only Tesla use?

      Are the properties owned by Tesla?

      If yes to any of the above, does Tesla get any government support for these Tesla owned sites?

      • 0 avatar
        whynot

        The Tesla Superchargers uses Tesla’s charger, so only Teslas can use them.

        As for if they get government support, that depends on who you talk too. Tesla says no, they were all paid for by Tesla. Some of their competitors have claimed otherwise.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        right now only Tesla’s cars have the ability to use them. I don’t think that Tesla intends to prevent the use of them by cars from other manufacturers if they supported it. Definitely wouldn’t be free to the owners, though.

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    Many of us have long argued, If there is any interest in the EV market, once a major player gets in, Tesla is finished.
    Dead.
    They would never be able to compete with their current plan. They couldn’t compete with the major mfr when it comes to dealers or the ability to produce in large volumes.

    Wouldn’t dealers be able to quickly instal supercharging stations for their brands and cars should they ever enter the market? This something Tesla could never match.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Being able and actually doing so are two different things, TT. Chevrolet, specifically, has expressly stated they have no interest in doing so for the Bolt.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        Yes, they’ve produced a 200-mile city car. That is nice, but it will always be on a short leash.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          but it does get rid of one worry with EVs, and that’s range anxiety.

          see, the thing about “range anxiety” is that it’s almost never about long trips. It’s “this car has enough range to get me to work and back, but what if I have to go somewhere else during the day?”

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            @jimz: but what if I have to go somewhere else during the day?”

            That was one of my concerns before I got my EV, and I do prepare for it. It has happened a couple of times and it wasn’t a problem. I can usually get back to 100 mile capacity in less than 3 hours with a level 2 charge. In an emergency, I have enough quick chargers in my area and I’m rarely more than 10 miles from one. Also, quick charges aren’t always 30 minutes. This morning I only charged for 11 minutes to get to 86% charge. All I needed to give me an extra buffer in the middle of 100-mile trip.

            At home, I can run most errands without the range estimate dipping below 100 miles. I think the worst for me around town is coming back home with 92 miles range.

            Just looked at my status after getting back home less than two hours ago from the 100 mile trip. The car is now showing 92% charge and 105 mile mile estimated range.

          • 0 avatar
            shaker

            “This morning I only charged for 11 minutes to get to 86% charge.”

            There will come a time when you’ll have to wait behind 2 other drivers for that juice – then the 200-mile EV starts to make sense.

            Edit: Transponders in EV’s (like EZ-Pass) that have accounts with the charging station owner. The Charging station will *limit* charging times to 20 minutes max (example) if the charging station detects two or more customers in range of the charging station.

            Something like this will *have* to happen, or otherwise ‘congenial’ EV owners are going to start acting like they’re in a Mad Max movie.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            @shaker:

            Yes, you are right about the wait. That is where the 200-miler would help. If that CHAdeMO charger had been occupied, I could have charged at level 2 while waiting, or driven across the street to another Level 3. If that had been occupied, there was a third level 3 further down the road. If that had failed, I had the option of charging on the return trip instead.

            On today’s agenda is a 125-mile trip. At the half-way mark, I’ll have access to a NEMA 14-50 outlet and will plug in my portable EVSE. If there was a problem with that outlet, my EVSE is adjustable (with a set of outlet adapters) and I have access to dedicated 20 amp 120v outlets that I can charge from at the full 20 amp rate. That’s enough to get me to 100% before the trip home.

            For the future, there are rumblings of third party EV upgrades in the works. Kreisel Electric in Austria is one possible player. They’ve taken a 24.2 pack in an e-Golf and replaced it with a 55.7 kWh pack that was the same weight and took up the same amount of space. It would be interesting to see if Nissan comes up with a 180 to 200-mile upgrade for the Leaf 1. That might be a way to get rid of used Leafs coming off of lease. Right now they charge $5500 for a new battery pack. If they could sell the 200-mile upgrade for maybe $8k (which is $133 per kWh and near what their current costs are rumored to be), that might be an interesting alternative to buying a new 200 mile EV.

          • 0 avatar
            shaker

            mcs:

            Thanks for the reply – your Leaf purchase was apparently a well thought out decision, allowing you the flexibility to minimize range “anxiety”.

            You might want to write an article about it for the upcoming TTAC “reader submission” event (with some tips and links to EV resources and charger locations).

            That would be a real resource – kinda like the EV equivalent of “How to Find an Ethanol-Free Gas Station”

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “That was one of my concerns before I got my EV, and I do prepare for it. It has happened a couple of times and it wasn’t a problem. I can usually get back to 100 mile capacity in less than 3 hours with a level 2 charge.”

            And suppose where I’m going, I can’t charge? In case you hadn’t noticed, EV charging stations are nowhere near ubiquitous. Even at work, where we have charging stations, they’re nearly always occupied. You (and your ilk) keep assuming best case scenarios when you push your agenda.

        • 0 avatar

          I’m not so sure this is big a deal. Tesla signed on with CCS charging so in all likely hood either Tesla will add CCS to thir chargers or their cars. Either way I expect CCS stations to pop up at Gas stations soon. It will be a bit of a problem at first but I imagine it will sort itself out in a few years. Plus there are as many CCS stations now as there are Superchargers it’s not like there is no infrastructure.

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        Understand.
        And agree.
        I was participating in the story as Ford has stated the effort. This is new, as far as I understand it.
        And if Tesla is going to try to prevent others from using their superchargers, which it basically is doing by keeping it proprietary, then they would lose terribly once nationwide dealers started doing a similar protective use program.
        Where will you find more superchargers if you are driving on a long trip, at Ford and GM dealers? Or at private Tesla owned?

        Once the ball game is on, then the mass production and big dealership networks win.
        And win big.

        C&D and others are really speaking well of the new Bolt. I am wondering what the final consumer price will be since it is listed at 37K.
        If around 30K…it will be interesting to see what GM does to promote…if they even want to.

        • 0 avatar
          tedward

          37 is basically what everyone is listing their current 100ish mile range evs for. If brands are putting between 2 and 5 grand per car in incentives on the hood, then the feds are adding 7500 we’re already well under 30, and these aren’t usually base trim level cars either. If a state ponies up another level of cash, say 2 to 3 grand, then you’re looking at a massive price advantage for ev’s vs gas models. It’s already the case when a state enters the incentive game.

          This isn’t something people should be happy about though. No one really wants them, the manufacturers are universally selling at a loss probably before their own incentive add, and if you remove those incentives there is not a chance in hell that anyone meets future carb ev mandate numbers. Then what? Brands pull their normal lineup and tell customers they’ve run out of their ice allotment for the month in carb states so they can only sell electrics? I know carb doesn’t really care about customer impact but they should be terrified of that outcome.

          • 0 avatar
            TrailerTrash

            The Bolt is 200 miles.
            That’s why I don’t understand anybody waiting on a 3 would not walk over and test…IF they REALLY wanted an EV.
            And as Jimz says, they aren’t worshiping at the Tesla alter.

          • 0 avatar
            yamahog

            @trailertrash

            I’m a prospective model 3 customer and here’s why the bolt is a non-starter.

            I hate that I already bought GM in 2009.

            The autopilot is the killer feature for the model 3.

            Elon Musk is going to do something cooler with my money than GM.

          • 0 avatar
            tedward

            Yamahog

            Is the bolt shipping without lane keep and adaptive cruise control? GM has the same goodies that tesla does, along with nearly everyone else.

            Not trying to talk you out of the 3 at all, I think it’s a neat concept, but honestly GM does way cooler things than tesla can yet. The corvette alone, never mind the Camaro, the trucks etc… Tesla does have a trendier brand identity though.

          • 0 avatar
            yamahog

            @tedward

            I don’t know if the base bolt will have the active safety technology (I’d be against it), but the base model 3 will. Tesla also has plans to update their system continuously, as far as I know, GM hasn’t upgraded any existing GM product with better safety technology. Right now, the autopilot in the Tesla requires 1/2 to 1/10th as many interventions as the systems in everyone else’s cars.

            Additionally, GM’s cool products are irrelevant. I don’t want a truck, and I value a 2 door sports car at about $8,000. A 2 door, two seat coupe is only marginally more useful (and slower accelerating) than my motorcycle.

          • 0 avatar
            tedward

            Yamahog

            That is very cool. If tesla is planning on adding new functions to the 3 as opposed to just tweaking existing ones like the test of the industry I’d keep that in mind as well. Look, the 3 is far more appealing to me than the bolt is as well, I’m more just sticking up for GM as we all, myself absolutely included, tend to dump on the company for historical reasons rather than product ones. I try to avoid that as I really don’t care about the companies or brands, just the cars.

            My opinion on these companies is that aside from a few small pockets of enthusiasm or brilliance its just a bunch of people who sent in a resume that matched the paperwork requirements. That seems to apply at multiple levels. Most if not all of the b&b posses more general industry knowledge and passion than the vast majority of auto industry people I’ve met. No different from an insurance company, a bank, etc… The brand is just a marketing tool to them, or a truly valueless tribal affiliation for us.

          • 0 avatar
            yamahog

            @tedward

            I made a type on the last post, I intended to say that I’d bet against the base bolt offering the safety technology.

            And Tesla’s system works very well in its current iteration. Word on the street is that we’re going to see a new sensor package in the S / X before the model 3 launch and the base model 3 will include that sensor package. Musk anticipates that sensor package will be good enough for fully autonomous driving (once the software catches up) additionally they’re going to offer a model 3 with a performance package and we should see a 0-60 in the 3 second range for that car.

            If I can get a 3 second 0-60 car with the ability to drive itself, game over. What more can you want? Performance when you want it, and the ability to watch shows during your commute.

            I can’t pan the bolt, it’s going to appeal to a lot of people who wouldn’t want a Tesla and electrification is a good thing (let’s get some of our best and brightest working on energy storage). Also, it’s apparently a good car.

            I’m just saying there are reasons to consider the model 3 beyond the brand. And I wish I had a more positive opinion of GM but GM seems to excel at pissing off their owners. (And somehow other companies really evangalize their owners (Subaru, Volvo)) Like the Malibus having rear wheel bearing issues, and the fast Corvettes having a heat sink issue. I know enough people with GM horror stories that I’d be really reluctant to get one.

            It’s not just that GMs break, heck, I know people who have had issues with 4Runners (even though they’re apparently all hand crafted by oracles up high in mt. fuji). But the local GM dealers seem to be as bad as VW dealers at sourcing parts quickly and approving repair work. And most GM cars seem to develop rattles really quickly which frustrate me relentlessly. I did actually test drive a V6 Camaro that I wanted to love – manual, yellow, with an HUD and upgraded brakes and it had a weird rattle from the door and it cost more OTD than a NISMO 370z. Yeah, the NISMO is 7 years old and the Camaro is new. But the automatic rev matching is really trick (though a novelty) and the NISMO felt like the paragon of visibility after I drove the Camaro.

            Classic GM problem – they launch things that are good but not dominant and once everyone else redesigns their cars, the GMs aren’t so good anymore. And the jury is still out on the long term quality of the current GM cars but it sucks when you have to fix things like power windows, and door locks, and wheel bearings and those random BS accessories are where japanese built cars shine.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      Nope. By being first mover, they’ve built up a loyal fan base which will gladly wait a decade for the Model 3 instead of buying a Bolt when it arrives.

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        In many cases, this has proven true in brand marketing.
        However, the ditches along road of market are full of losers in this very same first come, but now long gone branding game.
        It still comes down to affordability and actual product.

        and…
        why would anybody who really wants a small EV wait a decade? The Bolt is coming out now and is getting rave reviews…just go over to C&D. If you can get one now for 30K, or perhaps less, who would really wait a decade, or even 2 or 3 years?

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          ” If you can get one now for 30K, or perhaps less, who would really wait a decade, or even 2 or 3 years?”

          Geeks for whom Elon Musk is their LeBron James.

          • 0 avatar
            TrailerTrash

            I do agree, the cult following in the sweat tents never do make sense to the outsiders looking in.

            They give lotta money to Scientology and/or Gurus that make them fork over 10 or more percent of their income for the cause.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      A good example is Toyota’s (and Hyundai’s) fuel cell efforts.

      Instead of self-funding H2 fueling stations so the Murai can succeed, they’ve asked the various national and local governments to pony up the money. Not happening; there are only 29 H2 stations in the whole country.

      This is another reason why fuel cells will fail.

      Tesla wisely decided to produce its own charging network, and their cars can also use the other existing protocols as well. But mfrs of conventional cars don’t really *need* their EVs to succeed like Tesla does, so they only go in half-heartedly.

      If GM, Ford, Nissan, Audi, BMW, and VW really want their EVs to sell well, they’d adopt the Tesla Supercharger protocol and work out a payment scheme. Then we’d see the large mfrs become a serious threat to Tesla in the long-range EV market. Until then, they will remain bit players.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        @SCE to AUX

        not really comparable, I think. Hydrogen manufacture, storage, and transport is a huge bag of hurt. Hydrogen is practically never found naturally in its free (H2) form, it embrittles metals, leaks through most seals, etc.

        Electrical generation and distributions is “easy” in comparison. we may not have the generation and grid capacity to support a whole-sale shift to EVs overnight, but that’s a far easier (political) problem to solve than trying to make hydrogen work. Adding power generation with non-carbon sources (e.g. nuclear and renewables) is something the government should step up and make happen.

        And before you Randians scream “SOCIALISM,” remember that all of those interstate highways you take for granted were an enormous public works project kicked off by a Republican war hero president (Eisenhower.)

        • 0 avatar

          The other auto makers don’t want to support Teslas proprietary network. They are going to work hard at pushing out enough CCS cars to make that the standard it looks like Ford in onboard as well leaving Nissan and Mitsu as the only Chademo hold outs. Tesla is a member of CCS now to I imagine it will become the default.
          It was smart of Tesla to build the superchargers but I think selling them to 3rd parties to run and maintain in the future would be wise.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          I think Nissan’s ethanol SOFC will kill off fuel cells using compressed hydrogen like the mirai, although I think they may need to boost the power output a bit from what they were showing in Rio.

          As far as charging goes, with 100+ kWh batteries hitting the streets, we’ll need 800 volt charging to be added to the charging infrastructure. It’s coming and doubles the current quick charge/supercharging rates.

        • 0 avatar
          shaker

          “And before you Randians scream “SOCIALISM,” remember that all of those interstate highways you take for granted were an enormous public works project kicked off by a Republican war hero president (Eisenhower.)”

          Yes, but IIRC, he had to *sell* the idea as a ‘national defense’ project.

          The Interstates have moved some missiles and troops around, but have (due to cheap fuel) become absolutely essential to our economic survival, and the severe curtailment of our rail infrastructure. So, the lack of funding for the IHS is a mind-bogglingly stupid gaffe of politicians in D.C.

    • 0 avatar
      tedward

      Nissan and vw already have widespread if not universal level 2 chargers on premise. So yes, I agree, adding a DC charger to every ev certified dealership will definitely happen once the big brands actually enter the market.

      I don’t think the majority of the charging will happen there though, there’s not enough dedicated real estate on most dealer lots. Where charging will go is along highways and byways just like gas stations. It’s already under way, and this is where tesla is in trouble long term. What third party charge vendor wants to invest in infrastructure that only applies to a niche market product with an unproven record for volume sales?

      I think tesla desperately needs to adopt a universal charge interface. It’s their greatest vulnerability in my opinion.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        @tedward:

        There are 1848 Fast DC chargers in the US. 299 of them (16%) are Tesla’s chargers.

        What’s interesting is the geographical distribution of them. Tesla chargers are located along interstates, yet none of the other protocols really permit a cross-country drive, being clustered around cities.

        So to your point, while it would appear that Tesla should join the others, it turns out that other EV mfrs 200-mile cars actually won’t be going far from home (unless you live along the east or west coasts).

        All this can – and will – change with time, I suppose.

        Fast DC map without Tesla:
        http://www.afdc.energy.gov/locator/stations/results?utf8=%E2%9C%93&location=&fuel=ELEC&private=false&planned=false&owner=all&radius=false&radius_miles=5&ev_levels%5B%5D=none&ev_levels%5B%5D=dc_fast&ev_connectors%5B%5D=none&ev_connectors%5B%5D=CHADEMO&ev_connectors%5B%5D=J1772COMBO&ev_networks%5B%5D=none&ev_networks%5B%5D=AeroVironment+Network&ev_networks%5B%5D=Blink+Network&ev_networks%5B%5D=ChargePoint+Network&ev_networks%5B%5D=EV+Connect&ev_networks%5B%5D=eVgo+Network&ev_networks%5B%5D=EVSE+LLC+WebNet&ev_networks%5B%5D=GE+WattStation&ev_networks%5B%5D=Greenlots&ev_networks%5B%5D=OpConnect&ev_networks%5B%5D=SemaCharge+Network&ev_networks%5B%5D=Tesla&ev_networks%5B%5D=all

        Tesla map:
        http://www.afdc.energy.gov/locator/stations/results?utf8=%E2%9C%93&location=&fuel=ELEC&private=false&planned=false&owner=all&radius=false&radius_miles=5&ev_levels%5B%5D=none&ev_levels%5B%5D=dc_fast&ev_connectors%5B%5D=none&ev_connectors%5B%5D=TESLA&ev_networks%5B%5D=none&ev_networks%5B%5D=AeroVironment+Network&ev_networks%5B%5D=Blink+Network&ev_networks%5B%5D=ChargePoint+Network&ev_networks%5B%5D=EV+Connect&ev_networks%5B%5D=eVgo+Network&ev_networks%5B%5D=EVSE+LLC+WebNet&ev_networks%5B%5D=GE+WattStation&ev_networks%5B%5D=Greenlots&ev_networks%5B%5D=OpConnect&ev_networks%5B%5D=SemaCharge+Network&ev_networks%5B%5D=Tesla&ev_networks%5B%5D=all

        • 0 avatar

          I believe last I checked over 80% of EV sales were to states that touch the two coasts. Also with places like Sheets looking to install combo Tesla CSS chargers it seems a moot point in the future.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      @TrailerTrash: Wouldn’t dealers be able to quickly instal supercharging stations for their brands and cars should they ever enter the market? This something Tesla could never match.

      Dealer based charging is horrible. I have one dealership near me that likes to display used ICE cars in the charger parking spots and you have to wedge the nose in between the used cars to reach the charger. Another one won’t let cars that were purchased at other dealers charge at their dealership. Most of the others are pretty good though, although sometimes they have a bad attitude – like be glad we provide this service because we don’t have too. Be glad I didn’t buy a tesla to avoid dealing with your attitude.

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        MCS…what?

        First…my attitude? This is the same response I get from any blind faith follower, whether they be leftist, greenies or feminist.
        I can handle the hate. Just not the bull.

        Sorry for hurting your feelings, but I never was good with empathy. Especially when if forced the ignorance and neglect of the bigger picture.

        The point, friend, was IF the big players wanted to get into this, when they do they will put forth the nation-wide dealer set up and require their dealerships to participate in them just as they would any warranty program.

        You sell our products and our programs as agreed to.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Jack summarized pretty well in his “Notice me Senpai” article how this will turn out for Ford.

  • avatar

    I think Ford is missing an opportunity by not using the name Model tE (pronounced Model Tee). It evokes the best known automobile brand in history.

  • avatar
    pbxtech

    The Ford dealer near me is only interested in selling trucks, I suspect that’s not an isolated situation.

    • 0 avatar
      spookiness

      This. Same with Chevy. I’m intrigued by the new Cruze, but I’m in the sticks where everybody buys trucks, so most dealers barely even have cars on the lot. If they do, they are the commodity-spec in multiple shades of gray. Dealers are always the worst part of buying a car. I was an import buyer for decades, & now that there are some “domestic” models that I’m interested in, I step on a lot and everybody just wants to sell me an SUV or a truck, and assumes that if I want a compact-ish car, I must be poor, or cheap.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        at that point, your best bet is to test drive a model similar to what you want, then put in a special order. At least then you can evaluate things like driving position, seat comfort, etc.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    Tesla’s Superchargers deliver more juice in less time with a better connector, and they’re happy to let any other manufacturer who wants to buy into the standard do so.

    It baffles me why manufacturers a) aren’t building out infrastructure and b) are backing two objectively inferior standards, thereby ceding a marketing advantage to Tesla. If you can charge a Tesla (with adapter) at competitors’ chargers, but competitors can’t charge from Tesla’s…and Tesla has built out a huge charging network on top of that…then advantage Tesla. In fact, this is the most common reason I hear for waiting for the Model 3 instead of getting a Bolt: plenty of chargers, and better ones at that.

  • avatar
    la834

    The “Teletouch Drive” on the ’58 Edsel was the first automatic transmission with shiftin buttons on the steering wheel – now ubiquitous among sportier slushbox-equipped cars.

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