By on August 29, 2016

2017 Ford F-450 Super Duty Platinum Crew Cab 4x4

Ford Motor Company clearly wasn’t secure in knowing that its new 3.5-liter Ecoboost engine will give the F-150 the most V6 power in its class, or that the 2017 Super Duty will have the most torque in its class. And never mind that a looming diesel variant of the F-150 will likely get the best fuel economy in its class.

Ford wanted the gold medal in the fuel tank capacity race, and it just won by a mile. Actually, many miles.

The automaker recently announced that long-box Crew Cab versions of its new Super Duty will receive a 48-gallon fuel tank, by far the biggest of any heavy-duty pickup. As the model most likely to be found towing a trailer, that means many, many more miles before the bathroom break. (Which is a problem, as the 2017 Super Duty also wins the cupholder competition.)

48 gallons. That’s a lot. In contrast, the Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra 2500 HD twins have a 36 gallon tank, while the Ram 2500 and 3500 come with a 31 gallon tank (though diesel 3500 models have an option for an extra 5.5 gallons. Put another way, the Super Duty’s fuel tank can hold the equivalent of 512 beers.

Ford claims the capacity is 22 percent greater than past Super Duty diesel models and 37 percent greater than gas models. As part of the model’s revamp — which now includes the fuel system — the automaker changed the design of the separator filter and fuel filter to increase change intervals and reduce maintenance costs.

With Ford moving up from a Grande to Venti fuel tank, expect fewer Super Duty pickups blocking two pumps at your local station. When they show up this fall, expect an owner to shell out an average of $105 for a fill-up (going by today’s national gas price average).

Now, about Ford’s insanely competitive nature when it comes to its trucks. Not everything’s a race, you know.*

*Oh, we forgot another competition won by Ford — the full-size pickup sales race. Maybe this is why the company stays on top.

[Image: Ford Motor Company]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

59 Comments on “Ford Crowns Self Winner in Fuel Tank Capacity War, Might Need Competition Therapy...”


  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    The glasses in my kitchen hold DOUBLE the amount they did previously*.

    *When half full and dumped out.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Fuel economy and tow-ratings are so liberally-adjusted by their respective automakers (espeically for rigs like these that are technically exempt from fuel-economy ratings)…that they almost shouldn’t be a factor.

    Of course, fuel capacity is mostly indisputable.

  • avatar

    My ’96 F-SuperDuty has two 20-gallon tanks, which with its fuel economy (11-14) means about a 400-mile safe range. Two decades for eight gallons!

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      Many years ago my father dispatched me to go from Gainesville, GA to Chickasha, OK to pick up a horse trailer, using an elderly Ford F250 with a second tank, giving a 42 gallon capacity. Just for giggles, I wanted to see how far I could go without stopping. I made it to Olive Branch, MS, where both my bladder and the gas gauge insisted I get out. It’s about 420 miles and it took a little less than 7 hours, as the stretch between Birmingham and Olive Branch was on US 78.

      Now I drive a Fusion with the PHEV drivetrain, and can go almost 500 highway miles on a tank. I have no interest in trying that.

      • 0 avatar

        That 250 must’ve been elderly but still in good running order if you were able to average better than 60mph!

        You don’t mention if the rig was diesel or gas, but it’s my understanding it’s special hell on the PS 7.3s to run the tank all the way to empty, so I never have. Most of my hauls are no more than 50 miles round-trip anyway, so there’s usually plenty of opportunity to top-off at the beginning or end of trips.

        • 0 avatar
          FormerFF

          The trip occurred circa 1983, and the truck was from 1968. It had a 360 cubic inch FE big block gasoline V8. I’ve heard ugly things about getting diesel engines restarted after they run out of fuel.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            It’s not terrible. You do have to crack open an injector and prime the fuel pump eight times to get the air out, so it can take a while.

          • 0 avatar

            Perhaps “not terrible” in the sense that you’ve not grenaded the motor, but certainly terrible if it befalls you when you’re not expecting a long hiccup on a trip, or lack the tools to start yanking injectors.

    • 0 avatar
      ect

      Our ’85 F-250 Supercab also had 2 tanks, with about that capacity (I don’t remember the exact figure).

      Also shopped the Chevy/GMC competition, which also featured 2 tanks. Problem was, the filler caps were on opposite sides of the truck, which made no sense to me at all. On the Ford, the filler caps were immediately beside one another, so you could fill both in one operation.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        Back in the old days of saddle tanks outside the frame, each one had its own filler neck straight into the tank. My old GMC was set up that way, with a 3-way valve under the seat to select which tank you wanted to run.

        Keep in mind that gas station hoses used to be longer, so you could toss the nozzle into the bed, walk over to the other side, and have enough hose to reach the other filler neck.

        • 0 avatar
          ect

          Thanks, I had forgotten about switching between the 2 fuel tanks.

          I have not forgotten the manual hub locks for the four-wheel drive system, or the fuel consumption of the 460-4 bbl….

          • 0 avatar
            CobraJet

            I once owned a 74 Ford F100 with a 360 V8 that was bought new by my grandfather. He added two saddle tanks which were mounted outside the frame rails just ahead of the rear wheels, one on each side. They were filled from an opening that could be reached in the wheel wells just ahead of the rear tires. With those two tanks plus the factory tank, the total capacity was 55 gallons. There was no fuel gauge in the two saddle tanks so you ran until the engine sputtered, then turned a manual valve mounted on the floor by the driver’s seat.

            I used them for a while, but they got rusty inside because they were made of mild steel. That, plus the fear of rupture in a side impact accident caused me to remove them.

      • 0 avatar

        The Ford of that vintage were 19/18-gallon, I believe. I’ve had several.

        The only advantage to the Chevy/GMC layout so far as I can think would be that you could fill both tanks at the same time when you were in a service station with two columns of pumps. But if you’re in a hurry and in a station with two (or more) pumps per row, you can do the same thing with the Fords and not have hoses strung across traffic.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    “48 gallons. That’s a lot. In contrast, the Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra 2500 HD twins have a 36 gallon tank, ”

    My 2004 GMC HD Sierra gasser holds about 23 gallons. The small tank is a big complaint a lot of guys have about these GMT-800 trucks. When I’m towing my big boat getting 8 or 9 miles to the gallon the range sucks. With 36′ of boat and trailer behind you it is nice to be able to make it home sometimes without having to gas up.
    I’d be happy with even a 36 gallon tank.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Good, but can I still add a second tank on the other side?

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      no, because the exhaust system runs down the other side. Ford pickups which used to have two tanks had one inside the frame rail on the driver’s side, and the second was in the back of the frame above the spare tire.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Yes, I have seen those systems on early 00s F3/450s which is why I asked. The tanks were either 25 or 30 gal tanks each as I recall, something like a 500 mile cruising range unloaded.

        • 0 avatar
          Onus

          The old trucks have an optional rear 38 gallon in the spare tire location. its a popular upgrade for people on the 80-96/97 trucks. It can be purchased aftermarket as well. 19 + 38 = 57 gallons of gas/diesel. Should be enough for just about anyone.

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        Yep, that’s the way my ’95 F-150 (SuperCab 6-3/4′ box) was. An 18.2 gallon tank inside the left frame rail, and a 16.5 gallon tank above the spare, for a total of 34.7 gallons. And I got to drop the front one twice, to deal with flaky senders.

        If you bought one with the 8′ box, the front tank was 20.7, which added to the 16.5 in the rear tank brought the total to 37.2.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Although I don’t see gasoline going to $5 a gallon in all but the most extreme scenarios in the next 3 to 5 years…

    44 gallons X $4.98 a gallon = $219.12 for a tank of gas if you’re down to the low fuel light on.

    OUCH

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      Could be worse, you could be filling up Carlson Fan’s boat. I’m guessing that would be 200 – 230 gallons.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        Nope it only has a 70 gallon tank. Boat is only 25′, but including the trailer and outdrive it’s just under 36′ overall. The crooks on the lakes where I live are charging over $4 a gallon for gas this summer. It’s nice to have a trailer boat sometimes.

        • 0 avatar
          FormerFF

          It’s $3.69 at our marina, that’s for 90 octane ethanol free. You can get it for a dollar less at a land based gas station.

          When you consider how expensive it is to build and operate a floating gas dock, and that’s it’s only busy four months out of the year, I don’t begrudge them the extra money.

    • 0 avatar
      jamesbrownontheroad

      For anyone who wants to import one of these to the UK (and there are those with big trailers / small genetalia who see the need, I passed a UK registered 2014 F150 this morning) that’d cost you £205 (approx $269) to fill at today’s average UK diesel price (£1.1152/litre).

      :)

  • avatar
    seth1065

    wow m y tDI wagon has a 14.5 gallon tank and maybe still can out drive these** on miles per tank around 600 ( while hurting the environment, ) hate to be behind one of these things filling up, it must take forever, and hate to own it when gas goes up.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Anyone remember the Ram Long Hauler concept? It had both a bed extension with a fuel tank inside and another giant fuel tank mounted in the main bed. 170 gallons total.

    Somewhere around 500 miles of cruising range there comes a point of diminishing returns. My LS460 will get 600+ miles of interstate out of its 22-gallon tank and I will always have to stop before it does.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      http://www.trucktrend.com/cool-trucks/1206dp-ram-5500-long-hauler-concept-truck/

      Wow! Comes complete with broughamy interior, and prostitute using a laptop.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      While your bladder or back might not last the vehicle range it is nice to have more options of when and where you need to buy fuel. If you are working one of these in a remote location, towing or hauling big loads, off road in 4Low, using the PTO that big tank can mean being able to make it back w/o stopping at the sketchy station that is charging a big premium for being the only station for many many miles.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      “Somewhere around 500 miles of cruising range there comes a point of diminishing returns.”

      170 gallons would be there and then some but within the range of what’s sold from the factory there’s no such thing as diminishing returns to me. I don’t start every trip with a full tank, I don’t run it down to E before stopping, and I’d rather top off at a cheap station when it’s convenient than stop because I have to.

  • avatar
    Tinn-Can

    Our gasser F250 long bed crew cab needs the extra capacity since it get like 4mpg worse mileage than our 2500HD gas silverados. It really does suck to wait on 32ish gallons to fill if the light is on though. I wonder how the big rig guys deal with it.

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      Everybody knows that truck drivers have bigger nozzles.

    • 0 avatar
      mikeg216

      The pumps at truck stops are much much faster.. Usually they have at least two, 100 gallon tanks.. Using a pump on both sides at the same time it takes about 15 minutes. I have a suburban with the 42 gallon tank and it takes about 15 minutes at the local gas station.. Or 5 minutes at the truck stop

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Back in the first “energy crisis” (73-4) GM took a hard look at putting a 40 gallon tank in the B/C body. It was rumored the feds strongly discouraged it.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      Did the feds have a safety argument, or did they not like the idea of giving up control of how much people could drive based on their fuel rationing of the day?

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    It’s hard to say that men aren’t buying these to compensate when the damn manufacturers can’t even stop dick-waving.

    • 0 avatar
      BoogerROTN

      I’m not too sure that driving a Tesla, S8 or any other performance vehicle in the U.S. is any less of a dick waving situation.

      Draconian speed limits, shitty infrastructure and the cozy relationship between LE and the insurance industry results in those cars being driven like Camrys for 99% of their lives. As a result, the only real reason to own one is for vanity purposes (“dick waving”).

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    My FIL has a 2000 F350 CC Dually V10 gas, with what i believe to be a 40 gallon tank. I have had the unfortunate luxury of having to fill it when it is on E. Bring a book to read is mostly what I recall along with the horror of the dollar amount. My FIL would get peeved at the pumps that shut off at $75. When gas was $4 this was a serious PIA.

    • 0 avatar

      Yep, I know what you mean. My F-SuperDuty has dual 20s, and I’ve heard of other owners swapping the rear for the 40-gallon tank you’re talking about, as it’s apparently easy enough. For most folks, a 400-mile range seems fine, though I suppose if you did a bunch of idling in the sticks it might be nice to have an additional 20 gallons on hand.

      I don’t get to read a book, though, as the flatbed is a chore to fill up without making a mess. I have to hold the nozzle in a particular direction to avoid spilling as much as I’m pumping.

  • avatar
    SaulTigh

    One of my favorite things about my wife’s ’14 F150 is the 36-gallon tank. EVERY truck should have a tank this big or larger. Love not having to fill up all the dang time, and sometimes can even ride out minor spikes in fuel prices.

    I also hate vehicles with “too small” tanks. I think the new Mustang comes to mind, as I think I read it has a 14 gallon tank. Only an econobox should have something that small.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Dude enters the “Bullrun Rally” with an F-150 crew cab, and it made no sense. Everything else was subcompacts to sports cars. Then he makes it to final rounds. He had a range no one else could touch.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      @SaulTigh. I am with you. I had a F250 short bed 2002 powerstroke. Had a tiny tank, like 22 or 24 gallons and guzzled diesel with abandon. I have heard a major gripe of the early 00’s 4Runners was they have a 15 gallon tank and in 4Runner fashion…guzzle gas with abandon. Nothing better than getting gas every miles..

  • avatar
    VoGo

    Does anyone know the capacity of the bladder of that imaginary tiger?

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    A larger fuel tank is great for those who work or play in remote areas. The extra capacity also allows one to pick and chose when and where they want to fuel up.

    I drove to Calgary last year and made it with a 1/4 tank left. I was able to skip all of the higher priced tourist trap gas stations along the way.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      ^excellent point. A few years ago, I wished my 1996 Aerostar had a bigger (or 2nd) tank when I filled up in Idaho, just before crossing into Washington (which tends to be California-like in its fuel prices, taxes, etc).

      I did make it to western Wa before having to fill up again, and that was putting the high mileage, heavily-loaded van through its paces heading through the mountains.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Our fuel taxes are not *that* high. Mostly, our prices come from the West Coast refinery capacity bottleneck, which no company has an incentive to fix. Thanks, oil cartel.

  • avatar
    madman2k

    I have the 36 gallon tank in my F150.

    I’ve done some 700 mile trips on a tank, but it tends to leave at least a few gallons in reserve when the low fuel light comes on; it never actually took more than 33 gallons at the pump yet.

    Theoretically, the range is 936 miles, but that would mean going 60mph the whole way with no idling and running all the way to empty.

    We stop way more often to pee or eat than to fill up – it’s a nice luxury to have.

  • avatar

    My ’95 Volvo 940’s Tank is 20-21 gallon (if you really push it).

    I’ve always thought I’d want a touring vehicle and a sportier vehicle to contrast that.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Great news…. I guess

    Will the bed still get him les in it when a flimsy tool box makes contact with it?

    “*Oh, we forgot another competition won by Ford — the full-size pickup sales race. Maybe this is why the company stays on top.”

    Fleet sales and funny math.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • geozinger: Fnck. I’ve lost lots of cars to the tinworm. I had a 97 Cavalier that I ran up to 265000 miles. The...
  • jh26036: Who is paying $55k for a CTR? Plenty are going before the $35k sticker.
  • JimZ: Since that’s not going to happen, why should I waste any time on your nonsensical what-if?
  • JimZ: Funny, Jim Hackett said basically the same thing yesterday and people were flinging crap left and right.
  • JimZ: That and the fact that they could run on gasoline, which was considered a useless waste product back in the...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States