By on August 11, 2016

Jeep Wrangler Build & Price screenshot

Sometimes a manufacturer churns out a base trim that is — all things considered — the primo choice for that particular model. Here’s an example.

Jeep, especially the Wrangler, tends to evoke a visceral response from both fans and haters alike. Nevertheless, barring the original Volkswagen Beetle and Mini Cooper, few vehicles exist that so solidly own a certain body style as much as the Wrangler. Say “Jeep” to just about anyone, even if they care not about cars, and they’ll likely conjure the image above.

In base form, dubbed ‘Sport’ by some shrewd, pencil-necked marketers, the Wrangler offers up Chrysler’s now ubiquitous Pentastar V6, which powers everything from rear-drive Chargers to front-drive minivans. Delivering near-as-makes-no-difference 300 horsepower, the engine is lashed to a six-speed manual that’s a fine choice for everyone except extreme rock crawlers. For the Moab set, automatics are king. For the rest of us, Save the Manuals and skip the $1,350 automatic.

For better or worse, Jeep is FCA’s sales powerhouse, and pricing the base Wrangler a few shades under $25,000 undoubtedly contributes to this endeavor. Helping capture conquest buyers is an interior that no longer resembles a monk’s cave, equipped as it is with decent cloth seats and a tilt steering column. Don’t worry, purists; there’s still no headliner at this price.

The hue shown here is the $0 Firecracker Red, chosen because it stands out in a crowd and I like the name. Jaunty greens and blues are also on offer for $0. Sixteen inch on/off-road tires, fog lamps, and Dana front and rear axles are all standard. Optional Freedom Tops and Frontal Masks sound like big fun until you realize they’re only for use on the vehicle, so we’ll pass.

Sure, the Rubicon has a better 4×4 setup and gnarly 17-inch off-road tires. However, by choosing the base model and saving $10,000, you can roll to your nearest aftermarket shop with a shopping list and a wad of cash. Ten large buys a lot of off-road equipment.

And if you think this Ace of Base instalment is controversial, wait until you see the next one: it’s a $50,000 SUV.

Not every base model has aced it. The ones which have? They help make the automotive landscape a lot better. Any others you can think of, B&B? Let us know in the comments. Naturally, feel free to eviscerate our selection.

The model above is shown in American dollars with American options and trim — apple pie and bald eagles not included. As always, your dealer may sell for less.

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92 Comments on “Ace of Base: Jeep Wrangler Sport...”


  • avatar
    mike1dog

    Finding a base model at a dealer is pretty hard. I was looking last week, and the cheapest I could find was thirty-two grand.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Agreed. I thought that this model would be a good toy for me and a good starter vehicle for my 2 sons but base spec Wranglers are almost impossible to find. The local FCA stealership had a 3 year old low mileage one on the lot and they had it stickered at the exact same price as a new one.

    • 0 avatar
      motorrad

      Order one. Jeep die hards love to order their Wranglers. We ordered a Sport S with the alloy wheels and tow package. Paid $27K in March 2012. It took a little less than 2 months to arrive and Jeep has a pretty cool website that let’s you follow it through the build cycle. I just checked and Kelly has average retail today at $22.5K. Not bad.

  • avatar
    threeer

    Mike. This, plus 100000. Each and every time I went to look at a Wrangler, finding a base variant was akin to looking for a unicorn in leotards. They just don’t exist. I’ve been toying with a Wrangler, but want a base, manual, cloth-top, no frills version. They’ll gladly sell you a “Pokémon GO EXTREME” version (Pokeball shift knob FTW!) marked up to the heavens, but a base trim just doesn’t make the donuts, I guess.

    • 0 avatar

      Just searched new inventory on Jeeps site. Lowest price within 25 miles $31k. 50 miles $28.5k 200+ miles $26.8

      That’s a hard jeep to find. I’m amazed on that prices on unlimiteds around here. I remember a few years ago I looked and found plenty under 29K for sale. I have to move to 100 miles on the inventory to find one under 30k here. In fact the cheapest Unlimited at the 3 dealers closest to me (with in 25 miles) was 40k.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    IF I buy a Jeep pickup truck, it will probably be the Sport trim with options. Still, the projected price makes me wonder.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Vulpine,
      You stated you want to buy one of those Latin American style utes. These are small in comparison to a mid size pickup.

      Now, you want to buy a Wrangler pickup. A Wrangler pickup will be a mid size pickup.

      Why not just go out and buy a Frontier. They are good buy at the moment.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        What I want and what I get depends on what’s available. What I want has not been available for nearly 20 years, which is why I’m driving a near-20-year-old model.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Okay, sure.
    Wrangler Sport with 6-speed: $25,585
    3.73 axle ratio: $695
    Bright White exterior: $0
    Trailer tow group: $495
    Air conditioner: $1,295
    Total with destination: $27,375

    • 0 avatar
      360joules

      A quick skim of enthusiast websites shows that the base wranglers don’t have an oil pan skid plate. Buying a base wrangler as ajla’s suggested option package is a pretty decent off-road starter package but I’d omit the tow hitch and add an aftermarket oil pan-covering skid plate. First-gear in 4 wheel low with a 3.73 axle is a SLOW walking speed. Dropping a clutch in 4 wheel low with that 3.73 axle should get you around or over most common obstacles on a a Forest Service fire road or logging road in the Rocky Mountains or the Cascades in the dry season.

      • 0 avatar
        Pete Zaitcev

        I have a Rubicon and I trail it without the oil pan plate. It’s not a problem really, because your axle protects it. Now that transmission skid bar is a travesty for sure.

  • avatar
    ZCD2.7T

    “Optional Freedom Tops and Frontal Masks sound like big fun until you realize they’re only for use on the vehicle, so we’ll pass.”

    LOL – golf clap!

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Who hates the Wrangler? The four guys who have the FJ Cruiser instead? Defender purists? I don’t think I’ve really heard any hate for it.

    Not something I’d ever buy, but I get what it’s for and respect they haven’t messed with the formula in a long time. Nobody else offers an alternative.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      “Who hates the Wrangler?”

      People who think the last real Jeep was the CJ-(insert number here) and everything after that is poser trash.

    • 0 avatar
      SlowMyke

      People hate it because it’s an off-road SUV that is 90% of the time bought for road use only. People ignore that all other “SUV’s” follow the same trend. Same for trucks. And sports cars. Basically people get upset when others buy cars they like because of the image or whatever instead of the most basic mission of the car.

    • 0 avatar
      Snail Kite

      To most, it’s just a lifestyle vehicle. I don’t hate it, but I have no respect for posers.

      • 0 avatar
        SlowMyke

        Snail- who constitutes as a poser in a wrangler? Anyone who keeps it on the road? Or just people who keep a Rubicon on the road? Just curious if you think most jeep owners are in that group or just the ones that go for broke with options and then don’t use all that equipment.

        I used to think that people were posers for having off road vehicles as DD’s but then I realized most vehicles are not used for their intended purpose. I still get a little judgy about people who install a lot of aftermarket stuff and then don’t use it though. But I try to keep it to myself now cuz it’s their money.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          The more ‘posers’ buy wranglers, the more clean and un-abused used examples there will be in 10 years to modify and use offroad. Just take a look at the XJ Cherokee. Originally bought by trendy suburbanites, who probably didn’t know what articulation even means, or that their solid axle equipped kid hauler would become the darling of many offroaders decades later. I’m especially happy to see the all-street driven Rubicons, I’d love to get my hands on a 2 door one of those at some point. The explosion in the sales of Wranglers thanks to the 4 door Unlimited body style will hopefully finally depress used resale values to a reasonable level. As it sits, looking at older TJ Wrangerls, it’s absurd how much people ask for rusty heaps.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            gtemnykh,
            It appears your view on the Wrangler sits near where I sit with the Raptor.

            Posers? Not used as designed??

            Hmmmmm ……..

            So, what’s the diff??

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            BAFO – he is using the term to make a point but you use it to be an Oz hole.

            Still butt hurt because he said you should be banned.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Lou,
            Yes, and I try and prove a point as well.

            gtemnykh point even with the Wrangler has been similar to mine.

            These vehicles would not exist without posers, the Raptor more so than the Wrangler.

      • 0 avatar
        IAhawkeye

        Don’t cut yourself on that edge, hope you never buy anything more then a base Civic-that is all anyone ever REALLY needs! The so-called posers are at least way more fun.

      • 0 avatar
        GeneralMalaise

        It all comes out in the wash.

        Joe Bob 1:23 “Those who pose shall by their posing be known”

    • 0 avatar
      Pete Zaitcev

      There is a certain subset of car people who hate all SUV period, and they don’t realize (or don’t want others to realize) that Wrangler is one of the most economical SUVs, primarily because of its light weight. So, they promulgate the myth of solid axles being heavy, although if you look at the weight of Pathfinder or Pilot, the truth quickly becomes apparent. I can easily do 20 mpg in daily commute on the old 3.8L and Pentastar with 5sp auto does even better. Now of course the compact SUVs are better still, as they should be. The HR-V, for example, is simply smaller and lighter.

    • 0 avatar

      People who hate the Wrangler are the same people who think their XJ Cherokees are worth $5000 on Craigslist.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        Must be a lot of Wrangler haters in PA then…finding a sub $5k XJ in the classifieds with less than 150,000 miles is pretty much impossible round here.

      • 0 avatar
        Firestorm 500

        I sold my 1987 Cherokee Pioneer with 235,000 miles on the original drive train September 2015 for $5895 cash.

        Then in October, I sold my 1992 Cherokee Laredo with a rebuilt engine, 207,000 total miles on vehicle, for $5700 cash.

        Both were nice non-rusty Southern 4X4s that had seen little to no off-roading. The ’87 had been on some dirt roads, the ’92 was pretty much a street-driven Jeep.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Dude my XJ is a Limited and it only has 140k on it and three rust holes. I’m doing you a FAVOR for $5k.

  • avatar
    Maymar

    I wonder how much the extra Rubicon stuff is all that necessary – this should be plenty for mucking about some rough country unless hardcore offroading is a hobby, right? And at $23k, you’ll probably feel less bad about mucking it up.

    Then again, as much as I want one, nature hates me, so it’d be a wasted purchase.

    • 0 avatar
      Pete Zaitcev

      The necessity really depends on the mission. Rubi is set up for rock crawling out of the factory. Unless you do a lot of that, not much is necessary. That said, the base model Sport comes even without the rear locker, which is very helpful on a wide variety of unfriendly surfaces.

      • 0 avatar

        It depends I’ve had two 4×4’s with lockers the others without. Trail running in the northeast it defiantly helps but most trails I can go down without one. I will say tires make a big difference and would be the first change I would make to a sport. I’ve wheeled with stock wranglers they do pretty well all things considered, you could definitely get to the back country with one. I used to wheel with a guy with a stock 2 door base wrangler and I had a lifted XJ then a Toyota pickup. While the XJ did a lot better (3″ lift and locked rear) the pickups only real advantage was height in mud and break-over, but it was negated by length where the wrangler could easily scoot around obstacles with the short wheelbase that caused issues with my truck.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      The Rubicon comes with a 30 inch fiording depth. The stocker is basically hub height. Skid plates, lockers, disconnecting sway bars all cost money. I’m not sure what other features are different but if you do plan to go off-road you might be better off getting the Rubicon option. That extra 10k also gives you factory integration and a factory warranty.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    Best base model vehicle one can buy on the market today.

    Checks every box for an up and comer who needs transportation but has a life outside.
    Perfect city vehicle, easy to park turns on a dime.
    Perfect winter vehicle: 4WD
    Perfect summer vehicle: drop the top and put the sun shade up
    perfect spring and fall as well. get the tow hitch and a bike rack/ski/camping rack and you can carry your gear anywhere. Even do a little off roading to get to favorite destination!
    Due to CL, which actually has its own section for Jeep parts you never have to buy new tires or wheels again. When you need new shoes, just cruise CL and buy a mounted set on whatever the latest Rubicon factory Wheel from the folks who just bought said Rubicon but put a 6″ Lift and new tires/wheels on it. You can get new wheels and tires for $400-$500 all day long.
    And lastly, resale! Very few base model units retain their value as well as a base model Jeep Wrangler. Always a market for them, even if you pound 150k miles on it.

    I like mine with the Freedom top as it gets hot in the summer and the AC is nice…

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      Definitely not a perfect winter vehicel by any stretch. Really short wheelbase with a pretty loosey-goose suspension that is upset by expansion joints. I’d seriously rather have a fwd sedan short of deep snow conditions. My 4Runner is much the same way, snow tires were an absolute must for slick-highway driving.

      City living: wrangler is a prime target for break ins and theft from the interior.

      For the outdoors enthusiast, not being able to throw a canoe on the roof kind of stinks. Interior space is perhaps passable but falls quite short of what I’ve found I need when I go camping my SO and our two medium size dogs, or the SO and another couple+ gear.

      For a utility vehicle, I’d give the ‘base model’ edge to a Subaru Outback or Forester, or a now-defunct Xterra. Both are ultimately more practical, but of course you’d give up the Wrangler’s open top motoring experience.

      • 0 avatar
        SSJeep

        I drive in winter conditions all the time in the Wrangler, and have never had a problem. Granted, I have the trac-lok differential which helps, but there is no way a 4wd Wrangler performs worse than a FWD sedan. I have been able to get home in wintry conditions that left many sedans stranded on the side of the road.

        And the bit about expansion joints upsetting the suspension? Seriously? I have never once had an expansion joint upset the suspension in any of my vehicles, including the Wrangler.

        Normally your replies are excellent gtenmykh, but in this case you either have never driven a late-model Wrangler or bought a used one with 6 figures on the odometer and a “well used” suspension…

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          SSJeep – I have to side with gtemnykh. Any short wheelbase vehicle that is relatively tall (in relation to WB and width) isn’t going to be as stable on icy roads. It also depends on how fast you expect to drive. I started out in life with a regular cab Ranger 4×4 and it was no where as stable as a crewcab 4×4.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Long wintry-mix highway drive? I’ll take the more stable riding (and less susceptible to crosswinds) sedan any day over the tall/short 4×4 that feels like it wants to go sidewise over each expansion joint. Low speed hilly driving? Of course 4 driven wheels would be preferable. Likewise, for deep snow, 4wd and ground clearance is king.

          • 0 avatar
            SSJeep

            I suppose I can see where one would get the impression that tall 4x4s are questionable in snow, if I were to guess:
            – It was before effective traction control
            – It was with a 2-door Wrangler
            – The vehicle didnt have locking diffs
            In those cases, I would absolutely take an alternate vehicle on the ice. But I have a sedan and a 4-door Wrangler, and I can confidently state that the Wrangler is much better on the snow. Could be the tires, the effective traction control, or the locker, but it seems to work very well.

            Not to mention I can just blast the JKU down my driveway without shoveling while everyone else toils for a couple hours to clear out a narrow path for their sedan.

            I still dont get the expansion joint thing, so help me out on that one. Unless the expansion joints out where you drive are stacked like Steve Buscemi’s teeth, I dont see how any expansion joint could cause a problem. They certainly havent for me… OK, except maybe in my MR2 years ago.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Lockers are an option on all but the Rubicon and honestly they’re not really all that necessary for on-road travel if you have limited-slip diffs. On the other hand, lockers are almost mandatory for any pickup truck simply due to the lack of weight on the rear axle.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            Nothing beats real 4WD in full winter conditions at any speed. FWD feels like its barely capable of any acceleration or playfulness in comparison. But for mixed highways with variable ice, snow, and clear pavement where you’d have to leave it in 2WD for the sake of the drivetrain, give me the FWD sedan. With good studded tires, I’ll just set the cruise at the speed limit, relax, and enjoy my music, coffee, and the occasional 90 mph overtakes of trains of slow vehicles doing 30 mph on bad tires; while the vehicle floats around beneath me. Even with comparable tires, there’s no way I’m getting that comfortable in a RWD vehicle on ice. I’ll drive the speed limit and make passes, but it gets tiring having to stay alert with the throttle for hours on end.

            I did love my R50 Pathfinder on studded 31″ Coopers though. Great winter city vehicle, especially during pothole season. I installed brand new KYBs all around when I got it and the rest of the vehicle was tight so I never experienced any unsettled feelings.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            The JKU long-wheelbase version of the Wrangler does well on those long, wintry-mix highway drives. I make an 800-mile (one way) trip every Christmas season and the Jeep proves capable of handling any weather I run into along the route while staying toasty inside even with only the soft-top. It’s obviously going to be more stable than a shorter wheelbase while still offering ground clearance and full 4×4 capability if you get caught in a blizzard. Naturally you won’t be wanting to travel at high speed under those conditions, so any effect of the higher profile gets reduced.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          No I most definitely have driven a brand new Pentastar 6spd JKU, and it is as I described it. Expansion joints that are barely a jostle in something like a Camry cause the Wrangler do do a sort of ‘wiggle’ on both front and rear axles, and there is a lot more motion in that long travel, softer suspension. It’s the nature of the beast. Likewise my 4Runner with an independent front end and fresh suspension exhibits similar behavior albeit a bit better with the front wheels.

          All of the locking differentials in the world make not one whit of difference on the highway drives that I described. It’s stability and how settled the car stays, as uneven weight distribution and perturbances to the steering can cause loss of control and traction.

          If some form of 4wd is a must, something like an Audi Quattro or Subaru will blow a Wrangler (or any traditional SUV) out of the water for getting around under any winter circumstances where absolute ground clearance is a non-issue, such as higher speeds on a slick highway.

          A few years ago, before I put snow tires on the 4Runner, I was cruising along I86 W near Erie with sort of wintry-mix/rain conditions. The road seemed clear in my lane so I was doing just a bit under the speed limit, in 2wd (part time case). I hit an expansion joint and my rear end just starts to slide out as I glide over an iced-over overpass. Somewhat miraculously, I was able to dial in the right amount of counter steer and the truck regained its’ forward trajectory as if nothing happened. it was white knuckles and 4wd engaged and much lower speeds after that. Likewise I’ve been driving in similar conditions where cross wind bursts threaten to throw my 4Runner into the next lane. In those circumstances, my gf’s FWD Camry on all seasons would have been easier to drive and wouldn’t yield that ‘white knuckle’ experience.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            “If some form of 4wd is a must, something like an Audi Quattro or Subaru will blow a Wrangler (or any traditional SUV) out of the water for getting around under any winter circumstances where absolute ground clearance is a non-issue . . .”

            I can’t agree with that. On the highway, absolutely. I can’t speak for Wranglers, but my favorite vehicles for ripping around the city on snowy days have been relatively compact, short wheelbase SUVs. They rotate so nicely under throttle; perfect for accelerating out of 90 degree turns from a stop. Longer wheelbase pickups are clumsy because they need so much road to get an ideal yaw angle, and are usually attached to slushboxes with an ambiguous relationship between engine speed and wheel spin. AWD cars – including Subarus and Audis – tend to need more encouragement to rotate. Though nothing else I’ve experienced can spin in place on slippery roads like a B8 S4 with the sport diff, the responses don’t feel quite as immediate and natural as the older 4WD compact SUVs. The numb steering and electronic throttle might be a factor. They’re still plenty of fun though. These are relatively minor differences compared to the advantages they all have over on-demand systems. FWD doesn’t even compare. That’s for poor people, like me.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Best car for a wintry mix long drive? Any car that fits in the garage. For that kind of weather, stay home and avoid becoming a statistic. A warm house and a stiff drink is all you need.

      • 0 avatar
        87 Morgan

        Wow, long thread. I guess I should clarify a bit of my premise on why I think a base model Jeep Wrangler; 2 door is the best value on the market for base model anything.

        I assume anyone buying a base model unit, typically, is younger and not flush with cash. A base Jeep at 25k new gets you a lot of utility and fun that for most other units in the price point you get the standard: efficiency, fun, utility…pick two.

        I don’t find my 2 door wrangler to be all that inefficient at 20 mpg. Don’t tell me your 4runner or Xterra do any better.

        Finally, the nice thing about the Wrangler is you can ‘grow’ into it. I can’t think of any other vehicle that has more after market support. So, if you must carry a canoe…yes a roof rack is available for that along with anything else you would want to carry up top.
        You can start with a base heater and a key and if you choose build/modify/add-on whatever you find fits your needs. Of course, if you drive it to work everyday some here will call you a poseur because you have a lifted jeep with a winch that you drive to work on concrete and asphalt. Never mind what you may do on the weekend for fun.

    • 0 avatar
      Pete Zaitcev

      I agree about the parking advantage. But I prefer to use the Freedom Top in the opposite way: pop the top and keep the front panels. This basically gives one a Bikini top for free, on 2-door models.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    I guess the only way to get this is to order it direct from FCA, any idea how easy that is?

    For base models I say aAccord LX is pretty good as is a base Golf.

    Really AC is a option on a base Jeep , they are old school.

  • avatar
    johnhowington

    Lets add some beer cans.gif and guns.gif to this article since this is just a marketing rag.

    • 0 avatar
      brenschluss

      An “advertorial” would typically be for a product that a company is trying to sell; FCA and its dealers would much rather you buy a Rubicon Unlimited, and that’s why you’ll likely never see the model which this article is very clearly and specifically talking about in stock.

      In other words, no, not really.

  • avatar
    duffman13

    I drove a near-base Wrangler automatic on vacation a couple of years ago. For everything you want out of it, i.e. has radio and 4×4, it is great. The only notable omission is air conditioning (not on our rental), which might be worth stepping up to the Sport S, unless you keep the top off all the time. I will mention even in top-down driving, I’m generally running the A/C in my S2000 unless the temperature is below 75.

    Honestly for what you get for the money, there aren’t very many better deals, and as an off-roader, the Sport or Sport S are better as a blank canvas than spending the extra cash for a Rubicon right off the bat.

    Personally, I’d go Sport S for the A/C and the leather-wrapped wheel and shifter. The 17″ wheels give you a better tire selection too. IMO, it’s worth the extra $3k, especially since adding A/C to a Sport as a stand-alone option is almost $1500.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    Can you get a Sport in orange?

    My neighbor has an orange Wrangler but I’m pretty sure it’s a Rubicon.

    • 0 avatar
      Pete Zaitcev

      Chrysler has an extremely annoying habit of rotating colors every year or two. So, Wrangler comes in a different shade of orange depending on the model year. Once Mango Tango is gone, it’s gone, and replaced by a different orange and you can never buy it again new. Other than that, all colors are available on all models, except weird colors of special editions, such as Mountain.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    This is a great car and a fantastic value (if you can find one) **if** you are regularly driving it off-road and taking advantage of its strengths.

    If you’re driving it on-road all the time, it’s a terrible car. You sacrifice fuel economy, seating comfort, cargo room, ride, handling, quiet, and acceleration compared to a variety of similarly priced “regular cars.”

    But most buyers aren’t practical like that. They like the way it makes them feel, and the rest is secondary.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      “and acceleration”

      Pentastar wranglers, particularly with the 6spd, are actually pretty hilariously quick, particularly one of these 2 door base models with light wheels and tires.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        caranddriver.com/reviews/2014-jeep-wrangler-willys-test-review

        It isn’t *slow* but I don’t think I’d call it “hilariously quick” either. Any 6-cylinder car that isn’t the Legacy will walk it.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          I think compared to the old imagery of an old jeep that is seriously out of its element on the street, but with massive torque manipulation that allows it to climb the steepest hills, having one of these pull up to you and then burn rubber on it’s way to a sub 7 second 0-60 is definitely a stark contrast. I guess it is a matter of context.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Compare to a Mustang V6 at a similar price point or an Accord V6 for just a bit more.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Fair enough. I guess I was more so comparing it to “regular” cars IE 4cyl sedans and such.

        • 0 avatar

          Yes but compared to a CUV at a similar price point it’s pretty quick. The ride isn’t that bad, it is noisy and handling is weird but most people will never get to the limits of a wrangler never mind an accord. Plus it can tow a small trailer and it’s pretty inexpensive for a convertible.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            mopar4wd,
            I do think the ride in the Wrangler is choppy due to it’s weight and short wheelbase and suspension. It handles poorly on the road. Off road its a different story.

            For this reason I do find it hard to believe people buy these to look pretty in as a fashion accessory when there are many more vehicles available for on road use that are superior.

  • avatar
    ThirdOwner

    The base Subaru Outback is at the top of my list. It would probably be too expensive for Subaru to meaningfully decontent it, so they went in the other direction instead, adding electronic features and alloy wheels to their higher trim models. Their next real upgrade is the 6-cyl engine.

    4Runner might be similar in this regard too.

  • avatar

    1)Order Wrangler Unlimited Sport
    +Automatic
    +Pwr Group
    +3.73 Axle
    +Hardtop

    2) Buy at Invoice minus holdback

    3) +Custom wheels, tires, bumpers, spotlights, etc. @ wholesale

    4) Run at auction

    5) PROFIT

  • avatar
    FOG

    There are several upgrades and options on the vehicle I just leased that I would never have paid for; however, the manufacturer threw money at this vehicle that made not having those options result in a higher monthly payment. I don’t consider myself a poser, just a tightwad, cheapo type of upstanding American citizen.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    If I were in the market for another Wrangler, it would be this:

    Sport model
    A/C
    Automatic tranny
    Half-doors, basic top
    Either red or yellow color

    I’d probably have to order it, unless a better-optioned model had a lot of money on the hood, but I don’t think so, as they sell every one they make.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Zackman,
      If I were to want a Wrangler, I would want a pickup version.

      I would keep it as a weekend novelty vehicle for off roading.

      I do like the deepish Jeep red. Except I do know that colour is terrible off road.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      You can’t get the half doors anymore.

      Otherwise you just described my jeep, almost.
      Yellow, 6 MT, Hard Top.

      I have power windows though and before you laugh here is why. The configuration of the Jeep the window crank on the door literally is positioned right where my left knee rests while drive and not clutching. You sit very upright in a Wrangler, and I found the window crank was extremely painful digging into my knee. Strangest reason ever for needing power windows, but the truth.

      • 0 avatar
        Pete Zaitcev

        MOPAR still sells factory half-doors, last I checked. If you don’t want to deal with them, you can get the kit from Quadratec. Granted, I don’t know if Jeep still makes them or if the stores continue to sell off the old inventory.

  • avatar
    operagost

    Seems like carpet, not headliner, would be the most logical feature to delete in a base model 4×4. I mean, having a skidproof rubber floor you can practically hose down is a plus.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      operagost,
      My Cherokee Sport had carpet and lots of bling for a mid nineties vehicle.

      Somehow I don’t think “Sport” is the correct name for a base model Jeep product.

      From what I can gather the use of Sport indicates a 4×4 with high and low range and some added comforts, even performance enhancements, which seem primarily to be off road enhancements.

    • 0 avatar
      Pete Zaitcev

      You can’t delete carpet on Jeep. The heat from the transmission is super intense and your shin are going to burn. The strangest part is, the tub is lined with a heat-rejection layer on the other side, and it’s still not enough. In addition the noise without a carpet is very pronounced. People who are monstalining their tubs reported it.

  • avatar
    ericb91

    I found one:

    2016 Jeep Wrangler 4WD Unlimited Sport (Unlimited because two kids)
    MSRP- $28,690
    Sale- $25,971

    Not bad!

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Guy,
    I don’t know if the use of Sport by Jeep denotes it’s a base model.

    I did have a Sport XJ Cherokee. This was the base model in Australia, but not the US. The US had 2WD Cherokees, which was quite a novelty for us in Australia to see a SUV with only RWD and not 4×4 with hi and lo.

    Also, the XJ Cherokee Sport came with the great 4 litre in line 6 and not the four cylinder that was offered in the US.

    I thought Sport was used to indicate a 4×4 variant of a Jeep model, maybe a base model, I don’t know.

    My Sport Cherokee came with Koni shocks and shod with half decent Wranglers, which I considered nice from the factory. This does not seem quite a base model vehicle. It also came with quite a few bells and whistles, A/C, power windows, decent stereo/CD unit, etc. It had cloth seat though.

    Maybe a Sport is different in the US to what a Sport is in Australia.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      “Maybe a Sport is different in the US to what a Sport is in Australia.”

      There are obvious cultural differences between any country. What is desired in Australia isn’t necessarily desirable here. Manufacturers know those differences and market accordingly.

      In this case “sport” sounds much better than “base” model.

      You’ve said this before, “Google is your friend.”

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Lou,
        Thanks again for your insightful guidance.

        The fact is the US XJ Cherokee Sport is IDENTICAL to the Australian XJ Cherokee. They both are similarly equipped and trimmed.

        So, as you stated;

        GOOGLE IS YOUR FRIEND. Try using it.

        Hmmmm …………. incorrect again?

  • avatar
    rudiger

    This is easy. The Wrangler base (or ‘Sport’) is a lifestyle vehicle like a Harley. And, like a Harley, only the most diehard would try to use it as everyday transportation. Most would find that quite untenable in short order.

    But someone with the disposable income to be able to buy a Wrangler as a second (or even third) vehicle would find its capabilities quite enjoyable and not all that hard to overlook its shortcomings.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    To me it appears Sport is a trim level and these trim levels aligned globally. That is with the XJ.

    Trim levels[edit]

    Overhead console 1990-1996 (Laredo, Limited, Country, Classic, Briarwood, Wagoneer) As shown in a 1994 Jeep Cherokee Country

    1992 Jeep Cherokee Laredo interior with optional leather
    Base – 1984–1992 / SE – 1993-2001 included: vinyl or cloth upholstery, full-faced steel wheels, and AM radio with two speakers.
    Wagoneer – 1984–1990 included: ribbed cloth upholstery with leather trim, faux maple-wood interior accents with wood laminate exterior decals, alloy wheels, AM/FM radio with cassette player and four speakers, infrared (single-button) remote keyless entry for 1990 model year, overhead console for 1990 model year, dual power seats, and air conditioning.
    Briarwood – 1991–1992 (succeeded Wagoneer) included: leather-and-vinyl upholstery, faux maple-wood interior accents with wood laminate exterior decals, lace-spoke wheels, AM/FM radio with cassette player and six Jensen AccuSound speakers, infrared (single-button) remote keyless entry, overhead console, dual power seats, and an air conditioner.
    Pioneer – 1984–1990 included: cloth plaid-pattern upholstery, steel wheels and AM radio with two speakers.
    Pioneer Olympic Edition – 1988 included: cloth upholstery, AM/FM radio with two speakers, and an air conditioner.
    Chief – 1984–1990 included: cloth plaid-pattern upholstery, and AM/FM radio with two speakers.
    Sport – 1988–2001 included: cloth-and-vinyl upholstery, AM/FM radio with four speakers, full-faced steel or optional alloy wheels, optional infrared (single-button) (1988-1996) or radio frequency (dual-button) (1997-2001) keyless entry (if equipped with power locks), and an air conditioner.
    Country – 1993–1997 included: two-tone paint similar to “Laredo” with upgraded color-keyed pinstripe and the option for “champagne” gold along with silver as accent options, the replacement of several interior, formerly chrome accents with flat black (Base and Sport models, as well, starting in 1993 model year), cloth-and-vinyl (“luggage fabric”) upholstery with the option for leather (excluding 1993 model year), faux mahogany-wood interior accents, lace-spoke wheels, AM/FM radio with cassette player and four speakers with the option for six Jensen AccuSound speakers, optional overhead console (excluding 1993 model year), infrared (dual-button) (1993-1996) or radio frequency (dual-button) (1997) remote keyless entry (if equipped with power locks), optional dual power seats, and an air conditioner.
    Classic – 1996, 1998–2001 included: monotone paint color, cloth upholstery, alloy wheels, AM/FM radio with cassette player and four speakers, infrared (dual-button) remote keyless entry, overhead console, and an air conditioner.
    Limited – 1987-1992, 1998–2001 included: monotone paint, leather-and-vinyl upholstery, sun roof, color-keyed lace-spoke wheels, AM/FM radio with cassette player and six Jensen AccuSound speakers, infrared (single-button) remote keyless entry, overhead console, dual power seats, and an air conditioner.
    Laredo – 1985–1992 included: chrome accenting, cloth plaid-pattern (1985-1987) or “luggage fabric” (1988-1992) upholstery with the option of “Briarwood” style leather-and-vinyl seats for the 1992 model year only, five-spoke alloy wheels, AM/FM radio with four speakers and the option for six Jensen AccuSound speakers, infrared (single-button) remote keyless entry (if equipped with power locks) optional overhead console, optional dual power seats, and an air conditioner.
    Freedom – 2000 included: special badging, SE appearance group on sport body, 16″ Ultrastar alloy wheels(borrowed from the 1998 5.9L ZJ), AM/FM radio with cassette, radio frequency remote keyless entry and an air conditioner. Based on the Sport trim level. Available in 2wd or 4wd.[24]
    60th Anniversary – 2001 included: special badges, special floor mats, monotone paint color, 16″ alloy wheels, AM/FM radio with cassette, radio frequency remote keyless entry and an air conditioner. Based on the Sport trim level.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Trim levels[edit]
    North American YJ/Wranglers were available in the following standard trims.

    Base: also referred to as “S” & “SE” at different points in the model run; first few years the back seat and rear bumperettes were optional, some years the 6cyl engine was an option, other years only the 4cyl was available in the “Base” model. An A/M radio (later AM/FM stereo) with two speakers came standard, as did high-back vinyl bucket seats and a heater and blower. An AM/FM stereo, cassette player, and air conditioning were optional. In 1986, a basic Wrangler Base cost $8,995 MSRP.
    Laredo: Chrome grille, bumpers, and trim, hard top and hard full doors, tinted windows, faux leather interior, body color fender flares and alloy wheels. An AM/FM stereo with cassette player, rear speaker sound bar, air conditioning, rear removable bench seat, and high-back cloth bucket seats all came standard.’LAREDO’ decals adorned the hood on both sides or on the lower front fenders as part of the side stripes.
    Islander: See Islander
    Sport: which featured “sport” graphics and, beginning in 1991, a 4.0 L 242 CID inline-6-cylinder engine. An AM/FM stereo with two speakers and a rear removable bench seat came standard. A cassette player, rear speaker sound bar, cloth high-back bucket seats, and air conditioning were optional.
    Sahara: which came standard with most available options, including body color fender flares and steel wheels, also included with the Sahara edition are special green trail-cloth seats with storage pockets, interior door panels with pockets, front bumper mounted fog lamps, and plastic ends on the front bumper). An AM/FM stereo with cassette player, rear speaker sound bar, unique cloth-and-vinyl high-back bucket seats, rear removable bench seat, exterior color steel wheels, and air conditioning were all standard on this model.
    Renegade: See Renegade. ‘Sahara Edition’ decals adorned both front fenders.
    Rio Grande: Available in champagne gold, moss green, white, along with the rare colors aqua pearl metallic, and Bright Mango; with a Pueblo themed interior trim package. This trim was only available in 1995, and was added to spice up the base 4-cylinder Wrangler ‘S’ models
    A cassette player, rear speaker sound bar, and cloth high-back bucket seats came standard, and air conditioning and alloy wheels were all available on this model. Red-and-orange ‘Rio Grande’ decals adorned both rear fenders.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    It seems FCA (Jeep) are using the Sport naming convention as a marketing tool.

    The Sport name on Jeep products were not the lowest level trim available in the past, but more a mid spec trim.

    It’s all about money and deception.

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