By on August 24, 2016

2017 Honda Fit LX

Sometimes a manufacturer churns out a base trim that is — all things considered — the primo choice for that particular model. Here’s an example.

The Honda Fit usually ends up on the short list of shoppers who seek shiny new wheels on a Mr. Noodles budget. In fact, one of TTAC’s own had a Fit in his fleet until June of this year. Nearly a decade ago, Honda saw fit to bring the diminutive hatchback to North American shores, and journalists and consumers alike have foisted accolades upon it ever since.

Chief among those accolades are the “Magic Seats.” Sadly, they are not sourced from the Gryffindor common room at Hogwarts, but they do allow the Fit to offer a yaffle of interior space. Thanks in large part to the gonzo shape of its fuel tank, wedged as it is under the front seats and not the traditional placement astern, the Fit has a very low and very flat floor for cargo space. How much space? Why, 53 cubic feet when everything’s folded flatter than Kristen Stewart’s facial expressions. That beats most SUVs, by the way, meaning that if all those soccer moms with fake Coach bags were buying their Canyoneros simply for the room, they’d all be better off driving Fits.

Stick with rowing your own, as the CVT only serves to hoover up horsepower and make you sad. The $0 manual transmission has an extra cog in this newest iteration of the Fit, but its 6th gear has the same ratio as the old 5th, meaning while one will enjoy snappier acceleration, you will still be subjected to the Fit’s raucous near-4,000 rpm caffeine jag at 80 mph. And, yes, I know, teacup-sized drum brakes adorn the rear wheels.

Joyfully, Honda permits buyers of the base LX to have a Fit in decidedly non-grayscale hues without financial penalty, offering an eye-popping baby-puke yellow and a very pleasant metallic blue. Air conditioning is along for the ride at the LX’s base price of $15,990, as is cruise control and a steering wheel that adjusts for rake and reach. Tipping the scales at a scant 2572 pounds, the Fit LX nevertheless includes power windows, Bluetooth connectivity, and a backup camera. The latter of these is a welcome standard feature since many Fits are piloted by new drivers who are likely too hurried or horny to watch where they’re going.

The Fit is smartly packaged and well equipped at the instant-ramen end of its scale, proving that entry-level econocars need not be horrid little rotboxes providing a metronomic experience. Wouldn’t know how bad those vehicles are. We’re not allowed to drive those.

Not every base model has aced it. The ones that have? They help make the automotive landscape a lot better. Any others you can think of, B&B? Let us know in the comments. Naturally, feel free to eviscerate our selections.

The model above is shown with American options and is priced in Freedom Dollars. As always, your dealer may sell for less.

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82 Comments on “Ace of Base: Honda Fit LX...”


  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    This thing is as “fast” as my 09 Civic EX 5MT, while weighing 200lbs less, getting better gas mileage and being way more practical. It’s just a shame they are so unabashedly ugly. The 1st gens were pretty good looking but dog slow. Wish they’d make a “Fit Sport” with bigger wheels/wheel wells (key for reducing all that rear sheetmetal acreage) and the 2.0 from the Civic.

    • 0 avatar
      tedward

      I loved our 2nd gen while it was around. It was a tail happy, ultra-light microvan. I still get snarky comments about it from some car guy friends. We’ll usually have just blasted down some windy road and I’ll hear, “so you still miss that fit?” Assuming I’ll say no after driving a tuned gti, corvette or whatever it was. My answer so far has been along the lines of, “when this car loses 800lbs it will compete with the fit in terms of f–kery and giggles.” This has happened at least 5 or 6 times.

      A big part of that appeal was the cargo space I have to admit. In its own way the fit is the ultimate counterpoint to the cuv.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        There is something special about a car that weighs so little. One of my most memorable drives was a ~1900lb Fiat Panda all over Italy. With the right roads (we spent about a week in the Tuscan mountains) it was a blast. And it even comfortably did ~100MPH on the autostrada (I have the ticket to prove it).

        Still, once you get acclimated to a certain level of speed it’s hard to go back. My motorcycle pretty much ruined cars like this for me in the context of the daily grind.

    • 0 avatar
      SoCalMikester

      to me the first gen looked too ungainly. SO much wheel gap. And they were new, so dealers werent dealing.

      this is what i would replace my scion xA with if i had to.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    But it has no *soul*!

  • avatar
    seth1065

    really should be on everyones short list for a first ride, cheap to buy , cheap to own, good resale I think what is not to like from your first set of wheels. I know they made a fit sport no idea what it added.

    • 0 avatar
      tedward

      Bigger rims and, some body work and I think retuned dampers, although that could have been the lower profile wheels.

    • 0 avatar
      statikboy

      Also I think paddle shifters on the automatic. Previous gen.

      • 0 avatar
        Pete Zaitcev

        Mine didn’t have the paddles. Maybe the trim was too low for that. We’re talking about the prev-gen that had a real 5sp automatic, right?

        • 0 avatar
          escapenguin

          I have a 2012 USDM second-gen in Sport trim with no nav and the automatic. Can confirm it has paddle shifters. Only other differences between it and the Base I don’t see noted above were an anti-roll bar at the rear, the steering wheel is leather-wrapped, the body kit is more… aggressive (and adds fog lights).

          I have a mildly modified fifth-gen Prelude, and as much as I love that thing– the Fit is way more entertaining when the roads get twisty.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    “That beats most SUVs, by the way”

    Should rectify that to say something like “beats most subcompact CUVs” or some such.

    I can’t think of a single SUV that only has 53 cu ft of cargo space with seats folded, except for a two door Wrangler. Is that the point of comparison, Matt?

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      He just needed more snark for this snarkfest overload.

    • 0 avatar
      Macca

      That struck me as an odd statement as well. Just looking at Honda’s CR-V, it offers 37.2 cu ft with the rear seat *up* and 70.9 with them folded. Most of the other compact CUVs are in the range of 37-40 cu ft ‘trunk’ space and 70-73 cu ft with the rear seat folded.

      Going up a class to the Pilot, etc., and you’ll find 80+ cu ft with all seats folded and in the upper 40s cu ft behind the second row.

      53 cu ft is tremendous for such a tiny footprint, but it’s still a subcompact. Even the HR-V has more cargo volume.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        My beef with this gen 3 Fit is the prioritization of rear passenger legroom (a crazy 37+ inches now I think) over seat-up trunk volume. That used to be the Fit’s trump card was 23ish cu ft of seat up space, which is close to 30% better than most subcompact hatch competitors. Now they’re simply in line with everyone else. At 5’11” I could sit behind myself in my parents’ ’07 Fit in reasonable comfort.

        Likewise the raised belt line, weight gain, have all “normalized” it within the class. At this point I’d rather save a bit of money and buy a basic Note.

        My folks have really enjoyed their ’07 ownership so far. It’s an errand runner, commuter, and now farm trucklet hauling bee hives (yes with bees inside). Never gets below 30mpg even in the dead of winter with snow tires mounted, on a 2 mile commute. Summer is more like 35mpg in mostly hilly city/suburban driving. As high as 40-42 on 55-60mph state highways driving to the Adirondacks. Scampers around my parents’ hilly muddy/grassy property amazingly easily owing to the low weight and FWD. The same terrain requires 4WD to be engaged on either their MPV or my 4Runner. Likewise in the winter with knobby looking Kelly snow tires, the Fit is a little tank. The early-year non-Sport models actually have a decent amount of ground clearance for what they are.

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          “My beef with this gen 3 Fit is the prioritization of rear passenger legroom… Likewise the raised belt line, weight gain, have all “normalized” it within the class.”

          Bingo. You’re good at this.

          I adore my wife’s ’13. I have no love for this generation’s.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Kenmore they basically pulled a “gen 2 Scion xB” on it. Take a beloved un-compromised Japanese market design beloved by many here in the States for exactly those un-American design decisions and then Americanize it thus taking away much of the charm.

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            Again, totally agree. They just had to, as you say, normalize it.

            I don’t want normal; I want quirky-brilliant Japanese!

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            And now that the HR-V is available to suit American tastes, maybe the Fit can revert to JDM goodness? One can hope.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          @gtemnykh

          Evidently Honda prioritized passenger room which is sort of the point of a four door. I get your point though, too bad it cost a zillion dollars to certify a sedan and hatch version of the same model in Amerika.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            From the perspective of fitting rear-facing car seats the “limo legroom” makes sense. Otherwise, like I said it seemed like even the gen 1 was passably roomy for most people that rode in it. Perhaps the shift is all in time for our looming uber-gig economy :p

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The sensible thing to do would be to offer a sedan variant for this limo-legroom purpose and leave the hatch alone, or vice versa. I’m guessing Honda weighed the costs and determined more than 50% of the customers wanted more legroom.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            The Honda City is a Fit sedan, for all practical purposes. They just never sent it over here.

            carsguide.com.au/car-reviews/2015-honda-city-vti-auto-review-29076

        • 0 avatar
          bryanska

          I had a 2007, and this is the perfect description. A tough little vehicle that can’t be broken, and drives like a light experimental aircraft.

    • 0 avatar
      Pete Zaitcev

      If you consider CX-3 and Juke to be CUVs.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Not keen on the looks. When you get to the Navi trim better to spend a bit more coin on the Buick Civic.

    These sourced fron MX now? They used to come from Japan.

    • 0 avatar
      DevilsRotary86

      They used to come from Guanajuato in 2015 and 2016. They are now coming from Japan again. The HR-V has been such a hit that Guanajuato is now producing HR-V’s around the clock so the Fit is now being sent from Japan again.

      When we were shopping for my wife’s car it was about half/half Mexican and Japanese. Her Fit is Mexican. No complaints so far.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    “The $0 manual transmission has an extra cog in this newest iteration of the Fit, but its 6th gear has the same ratio as the old 5th, meaning while one will enjoy snappier acceleration, you will still be subjected to the Fit’s raucous near-4,000 rpm caffeine jag at 80 mph”

    It was odd that I could cruise around town at 50km/h in my five-speed ’08; I always wondered what the other gears were for and figured “Well, if they add a sixth, this would be ok”.

    What the actual f_ck, Honda?

    • 0 avatar
      davefromcalgary

      The chosen gear ratios are an absolute deal killer.

      • 0 avatar
        ijbrekke

        Seconded. It was on a short list to replace my Protege5, but Honda chose to give it the exact same fatal flaws as previous models (gear ratios, road noise, not enough power).

      • 0 avatar
        tmport

        It’s a moot point because it’s nearly impossible to find a Fit with the 6MT these days. They were readily available when it first came out last year, but Honda has apparently decided that people shouldn’t have the choice.

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          I don’t know, I remember eagerly and mistakenly awaiting the ’15 Fit. Local Honda store got two red 6MTs in and they sat there for well over a month.

          The sales people made it very clear that they couldn’t wait for the pipeline to begin disgorging ATs.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    “Tipping the scales at a scant 2572 pounds…”

    ..is why..

    “And, yes, I know, teacup-sized drum brakes adorn the rear wheels.”

    …is completely acceptable.

    • 0 avatar
      tedward

      Seiously. There was nothing wrong with the brakes on ours. I loved to use my car as an example when people were dumping on a base mazda3, jetta (briefly) or whatever solely because of tech spec details. It’s also a great car when discussing objectively awful cars, if the fit can be this and is the most primitive car on the us market, what’s Nissan’s excuse?

    • 0 avatar
      Matt Foley

      Rear drum brakes are fine until they need service. First you back off the starwheel adjuster by blindly flailing around through a tiny port in the backing plate, then you use a BFH to separate the rusted-on drum from the hub, then you give up and use a damn puller to remove the drum anyway, then you use a collection of medieval-torture-looking instruments to remove the retaining clips, springs, and finally the shoes themselves, then you have to go around and look at the other side of the car to remember the order in which all this pre-Cold-War-era technology goes back together. Screw all that.

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        Yes, but they don’t need service nearly as open as discs do.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Yep on a daily driver in salt country, I’ll take rear drums that won’t need touching for 15 years aside from lubing the external e-brake mechanism over rear disks that will need replacement every 5 years as they rust out.

      • 0 avatar
        SSJeep

        Worse yet are the drum-in-disc hat shaped rotors that are used for both braking and parking brake functionality. I hate those.

        4 wheel discs please.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          er, which ones are those? the vehicles I’ve had with drum-inside-hat setups, the drum is only for the parking brake. it’s too small to be of any use stopping the car. My Ranger has them, and the linings on the shoes are only like 3mm thick.

      • 0 avatar
        indi500fan

        My method is to remove the drum when the car is new, which is an easy adjunct to tire rotation, and apply anti-sieze at the joint.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      2572? Ugh.

  • avatar
    paanta

    I love my (previous generation) fit, which I got as a “what’s about the weight of my Miata but will seat the kids” commuter. Drum brakes are no big deal given how little weight is back there. Stock is fine, and with good pads on the front and proper tires it’ll out brake most cars. Not a lot of power, but it’s about as quick around a track as my old Miata:
    [vimeo 107462537 w=640 h=360]

  • avatar
    paanta

    Huh, no video. Maybe
    [vimeo 107462537 w=640 h=360]

    Point is, ~300lbs more than a NA Miata and everyone should slap proper springs/shocks, brake pads, sways, tires and camber bolts on these things and hit a track day, bro. It’s freekin’ hilarious to run down fast cars in slow cars.

    • 0 avatar
      probert

      I’ll tell you, it’s classic Honda – a willing engine and soft but controlled suspension. Set it in a curve and it will hang on for dear life -and because it’s so compliant, bumps will not move you off the line – control your arc with the throttle (FWD is good here). You never have to slow down- it’s a blast.

  • avatar
    tsoden

    In Canada we have an even more BASE model of the Fit – the DX…

    Available in manual only, it features:

    -No AC
    -Black mirrors and door handles
    -15 inch steelies with plastic caps

    All for the same price as an American LX… oh and it comes in Red, Grey and Black only.

  • avatar
    CaptainObvious

    A great car IF you can get past the awful front seats and lack of adjustments. As a fairly tall guy (6’4″) I sat in one and immediately said nope, nope and nope. Headroom was good though.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    In my neighborhood, where BMW, Audi, and Mercedes are quite common, I see a large number of Fits. They’re the anti-car car – the common-sense choice for someone who needs a vehicle but not a lifestyle attached to them.

    My brother – who doesn’t know much or care about cars – owns a Fit and ferries his family around – including long road trips. Not quite my thing performance-wise, but I do understand the utility, mileage, and the reliability.

  • avatar
    GTL

    I took a test drive. It was fun but at 6’3″ & 210lbs, I just didn’t, uh, fit.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      The first Fit wasn’t a problem for large drivers: I’m 6’8″ and could drive it.

      In the second version, they pulled the dash forward such that taller drivers would knock knees or shins. I assume this was to excise the feeling of openness that the first car had: people seem to like fighter-jet cockpits.

      I haven’t tried the current iteration, but it sounds like it has the same issue.

  • avatar
    DevilsRotary86

    “Sometimes a manufacturer churns out a base trim that is — all things considered — the primo choice for that particular model. Here’s an example.”

    Well, that’s just like your opinion, man. We bought my wife a 2016 Honda Fit EX-L w/ Navigation and don’t regret buying the top trim. The upgraded seats on the EX-L trim alone make it worth it.

    My only gripe: When leafing through the manual when we first got it, I noticed a section on automatic climate control (if so equipped). I thought that was nifty; why didn’t ours have it? Maybe it’s an option that we missed. I checked the Honda website and brochures and nope no automatic climate control. So I thought “what? Is there some sort of secret super trim?”. A little more research and I found the “secret super trim”. Honda Fit EX-L + Navigation as sold in Canada. Sorry US customers! I thought that was a little strange.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      In Canada, the bargain-basement Civic comes with — are you ready — climate-control WITHOUT A/C!

      Just like the original 9th-Gen Accords in Canada had manual A/C in the lowest trim — when ALL U.S. Accords — built in the same Marysville, OH plant — had fully-automatic CC as standard!

      Just like the fact that the Accord Touring in the Great White North could be had with the J24 and six-speed stick — but no Adaptive Cruise, as in the V6 (auto only) U.S. Touring.

  • avatar
    ijbrekke

    It’s simultaneously incredibly practical and quite ugly because it’s the smallest van shape on the market.

    That being said, put that new 1.5t from the Civic in, give me a taller 6th gear, and maybe add 75lbs of sound deadening. I’m all in on that, ugly shape be damned. Why does there continue to be no Fit SI?

    • 0 avatar
      yamahog

      Because F*&* you that’s why.

      It’s a shame. If Honda just put better motors and firmer suspension in the Fit / CRZ, they’d sell a lot of them and make some hand over fist money. There’s no way the K20 costs way more than the L15 (and the IMA system)

      • 0 avatar
        Kenmore

        Yeah, retired ladies really want a firmer suspension and “better motors”.

        Just think, we could still have new Elements if only Honda had your wisdom.

        • 0 avatar
          Willyam

          Yep, it does suck, doesn’t it. One of the best cars I ever owned was a 91 Civic three-door DX. Four-speed, dealer add-on air (do they do that at all anymore?) and vinyl seats. Car was infallible for a decade and I wish I still had it. Every time I sit in a Fit at an auto show I desperately want the Fit to be the reincarnation of that car, and maybe it is.

          Problem was, on my DX Honda made perhaps 20 bux profit. Making really good cars doesn’t always equate to making good money. (See Jack’s Element article last week)

          • 0 avatar
            ItsJustaRide

            I had a ’91 Civic DX hatch, too, with the 5MT and dealer air. My first new car.

            No tach in the cluster, so I’d just rev it until it stopped pulling. Never hit the rev limiter.

            Compared the domestic stuff I’d been driving, the workmanship, handling and efficiency were revelatory. You could feel the engineering that went into the car.

            The closest I can get to that feeling today is in the Fiesta, but only because the Mazda2 is disco’d.

        • 0 avatar
          Willyam

          Sorry, went off-point there in nostalgia.

          As Kenmore said, the money ain’t in the Si AWD wagon with wings and fins and Prelude 4-wheel steering. The money’s in the silver CR-V EX with marshmallow ride and butt warmers.

          • 0 avatar
            ijbrekke

            It seems like volume is already taken care of with the Fit and has been for some time. They sell a bunch.

            But isn’t there room in the budget for a Fiesta ST competitor? That car does pretty darn well for an enthusiast model. If it had useable back seats I’d probably already own one.

            I know the new Civic is coming out in a hatch (well, sort of). But it’s basically what I classify as a mid-sizer in size and weight. I still pine for a Fit SI regularly.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          Ronnie retired?
          You’re gone a week and everything changes.

  • avatar

    We bought a 2015 Honda Fit LX back in late 2014 as our very first brand new car, equipped with the six-speed manual.

    The LX came so well equipped that there was no reason to spend more on the higher trim EX. With the Bluetooth, cruise control, CD/MP3/AUX, power windows, door locks, and even a backup camera (not a feature on my “must have list”), we didn’t feel like we were lacking anything necessary. The LX also avoided the EX’s touchscreen radio that almost every reviewer despises, and replaced it with, real logical knobs instead. For the price, the LX is a great value

    But a lot of your comments held true for our Fit. The fifth and sixth gears were almost interchangeable and even slight grades required downshifting two gears. It almost seemed more like a marketing gimmick than an engineering necessity: “we have six gears!!!” Engine reves were very high and this was a noisy car on the freeway.

    And some of you mentioned front seat space. It almost seemed like Honda designed this car around the back seat, and it was almost limo-like back there. But for my 6’4” frame, leg room was lacking and the dash jutted into the front passenger’s knees. An extra few inches of rearward travel of the front seats would’ve been appreciated.

    The quality of our Hecho en Mexico was extremely poor over the 18 months we had it, and eventually we had to rid ourselves of it. The latest ones are made in Japan, and hopefully holding up better. If Honda can resolve some of the gearing issues, engine noise, and front seat packaging, this really would be a great little car

    • 0 avatar
      cargogh

      I called a couple of dealers and keep reading that all ’17s are made in Japan, which is what I wanted. But I just looked at 24 new examples of EX 6 speeds on Autotrader, and every VIN starts off with 3HG which is made in Mexico. So I’m wondering if only the CVTs are Japanese made. It’s not like they’re left over ’16s, because one is listed with the new Lunar Silver paint.

  • avatar
    brettc

    The Fit isn’t a bad option, but why the eff do I have to get an EX-L to get heated seats and side mirror turn indicators?

    It is nice that the base LX offers LED tail lights though. Even the GTI and Golf R don’t come with LED tails in the U.S. Looks like Honda sensing isn’t available in any trim, yet.

    • 0 avatar
      tmport

      Heated mirrors, too (at least in the US). Honda seems to think heated mirrors are a luxury item, not a safety one. They have the same attitude toward variable intermittent wipers, which aren’t available on the Fit LX or Civic LX.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        As I stated in comments on something else Honda-related, they used to pre-wire everything, so theoretically you could swap those mirrors out the mirrors.

        Now, I’m sure you’d need to run wiring and swap fuse panels to do it! Then there’s the matter of telling the CAN-bus to activate the signals and heaters!

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Don’t understand the lack of a “big” overdrive when you’ve gone to 6 speeds forward.
    Are the boy racers in charge of this model?
    Yeah gas is $1.XX here in the US but let’s have a cruising/econ gear.

    • 0 avatar
      King of Eldorado

      It seems to be not so much a transmission issue as an engine issue. A taller 6th might work for steady cruising in table-flat Florida or parts of the Midwest, but I don’t think the current engine has enough torque at lower rpm for it to be feasible elsewhere. Even the slightest upgrade or acceleration to pass would require a downshift to avoid bogging down.

  • avatar
    cargogh

    My current job requires me to drive 45 miles to a building that has street parking. I park way off skipping a few spots every day saying, a fit would fit. I have one passenger and have to haul tools. So, I needed something short, versatile, and frugal. In the past I’d bought 4 cars for the near 20K it will take to buy this car. That doesn’t mean I still don’t see cheap and great deals and daydream for a huge garage to store my imaginary purchases. I considered the LX, but liked the sunroof on an EX. I’ve been wanting a Fit for 10 years. It was weird to have to order and wait for a 6-speed, but it should be here next month. Nearly everything nation wide is CVT. I’ve been looking for updates hoping for a taller 6th gear. Nope. But now being built in Japan, perhaps some of the earlier quality issues will be removed. Years ago, I had an old Accord EX 5-spd that turned out to be the most dependable driver ever for 7 years. Maybe this Fit will be as good.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Do these seriously use drum brakes? I thought we’d be done with those with the upcoming Mazda Yaris.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    Bought my 2015 Fit LX 6M in October 2014. 35,000 miles on it so far. Average 42 MPG in my country/city commute. I imagine my ancestors finding this thing buried in volcanic ash and wondering why the 5th gear in the transmission appears to have never been used. Drivers seat should have more rear travel. The “carpet” I suspect is actually roofing tar paper rejected by Home Depot. Carries 4 tall adults in reasonable comfort. It’s a cheap car that feels cheap but I’d buy another today if this one was stolen.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Honda carpet even in the Accords since the 9th-Gen is put to shame by the best felt at the local craft store. Husky or WeatherTech FloorLiners are a necessity, unless you’re in a snowless climate where the Honda All-Season mats would be adequate.

  • avatar
    Sigivald

    “Why, 53 cubic feet when everything’s folded flatter than Kristen Stewart’s facial expressions. That beats most SUVs, by the way, meaning that if all those soccer moms with fake Coach bags were buying their Canyoneros simply for the room, they’d all be better off driving Fits.”

    … “most SUVs”?

    A quick spot check doesn’t show 53 cubic feet *folded* as especially large, let alone more than “most” SUVs, folded.

  • avatar
    Wodehouse

    It’s unfortunate that Honda has done the “2013 Chevy Malibu” thing to this generation Fit. Nice enough car, but, it’s missing the individual personality of the previous generations. It’s as if Honda wants it to appeal more to fans of the more generic competition. Maybe the never-ending, blood curdling race to 12-star and Top Safety Pick++Ultra-Deluxe ratings have much to do with it.

    Chevy took the quite nice 2008 generation Malibu and turned it into a slightly underdone imitation of an old Camry. (That ugly GM steering wheel!) Nice enough, but, who wanted an imitation Camry?

    Funny (or sadly), to my aging eyes, the refreshed 2015 Camry has a suspicious resemblance to the 2015 Malibu!

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