By on August 18, 2016

2017 Genesis G90, Image: © 2016 Steph Willems/The Truth About Cars

A paranoid person, or maybe just a very cynical one, might have suspected the man of being a covert OEM plant.

“Is that a Bentley?” asked a well-to-do looking gentleman outside our Kelowna, British Columbia hotel, where a line of Genesis G90s rested after our drive up from Vancouver. Had they been within earshot, the automaker’s PR reps might have broken out into guarded, nervous smiles.

Disclosure: Genesis provided the vehicles and fuel for this test, and put us up in swanky hotels in Vancouver and Kelowna. Food was plentiful. Mentions of Hyundai were not.

No, these sedans didn’t arrive from the land of Brexit and dual carriageways, I told him. Hyundai Motor spawned a luxury marque, you see, and the G90 is the new brand’s flagship. This was all news to him. Your average stranger normally knows very little about cars, but they all seem to feel that a long, expensive-looking vehicle with a big grille is a Bentley.

How can you blame the guy in this case? The G90 has a stately presence. A long hood and short deck, coupled to a long wheelbase, are classic luxury car cues. A strong, high character line sweeps rearward from the grille to the taillights, while a downward slash aft of the front wheel well calls attention to the space between the opening and the front door. See this real estate? You don’t see this on an XTS, the crease whispers.

Genesis calls its design language “athletic elegance,” and it’s supposed to make people subconsciously think “Bentley.” While building the Genesis dream team, Hyundai hired two ex-Bentley designers as the brand’s design head and vice-president, so any design similarity might not be a coincidence. That wide grille and winged badge is mighty suspect.

2017 Genesis G90

 

The G90 goes on sale in the fourth quarter of this year, alongside the G80 (a rebadged Hyundai Genesis). It won’t gun for the likes of Bentley, but it does have the Mercedes-Benz S-Class, BMW 7 Series and Audi A8 in its sights. While touting the G90’s measurements prior to the drive, Genesis brand director Michael Ricciuto used the S-Class as a benchmark to measure up to — and surpass.

In terms of size, the G90 is longer (3.4 inches) and wider (0.6 inches) than the S-Class, and boasts a five-inch longer wheelbase. As the newcomer in a crowded market, Genesis needs to make a splash or risk becoming invisible right out of the gate. Go big — in this case, literally — or go home.

Looks aside, a luxury vehicle is nothing without a ride that delivers the content and cushiness a buyer feels they deserve. In the 250-mile jaunt from downtown Vancouver to the heart of B.C.’s wine region, the G90 revealed its pampering prowess.

The automaker claims it doesn’t want to offer half-assed luxury, so Italian leather abounds throughout the G90’s cabin. Real hide, not plastic or leatherette. Warm wood glows from beneath a thick varnish, while above, a headliner of soft, contrasting suede flows to the bottom of the pillars. Controls are well laid out, with interior brightwork provided by stereo knobs and climate switches that Genesis reps assure us were designed to feel natural to the touch. A 17-speaker Lexicon audio system sports stainless steel grilles.

2017 Genesis G90, Image: © 2016 Steph Willems/The Truth About Cars

The infotainment system functions via a rotary dial selector and 12.3-inch media screen. Finding our way using the navigation system was a breeze, thanks to a detailed map and no GPS command hiccups.

On the highway, heading towards the coastal mountains, the main impression of the G90 was a feeling of sensory deprivation. The G90’s suspension does such a good job at absorbing shocks, it lends a maglev-like feel to the journey. Passengers can thank adaptive shock absorbers with electronically controlled dampers for the jostle-free ride. Or they can be completely ignorant to the suspension technology’s existence. That’s what luxury is all about.

Don’t expect to be bothered by intrusive noise, either. If ever there was a vehicle made for listening to an audiobook, it’s the G90. The Genesis crew piled on the insulation, both in its body and greenhouse. Two layers of acoustic film on the G90’s windows and an extra helping of sound-deadening in the firewall makes the sedan appropriately library-like. Helping that is a unique wheel design that uses hollow chambers to absorb road noise.

2017 Genesis G90 interior, Image: © 2016 Steph Willems/The Truth About Cars

In fact, if you want to hear any evidence of the twin-turbo 3.3-liter “Lambda” V6, you’d better punish the accelerator, and even then, it’s a distant, muted snarl. The automaker expects the 3.3-liter, which makes 365 horsepower and 376 pounds-feet of torque, to be the volume drivetrain. (There’s also the 5.0-liter “Tau” V8 for those who want it. That mill makes 420 hp and 383 lb-ft, barely an upgrade in grunt.)

The eight-speed automatic does its part for tranquility by keeping its head down and staying in the background. Upshifts generally aren’t noticeable, and downshifts come without hesitation. Genesis aimed for a high level of standard content, including a full suite of driving aids. The model’s adaptive cruise control and lane-keeping technology functioned well, taking some of the burden off the driver.

While front seat room is competitive (a 22-way adjustable driver’s seat and 16-way passenger seat helps the comfort up front), the backseat is the main benefactor of the extra wheelbase. This isn’t just an updated Hyundai Equus, the reps insisted. They couldn’t mate that platform to the HTRAC all-wheel drive that will be optional in the U.S., standard in Canada. So, Hyundai Genesis gave the former platform the Gumbi treatment, creating a “bespoke” platform for the range-topper. We call it a “platform.”

2017 Genesis G90 rear seats, Image: © 2016 Steph Willems/The Truth About Cars

The outboard rear seats are semi reclined, with a center console (hiding a pass-through) giving access to audio and climate functions. Basketball was never this writer’s bag, but at 6’4”, it was a physical possibility. So cavernous was the rear seat, you’d have to travel 10 inches from my knees to reach the front seatback. Rear headroom is also generous — this isn’t a “four-door coupe.”

Ricciuto claims the G90, already on sale in South Korea, is a popular chauffeur vehicle in its home country. No shock there.

At just over 4,600 pounds, the G90 is no featherweight, but it’s no slouch when a situation calls for power. Up in the mountains, winding canyon roads begged for a heavy right foot, and the G90’s powertrain responded without complaint.

As high-speed cruising gave way to high-speed twisties, the G90’s handling — once sure-footed — grew somewhat hesitant. In sport mode, the revs stayed high and the nicely weighted steering provided decent feedback, but the maglev-like suspension didn’t suddenly sprout sporty sea legs.

Granted, it’s a plush luxury sedan with no “S” or “R” following its name, and it wasn’t hard to judge the G90’s tolerance level in turns, but the model just isn’t sticky. It looks the part, though — turbine-style 19-inch alloy wheels come standard, splitting the difference between sporty and classy. “Athletic elegance” is the company’s Bible, remember — their Book of Genesis, if you will.

2017 Genesis G90, Image: © 2016 Steph Willems/The Truth About Cars

The automaker claims the G90’s body is made up of 52-percent high-strength steel, double the amount used in former upscale Hyundai models. Genesis can’t afford body flex or rattles as it tries to stake a claim against established luxury players.

The G90 is a serene place to spend time, but it’s not without its gripes. The transmission shift lever is a monostable design, similar to the unit that got Fiat Chrysler Automobiles into trouble. A driver can’t select Park using the shift lever — a Park button, partially obscured by the lever itself, must be pressed to keep the G90 at rest.

Many sedans in this league offer panoramic sunroofs, but not this rig. It’s a minor complaint, for sure, but other automakers boast about their sprawling glass canopies. Genesis can’t.

Pricing hasn’t been announced, but Ricciuto claims there needs to be a value aspect to the G90. A bevy of standard content offered at a lower price point than its competitors would give the model, and the brand, a leg up, but Genesis doesn’t want to be known as a value brand. Other incentives include a direct sales model and concierge service, with five-years (or 100,000 miles) of free maintenance.

The automaker has six models on tap over the next five years, with a compact G70 due out next year … or maybe the year after (Genesis won’t say). Two SUVs and a sporty coupe complete the roll-out by 2021.

The short-lived Hyundai Genesis impressed us back in 2014 — clearly, the response to the luxury sedan boosted the automaker’s confidence, otherwise it wouldn’t take this leap. Creating a whole new brand isn’t for the faint of heart, but we’re told the company’s executives are in it for the long haul. As it works to build a standalone dealer presence, the brand’s competent flag carrier seems well equipped to do battle.

Still, there’s an obvious, nagging question that surely keeps staff up at night: Can Genesis, a new player with no history or reputations to build on, sway luxury car buyers away from established German, American and Japanese brands?

2017 Genesis G90, Image: © 2016 Steph Willems/The Truth About Cars

[Images: © 2016 Steph Willems/The Truth About Cars]

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119 Comments on “2017 Genesis G90 First Drive – By Any Other Name...”


  • avatar
    Land Ark

    I really like the design from the nose back. The front still screams Hyundai/Kia which could be understandable except they appear to be trying to distance themselves from those brands.
    This would be the perfect opportunity to pull out a new front end design. They could mess around with it and then if successful, send it down to the H and K marks, this seems more like sending a Hyundai grille up to Genesis.

    That’s not to say that if I had the means I wouldn’t still strongly consider it – assuming it maintains its bargain price point.

    • 0 avatar
      romanjetfighter

      Yeah, the front doesn’t match anything after the front axle. I imagine this can be easily updated, though.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Land Ark,
      Like you I’m quite impressed with this vehicle. I have a soft spot for Hyundai and Kia products. They are very under rated.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Actually much prefer the interior design and execution (much better than in the Equus which I disliked) to the exterior – it’s fine, but a bit too sedate (not that there’s anything particularly exciting among the current crop of flagship sedans).

      The new leadership group at Genesis wants to bring a bit more excitement to the sheetmetal a la the New York concept – so might see cues make way to the G90 for its MCE or might have to make way until the next generation model (supposedly, the G70 will be the 1st Genesis model infused with the new design language which will make its way to the rest of the lineup).

      Hyundai offers matte wood trim in the Korean market (the matte grey ash is very nice) – hope they offer one for the NA market.

      For those wanting a big luxury sedan experience and don’t want to pay $60k+, the new Cadenza has been getting very positive reviews (Alex seems to really like it).

    • 0 avatar
      Carzzi

      The Bentley question in the first paragraph echoes my first impression of the G90: The rear quarter-window is very Ing-Lishh.

    • 0 avatar
      baconator

      To my eye, it’s better looking than either of Bentley’s bloated-looking sedan offerings. Not sure who the buyer is at this price point, though – you’re not a “bargain shopper” at the $70k, so this thing will have to be good to pull people away from a Lexus GS or E-class Mercedes.

  • avatar
    whynot

    Great looking car, but man do those LEDs in the front look cheap. If you can see each individual light when they are in a strip, it looks aftermarket.

    • 0 avatar
      davewg

      This is so true.

      Ford nailed the LED signature on the ’17 Fusion. White as the DRL, changes to amber for the signal. Classy, looks great and at that price point everyone else needs to step it up a notch.

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      The Fusion most likely uses single LED’s with a light tube. I couldn’t say if Hyundai is looking to use this as a fog lamp as well which may require more than a single LED. I am glad that for the most part they’re keeping them out of the headlight assemblies but the design screams Sonata and Tucson.

    • 0 avatar
      KalapanaBlack

      I thought those looked surprisingly cheap on the new Sonata. Surprised they carried them over almost unchanged to this top end luxury sedan.

      In fact, the whole front clip looks disturbingly Sonata-derived. Everything behind the headlamps is in good order. Shame they couldn’t have afforded the front an extra 6 months of development time. The G80, nee-Genesis does not suffer from this malady.

  • avatar
    dwford

    They sold plenty of HYUNDAI Equus and Genesis units, I am sure they will do at least as well with the new brand.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Kinda looks generic.

    And if Hyundai wants to be serious about playing in this market, it has to do something about the horrific depreciation with their luxury cars.

  • avatar
    RedRocket

    The new Lincoln Town Car for airport livery service, around-town Uber drivers, and similar drive-for-hire duties.

  • avatar
    n_tesla

    Ex-Genesis owner here. I had a 2011 V-8. The car was great, the after sale dealer support was the reason I sold it and moved on to another brand. They can have a “direct sale” model, but until they have a different service plan than bringing it to the local Hyundai store it will fail.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      I’ve always wondered if the dealer support matched the image they were trying to project. Cars in this category convey an image and if you want to compete, you have to make that a desirable one.

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      You don’t step foot in the dealership for 3 years with this model. 3 years of service is free, and they will bring you a “valet” car while they take yours for maintenance.

  • avatar
    madman2k

    Definitely looks like a good place to sit and be driven around.

  • avatar

    444 on an Ontario license plate in Vancouver for an aspiring luxury car trying to break new ground.

    It remains a Hyundai, and will motivate the Germans to step up their game.

    North America is not rear seat oriented, the rear armrest looks very busy with a ton of controls.

    Lots of wood in the interior, the stitching and pleats on the seats is a reminder of the Equus, the silver speaker covers in the doors stand out and break the door panel finish.

    Sedans in this segment have a V8, not a V6.

    It has a Bentley look from the rear.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      The wing logo is such a rip off. It just makes the whole car seem like a Chinese copy. They need something unique to identify the brand. And that logo, grill and tail light assembly is not it.

      • 0 avatar
        RHD

        Precisely, JMII. The side character lines are Bentley ripoffs, the grille is Ford/Aston Martin, the rear view is Honda Accord, the interior is Bentley and Ford, the taillights look like a Camry or any of several other cars; even the wheel design has been done before.
        Is it so hard to make an original car, or have all the design and style cues already been invented?

        As an aside, a co-worker of mine once had a Kia Amanti. It was a complete ripoff of other designs, but was relatively inexpensive… so he overlooked its lack of originality, since it was the nicest car he could fit into his budget, and Kia would finance him. After a few years he traded it in on a pickup truck.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          Hyundai was doing the oversized, hexagonal-shaped grill before Ford (Aston didn’t use a hexagonal grill until the Lagonda Tarif).

          And there are numerous automakers who have longed joined the bandwagon of hexagonal shaped grills – most notably Audi, Subaru and Datsun, along Toyota and other makes who have used the hexagonal grill shape for certain models.

          And having a winged-badge is very common in the auto industry.

          Aston, Bentley, Chrysler, Mini, Austin-Healey, Superleggera, Morgan, etc.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        Yeah, how dare they copy Chrysler’s logo?

        (I kid. It does look a lot like the Bentley wings.

        On the other hand, this thing looks better to me than *any actual Bentley does*.)

        Re. engines, well, tell that to Cadillac or to MB Germany – or, indeed, to MB USA as recently as 2013 … or BMW USA now, with the 740.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I concur. The wing logo has always been a letdown. Should have ditched it with the new brand, even if they had to go with a hood ornament or something.

    • 0 avatar
      operagost

      They mentioned the V8.

  • avatar
    energetik9

    I’m not really much interested in this segment, but it does look much improved from previous generations, at least in looks. Not sure if it will sell big though.

    The front grill looks odd to me and I can’t quite place it. The grill is too large for the car in my opinion. The LEDs aren’t that clean and the front headlights almost look a little mustang-ish with the angled light bars. And why is there is silver box in the middle of the horizontal grill slats?

  • avatar
    redliner

    If Lexus can do it…

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      You always hear this, but it just isn’t the same thing. When Lexus “did it” they did it by capitalizing on 1) a stellar quality reputation of Toyota which was head and shoulders about everyone else not Japanese, and 2) tons of discontent over the Germans who were fat, lazy, outdated (1990 560SEL??) and hyper expensive.

      Nowadays, the E/5 and S/7 classes are hypercompetitive, and there aren’t bad cars in the segments anymore. If you want to break from the MB/BMW herd, you can buy Audi, Jag, Lexus, and Porsche. There are no bad choices there, just varying degrees of greatness. Aside from the occasional oddball who wants to spend a lot of money and have no one realize he’s doing it (ask VW how big that market is) or patriotic Koreans, who the heck is going to buy this (in the USA)?

      • 0 avatar
        Higheriq

        Agreed – there are still a great many Americans who will question someone’s decision to spend this much money on what is still a Korean car. Hyundai/Kia has made great strides with their mainstream models, but there aren’t too many buyers who are willing to pass the M-B, BMW, or Audi stores to buy one of these.

        • 0 avatar
          Sigivald

          A *loaded* Genesis 3.8 has an MSRP like a *stripper* E300 – which itself has a turbo 4 with the same power output as a farkin’ *Fusion*.

          That’s a powerful reason to walk right on past the Germans, unless you’re all about repping a badge.

          (Can’t price the G90 yet, but I don’t think they’re going to add $40k to the price.)

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Higheriq,
          I remember when Lexus came out.

          “Why would you spend this kind of money on a Japanese vehicle, a Toyota at that”.

          All must start from somewhere.

          Unlike people, a business can’t be “born into class”.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        Well, the Genesis/G80 outsells the A6, GS and Q70 (on track to outsell the GS 2:1 and the Q70 by many multiples).

        The G90 likely won’t have comparable success in the flagship segment, but can see them doing 25-30% more than what the Equus did at its height due to the addition of AWD and the much improved interior appointments.

  • avatar
    Sloomis

    Can’t blame the guy for thinking it might be a Bentley, given that the Genesis badge is a complete rip-off of the Bentley badge. I’m surprised Hyundai got away with it.

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    So what segment is this in? Bigger than an E/5, where a V6 would do okay, but cheaper than an S/7, where a V8 is a requirement. I’m sure it’s very nice, but how many buyers are there who don’t want an MB/BMW/Audi who aren’t happy with their Lexus?

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      “but cheaper than an S/7, where a V8 is a requirement”

      BMW does not think that a V8 is a requirement, since the 740I has a six.

      As did the S until recently (and still does in Europe).

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The A8 also has an FI V6, as does the Jaguar XJ (supercharged) and the Cadillac CT6 has a T6 with the base being a T4 (but arguably, the CT6 is a “tweener” and not a full-fledged flagship as that was supposed to be the CT8).

      The next gen LS will likely be getting a T6 as well for the base model.

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    Cannot imagine paying this much for a car.
    I would rather wait for the Continental and see where it sets, price wise.

    Hell, truth be told, the Buick LaCrosse looks better and probably drives as nicely.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    This looks good… much better than the Equus it replaces, in all the places that thing was weak.

    Though I can’t help but think it’s not ’89…. literally everything is different. The Germans aren’t sleeping… the S class is the best its ever been. Large luxury sedans are in decline and falling out of fashion; they aren’t the status statements they used to be. And luxury has been democratized almost to excess. I know they couldn’t pull this off any earlier but it still looks like they’re a good 15-20 years too late

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      That’s an interesting thought….what if H/K tried to establish a luxury brand using only crossover/SUV types? Don’t even try to play the LR offroad cred game, just make super-nice GMC Acadia type vehicles. I almost wonder if they would be more successful? Or is the typical SUV buyer even more shallow and badge-whoring to where it wouldn’t work?

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        It’s been noted that a G90 based SUV will be next, along with a smaller crossover that will be Genesis models by 2020.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        Building luxury crossovers is basically printing money at this point, so that path is a no brainer- not just for Genesis, but for any brand struggling to convince people to buy its luxury sedans.

        I get the logic behind their launch sequence but it’s based around parameters that are no longer valid. Truthfully I think their flagship should be an X5 sized crossover, not this octogenarian targeted sedan, as good as it may be.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      I’m gonna say what I said up above.

      It’s “not an S class” – it’s $40k or so cheaper.

      Isn’t there room in the market for something the size of an S or LX or 7 but fully-optioned for E-class money?

      I think there is.

  • avatar
    PRNDLOL

    For the first time a Kia/Hyundai ultra lux dashboard looks the part here, the Equus and Genesis never quite matched what they were trying to achieve in that way. In fact aside from the wood on the back of the seats which is just too much, I like most all of the shapes inside and out with this new G90.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Ironically, the reason for the not-up-to-snuff dash quality was due to owners really never being in the driver’s seat for the domestic market (as they had drivers and sat in the rear seats).

  • avatar
    V16

    It looks to me like the Genesis brand understands the luxury market.
    Execution, which translates into conquest sales will be the test.
    It’s a shame that Lincoln and Cadillac, with the new Continental,
    and CT6 are good but not great efforts.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Hyundai’s trying to build a car that’s just as good as the competition. They’re hungry, they’re driven to be as good or better than everyone else (especially the Japanese), and that’s why they deserve a look. Meanwhile, Cadillac is busy having its marketers tell you that the car is just as good. I’m not sure what Ford’s plan is. “The Chinese might buy it, if we can convince them Americans like it,” I guess.

  • avatar
    duffman13

    So we’ll start with what I’m not a fan of –

    1. The aluminum speaker grills – looks aftermarket and cheap
    2. Glossy wood trim. Very 90s, a black ash or a matte would be more with the times.
    3. Monostable shifter, but that’s a personal thing – -everybody else in the segment has something similar.
    4. V6T base motor. This car should start with a V8.
    5. Lack of a Panorama roof – when you’re the only one who doesn’t offer it, it stands out. Looking at you, CX-9 Signature.

    And what I am a fan of –

    1. The seats. They look great, and if they’re anything like the Genesis seats I sat in at a car show last year they’ll feel great.
    2. The IP – It looks like they have nice actual gauges.
    3. The styling. It’s moderately generic, but better than the Lexus predator grille or the front end of any Infiniti.

    I really hope they succeed. That said, I hope it tanks values on current Hyundai Genesis models, as I’d like to pick up a CPO 2016 in a couple of years.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      V6T base motor. This car should start with a V8

      Tell that to Cadillac.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        And BMW (740i).

        Power matters a lot more than cylinder count; I cannot imagine the turbo 6 is remotely slow in that thing, and I’d be the torque curve looks better than an NA V8, too.

        • 0 avatar
          SC5door

          Audi A8L—-3.0TFSI 333hp and 325 lb-ft torque.

          Genesis 3.3 T–365 HP and 376 lb-ft at 1300 RPM.

          Honestly no need for the 5.0 unless you want to pay for more at the pump.

    • 0 avatar
      Snail Kite

      Power band on a V6T makes more sense here anyway. No one’s going to floor this thing, it needs low end torque to waft along.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Most cars in this class have various wood options. The current Genesis (G80) has at least three different wood finishes, including dark/light and matte/glossy finishes. This car will probably have options. I really like seeing all that wood in the back. Even most luxury cars are just caves back there.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      There are matte wood trims available for the KDM EQ900 – we’ll see if the NA markets get them as well.

      And the supercharged V6 for the Jag XJ with the upcoming new LS likely getting a base engine.

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    I dont mind this at all. I get that it probably doesnt tick all the boxes as yet.

    However I have a problem with the carry-over engines. I reckon an n/a 3.3 v6 and a 5.0 v8 isnt cutting it.

    They should be going with a 3.0 v6 and a 4.0 v8… both with twin turbo ‘hot vee’ motors.

    Lexus isnt even the target here. The Germans obviously have the edge when it comes to motor technology.

    Hell, I’d even go with the GM pushrod V8s over this.

  • avatar
    Steve_S

    This or a Continental is going to be a great 2-3 year old buy.

  • avatar
    RHD

    An engineering question: If the fins on the wheels were shaped like fan blades, drawing air out from under the car, would they create enough airflow to cool the brakes?

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    These always looked more Audi to me up front, with a typical Korean knock off body. Seems to me that Hyundais going back to its XG350 and Sonata routes, hopefully this time the interiors won’t peel after a few years.

  • avatar

    And until you’re able to buy one without stepping foot inside a Hyundai dealership, it’ll remain a heavily-depreciating footnote.

  • avatar
    Chiburb

    Since late 2008 I’ve had the ’09 Genesis (V8), the 2011 Equus, and the ’14 Equus. They were all fine cars, which I called “affordable luxury”. Yeah, the ride and handling could’ve been better on all, but there was nothing “bad” about what they delivered. It may have seemed that way to “professional” reviewers who spent seat time in S Classes or 7 Series, but overall there was much more to like than complain about. Sometimes I described them as 80% of the big boys at 50% of the cost. (And before you compare MSRP’s to refute that, please add the packages to build comparable features.)
    As for the dealer experience, I’m not one who cares about having to rub elbows with the Elantra drivers: there but for the grace of god go I! And my dealer is in suburban Chicago, so the Zone techs are handy if something is beyond the in-house expertise.
    But…
    I’m NOT getting the G90 this time. I take delivery of the ’17 G80 tomorrow (Ultimate package, AWD, 3.8 V6). After 3 RWD V8’s that sat at the train station about 200 days a year and worked well for a couple of trips to Florida each year, I decided to downsize.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The 1G Genesis and Equus showed their KDM roots – too much geared to a soft, floaty ride (the US engineers tried to give them a more planted feel, but more difficult to work your way back) and too focused on the rear passengers.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    I love the refreshed Ford Taurus!

  • avatar
    TDIGuy

    “Is that a Bentley?”
    “How can you blame the guy in this case? The G90 has a stately presence.”

    I would say the fact that the Genesis logo looks like a Bentley logo to the uninformed might also have something to do with it.

  • avatar
    akatsuki

    Looks good to me, and I don’t give a shit about what other people think, so the value prop seems there for me.

    But the drive sounds like typical floaty Asian limo service. Not going to work for me, I get too carsick.

    The interior might have nice materials, but the lack of interior aesthetic (i.e., taste) really shows – the Volvo interior elegance is the new standard with MB close behind. Those glossy woods might as well be plastic since they have buried the grain in plastic coatings. The wheels aren’t terribly nice looking either.

    When reporting quietness, it would be nice to have a sones measurement and comparison to current standard bearers (Lexus and MB).

  • avatar

    This was one of “my cars” when I worked at H as a Product Planner. I got to drive an early one back in the winter and I look forward to seeing these on the road! My one regret that was I couldn’t get anyone to drive *me* around.

    Stef, you skipped over the direct sales model (in Canada) which is going to be a very cool initiative on the part of Genesis. I believe it won’t be offered in the US, since Canadian laws around franchising are different (many luxury brands in Canada have corporate stores).

  • avatar
    here4aSammich

    Wow it sucks to live in a jurisdiction that requires a front plate, it really ruins the look of the front end.

  • avatar
    Jaeger

    I think it’s a really solid effort – looks great inside and out, sounds like it drives well and it doesn’t nickel and some you to death with options. Anyone price out a fully loaded E Class with a 4 cyl engine?

  • avatar
    jonnyanalog

    Not a bad first effort. Still seems a bit generic with hints of other luxury brands thrown in. The interior, IMO, is not very good. Still doesn’t hold a candle to an S-Class or A8. Again, it looks generic and feels more like a $35K car interior.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    This is the type of thing that, frankly, Lincoln and Cadillac should have been doing 10 years ago.

    The right engines, right transmissions, right warranties, not compromised by sharing parts with “lesser” vehicles etc etc etc.

    And it sounds to me like this is EXACTLY what an American luxury car should be. Big, super cush inside, silent, and a serene ride.

    We will see how it plays. I could see this doing something similar to Lexus as long as the quality/reliability are there.

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      There are things that it does share for better or worse:

      The Start/Stop button is straight out of the `16-`17 Tucson. (Not that it’s bad quality, and it actually shows what mode the ignition is in around the bezel)

      The stalks on the steering column are shared among Hyundai as well. The odd thing is that the ones that are manufactured in Korea have a higher quality feeling than the ones made here in the states. I had a `17 Santa Fe Sport (HMMA built) with the same controls as my Tucson and the Santa Fe’s felt a bit “cheaper”; for example the intermittent setting selector on the wipers feels to have some weight when moving it compared to the SFS which felt flimsy.

      But some parts sharing does happen. I’m looking at you LEXUS with your stupidly cheap Toyota key fobs.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    Meh,..its not self driving so no one will be interested..It has to say Tesla in order for it to conjure up excitement.

  • avatar
    Michael S.

    I’ll be honest… I like it. I have been looking at SCREW F150 Lariats. I will end up ordering it if I go that route. If the pricing is right, I may give this strong consideration.

    As for the panoramic sunroof, this is – to me at least – the most idiotic trend in cars today. I live in the South. They turn an otherwise comfortable vehicle into an Easy Bake Oven. I just don’t get it. They make no sense from a safety, security, reliability, or practicality standpoint. Perhaps I’m biased because of my geographic location and the fact that I had a regular one shatter on me in a hail storm, but I just don’t get it. It’s also the reason I will be ordering an F150 if I go that route. 75% of the Lariat with 501A I can find in a 200 mile radius have these foul contraptions.

  • avatar
    jacob_coulter

    I think there is a market for something the size of a flagship sedan like this but tens of thousands of dollars less.

    The other luxury automakers can’t do this because they are afraid it would cannibalize their larger offerings, so you end up with $60k “midsize” cars with tiny backseats that are barely useable for anything but small kids.

    The styling is clean, but it does have that “knock off” look about it.

  • avatar
    bswanny

    I love the design. However Hyundai/Kia really need to focus on making all their vehicles lighter. Either develop more powerful engines (not going to happen) or loose that extra weight. If the 7 series can ring in at 4,000lbs, this car should as well.

  • avatar
    Nick

    I know this isn’t something you buy for the mileage, but I imagine this must swill gasoline.

  • avatar
    PentastarPride

    The interior looks a lot more refined than what Mercedes has put on the market (as much as that pains me to say). The interior of this car has fairly clean lines for a 2017 vehicle, which is a rare trait these days.

    The grille is very bland, generic and uninspiring. It’s not Toyota/Lexus ugly, however, it looks as if they forgot to add one and slapped one on hastily. That’s not the impression that you want to leave if you’re trying to attract premium buyers. I have to admit that the current Hyundai Sonata’s front fascia looks the part a lot better than this car.

    The rear sort of resembles a current Mercedes of some sorts. In a way, I guess it’s fair payback since the entire Mercedes lineup now resembles rebadged Hyundai and Kia. Speaking of Mercedes, the pre-2013-ish Mercedes C/E/S/GL-Class are the last of the classy, distinct Benzes. It’s an end of an era.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    The Soho Set, Cafe sippin’, Kinks and Andy Warhol Caddy people should look at this and think to themselves;

    “Where did we fnck up?”

    This is more desirable than any Caddy, I’d rather the V8. This is so people can hear quality.

  • avatar
    ZCD2.7T

    Though it’s too big (and apparently soft) to be of interest to me, I sat in it at the Chicago Auto Show and thought the interior was among the best I’d seen overall. Seriously impressive in both design and execution.

    Give me that quality of interior in the G80 with a hotted-up TT V6 and AWD and I’d be very tempted…

  • avatar
    CincyDavid

    That interior is just beautiful. I walked by a white K900 the other day with off-white leather. Pretty car, looked well-built, but this trend of using such pale interior materials is silly…it had denim stains on the driver’s seat bolster, which so many really light colors are prone to. Give me chestnut brown or dark gray leather. A coworker got a new Mazda 6 the other day with oxblood leather…very nice looking and a nice change from the pale colors.


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