By on July 18, 2016

2015 GMC Sierra 1500 SLT 4x4 6.2 (6 of 25)

We’ve all seen the ads. Glistening GMCs plying the streets of Manhattan as Eminence Front swells in the background, broadcasting loud and clear to urban car buyers that we’re here, we’re trucks or truck-like vehicles, get used to it.

Boosted exposure is a big part of GMC’s plan to grow sales and brand recognition, but the next phase of the automaker’s revamp could see it take on Jeep.

GMC’s plans for the future are starting to become clear, and while it looks like a small crossover is out, a small SUV could be in. Speaking about the company’s two-phase plan, GMC brand chief Duncan Aldred told Automotive News that Jeep’s runaway success might need to be countered.

“I do think GMC has got the brand equity and brand character in many respects to give customers a really good alternative to Jeep products,” Aldred said.

Industry sources told Automotive News that GMC is in the early stages of crafting an SUV that will borrow the frame of the GMC Colorado midsize pickup. Analysts agree that Jeep is the most likely target for the automaker, though sources say the rumored SUV wouldn’t arrive until 2020 or later.

GMC sales hit an 11-year high in the U.S. last year, so the newfound exposure seems to be working. The high-end Denali line, which Aldred pushed in order to boost the brand’s profitability, now makes up 20 percent of sales.

Still, it’s new products that grow excitement. The GMC Terrain and its Chevrolet twin, the Equinox, are expected to shrink in size when the next generation bows in 2017. Those models will ride atop the Chevrolet Cruze platform and could source the 1.5-liter turbocharged four-cylinder from the Malibu.

Plans for a smaller crossover inspired by the Granite concept vehicle fell though, possible because sales could overlap with the Chevy Trax and Buick Encore. Aldred wants it, but it seems that General Motors executives aren’t keen on the idea.

[Image: © 2015 Mark Stevenson/The Truth About Cars]

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94 Comments on “Will GMC’s Brand Makeover Include a Jeep Fighter?...”


  • avatar

    Sounds like a great waste of money. While it would be great to see, it sounds like a fools errand.

    “I do think GMC has got the brand equity and brand character in many respects to give customers a really good alternative to Jeep products,” Aldred said.

    This guy is kidding himself right?

    • 0 avatar
      IAhawkeye

      Unless he’s talking about Denali, I really have no idea what he’s talking about. GMC to me just means slightly nicer Chevy’s, sometimes they look better then their twins.. sometimes they don’t. I’m certainly not dying for the chance to buy a Chevy-Jeep.. whatever that’d even be.. they could make something Jimmy Sized again I suppose.. but would buy one anymore?

      • 0 avatar
        Joe Btfsplk

        GMC is and has always been a pickup for the Buick-Pontiac-Olds-Cadillac stores that does not violate the franchise agreement with Chevrolet dealers. Now that heavy trucks are all but gone, that’s all it is.

        • 0 avatar
          baconpope

          Actually, GMC invented the truck and continued to demonstrate that it was a proper purposeful truck into the late 60’s. I would agree, though, that it has become little more than a Chevy trimline.

      • 0 avatar
        JustPassinThru

        That’s what kills me. GMChevrolet goes on so much about their brand meaning “trucks” – while it’s been twenty years since they made a commercial-grade truck that actually was intended to haul stuff with. It’s simply a badge-engineered Chevrolet truck – and it needs to die, or else kill the Chevy line of trucks and give all GM dealers a shot at carrying pickups.

        They didn’t want the lower-volume but guaranteed-sales middle and heavy-truck market; but they want to spend money to tool up to build a toy trucklet – chasing a relatively-small Wrangler market.

        Whose buyers are mostly buying the Jeep name.

        Maybe GM should save their money, and wait for Fiatsler to go where it’s unable to not go, Bankruptcy Court…and just BUY Jeep.

        Hey, it worked for Lido…he wasn’t a design genius, but he did know how to make money with a car company. Borrow a page from what’s worked in the past…

    • 0 avatar
      freekcj

      Since Ford is coming out with a new Bronco, maybe Chevy is responding to that as well? Anything will be a niche vehicle and won’t take anything away from JEEP. (And by JEEP I mean Wrangler)
      To my recollection they never made a ‘Jeep fighter’ in the first place. Unlike Ford’s Bronco, IH Scout, or Toyota FJ – they don’t have a heritage of producing such a vehicle.
      They failed with Hummer H3, and no one has been able (and probably never will) to unseat JEEP and it’s hold on that piece of the market.
      Fools errand, indeed.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    Bring it on! A slightly more offroad-y (4Runner-ized) “Envoy 2.0” sounds good to me. Just make sure to make the inevitable lower air dam easily removable, and 17 inch wheels with meaty tires an option. I’d also love to have the 4.3L OHV V6 truck motor rather than the somewhat effete 3.6L OHC car mill.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      In a mid-sized SUV? You can kiss the 4.3-liter off. Even Toyota recently replaced its venerable 4.0-liter V6 with its ubiquitous 3.5-liter car engine in the Tacoma.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “I’d also love to have the 4.3L OHV V6 truck motor rather than the somewhat effete 3.6L OHC car mill.”

      +1 – do that with the midsize PU twins as well!

      My offload vehicles get towed behind my SUV so I have no desire for anything designed to compete with a Jeep product. Unless your on your own private land there is no place in MN to off road legally with a truck anyways.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I sure hope the 4Runner doesn’t get the 3.5, that is a godawful engine by every conceivable measure to the 4.0.

      GM needs to be realistic and leave the minivan engines in the minivans, if this is a true SUV they will have no problems using exclusively truck engines.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I hope those 4Runners get 4×4 too one of these days :D

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        I’m kind of tempted to replace the Golf SportWagen TDI with a 4Runner, because I know it’ll last and maintain its resale value; plus I just really like them.

        Also on the list:

        NEW:
        F-150
        Mustang (EcoBoost or GT)
        Grand Cherokee (maybe; I’m still not that fond of FCA)
        Golf SportWagen TSI
        Golf R
        Avalon Limited

        USED:
        Genesis 5.0 (current-generation)
        V60
        535i
        Imported current-generation 530d wagon (assuming it can be done)
        GS 350
        Touareg (current-generation)
        Phaeton
        90s Rolls-Royce (pre-BMW); wouldn’t be a daily-driver
        Fusion Energi
        Another X5 (I know, I know)
        80s 560 SL; also wouldn’t be a daily-driver

        It’ll be interesting to see where we end up…

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Can’t go wrong with the 4Runner just negotiate a good deal and if you don’t like it, you can sell it with very little depreciation. Granted if that’s not a big deal there are multiple vehicles on that list that are very interesting.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            They don’t do a whole lot of negotiating on those, from what I can tell; furthermore, Gulf States Toyota (which manages the Oklahoma market) is notorious for putting all sorts of useless ad-ons on high-profit models like the 4Runner and Avalon.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            I got mine right at $30k, is has a couple of those stupid features (plastic covering half of the paint, assumedly due to low quality paint – interior spray clean crap) and a couple features heated seats, winter package, etc, no 4×4, the window sticker was a bit over $35k I believe. They’ll work with you, you just have to push them.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Haha, Avalon. You’re about 40 years too young for that one.

            LOL Phaeton
            LOL old Rolls

            You are glutton for punishment!

        • 0 avatar
          Fred

          That’s a pretty eclectic list of cars.

        • 0 avatar
          SSJeep

          4Runners are a whole lot of fun, but they are stuck with a millennium era powertrain. Add to that Toyota dealers dont stock very many 4Runners, and those that do stock any usually only have a couple SR5’s on the lot (good luck trying to find a Trail or Limited), and you are in for a headache Kyree.

          The headache will be made infinitely worse by the Toyota lot lizards accosting you upon your arrival, and then trying to “upsell” you into a far less appealing Highlander….

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            My buddy that dumped his 2 year old 4Runner for a Tundra told me last weekend he didn’t care for the way it drove. Specifically that it darted on the highway. It also was too underpowered to tow his v-nose enclosed snowmobile trailer.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            “millennium era powertrain”

            I don’t see this as a bad thing at all. The 4.0L is smooth and refined, gets the 4Runner to 60 in about 8 seconds, gets 20-21mpg highway. 5spd auto works predictably and smoothly. I’d take the 4Runner’s powertrain over a lot of others including Toyota’s own “up to date” Tacoma direct injected 3.5L torqueless wonder hooked up to the newer 6spd.

          • 0 avatar
            Lorenzo

            @Carlson Fan, your buddy should have just swapped an LS into it.

          • 0 avatar
            Sigivald

            Used GX!

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Kyree I think of you as more of a Euro/luxury car guy, the 4Runner will come across as way too ‘trucky:’tippy and bouncy in terms of on-road handling. Then again you have experience driving a GX470 so if if you didn’t mind driving that then you’re all good. For folks like you that will use it almost exclusively on road, the loss of a torsen center diff that allowed for a ‘full-time’ mode on pavement on non-Limited trim trucks really stinks.

          If you can live with the ride and climbing up into it, as well as the pretty high purchase price, these are truly fantastic vehicles. My neighbor has a Trail Premium in dark blue that is just perfect. I’m super jealous. Not sure of the state of pavement where you are, but I am thankful on a daily basis just driving around town that I’m driving something engineered for sustained offroad use.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Good advice; yes, I do wonder about the ride. I’ve never driven a current-generation 4Runner, but I have driven the GX470 and newer GX460, but those had rear air suspension.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            I think a carefully selected WK2 Grand Cherokee (ie avoid air suspension and other trouble prone systems) would be your best bet. Better-than-Euro reliability on the whole and I would guess cheaper servicing. Better than 4Runner on road performance.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I’m very leery of current JGC overall quality and longevity.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Corey I agree, I did some reading of TrueDelta complaints from owners on 2011-2014ish trucks (v6, hemi, all different trims), and the issues span absolutely every component of the vehicles, and at surprisingly low mileages. I retract my earlier recommendation!

        • 0 avatar
          bumpy ii

          My stepmom’s current-gen Highlander was in the body shop for about a month this year after it got rear-ended. She got a 4Runner rental. General theme was it looks nice, but rides and uses gas like an old truck and is harder to climb into.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            If a new 4Runner rides like ‘an old truck” I shudder to think what she’d think of how my ’96 rides! To me, a new 4Runner rides like a freaking Cadillac!

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            A DeVille takes issue with this statement.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I like the current styling on the 4Runner in Limited trim. The Limited’s multi-spoke wheels are nice, and the front end treatment is suitable. The overall look is blocky and competent.

            Interior still falls down though for the asking price.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I imagine the new 4Runner rides better than what’s badged as a Cadillac these days.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            You should take a ride in a scout or an old 3/4, the 4Runner rides like a Cadillac. Idk how she got bad MPG, I’ve consistently been over 20.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            Rough is a relative term, in comparison with the Highlander, and the Murano before that, and the RAV4 before that. She is a leadfoot in general, and likes to oscillate the pedal for some reason.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Makes sense in that case, the height I knew was subjective since I sit down into mine.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      gtemnykh,
      I don’t know if GM in the US had something similar to the Holden Drover.

      Something like this, modernised with a 2 litre petrol or better still a 1.6 turbo diesel would be a Jeep killer.

      On road the Drover was sh!t, off road they are incredible good fun.

      A friend at work and myself were talking a couple of weeks ago in buying one each and modifying them. They would need to be floated.

      He just came back from Japan off roading. He said the Japanese had tweaked Suzuki Sierras (the Drover is a re-badged Suzuki Sierra) with Mazda rotaries, and 2 litre turbo gasoline engines.

      Apparently the fun factor was huge.

      http://www.automobile-catalog.com/make/holden/drover/drover_hard-top/1985.html

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        When talking “Jeep Killer”, the drive train, other specs, and even build quality aren’t enough. You have to overcome the brand cache, and as with Mercedes and BMW, that’s a tough nut to crack.

  • avatar

    Buick/Cadillac stores need a truck line to sell, hence, GMC.

    Considering FCA’s abysmal quality relative to everyone else these days, Aldred may…MAY have a point.

    That said, might a better long range plan involve GM mandating its dealer franchisees carry Chevy, Buick and Cadillac…and drop GMC?

    Considering their moving Chevy upscale with new “High Country” models and the like, if GM truly took the mindset with Chevrolet that FoMoCo has taken for decades with Ford, in this mindset, eventually GMC and possibly even Buick would be as irrelevant as Mercury became.

    I have no reason to believe this will ever happen for GM but it might save them marketing expense.

  • avatar
    orenwolf

    I guess in a lot of ways it comes down to: What makes a jeep a jeep, and why are they so popular? From comments from the B&B, it isn’t especially high reliability or build quality, aside from a few, intentionally-basic models, right?

    It can’t just be the nameplate.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      For a few enthusiasts, it’s “genuinely ludicrous – especially with aftermarket help – off-road capability”.

      For the general market it’s the *idea* that you could actually go off-road.

      (I can sort of see a Chevy Blazer (like the old two-door K5) competing in that space.

      A GMC? Well … I guess it’s sort of like a Lexus GX?)

      • 0 avatar
        GeneralMalaise

        Yes… the Blazer was what popped up on my end, lol.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Yeah a GX competitor is what I had in my mind, moreso than something rough and tumble like a Wrangler. Handle the worst of modern America’s crumbling urban infrastructure in an unflappable BOF SUV, that should be their marketing strategy. Heck the old Envoy and the Lexus GX even looked somewhat similar in terms of rear end styling. GM’s trucks have gotten much nicer interiors as of late so hopefully we could all forget about the travesty that was the GMT-360 interior.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        The Envoy did kind of look like a budget version of the contemporary GX470 from the sides; never mind that the Envoy debuted a full model-year sooner.

    • 0 avatar
      JustPassinThru

      But it is the nameplate. It’s the IMAGE – of a war reconnaissance car, and of the hardscrabble companies, Willys and AMC, which made and sold it for half its history.

      It was a revolutionary thing, in the 1970s – selling the CJ-5, venerable even then, with the new foo-foo Renegade package, complete with Levis seats. But it did catch on; enough to get AMC to spend money it didn’t have to engineer the more fashionable CJ-7 – which had a more-balanced overall look, a stretched tub to go with the stretched nose the CJ got in 1972.

      As an aside, the CJs first caught on with the gay community – an in-yer-face ironic fashion statement. This was the early 1970s; and VW tried to do something similar with its recreated Wermacht Kubelwagen.

      Between safety standards and the Chicken Tax, the VW Thing was shot down, but the antifashion-fashion of the CJ caught on and stayed with us to today.

      But it’s gotta be a Jeep, get it?

      I don’t, either.

  • avatar
    jeoff

    Could GMC bring back Hummer as a Model?

    • 0 avatar
      JustPassinThru

      Don’t know if the designs and tooling were sold with “old” GM’s bankruptcy.

      In any event, they’d have a hell of a time getting new dealers for it – after ALL the Hummer dealers got burned, after building those expensive fashion-boutique dealerships which were finished about the time Hummer was shut down.

  • avatar
    slance66

    Well they certainly aren’t there now. Could they do it? I suppose it is worth a shot. Sales of the 4Runner and GX are up, along with Jeep selling well, so there is a market. To do it’s they’d need a solid off road capable 4Runner competitor, and they’d need to undercut Toyota on price. GM doesn’t even have a vehicle in that size category right now.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      There is the TrailBlazer, which is sold overseas, but not here. I believe it is, in some way, related to the global Colorado pickup.

      https://i.ytimg.com/vi/XA4Y3TsEJ18/maxresdefault.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      Frylock350

      GM wouldn’t need to undercut the 4Runner. Remember that before they abandoned it GM/Ford owned the midsized BOF market. They can ask what they want (as long as its less than a Tahoe) and they’ll sell it. I’m hoping for a new BOF Envoy with small block power.

      Also, the 2017 Acadia is in the size category.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    Hmm… maybe moderate off-road capability will be the Next Big Thing as state & local governments get overwhelmed by road degradation.

    I’m just trying to understand why anyone would otherwise care about a Jeep fighter.

    • 0 avatar
      tedward

      It’s probably a relatively easy sell within the company actually. There are only two vouched for methods when it comes to creating a halo suv. There’s the wrangler option (slow off roader) and the srt8 option (fat and fast wagon). I’m not aware of any pre runner raptor type options on the table in this category, although I’m sure that would work as well for these purposes.

      Seeing as they’re starting with a pickup chassis the fat wagon probably wouldn’t have a credible end point. Seeing as gmc is a older demo luxury rebadge trim a pre runner would be a poor image fit. Voila! We’re left with a slow but capable off roader.

      None of us should be surprised, or question the business case of, a halo suv model at this point in time. Every make with cash on hand should at least be seriously considering one.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    It’s really a truly easy market to crack, BOF, two solid axles, starting price no more than $25k don’t worry about the fuel economy, as long as it averages at least 15 MPG no one that actually buys off-road vehicles will care.

    Try to do unibody or IRS, just go sit back in the sand box, because you’ve wasted billions in development costs.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      Something like this makes sense for GM and I think you’d agree that the ‘Burb/’Hoe, ect. continue to drift farther away from their off-road roots with each iteration. Which I appreciate w/2007 GMT-900 because of what I use it for.

  • avatar
    Fred

    What is with GMs latest hard-on for Manhattan?

  • avatar

    If a small SUV is what GMC needs, GM already has what I believe is a fully engineered competitor to the Wrangler. It was called the Hummer HX concept, probably the only Hummer that made sense.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hummer_HX

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Pfft they all make sense, you just didn’t get enough drive time behind the wheel of each of them, the HX is starting to get outdated, plus the engines it were suppose to have were heresy – turbo 4 and small V6?- NAH!

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Ronnie,
      There is also these two. A Colorado 7 and the Izuzu MUX. Both 7 seaters as well. They sit on a full chassis and are real off roaders with hi and lo range. They are based on the Colorado/Dmax platform.

      Even though they share a lot both are very different with different suspensions, engine/drivetrains.

      In US speak they would sell for around $30 000 to $35 000USD.

      http://www.caradvice.com.au/279783/holden-colorado-7-v-isuzu-mu-x-comparison-review/

  • avatar
    dwford

    With GMC paired with Buick and in many places Cadillac as well, how much room is in that showroom for more crossovers and SUVs? Buick has 3 now, GMC has 3+ depending on how you want to count, and Cadillac has 2 with more on the way. Going more in the truck direction makes sense, but the size and price points will be similar.

    I recently went to my local Buick/Cadillac/GMC store to see all the new arrivals. The GMC Acadia is NOTICEABLY smaller than the old one, but looks nice. The trim around the touch screen looks cheap, though. The new Cadillac CT6 seemed hopelessly dull and not rich looking for the $89,000 sticker price. The new Cadillac XT5 is just not attractive at all, the touch screen looks small in the dash and it didn’t look like the $65,000 sticker. The new Buick Envision actually looked nice, but again the screen looked small. It was the nicest of the 4 new models, and even at $43k looked preferable to the XT5.

    They had 3 ATS-V coupes in stock, including a nice blue one for $10k off sticker. (still $66k though…)

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      $76k for a compact Turbo 6 that gets worse fuel economy and has lower outputs than an LT1?
      This is why GM needs a major shake up, FCA may have issues but they still focus on selling *Interesting* cars to the American public at prices that the average consumers can afford.

      And this is a perfect example of why I have no trust in GM to build an American class off-roader, had 2009 gone differently this exact same car and drivetrain would be sold at the local Pontiac dealer for ~$32k before discount, right under the V8 that belongs in the engine compartment.

      • 0 avatar
        dwford

        Yes, $76k for a stick shift Cadillac coupe. I didn’t look at the whole window sticker, so I have no idea how much options contribute to that. I’m sure it’s amazing to drive, but let’s get serious.

        That XT5 at $65k. You can’t even get a Lincoln MKX Black Label to that level, let alone a regular MKX 2.7TT

        To me it seems like Cadillac is trying to fake it until they make it on pricing, regardless of their real brand perception among buyers.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          $65k for a FWD crossover from a brand with no cache in the compact crossover segment? Har, BMW doesn’t even do that, I doubt Rolls would do that. Words cannot express the disconnect GM has from reality.

          • 0 avatar
            Sigivald

            (Nothing personal here, but I’ve seen it from two different people in this thread, so I gotta say something for the record:

            Cache – n.; A hidden stockpile of something preserved for later use. An intermediate storage space in a computer system between CPU and memory, by analogy.

            Cachet – n.; Prestige, from the French.

            Brands have cachet (ka-shay), not cache (kash).)

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Caché is also the name of an obscure medical object oriented DBMS.

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/InterSystems_Cach%C3%A9

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Is this NSFW? I don’t know any of those initials. LOL

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            Data Base Management System, aka herding 1s and 0s like feral cats with laser helmets.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’m tempted to make a Dr. Evil reference, but I am curious what you mean with that reference.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            “Preparation H” feels good, on the whole.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            Old SNL skit, probably inspired by Dino Riders.

            [hulu id=281962]

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            The more you know!

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Considering that the SUV / crossover is becoming the paradigm for the modern vehicle, if the alternative is Regals and Veranos that sit on the lots un-driven, I suspect there’s a lot of room for more hot-selling crossovers and SUVs.

      That said, there’s a rumor that Buick will bring over a wagon version of the current Regal (aka Opel Insignia), which should be nearing the end of its lifecycle; I would nevertheless be highly interested in such a vehicle.

      • 0 avatar
        GeneralMalaise

        A Regal wagon would actually be pretty darned interesting.

        • 0 avatar
          tedward

          Moar wagon! Seriously, at this point I only have two non luxury options. Only one of those has the required manual transmission, and not paired with any decent options. I certainly would shop a buick wagon, just so long as they don’t tsx it.

  • avatar
    Johnster

    GMC should be able to quickly come up with a cheap-to-develop body-on-frame SUV based on the Canyon/Colorado. And as Kyree has pointed out, they seem to have such a vehicle for sale in other markets. Let’s not forget that Ford is bringing back a “Bronco,” although it sounds more like the old body-on-frame Explorer than the classic Bronco from the 1960s and early 1970s.

    The GMC SUV might not compete directly with the Wrangler, but should steal a fair number of sales if it is priced and marketed competitively. And yeah, add a Chevy version to spread the development cost around and increase sales a bit more. GMC can get a unique Denali version.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    On paper it looks like a smart move, but I don’t think it is a smart move. I doubt Wrangler faithful will cross-shop one, and I doubt the generic CUV market would give it a look (since the CUV proves these buyers are seeking zero real world capability as long as they receive other perceived “truck” benefits).

  • avatar
    Trucky McTruckface

    GMC remains as redundant as ever, existing only to placate a redundant sales channel that GM long ago gave too much leverage.

    Yeah, sure, sales may be up in whatever meaningless metric, but how much different would the results be if GMC was shuttered and its offerings folded into Chevrolet and Cadillac? Development costs would go down and the other brands wouldn’t have to wear such cheesy, contrived corporate faces in a futile attempt at differentiation. In other words, maybe GM’s products could focus on being more, you know, appealing to real customers.

    As for a Wrangler competitor, GM had one in 1969. It was called the Blazer/Jimmy. Take a full-size truck, shorten it and throw a fiberglass cap over the bed. Done. They made a smaller version of it for ’82, too. Try it again, it’d be cheap enough to do even if it doesn’t meet sales forecasts. What definitely won’t meet forecasts is the blatant Wrangler knockoff that I presume the GM suits are proposing. The Jeep name and heritage is a major sales driver; Even ancient junk like the Patriot sells like hotcakes because of the badge on the hood. If a Brand X Wrangler was really that marketable you could still buy a Scout, an original Bronco or Land Cruiser, a Samurai, etc…

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Just buy Jeep and be done with it. Either wait for FCA bankruptcy or offer FCA enough to buy Jeep outright.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      ;) The twilight zone, eh.

    • 0 avatar
      JustPassinThru

      Ha! After Jeep had killed Bantam; Willys-Overland; sent Kaiser into AMC’s arms; and then had to endure AMC’s death throes…

      …and then burning Renault badly; and then going to Chrysler just before THAT parent got gang-raped by the Germans…

      …picked up like a $10 hooker by a venture-capital outfit and then left for dead; and then GIVEN to the Italians for another go-round of gang-rape…

      …the Jeep Pox is now gonna do to GM what should have happened to it ten years ago.

      Kill it.

      I’ll shed no tears.

  • avatar
    zerofoo

    Here’s the only “GMC” retro military vehicle that should be built:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M3_Gun_Motor_Carriage

    On a more serious note – GM already tried to bring us a civilian “military” vehicle – have we forgotten the Hummer brand experiment already?

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    They’re in a tough spot here, I think. They don’t have the name recognition of a long standing model like the Wrangler. They don’t have a midsize real SUV competitor to the GC since you’ve got to step up to the Yukon. And their smaller items are going to get even -smaller- and be based off the Cruze (not sure that’s a good idea). The Acadia isn’t a real SUV and it’s obvious, and it too is shrinking.

    So, new model to take the place of the old Envoy, or something? Every which way I look to see GMC compete with the Wrangler and the GC, I just get big red NO signs in my mind.

    I do advocate for more separation of the Denali line from GMC as well. It doesn’t need to say GMC on the front any more, just a tasteful DENALI logo (or in block letters like Land Rover). It would absolutely increase sales.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      They have the Acadia, that’s the GC competitor, midsize crossover vs midsize crossover.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I guess I don’t really count the Acadia. I see the GC as more of an SUV, and something which can actually go offroad. Also view the GC as a bit nicer than the Acadia (though I still wouldn’t purchase either).

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          I wouldn’t take the Mercedes crossover it’s based on offroad, and you can’t really make a platform not designed for off-roading suddenly capable by slapping a name from an off-road vehicle onto it. imho

          The problem is the GC is a Really good crossover, whereas the Acadia is something that old ladies end up settling for when they go to the dealership and find they can no longer afford to replace their Yukon with a newer version. I’ve heard this exact issue more times than I can count, GM is boned if someone comes out with an affordable Tahoe/Suburban competitor.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Who would that be, with the Yukon competitor? Ford is going aluminum so if anything costs will go up with that new generation. Unless Nissan’s new Patrol is seriously cheap AND fairly luxurious, I can’t think of anybody doing it.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Only FCA at this point.

  • avatar
    baconpope

    GMC needs to get back in the RV business–a place where they truly excelled. Outside of the Oldsmobile Banshee and the ZR2, GM has never tried to produce a “serious” off-roader. The diesel Canyon could make a stellar platform for an off-roadable RV with lots of room for profitability.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Huh? GM produced the H3 remember? Front & rear lockers, full time 4WD w/ 2 speed transfer case standard. Additionally they farmed out two amazing off-roaders from AM General to sell. These vehicles laugh at the doll-up package that was the ZR2.

  • avatar
    maserchist

    A very attractive grille on the articles picture only has 3 big things wrong with it (sung to the music of The Grinch who stole Christmas) I repeat ” G. M. C. “.

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