By on July 21, 2016

2016 Mazda 3 sedan red

Enthusiast praise for the Mazda3 began before the current-generation compact Mazda arrived in late 2013. Previous iterations benefited from hugely positive reviews. “We’re going to love the 3 once it arrives in America,” Automobile wrote in December 2003. Credit for dynamic excellence was the norm a generation later. “Steering is direct and the suspension is firm enough for spirited driving and equally competent at soaking up bumps,” said AutoGuide in early 2009. I haven’t hesitated to get in on the action, writing in my second review of the latest compact Mazda, “The Mazda3 is still the best compact car you can buy.”

It’s therefore not surprising to see that in a five-way compact car comparison for the magazine’s July edition, Car and Driver named the 2016 Mazda3 i Grand Touring the winner of the test. Car and Driver handed the Mazda 203 points, 44-percent more than the fifth-ranked 2016 Nissan Sentra SL achieved.

Industry observers also won’t be surprised to learn that Car and Driver’s fifth-ranked Nissan Sentra produced 139-percent more first-half sales than the Mazda, while the other three losers all roundly outsold the Mazda, as well.

Let’s be clear: the individual compact car buyer isn’t forced to make their buying decision based on a single review. That can be dangerous.

“Dodge’s 2016 Dart compact sedan brings European driving character to a highly stylized American 4-door loaded with features,” Kelley Blue Book’s Joe Tralongo writes, while also pointing out that this car, which even Dodge’s own FCA parent company doesn’t believe has the goods to make it past September, “offers something for everyone in a package that is fuel-efficient, safe and fun.”

Furthermore, popularity contests don’t invariably provide a clear understanding of class leadership, either. After all, Big Macs outsell In-N-Out’s cheeseburger. The fact that the Scion tC outsells the Mazda MX-5 Miata does not make the tC the superior car.

That said, the Mazda3’s knack for generating consistent critical adulation stands in stark contrast to the reaction of the market at large. Sales of the 3 climbed to a three-year high in 2015 but were down 13 percent from the 2012 U.S. sales peak. Through the first-half of 2016, sales of the Mazda3 are down 6.4 percent in a category that’s fallen 6.1 percent. Only 5 percent of the compact cars sold in the United States in 2016’s first six months were Mazda3s. Eight competitors are selling more often. The Honda Civic and Toyota Corolla are selling nearly four times more frequently. The Nissan Sentra and Ford Focus are both selling at least twice as frequently.

2016 Mazda 3 hatchback

Though two of the competitors in Car and Driver’s test, the recently replaced Hyundai Elantra and Chevrolet Cruze, posted significant first-half declines valued at 73,599 sales, the Nissan Sentra (which ranked fifth in the comparo) is up 16 percent to 123,014 sales already this year. Mazda is unlikely to sell 100,000 3s by year’s end.

Meanwhile, the one car that closely challenged the Mazda3 for Car and Driver’s compact title, the new tenth-generation Honda Civic, is up 20 percent, year-over-year, and ranks second overall among passenger cars in 2016. At the current rate of growth, Honda is on track to sell 400,000 Civics in America this year.

The subject of poor Mazda USA sales figures is not a new one here at TTAC. We’ve blamed road noise and cheap-looking base and mid-grade trims. A small dealer network and historic rust concerns are a factor, even as Consumer Reports bestows positive reliability ratings upon Mazda.

Car and Driver calls the Mazda3 “an overachiever in a world where excellence isn’t always rewarded with sales” and says, “In the fun-to-drive category, where few affordable cars even try, Mazda makes the greatest effort and overwhelmingly succeeds.

The credit paid to the 2016 Mazda3 seems not to matter to the overwhelming majority of compact car buyers. Will they care about a refreshed Mazda3 for 2017?

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

127 Comments on “2016 Mazda3 Wins Comparison Test, All The Losers Win Bigly In The Real World...”


  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    I feel like BTSR this morning…

    FCA should buy/merge with Mazda. Park these cars on a FCA lot with a FCA badge on the hood and the sales would sky rocket.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      You might want to see a doctor about that.

      “FCA should buy/merge with Mazda.”

      FCA and Mazda are similar size companies, it would have to me a “merger of equals”.

      • 0 avatar
        deanst

        “FCA and Mazda are similar size companies, it would have to me a “merger of equals””.

        You might want to see a financial analyst about that.

        Fiat sold 4.6 million cars last year, Mazda sold 1.3 million; FCA also has about twice the enterprise value.

        • 0 avatar
          zamoti

          I think the value is that FCA (at least the Dodge brand) doesn’t do small/midsize cars well and Mazda doesn’t do large cars at all. Together, they could round out the portfolio and it means that Mazda doesn’t have to go under.

          • 0 avatar
            SCE to AUX

            Apparently, Mazda doesn’t do small/midsize cars well, either.

          • 0 avatar
            redav

            If Mazdas had a blue oval on them and were sold at Ford dealerships, they’d do just fine.

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            redav-

            They sold great when they were at Ford dealerships. Heck, the Focus, which shares things with the previous 3, sells better than the new 3.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “Apparently, Mazda doesn’t do small/midsize cars well, either.”

            Mazda’s “problem” is that they focus on stuff the average car owner doesn’t care about.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Mazda’s market cap in USD is only about $1B more than FCA’s. One is not clearly towering over the other.

          “Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCAU) has a market cap of $8.7 billion.”

          “Mazda Motor. Market Cap As of May 2016; $9.7 Billion”

          “What is ‘Market Capitalization’
          Market capitalization is the total dollar market value of all of a company’s outstanding shares. Market capitalization is calculated by multiplying a company’s shares outstanding by the current market price of one share. The investment community uses this figure to determine a company’s size, as opposed to sales or total asset figures.”

          http://www.investopedia.com/terms/m/marketcapitalization.asp

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            The problem with merging one thing with character that I like, and one thing I largely question/dislike is that you end up with one larger thing with no character and which I also dislike.

          • 0 avatar
            deanst

            I used the term enterprise value, which includes the amount of debt in the capital structure.

            Contrary to what you may read on the internet, this is the more common measure of a firm’s size used by the investment community. It would be silly to suggest that a company changes size as it changes the ratio of debt/equity in its capital structure.

          • 0 avatar
            87 Morgan

            Honestly, I was not aware of the market cap of either firm.
            I guess I am looking at it from a pragmatic standpoint. The FCA dealer would love to have a product like the Mazda lineup. Think of all the garbage they have had to foist upon the car buying public, and done it successfully. Avenger, Sebring, Breeze, Sundance..you can go on an on.
            Whereas the Mazda distribution channel is fragmented at best and just about always a side show to the core product line of the owning dealer. Conversation with the sales staff usually go like this…Oh, you wanted a Mazda? Well, let’s see, I think we have QX9 out back. You Sure you don’t want a Subaru or VW? Oh, it’s a CX9? My bad.
            Very few Stand alone Mazda stores out there.

            Pack them in to the far more plentiful and honestly a nicer place to be, FCA store with a FCA badge and I would bet the retail sales volume of Mazda doubles.

      • 0 avatar
        ect

        “merger of equals”? In the real world, there is no such thing.

        That said, a combination of FCA and Mazda would seem to make sense.

    • 0 avatar
      sutherland555

      87 Morgan: I’m not entirely sure Mazda would be OK with a full merger with another carmaker but they have shown themselves to be open to partnerships (Toyota and FCA). So maybe FCA buys a large stake (a la 33% Ford used to own)?

      SCE to AUX: I own a 2013 Mazda 3 and test drove other compacts before I bought it. It certainly has it’s negatives but it definitely drives better than any other car I tested. Honest question, have you ever driven a current Mazda?

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        I have not driven a current Mazda. My comment is based on the fact that Mazda continues to struggle to *actually sell* their small/midsize cars.

        I have no doubt there are many Mazda owners who are very happy with their purchase. You describe how well it drives, which is what most media reviewers do also. But most consumers – not caring about that – are looking at things like value, fuel economy, resale, reliability, and features, and so they gravitate to other brands.

        Mazda is at the bottom of US sales for standalone mfrs, except for Mitsubishi and Volvo.

        Mazda needs to find a differentiating niche. Even Mitsubishi has the el-cheapo Mirage.

        • 0 avatar
          sutherland555

          SCE to AUX: Resale value on the 3 is reasonably good but it might be different in Canada where Mazda’s actually sell pretty well.

          Fuel economy is quite good on the skyactiv engines & transmissions. Very competetive, if not class leading.

          As for reliability, it hasn’t been as reliable as my old 99 Civic but i also don’t think anything really is. I can’t find the Timothy Cain’s article re: Mazda reliability but the main gist of it is that reliability differs greatly from model to model. As memory serves, the 3 was their most consistently reliable model.

          I do understand why people don’t buy the 3s over a Civic or Corolla. The ride can be harsh for some, the NVH sucks and it’s cramped in the back seat for sure. It’s definitely not for everyone but I am consistently surprised by how many people don’t even consider it.

          • 0 avatar
            SCE to AUX

            Well, I’m sympathetic.

            I’m not one to advocate buying in the center all the time. I’ve had mostly non-mainstream cars over the years, including a Nissan Leaf and Scion xB1, and even a 74 Fiat 128SL.

            I suspect one reason people don’t even consider the Mazda 3 is the rarity of dealers, and lack of advertising. There is one very close to me, but I guess that’s not true for most of the population.

        • 0 avatar
          Flipper35

          A Dart that drives and rides like a Mazda anything would have been a much better seller.

    • 0 avatar
      npaladin2000

      I honestly think this is a great idea, they can complement each other fairly well. Mazda has great small engines (where, pray tell, is Hurricane still?), and they’re much better at transmissions than FCA as well. FCA, on the other hand, brings solid car platforms, including a new RWD platform to build Mazdas off of, great AWD systems, and platforms to slot in below the CX3 and Mazda2. Not to mention commercial vans and trucks, and larger engines for the CX-9. Oh, and UConnect is a MUCH better system than Mazda has.

      True there would be some overlap, the CX-3 and the 500x would compete for sales until they were properly consolidated for example, but I think there’s a good fit to be had. AN

    • 0 avatar
      npaladin2000

      I honestly think this is a great idea, they can complement each other fairly well. Mazda has great small engines (where, pray tell, is Hurricane still?), and they’re much better at transmissions than FCA as well. FCA, on the other hand, brings solid car platforms, including a new RWD platform to build Mazdas off of, great AWD systems, and platforms to slot in below the CX3 and Mazda2. Not to mention commercial vans and trucks, and larger engines for the CX-9. Oh, and UConnect is a MUCH better system than Mazda has.

      True there would be some overlap, the CX-3 and the 500x would compete for sales until they were properly consolidated for example, but I think there’s a good fit to be had. And Mazda is really just too small to go it alone anymore.

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    The problem is that auto journos rate cars on looks, handling and performance. Buyers in this category care about value, practicality, reliability, and durability.

    • 0 avatar
      carrya1911

      Pretty much. It’s about managing risk. If I had to buy a car in that segment because I couldn’t afford anything else, I’d buy the Civic too. Because I’m reasonably certain that the Civic will depreciate less and will be running should I decide to keep it for a very long time.

    • 0 avatar

      More often than not.

    • 0 avatar
      jmo

      I would also add comfort and low NVH.

    • 0 avatar
      HeyILikemySaturnOK

      Indeed. The journalists usually just rent or are provided with a car by the manufacturer and their articles focus on short(er)-term qualities.

      Also, when I look up the average prices for the Mazda3 online, they appear to be priced more like mid-size cars than the so-called competitor cars with which they are compared. Slighter higher than the Honda Civic which is also higher than it’s own competition. They all just seem too highly-priced for some of us who do not necessarily want a 5 year loan. So, i can see the cheaper-but-still-adequate cars selling higher volumes.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      … and looks.

      Lots of people (“me”) think the Mazdas are overstyled and would be much more inclined to buy one if they weren’t.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      Automotive journalists also tend to review extremely well equipped cars. Most people purchase lower trim levels. I’ve often been disappointed with lower trim Mazdas. They look and feel incredibly cheap.

  • avatar
    mmarton

    New about the 2017 Mazda 3 is bubbling over improved driving dynamics but I haven’t read anything about addressing the continual shortcoming – cabin noise. Anything?

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      Supposedly they addressed it in the CX-5, but I haven’t ridden in before/after examples to say. If they did it with that without a major revision, then they could do it on the 6 or 3, but I don’t really expect it until the next major generation comes out.

      The 6 and CX-5 are getting long in the tooth and should receive major overhauls in the next few years. That would be the ideal time to address noise (like they did with the CX-9).

  • avatar

    So what’s the proposed solution? They can clean up the dealer network over time, and work on the rust issues, but then they’re running into the fact that the 3 isn’t designed for, or marketed to, people buying Civics and Corollas–buyers to whom reliability and resale are the most important aspects to consider with their vehicles. The people buying Civics and Corollas are some of the most risk-avoidance folks on the road. To each their own–I’m just saying I don’t see them walking down to the Mazda dealership just because the journos start telling them “the 3’s lost some of its handling and feedback, but now it’s more comfortable, spacious, and might even hold up like a Corolla”.

    The stance in articles like this seems to be that if only the 3 and other Mazda products were made to be Toyota and Honda clones, they’d do better. Okay. Who’s to say they’d simply lose what market share they have trying that? They’d be losing what makes them a unique proposition in the market, while stepping into saturated waters.

    I don’t envy Mazda’s position.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “So what’s the proposed solution?”

      Lower the prices. Mazda is doing the Cadillac thing where they have a decent enough lineup but then price everything at parity (or higher!) than the long-established players while refusing to acknowledge they are a bit brand in most segments.

      Or do rebadges for FCA.

      • 0 avatar
        Nick_515

        ajla, that’s it.

        I’d never buy a civic over a mazda3 (corolla doesn’t exist as far as i am concerned). but i can have a golf for the money it takes to buy half a decent mazda3. that’s a problem.

        oh, and the sedan, my preferred version, looks cheap.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Or do rebadges for FCA.

        Yeah Mazda doesn’t need a merger but I’m convinced that Dodge Dart badging on a Mazda 3 would be better for FCA than what they have now. Be really cynical and don’t even change the sheet metal – most of America won’t notice.

      • 0 avatar
        kefkafloyd

        They’re already doing rebadges for Toyota, but their main issue for that is production capacity. Even if they wanted to do rebadges for FCA they probably wouldn’t be able to build them given their capacity in Japan and Mexico.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        This!

        The prices on Mazdas get up with more established and (arguably) better-made players with better badges and better resale value in a hurry.

      • 0 avatar
        Felix Hoenikker

        I found this to be true when comparing the Mazda 6 vs the Accord. The 6 had fewer features at the same trim level but listed for $2K more. The local Mazda dealer declined to discount, but Honda knocked off $1.5 K off list price with very little effort on my part. Which do you think I bought?

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I rented the exact car they tested and I’m truly confused as to how they arrived at those conclusions about its dynamics. The front washed out immediately. The steering had good weight and speed, but zero feedback. The 2.0L sounded like a blender chewing marbles at idle, though it did get better as the revs climbed… however, the transmission was slow to respond in both automatic and manual mode.

    Like I’ve said before, dynamically it was just as anodyne and security focused as the Golf TSI I rented. It did not goad or reward enthusiastic driving at all. I rank the two cars even as I much preferred the Mazda’s interior, but as far as driving experience goes the Golf’s meaty torque band made the sluggish transmission and soggy dynamics irrelevant.

    And neither was anywhere near as tail happy, communicative or eager as my 09 Civic EX out of the box. I would bet the current Civic is this thing’s dynamic superior now.

    Most importantly these nuances are irrelevant to 99% of the buying public. Mazda fails because it doesn’t have the dealer network, interior volume or value of its competitors.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      They sell their esteem to the highest bidder. Mazda apparently thinks success will follow bought reviews like it did for Porsche. They’re forgetting that every new vehicle release is accompanied by a SWAG retreat at a posh setting, so buying a comparison test win or two won’t get much traction when every car released is lauded as a potential best-in-class break through until the next comparison test.

      • 0 avatar

        So if the 3 wins comparo after comparo, it means Mazda bought out every auto journo running comparos?

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          Mazda doesn’t have the money to buy a review. Heck I was amazed they dropped the coin to use “The Lorax” in their advertising a few years back.

          “I speak for the trees, and the Mazda Threeez”

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          Lost in this article is that Mazda’s 3 finished a distant 4th in the Motor Trend comparison test, behind the winning Honda Civic, the heavily hyped Chevrolet Cruz, and the no longer a value Hyundai Elantra. The 3 was described as “feel[ing] less special now and offer[ing] middling performances in almost all of our seven criteria.” Car and Driver’s rent boys are perhaps the least credible in an incredible field, which is why the archaic Mazda 3 won their 2016 comparison test.

          http://www.motortrend.com/cars/chevrolet/cruze/2016/2016-2017-big-test-compact-sedans/

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          I think ToddAtlasF1’s theory is a bit ridiculous, but you seem to be proving it.

          In any case, it’s not unheard of for auto journos to be wrong. The talk of the excellent steering feel and tail happy dynamics in the 3i is ridiculous. I had one for a week and experienced neither. OK, the 3i is a good step up from something like a Sentra or Corolla dynamically, but it’s not heads and shoulders above the new Civic or even a base Golf. C&D’s relationship with the 3 is like the emperor’s new clothes…. I find EVO’s assessment to be more reflective of my experience:

          “The driving controls are well-weighted and linear in response too, which means you always know how much to squeeze the brake pedal or turn the tactile steering wheel. In a way it’s satisfying, but in saying that, this isn’t a car you’d grab the keys for a drive in for the enjoyment of it.”

          I’m depressed that cars have become so dynamically numb that something like the 3i is hailed as a dynamic benchmark. I suppose it’s a more contrarian choice than a clearly superior Civic, which I know journos and internet commenters love to be

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            Would you grab the keys to a basic Civic or Golf for the purpose of enjoyment?

            It’s not that anybody is necessarily wrong. We all have valid reasons for our preferences, and those who review the cars are no different. The key to determining useful sources of reviews is to find those reviewers who desire the same traits as you.

            I don’t have a lot of experience with the new Mazda3 and haven’t done anything really aggressive in one, but taking it on the cloverleaf immediately after an HR-V and a CX-3 put a smile on my face. It felt like a proper car after doing the same with those, especially the completely numb HR-V. It also had much better dynamics than the Juke and Impreza that followed. The Focus, however, might have been my choice of the bunch. I’d need more driving time to be sure. It felt more refined than the 3, but still seemed dynamically competent and communicative. The MZR-based engine sung a nicer song than the Skyactiv as well. I suppose I shouldn’t have been surprised that I’d like a car that shares so much DNA with my own Mazda3.

            Then again, every time winter rolls around I’d be yearning for the Impreza. It wasn’t a bad drive. The prospective buyer cares not for having fun in snow though, and fuel economy was a priority, so the Mazda3 was her choice to replace the ’93 MX-6 she drove for sixteen years. It was still a solid car and I was sad to see it go, but it went to a good home.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            I’ll add that we never drove the Civic. She was only interested in hatchbacks. I’d have been interested in driving the Golf, but I certainly wasn’t going to be the one to suggest that she roll the dice on German reliability.

            The last Golf I drove was a 2008, and I found the steering to be quite slow and numb in comparison to my first-gen Mazda3. The two generations of Mazda3 that followed lost a lot of that excellent feel, but I’d still put them well ahead of the ’08 Golf.

          • 0 avatar
            sportyaccordy

            I would go for the Civic for sure. I’m a Honda fanboy, but that’s only because they haven’t let me down in the fun to drive department in almost 15+ years.

            Focus is the dynamic champ of the segment IMO… good engine, best chassis. Also among the best exteriors. For me though it’s completely undone by the ghastly dashboard design and SYNC2. Hmmm, actually looking at the interior now it’s not as bad as I remember it.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            They did like the Civic. It might have been their top choice if the transmissions had been manuals.

            I see that the Mazda3 had the best slalom performance despite having the slipperiest tires with the tallest sidewall and the narrowest tread in the test. That says something about the handling. It also shows that the Civic and Cruze did well to keep up with the 3 in the fuel economy department despite the 3 gaming that aspect with terrible LRR tires. Those Bridgestone Ecopias pulled off a whopping 0.79g dry and 0.61g(!) wet on an E92 BMW in Tire Rack testing.

          • 0 avatar
            WheelMcCoy

            @rpn – “The MZR-based engine sung a nicer song than the Skyactiv as well.”

            I know what you mean. 2010 Mazda3 here, and the MZR engine, when revved above 5,000 rpm has a smooth and resonant song.

            I found a promo video of the Mazda3 in Singapore, which is known as the Axela. There’s music playing, but since you’ve driven an MZR, I think you can discern the engine note around 00:45

            https://youtu.be/yAAolgbWhcY?t=32s

          • 0 avatar
            WheelMcCoy

            EVO readers are more demanding than average. Here’s an old review of the 2010 Mazda3 from a Consumer Reports who buy their own test cars. I would think the SkyActiv Mazda3 would perform similarly.

            https://youtu.be/AWo0PJbbpic

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            Sounds familiar!

            The solid rubber CP-E engine mount on mine transmits quite a bit more of the lovely high-rpm song into the cabin compared to stock. I suppose some would be annoyed by the additional NVH, but I’d enjoy having even more of the mechanical engine noise make it into the cabin.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            I can relate to the EVO summary. I don’t see myself ever craving a drive in something that can’t go sideways under power. But that doesn’t mean I don’t enjoy my economical FWD car whenever I actually need to drive it.

          • 0 avatar
            tjh8402

            @SportyAccord – Car and Driver hasn’t treated the Mazda 3 as being head and shoulders above the competition. In the last comparison test, they said a 6 speed manual in the Civic could reverse the first and second place finishers. The Honda finished only 3 points behind the Mazda, and actually won the chassis category by 3 points. The only place the Mazda handidly beat the Civic was in features and amenities, which it won by 4 points. The Focus lost its comparison to the Mazda largely on the same basis as the Civic (and the Focus had previously defeated the prior generation Mazda 3). In another class comparison, the 3 only beat the VW Jetta by a single point overall. The comparison test with the Golf was a powertrain focused one, and the 2.5L’s superiority there to the VW 1.8t is pretty clear (it was more fun, quicker accelerating, and turned in the same mpg).

  • avatar
    kefkafloyd

    The Mazda 3 is an excellent car being sold by a mediocre company.

    That said, the current 3 starts getting pricey pretty quickly, especially in hatchback form, and the dealer experience leaves something to be desired. If it had a Honda badge on it, people would be buying them hand over fist. I’m biased, as a Mazda owner and enthusiast, but this is not the first example of “excellent product sold by a mediocre company” out there. I always seem to hitch my wagon to these things, be it Minolta (and now Sony) cameras, Casio pocket computers, Commodore products…

  • avatar
    Rod Panhard

    We recently took our 2016 Mazda3 Grand Touring on 4450 miles of road trip. The “road noise” really depends on the pavement. Most of the time, it’s not a problem.

    Handling, and fuel economy have been outstanding. Getting 40 mpg on the highway is normal. The six-speed manual makes all errands fun, and as an owner of a Miata, I have no qualms about this car being like a four-door Miata.

    Drawbacks? The OEM tires aren’t exactly the best in the rain. What’s odd though is that they’re fine in 3″ of snow. We got the sedan, rather than the hatch.

    Previous cars we used to fulfill the role that our Mazda3 is now fulfilling, with ease I might add, include a Volvo 245 wagon, a Saab 900s, and a Mercedes C320 wagon.

    The Mazda3 with a manual scratches the itch of wanting the practicality and fun-to-drive factor of an older Saab, but without the uncertainty of old-car reliability, or lack of access to qualified mechanics.

    In short, I absolutely love this car.

  • avatar
    ajla

    So I just went to Truecar and the offer on a Sentra SV CVT Appearance Package was $14.5K.

    A Mazda3i Sport Auto with Preferred Package was $19.2K, basically the same as what I got for a Corolla LE Plus and Civic LX CVT. Even a popular-optioned Dart SXT was $17k.

    Unless the website is being weird, it looks like Nissan is offering some big upfront savings.

    • 0 avatar
      zamoti

      Nissan is a fantastic small-car value brand if you don’t care much about how their cars drive. For most people, they just want cheap transportation and Nissan is the go-to right now. They’ve out-Hyundai’d Hyundai and Mitsubishi is no more. With their low-rent interiors and nasty CVTs they’re easy to look down your nose at from a consumer perspective, but when a college kid needs some new wheels or a struggling parent needs to get to work, it’s hard to ignore the value proposition.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Yep Nissan uses the simplest and most straightforward strategy: hit all the important needs of the majority of compact sedan buyers (reliable, efficient, roomy) at a price point that undercuts most of the competition. A coworker ended up with a Sentra SV with my whole-hearted approval and has been more than thrilled with being able to easily fit two car seats in the back and to get 40+ mpg in his mixed suburban commute. The Sentra was 15-20% cheaper than some established players. Nissans also tend to prioritize a smooth ride over “communicative handling.”

        • 0 avatar
          JD23

          Nissans aren’t even particularly reliable anymore – CR has Nissan ranked average – but they are sure are cheap. I had an Altima as a rental a few months ago and it was a cheap, utterly forgettable car.

    • 0 avatar
      sutherland555

      Nissan offers cheap sleep inducing cars that have two redeeming features: incredible fuel economy due the CVTs and a plush comfortable ride.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    The Mazda 3 is too small inside.

    Maybe Mazda could produce some sales champs if they didn’t squander so many resources keeping rotary engine development alive.

  • avatar
    theonlydt

    I can get a Sentra SV (manual) here in Canada on lease cheaper than any other compact, and cheaper than most sub-compacts. It’s a few $ a month more than the Versa Note. I’m guessing it sells well on cost, plus it’s quiet and comfortable.

    I’m glad someone called out the 3 for looking cheap and nasty in the lower level trims. Flat paint, steel wheels, it all just looks bad. I do like the sedan, but felt the hatchback was a step backwards over the last one. However, once you see a 6 you realise the 3 is just a poor imitation. I LOVE the lines on the 6, it has the right proportions.

    Agree that it can get expensive once you’re mid-level, especially if adding auto.

    Now, if only Mazda could ignore common sense and bring over the 6 Tourer… mmm…. especially with the 2.5T from the CX-9… mmm mm mmmmmmmmm…. https://www.mazda.co.uk/assets/uk/cars/all-new-mazda6-wagon/overview/2/1/mazda6_UK_wagon_front_960x540.png

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      And yet, up here in Canada, the 3 outsells the Sentra and Versa (which I include because it’s huge inside) combined. The Nissans are good for about 15k per year each, while the Mazda is having a bad year if it does less than 40k (although, volume looks to have fallen off a bit since the current generation was released)

      I suspect dealer network or public perception is the real problem, over all of the B&Bs little perceived faults (especially since they do so much better in Canada than the US). Mazda can barely sell the CX-5 down there – if you can’t succeed with a decent small crossover, you’re worse at selling than I am.

      • 0 avatar
        SP

        I see buckets of CX-5s in my area (near Philadelphia). The dealer network is a factor I had never considered before some commenter here mentioned that the Mazda dealers are rare in some parts of the country, and may have a bad reputation.

        The 3 is also quite common, at least in the previous generations. Sadly, the new 3 and 6 are still fairly rare. The world needs more Soul Red …

        My local dealer is very nice, even though they have an old facility. But maybe some are not so fortunate.

        I should also mention that I see far more Mazda 5s on the road here than one might believe possible, after reading so many comments about how nobody ever bought one.

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    Mazda either needs to offer a 100,000 mile warranty (worked for the Koreans), or slash MSRP’s drastically.

    In the eyes of buyers, they’re an also-ran, “that ‘other’ Japanese car company.”

    If cars were cell phones, Mazda would be Blackberry. They can’t sell on name alone, and are never going to be relevant unless they can offer more value than Toyota/Honda/Nissan.

    • 0 avatar
      NN

      You beat me to it. A 100k warranty and a big advertising budget to announce it will get asses into seats. If the cars are so reliable then it won’t cost them much.

      The Nissans sell on price. Americans love a deal

    • 0 avatar
      zamoti

      Hey, what’s wrong with BlackBerry?

      –Sent from my BlackBerry Passport

    • 0 avatar
      sutherland555

      In Canada, Mazda has a 3 year/unlimited mileage warranty on all new cars (starting last year) so they must be confident in the reliability of their products.

      I suspect that maybe we’re a test market for this policy. The dealer network is actually really good here in Canada so that could be a factor as well. Mazda also generally does a lot better in Canada than pretty much anywhere else.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        Well, for most of us, “3 years” means “not even 50kmi” (80kkm).

        (Unlimited mileage for 3 years is a great deal if you’re the guy who drives 100,000 miles a year.

        Pretty much nobody is that guy, though.)

        They want to impress me with confidence in their car, double it.

        • 0 avatar
          sutherland555

          I don’t think I actually drive all that much (20 km/13 mile commute, weekend errands and the odd road trip) and have easily managed to put 56000 Km/35000 miles) in almost 3 years of ownership. I don’t think it’s that far fetched for a lot of people to go over 36k miles in less than 3 years.

          At any rate, it’s a sight better than the standard new car warranty. Besides Hyundai and Kia (?), is there anyone else that provides the 100000 mile warranty?

        • 0 avatar
          redav

          Average in the US is around 12k mi/yr. Plenty of people are at or above 15k mi/yr and run out of miles on their warranty long before the time is up.

          I see a lot of value in the 3 yr / unlimited mileage warranty. If they are serious about moving upmarket, a 4 yr / 50k mi warranty would certainly announce it loud and clear.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Industry observers also won’t be surprised to learn that Car and Driver’s fifth-ranked Nissan Sentra produced 139-percent more first-half sales than the Mazda.

    Wow. That’s amazing because every other Nissan I see is a VERSA, followed by Altima, Sentra, and then Maxima (where sedans are concerned.) With the Versa flying off lots I’m amazed that the typical buyers in that segment buy a Sentra once they’ve seen the Versa.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      I think to most Nissan buyers, who are financing, the modest jump in monthly payment to those who can afford it is totally worth it. Sentra has mroe shoulder room, a higher quality interior, and is just a step up in refinement all around.

      I was going to pull some prices and was absolutely blown away. If I’m willing to take a drive, I can scoop up a NEW 5spd Versa for $7,500. No really. A new car with a warranty, airbags, air conditioning, that gets 40mpg and will run for 150k miles without serious repairs, for $7,500. Unreal!

      A Sentra S with a CVT or 6spd can be had for about $12k, also remarkably affordable.

  • avatar
    deanst

    The poor sales of the Mazda says more about Americans than it does about the car. In Canada the car is typically #4 or better, and at times has approached the top of the charts. Nissan is far behind in the dust – where it should be.

  • avatar
    threeer

    Will (sadly) parrot much of what already has been said. Folks looking to buy in this class/size of vehicle aren’t exactly looking for the sportiest of the bunch. Most of them are over at the Toyota or Nissan dealership looking at either a Corolla or Versa/Sentra. Like it or not, cars like the Corolla/Sentra/Civic are seen as safe, reliable and functional options for the daily grind. There isn’t much stomach for adventure in that market, and Mazda is seen as a sporty variant and thus an outlier to the compact car party. While enthusiasts get excited about “zoom/zoom,” the average commuter isn’t really interested.

  • avatar
    discoholic

    Interestingly, both MotorTrend and C&D have just published compact comparison tests, and both of them have the Nissan dead last. Both publications have heaped scorn on its awful driving dynamics, its drivetrain and the el-cheapo interior. So while we can safely assume that it’s a below-average car, it still sells like hotcakes.

    I’ve noticed a similar discrepancy in Europe: car-nut publications have been focussing on driving dynamics to the point of excluding all other factors (typically, cornering abilities and braking performance will make up about 25-40% of the total score in comparos, which means absolutely everything else will play second fiddle). Sorry folks – that’s not how most people in the real world buy cars.

    I’ve always been a car buff, but even I couldn’t care less about the lateral grip figures of the car I own – because out there, I drive like a normal human being, i.e. I usually exploit about 20% of what any modern car is capable of. In fact, people who drive a car at 9/10 on a public road should be jailed on the spot.

    Most of the time, I appreciate it when my car gets me from A to B in supreme comfort without breaking down, so the things that matter to me (and I suppose to most buyers) are quality, usable power (as opposed to having to rev the nuts off the engine), space, comfy seats, ride quality, a sense that vehicle controls have been integrated well, price, the equipment level I get for the money, reliability, a killer stereo and looks. Which is why I drive a Lexus, not a Porsche or a BMW.

    And boy, does the motoring press hate Lexus – to me, this proves that most car journalists really do live in a kind of parallel universe where everyone appreciates the sublime steering of a Boxster, the great seat-of-the-pants feeling a BMW will still give you, or the superior dynamics of the Mazda 3. I do, but not enough to buy any of those cars, because in my real driving world, I’d hate each of them in certain situations, and I’m not willing to pay upwards of $20,000 more to get the BMW equivalent of the Lexus I’ve got.

    Still surprised why everyone and their brother chooses a Sentra over a Mazda 3?

    • 0 avatar
      mic

      +1
      Most of the people crying about the success of the Versa and Sentra are the ones I dub “maniacs” on the road LOL. (Disclaimer: I once owned a Versa ;))

    • 0 avatar
      Frylock350

      “Still surprised why everyone and their brother chooses a Sentra over a Mazda 3?”

      I’m surprised any one chooses it over a Civic or Cruze. They both do literally everything better.

      • 0 avatar
        discoholic

        @Frylock350
        You’re totally right, I admit – but maybe, when you buy your car like you’d buy a dishwasher, other factors like the price, the lovely salesman at your local dealership or the fact that you can get the car serviced round the corner will swing it. (My mum bought a 65-hp Skoda Fabia – basically a petrolhead’s idea of hell – because she’s got a bad back and the seat in the Fabia is positioned an inch or two higher than in comparable small cars.)

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        Per Edmunds “true market value” estimates, the base spec (automatic) trims of those two are both … at last $2,300 higher than the Sentra.

        (On a Sentra that’s estimated at $17k! – that’s over a 13% price bump.)

        That’s why.

        Money.

  • avatar
    LS1Fan

    Auto journalists really do live in an alternate world.

    Not to diss them, but even I learned as a kid that what they wrote didn’t have much relevance to ordinary people’s decisions on cars.
    Case in point;

    I had a discussion with a coworker about cars. Essentially it was a rehash of the “buy new econobox vs buying used enthusiast car”. He bought the new econobox, a sensible mid grade Corolla. I bought a Rally Red F body.

    Dude just didn’t care about power, driving excitement, or anything connected to vehicular enjoyment. I waxed poetic about wind in the hair and steering feel. To him a car was an appliance he was forced accept as a necessary evil. If he had his way , he’d dispense with the car totally.

    Most folks shopping the dealer lots view a car as a rolling washing machine. Further- unfortunately- most enthusiast cars can’t be driven enthusiastically without grave risk. I respect the FRS/ BRZ cars for that reason; I won’t have to worry about them on the 1/4 mile, but they can drive their cars to the limit without risking a close encounter with a tree or worse.

    All of that to say; as much of a car guy as I am, there’s compelling reasons why smart people drive boring cars. Auto mags should remember that .

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      The thing is that I personally don’t buy auto mags or read auto blogs or whatever to read/hear all about why the “boring” or “safe” option is best.

      I’m thinking someone that sees cars as a “necessary evil” wouldn’t be a reader even if auto writers went with more mainstream opinions so I don’t see the incentive to change either.

      So I suppose I’m happy with auto publications living in an alternative world because I live in the alternate world too.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        “I live in the alternate world too.”

        An accurate description for Florida!

      • 0 avatar
        tedward

        That x1000

        “Mainstream consumers” are defined, by us, as people who do not digest our media sources. That is exactly what any enthusiast means when they use the phrase. People simply don’t know about mazda, nevermind any specific model.

        This has been borne out every single time I’ve helped a true normal car shop. Every single time whatever cars in class I point out as being high performers take top honors after driving them, and at least end up on the final list for the price fight. They usually wouldn’t have without my intervention.

  • avatar
    Der_Kommissar

    Personally, I think the Mazda 3 reviews better than it drives over the long term. The interior is great in the areas that reviewers notice in their short time with cars. The steering, handling, and acceleration are also great when you are pushing the car, which is what a reviewer does. When its the only car you drive, then its possible to see where interior costs were cut (it is an economy car, after all) and to get tired of the “sporty” ride during 90% of your time in the car when you are just driving from point A to B on the highway. No question Mazda is trying to be the step up option in the economy/mainstream market, and I have high hopes that the 2017 refresh will get closer to that goal for owners, and not just for the press. Simply putting better tires on it and spending some money on interior pieces that you don’t touch every day would do it.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    The 6 in Touring trim with Tech Package (nav not available) and leatherette is $30,000.

    The Accord EX-L V6 with actual leather, Nav and Honda Sensing is $32,000.
    Without the nav package, it’s $30,000.

    Mazda, lower your prices.

    • 0 avatar
      Der_Kommissar

      Actually, Touring w/ tech, auto trans, and Bose/Moonroof package is 27,309 before a $1500 customer cash rebate. Nav is an extra $400. That’s priced just about right, with a higher quality interior than the 3.

      You’re talking about the Grand Touring (which does include include Nav) trim with tech, which admittedly, costs too much for the market because of its engine.

  • avatar
    3800FAN

    This is another classic example of how out of touch auto journalists are with the general public, and as usual Car and Driver is the worst offender. If it’s a car marketed as a “performance” and “fun to drive” brand they will always always always give it top spot. BMW always wins, Mazda always wins, Honda always wins (unless it’s a comparo with Mazda then it’ll get 2nd like here,,,as long as there’s not a bmw in the mix).

    They trash toyotas endlessly calling them boring and dull…but journalists don’t drive their own cars they don’t own their own cars they don’t have the values the buying public do. Auto journalists live at the track. We live in the real word. That’s why I tell everyone don’t listen to magazine reviews. Test drive the cars your interested yourself and decide. I’ve driven many cars that got top reviews and to me they drove like total shit (2014 mazda6 and 2002 maxima are the best examples) and were a total let down.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      It has nothing to do with marketing. If it did, BMW wouldn’t be losing all the recent C&D comparison tests. They simply prefer cars that actually are communicative and performance-oriented. BMW isn’t really into the communicative thing anymore.

      Nobody who understands driving dynamics wants to drive blind. But for the vast majority who don’t understand, it’s irrelevant. So most cars are targeted toward the majority who think that feeling what the car is doing is an annoyance rather than a virtue.

      I agree that the test drives, along with brand reputation, are the most important factors when purchasing a vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      3XC

      @ 3800FAN

      This is EXACTLY right. C&D has always functioned as a shill for BMW, as far back as I can remember, and neglect to include in their “long term tests” of 12 whole months, all within the warranty mileage limits, about BMWs shoddy build quality and tendency to disintegrate before they’re 10 years old.

      The E65 was a terrible, terrible car. My vaunted E46, the most fawned about, overpraised car in history, was a badly built, unreliable, flimsy primadonna that did nothing exceptionally but failed in its basic purpose: delivering the driver to his intended destination. Headliners shouldn’t come down before 60k miles, turn signal lenses should not fall off at speed, the bolts that hold accessory belt pulleys to the power steering pump should not shear in half in a parking lot, windows should not fall off their tracks and into the doors, the sunroof should not leak, NONE of these things should happen before the car is 7 years old and has 100k miles on it, but all of them did.

      It was better than a “non premium” Accord of the same model year at one thing, that being badge whoredom, and worse at literally everything else, including being a car.

      Not saying Mazda is guilty of any of these shortcomings, but a C&D endorsement is utterly worthless. Perhaps if you lease cars for 2 years, tops, and autocross your leases (I’m sure 0.000001% of the public does exactly this) and all your clothing has conspicuous alligators on it, have at it. May as well leave the window sticker in place so others can see what you paid for it as well.

      • 0 avatar
        tjh8402

        @3xc – Car and Driver, at least recently, hasn’t been papering over BMW’s reliability shortcomings. At the conclusion of their 328d wagon long term test, they said “one should avoid BMW’s that are out of warranty.” Their recently completed M3 test included a nice paragraph detailing their problems with the car, including some the dealer was never able to solve.

        That being said, I owned an out of warranty E46 from 90k to 145k miles and if I wasn’t driving as much as I am now, wouldn’t have gotten rid of it. Yes it had niggling problems, but it never “failed to deliver the driver to his intended destination” except when it was my fault (an unfortunate race track incident and a failing thermostat I procrastinated fixing), and the way it drove more than made up for drooping headliners and failing power window regulators. Sunroof never leaked on mine, and aside from the headliner, the trim and interior materials all felt fantastic. When I sold the car, it still felt tight and solid. I test drove Accords of the same vintage and the steering transmission, handling, ride etc are not even in the same league. I rented a new Accord as a one way to go pick up the BMW when I bought it, and my dad (who drove with me) noted how incredible it that the then 10 year old 90k mile BMW felt so much better than the new low mileage Honda.

  • avatar
    don1967

    We recently chose a new Mazda3 hatchback for my wife, and not since my ’89 Civic Si have I encountered such a pleasing right-brain choice in a compact car. But yeah, most consumers are left-brain spreadsheet types.

    Quiet ride? MEH! Sounds like winter tires.

    Power source for the gadgets? MEH! One lonely 12v plug between the seats, not switched to ignition.

    Low maintenance? MEH! Mandatory synthetic oil every 4 months in Canada.

    Durability? MEH! It’s easier to count the rusty cars on Canadian roads that are *not* first-gen Mazda3s. They sold buckets of these cars, many of which now look like buckets.

    With such basic oversights it’s not surprising that a bland, mushy Nissan Sentra is beating the 3 on the sales floor.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      The four month oil changes are ridiculous. 1 km north of the border; change the oil every four months. 1 km south of the border; oil life monitor tells you to change it once a year.

      My friend only drives a few times a week, so that would be 2k mile synthetic oil changes with a minimal amount of cold starts involved.

      It appears I’ll be accumulating large stocks of Mazda filters for the next few years. I use the surplus 0W-20 in other vehicles anyway.

  • avatar
    incautious

    Besides the small dealer network, most of the Mazda dealerships around here are one step above a used car lot. Sleazy to say the least. Want you vin etched no you windows $500 please. All cars come this way at one dealer here. Documentation fee $499, to drop off stuff at the DMV no waiting for them.
    Mazda isn’t much better, for instance the CX-5. Only like the GT because of leather and satellite radio( have to get sunroof/Bose for like $1300) in lower model just to get satellite( should be standard). But 19″ wheels, really? Never mind the potholes here in the northeast the replacement cost is like $1000/set.
    And what about all the cracked windshields. The body flexes so much windshields are cracking like crazy and Mazda say’s tough.

  • avatar
    WheelMcCoy

    Mazda’s peak sales in 2012 coincided with Honda’s worst Civic. The 2012 Civic was panned in almost all publications, but it still took some time before the buying public recognized that it wasn’t a very a good car… or at least not as good as it once was.

    It’s even harder for the public to recognize a genuinely good car. Mazda has to overcome a lot of inertia and preconceived notions, and that takes time, money, and perseverance. Now that the new Civic is actually pretty good, Mazda’s job is even harder. But props to Mazda that they were able to capitalize on Honda’s momentary weakness. One can be successful filling a niche. If that’s Mazda’s goal — and I think it is — Mazda is on the right track.

    • 0 avatar
      Der_Kommissar

      Good point. Honda is no longer mailing it in, which has to hurt Mazda sales. If I had waited longer to buy, I would have at least test drove the new Civic. I did not even bother when I bought my Mazda 3 in late 2015.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    Establishment car guys are still car guys?

    Mazda might do better if their dealerships weren’t so close to payday loan joints and Mexican food emporia.

  • avatar
    readallover

    Mazda is just a big tease. And they are so close to putting it all together. Put the 2.5 Turbo in the 3 and 6, then add 20 pounds of foam insulation and they would solve most of the problems/complaints people have with the cars. But they have been so damn stubborn in addressing what they have to know is keeping people from buying Mazdas.

  • avatar

    It’s the pricing and incentives.

    A leased Jetta is $155/mo with an MSRP of $17,500.

    A comparably equipped Mazda3 is about $275/mo with an MSRP of $20,000.

    People looking for a transportation appliance will go with the cheaper car, and if they want something sporty they’ll spend $5,000 on a used Miata.

    • 0 avatar
      Der_Kommissar

      Jetta prices have only recently crashed like that. If they were this cheap back in ’15, I likely would have gotten one instead.

    • 0 avatar
      SP

      It looks to me like the current Jetta lease deal is for a Jetta S, with $2,999 down, and $129 per month, for 36 months. That adds up to $212 total per month, but you have to have the $3 grand in cash right now.

      Mazda will lease you a base 3 sedan with automatic for $219 per month, with no money down, for 36 months.

      Unless I am missing something in terms of the features, I think the Mazda lease deal is actually more affordable.

  • avatar
    runs_on_h8raide

    I’m with what one of the users said above…Merge with FCA. Rename all models Hellcat. Hellcat3, Hellcat6, Hellcat Miata MX-Hellcat.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    A small car comparo with no Corolla???

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    The Corolla and Civic benefit from their fantastic loyalty base. They very nearly have a floor below which their sales can generally be expected to never dip below. Any improvements to the car or external factors will help them increase sales. Certainly the Civic is likely benefiting from its rave reviews. Nissans have very nearly replaced Chevies as fleet queens. They proliferate throughout rental agencies. That and the reality is they have learned the lessons that Koreans first did and have, to a degree, taken their place in the market. They offer cheap driving and feeling cars that have nothing to recommend from behind the wheel but they are cheap to buy, offer lots of features per dollar, are fuel efficient, and usually quite spacious for their class. For those look for appliance transportation, they are the Kmart Corollas.

  • avatar
    bd2

    The thing is, the general American consumer doesn’t care so much about handling, steering feel, etc. – and instead, cares more about reliability, interior space, having a quiet ride, etc.

    Mazda’s car offerings, while fun to drive, have lagged in those areas (road noise has been an issue for Mazda, but for the new CX-9, they actually put in a good amount of sound-deadening insulation).

    But there are other markets which place a higher premium on handling/steering feel – and in markets like Europe, Canada and Australia – Mazda does a lot better on the sales front.

  • avatar
    MigratoryPelican

    I’ll be buying a car in 2017, and it’ll be either a 3 or a Civic (top priorities are small sedan, MT, fun to drive, nav system). For me to buy a 3, Mazda has to fix the live traffic updates in their navigation system.

    I know it sounds stupid, but honestly I can’t imagine Honda selling a nav system with live traffic updates disabled, and then leaving it broken for a year.

    It’s the little things.

  • avatar
    carlisimo

    Some of Mazda’s sales problems are due to their move away from incentives and fleet sales. But only some.

    I bought a 2016 Mazda3s Grand Touring 6MT, and I’m very happy with it. I even had a good dealership experience! I think it competes well in the ~$25k segment; it does have disadvantages in its smaller back seat, road noise, and weak A/C, but it’s easy not to notice those on a test drive. The problem is at the lower trim levels – in the $20k price range, you can get better values elsewhere.

    Consumer Reports has touted their reliability and mileage for a few years now, and they’ve discussed Honda’s reliability dropping, but maybe CR isn’t as influential as we thought it was. This one time, I would’ve liked it to have been true.

  • avatar
    Mackie

    Even though the Sentra is aggressively mediocre, it has the strongest value proposition. It’s all about price in this segment.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    I’m still not convinced that Mazda understands what “corrosion protection” is:
    http://forum.mazda6club.com/models-trim/343489-beginnings-rust-my-2014-a.html

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • DenverMike: Do you know what a pacifier is? Ford can’t call it what it really is (in a statement). Mama Drama,...
  • kcflyer: our local taco joint has had a big sign out front for over a month begging people to interview for and...
  • NormSV650: Which Cadillac made today looks like Chevy? When was the last time your eyes were checked?
  • mcs: Another automotive feature that can kill if it’s abused by idiots. Not nearly as high as the Fiesta or the...
  • EBFlex: You are the type of person to buy a brand new house and have corrosion on all of the water faucets and...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber