By on June 21, 2016

2016 Nissan Leaf, Image: Nissan

Nissan doesn’t want its aging Leaf electric hatchback to be left in the dust when the long-legged Chevrolet Bolt and Tesla Model 3 hit the market.

To counter the threat, Nissan will double the size of the Leaf’s battery, giving it a range of more than 200 miles, the automaker’s green chief told Autoblog. Exactly when the upgraded EV will show up remains a mystery.

Kazuo Yajima, Nissan’s global director of EV and HEV engineering, confirmed that the next-generation Leaf’s battery will grow to 60 kWh. The Leaf, which first showed up in late 2010, currently makes do with a 24 or 30 kWh pack, depending on the trim level.

“It’s coming,” Yajima told Autoblog at an electric vehicle symposium in Montreal. “In the near future, I believe, we can produce an electric vehicle that doesn’t have any driving range problem.”

The addition of a slightly larger battery for the 2016 model year saw the Leaf’s maximum range grow from 84 miles to 107 miles, but that pales in comparison to the Bolt and Model 3, both of which offer ranges of more than 200 miles. Doing the wildly simple math, a 60 kWh battery should boost the Leaf’s range to more than 210 miles.

Hybrids and EVs are a tough sell these days, and competition is fierce for that tiny slice of market share. Lately, Nissan isn’t winning the battle. Leaf sales are falling fast, and big changes need to happen if the automaker wants to regain ground.

Yajima didn’t provide any details on a launch date, but the second-generation model is expected to bow in 2018. Expect to see design cues from last year’s Nissan IDS concept vehicle when the next Leaf arrives.

[Image: Nissan]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

64 Comments on “Next Leaf Will Go 200-Plus Miles On a Charge: Nissan Exec...”


  • avatar

    Until you sell an ALTIMA or MAXIMA sized Nissan that can do that 200 miles – and you have a good way to charge it on the go,

    • 0 avatar
      PandaBear

      No, many people would want a Yaris / Fit size EV that goes 200 miles. Most of these cars are sold to people commuting long distance and 100 miles are barely cutting it for them if they couldn’t find a charger to charge at work. People that wants a big car will likely have more than 1 car at home (family) anyways.

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        This. I commute 90 miles a day, so a 200 mile vehicle is perfect – enough legs to get to and from work, plus any errands in the DC metro that I might need to go enroute or for off-site meetings during the day.

        We have the wife’s SUV for road tripping, and I still have my S2000 for fun. As a commuter, a leaf would be perfect, and just as good if not better than the Mazda 3 I do that in now.

    • 0 avatar
      SSJeep

      Ill be buying one if it turns out to be a true 200 mile EV at or below the 30k mark.

      • 0 avatar
        TonyJZX

        Nissan are better off with an Xtrail Rogue Dualis Qashkai whatever the hell, dropped onto a Leaf chassis.

        The problem with “EVs that are not Tesla” is that they are all as sexy as your grandmother and as about as aspirational.

        Tesla made the EV sexy. I like them. I hate the idea of a 5,000lb EV but look at it… look at how they made an Apple EV car better than Apple could ever do.

        Look at a BMW i3. Why the hell would anyone pay for that?

        The Leaf v2.0 needs a body redesign and maybe even a name change. The “leaf” is an awkward name that holds no cache.

        You can get away with a CUV that looks a little dumpy because its a CUV. So why not make an EV CUV?

  • avatar
    johnhowington

    so i only have to wait 40 hours for it to be fully charged at 110v?

    • 0 avatar

      TESLA pretty much owns plug-in EV in America.

      I still don’t understand how other companies who want to sell EV here are going to deal with road trip charging.

      And that’s the reason PHEV is the safest way to go for the foreseeable future. You’ll just have a “hybrid” that gets a lot of MPG and is able to recover normally wasted energy through the regen brakes.

      I have no idea why anyone would even bother trying to build EV unless they’d benchmarked the Model S and X.

      If you can’t do “as much” or “better” – you’re wasting our time.

    • 0 avatar

      @johnhowington
      If you arrive home empty. Yes.

      However you are applying “gasoline refueling logic” to EV’s

      WIth a gas car you wait until the low fuel light comes on, and then fill ‘er up.

      WIth EV’s one recharges the battery at all convenient opportunities, topping up each evening even if its 3/4 full.

      So if your commute is say 50 miles round trip (double the national average), you will be trying to charge 50 miles of range at 110v not 200+ miles of range. So about 10 hours charging at 110v each evening.

      That is if you are unable or unwilling to fit a dedicated EVSE into your home. If you install a 240v dedicated unit then there is no issue at all.

      For the double-the-average commuter its a non issue at 110v charge rates.

      • 0 avatar
        heavy handle

        I agree. It’s a major electrical appliance, you should give it it’s own circuit, just like your stove, clothes dryer, A/C, etc.

        One may as well argue that electric ranges will never catch-on because they need 220/240.

        The end-goal, of course, is to bury inductive charging under your parking spots. That way you never have to worry about filling-up.

        • 0 avatar
          SSJeep

          220/240 is easy, every household in the US is supplied by 220v split between two breaker rails. Its just one more wire and thicker gauges. Not rocket science.

          I will be installing a 220v EV charger in my new garage this year. I am wiring in a 220v/60a box from the existing household feed, and breaking it out into 220v/30a for the EV charger – and wiring it myself.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            120v 20 amp works well if you have a portable EVSE that can handle it. I’m charging off of it now and my unit is showing 2.3kW.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            I’d think about future proofing your garage project with a 100a panel. You may want a second EV later or hook up a welder, compressor ect.

      • 0 avatar
        JW9000

        In all seriousness, who buys a car just for the commute, other than the proverbial beater?

        I can see how this model would work for cosmopolitans who never leave the big city, but the rest of us need a car that has utility beyond hype and trendy hairshirts. Cost, including the value of my time, is a major part of that utility. EVs, including the holy Tesla, don’t fit that bill and won’t, until a major shift in technology occurs.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          A married couple with two cars. A 200 mile EV would satisfy all of my current driving needs besides the 200 mile trip to our cottage in Northern Michigan. We have a big crossover/wagon thing for that task anyway.

          I’ve driven over 200 miles in a day with my C-Max less than twenty times in four years. Probably less than fifteen times.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “so i only have to wait 40 hours for it to be fully charged at 110v?”

      Only if your dumb enough to only charge it when the battery is pretty much fully depleted. You don’t fuel an EV like you do an ICE so get that paradigm out of your head. And if you haven’t figured it out, it doesn’t necessarily need to be fully charged to get you where you need to go and back.

  • avatar

    But can it go 5 years and be worth more than $7500?

    • 0 avatar

      Can it go 5 years and be worth *as much as* $7,500?

      One hopes Nissan are smart enough to extend the warranty for battery capacity. The 30kWh battery has a 100,000 miles, 66% capacity or better warranty. With double the capacity they could potentially extend that to 175,000 miles. Let’s hope they do that, failure to do so will result in abysmal resale values as with the current crop of vehicles.

      24kWh battery costs $6,000 to replace. One has to assume at least double that cost for 60kWh. It is imperative they both engineer and warrant the battery to the point that the car wears out before the battery does.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        No the larger batter pack should be less per kWh than a smaller pack as some of the cost is the pack and electronics contained in it which will not double in cost with the doubling of kWh.

        • 0 avatar

          @Scoutdale

          Your logic is sound, its just your arithmetic needs some attention.

          60 is 2.5 times 24

          So yeah 2.5 times as big may only be twice the cost.

          For arguments sake lets say $12,000.

    • 0 avatar
      jeoff

      What is resale going to look like for the 60-mile ev’s when the 100-200 come out?

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I will be watching with great interest… currently low mile Leaf examples are doing 7-10ish.

        • 0 avatar
          SCE to AUX

          I’ll bet they drop by half for three reasons:

          1. They’ll be older vehicles than they are now.
          2. Their batteries will be further degraded.
          3. Most obviously – they won’t have the 200-mile promise.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Elon had a good run, but he needs to cash his chips in.

    His fortunes have depended on the MAJOR MANJFACTURERS NOT cracking the pure EV 180 mile to 220 mile TRUE RANGE (i.e. in all temps, with A/C or heater on, stereo on, etc.), and the MAJORS are within 12 months of being there (rumor from credible source that GM has Bolt up to 215 mile range with 6 hour recharge on 220).

    Tesla was never about an EV vehicle. That relatively simple code was cracked a century ago – EVs are much larger, heavier, comfortable, faster, crash safety-conforming golf carts).

    Tesla was about 200+ mile range and rapid recharge.

    The MAJORS have now teamed up with co-Are&D projects with companies like LG to crack the real force behind eliminating EV range anxiety – ***battery storage capacity***. And they’re there in very short order.

    Wait until the MAJORS (GM, VW, Toyota, Ford, Honda, Nissan, FCA, BMW, MB, etc.) announce that they’re all collaborating on 15 to 20 minute rapid recharge stations for more EVs to be placed no further than 20 miles apart and at municipal and government and major complexes/facilities/rest stops.

    We’re very close.

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      What makes you think Tesla will rest on its laurels?

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      p.s. – A minimum of 35% of vehicles nationwide will be pure EVs by 2025, with the coasts skewing closer to 55%.

      Tesla will be put out of business by the Major Manufacturers in 3 short years.

      • 0 avatar
        orenwolf

        Really?

        What other major manufacturer lets you purchase without a dealer?
        What other major manufacturer has an international charging network? (even if you have to pay for it?)

        You seem to assume that people have chosen to purchase Tesla’s simply because there was no other option available. I think you’ll find that not to be the case.

        *I* will look at a 200-mile-range leaf. I will also look at a Bolt when they are finalized, and both of these will sway heavily in my choice to get a model 3. However, I do not expect them to have the performance, styling, or other perks the model 3 will, and so I strongly expect that I will not cancel my reservation.

        There is value in a different way to purchase cars, and in a different kind of purchase and ownership experience. Will it be enough? We’ll see.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Musk could sell out or partner to/with anyone looking to be in the automotive space and wants to sell EVs before he goes bust in your three year prognostication.

        Here’s a cute article circa 2015 I happened to come across earlier:

        “SAN FRANCISCO (MarketWatch) — Tesla Motors Inc. TSLA, +0.10% Chief Executive Elon Musk said the company’s market capitalization could equal that of Apple Inc.’s AAPL, +1.08% in 10 years.

        Apple recently became the first company to top $700 billion in market cap. Tesla’s current market value is roughly $27 billion or less than 4% of Apple’s.

        Musk made the comments on a conference call with analysts following Tesla’s unexpected quarterly loss. Musk said his upbeat estimate was based on “back of the envelope” calculations.”

        http://www.marketwatch.com/story/musk-says-tesla-market-cap-may-rocket-to-apples-level-in-10-years-2015-02-11

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        **Breaking News**

        I’m a predictive genius.

        Elon is so desperate that it’s just being reported that Tesla is attempting to buy (cousin company & scam company) SolarCity with fractions of shares of Tesla (which no one even seems to know whether is legal from a securities or general law standpoint).

        Tesla is a ponzi scheme as many of us have alway maintained.

        They make car bodies and conventional suspensions (not well – and with “old school” engineering help) and then depend on battery technology to propel those vehicles.

        The value of Tesla or any pure EV maker truly resides in the amount of compressed, condensed energy that they are able to reliably store in the batteries used in their vehicles.

        Tesla is the short of a lifetime. Both its vehicles and shares will be exposed as vapors by the majors (and the battery technology firms who sell to anyone and everyone).

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      DeadWeight,

      The only problem with your theory is that people were saying the same thing 2 years ago, and two year before that. It looks like it wasn’t as easy as the “majors” initially believed.

      As I’ve said before: lots of people used to think that Barnes and Noble could build a web site and knock Amazon off the intertubes!

    • 0 avatar
      yamahog

      But Tesla has a very real chance of leading the push to autonomous driving. With the long lead cycles that the major players have (6 years between project formation and cars hitting the road), Tesla has a very good chance of getting a major start on level 3 and level 4 autonomous cars which is a compelling feature.

      Frankly, we’re on a glide path to selling a good amount of electric cars regardless of what Tesla does. But we’re one breakthrough in energy storage away from selling a majority of electric cars in the developed world.

    • 0 avatar

      @Daedweight.

      The BMW EV program appears to be in full reverse gear right now, the i3 gave them cold feet. They have announced they will focus on autonomous driving first.

      I doubt Toyota will abandon their Hydrogen fantasy this decade.

      FCA are openly and fiercely resistant to EV’s

      I only see GM and Ford making headway in the US willingly. VW, a small US player anyway, will do well enough with EV’s since diesel gate ruined their US brand but will most likely remain a minor brand in the US.

      Nissan will focus on Europe and Asia in the short term and only come back strong in the US once they have litigation and heat proof technology.

      Musk has a few more years to get ahead before the majors havea hope of denting his ability to sell EV’s. A rising tide lifts all ships.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        IT’S THE BATTERY TECHNOLOGY – NOT THE VEHICLE!!!

        Tesla vehicles were just the 1st (stylish) platform to even approach reducing range anxiety.

        The competition that has way more scale than Tesla is awakening quickly and is deploying vast resources along with energy/battery partners.

        • 0 avatar
          orenwolf

          “IT’S THE BATTERY TECHNOLOGY – NOT THE VEHICLE!!!”

          It’s people who think that way that will never understand how Tesla could possibly be appealing.

          It’s like saying cars are about tank sizes and engine displacement. Once everyone can build the same size tank and same engine power, well, why would anyone not buy a Camry?

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Pure EVs all drive/feel the same once a certain threshold in terms of power is achieved. They are eerily quiet, have instant torque, and etc.

            The key determining, distinguishing features of EVs once they all exceed 200+ miles real world on a charge will be storage/passenger space and exterior styling.

          • 0 avatar
            orenwolf

            “Pure EVs all drive/feel the same once a certain threshold in terms of power is achieved. They are eerily quiet, have instant torque, and etc.”

            I disagree. Driving is about a lot more than power. How does the car handle on the road? How is external road noise? How comfortable, approachable is the interior? Steering responsiveness? Weight distribution (batteries in the floor, the front, or the rear?).

            If we were to look at 200hp engined vehicles across any segment, “They’re all the same” would (hopefully!) not be the conclusion drawn.

            Even if it were, there will, no doubt, be feature differentiation in other ways. As much as you might want to suggest that all EVs are “appliances” and interchangeable, I instead counter that they are *cars*, and the ultimate question, at least for me, in the longterm will be: Who can produce the best *car*, for some value of “best” (Cheapest? Most luxurious? Fastest? Best Handling? Most Stylish? etc etc etc).

            i.e., like ICE cars, there’s more to a good vehicle than the drivetrain. Will Tesla ultimately be on top? I think, personally, that will depend a lot on EV development going forward. If companies shoehorn BEV powertrains on oldschool platforms, then I don’t imagine it will be a good vehicle, for example.

            There’s a lot of room to play, the same way there’s lots of room for ICE cars with basically the same specs to compete with other factors. Like I said, the reason we don’t all drive Camrys (well, ok, civics here in Canada) today.

          • 0 avatar
            LIKE TTAC.COM ON FACEBOOK

            How dare you use sanity and logic to disprove dyed-in-the-wool AM talk radio level pre-digested opinion?!

        • 0 avatar
          Chocolatedeath

          DW I have a question. Why is autonomous driving so important to some on this site? I dont get it. If its that important to you catch a bus or move closer to work.
          I understand that a car is just a tool to some so just use a different damn tool.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            I see the appeal of autonomous driving when it comes to the daily grind, especially if it reduces commute time (by tying into a smarter grid infrastructure). It will also allow for more leisure/productive time for former drivers.

            I don’t see its appeal in terms of driving pleasure as there won’t be any for enthusiasts.

            However, realistically, I doubt we’ll see roads full of truly autonomous vehicles until at least 2030, if not later . there are way too many infrastructure and technological hurdles, not to mention vast expenses, to deal with/overcome before it is viable.

            Developing a fully autonomous vehicle infrastructure is akin to building out the national highway system in terms of expense and hurdles; it may be even larger an undertaking, and taxpayers will subsidize huge % of the cost.

  • avatar
    orenwolf

    So, this pretty much had to happen. I’m glad that they’ve made this commitment,.

    • 0 avatar

      Without a firm date in mind, they have committed only to issuing more press releases.

      200+ mile EV’s on the horizon.

      GM Bolt – Firm Date (2016).
      Hyundai – Announced Date (2018).
      Model 3 – Musk Date (2017-ish).

      Nissan – We’ll get back to you on a date. No firm date on getting a date either.

      • 0 avatar
        orenwolf

        Sure. totally agree. But at least they’ve indicated this is their plan. By “commitment” I meant “They’ve indicated they will go in this direction”. I would MUCH prefer details of course. :)

        They could, after all, have tried to take the leaf downmarket, make it a value, 100-mile city car.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    What I want to know is will they offer 2 versions, the current ~100mi range works just fine for many people and if they have no use case for ~200mi on a single charge on at least a somewhat frequent basis they will not want to pay more for range that they will never use or maybe use once or twice per year.

    Just like you used to be able to order a second tank on trucks if you needed/wanted that range they should do the same for EVs.

    Offer say 3 levels, 100mi for most people, 150mi for edge cases and 200mi for those that just have to pay more or the very few that need it.

    Base price $25k, mid range battery $3500 option, max range option $6000. That is what Tesla initially did but to save money with their limited resources and manufacturing capabilities the smallest range is and will again be limited by software that you can unlock in the future if desired.

  • avatar
    Asdf

    A car with a range of only 200 miles in 2016? That’s UTTERLY PATHETIC. One may purchase a 20 year old wreck with more that twice that range for a symbolic amount of money, and yet Nissan expects consumers to shell out a lot of cash for this joke of a new car with an ultra-short range? Shame on Nissan.

    • 0 avatar

      You have haughty expectations.

      • 0 avatar
        Asdf

        Nonsense. Consumers should expect EVs to be at least as good as traditional automobiles with regards to range and “charging times”. As long as the manufacturers don’t deliver, they deserve to be ridiculed for their ridiculous offerings.

        • 0 avatar
          orenwolf

          I can’t refuel my Mazda 6 at home every night. I don’t travel 200miles in a day except for a few road trips a year.

          If I had an EV, I’d need to charge it away from home a few times a *year*. Find me a ICE that only needs fueling a few times a year.

          Comes down to how you use the vehicle.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          My EV is effectively fueled faster than an ICE vehicle. You don’t have to stand next to the vehicle pumping electricity into it. It fuels while you are off doing other things. For me, it means every time I go to drive it, there is more than enough range to go where I want to go somewhere. I don’t have to take time out of my day to take it to a gas station and stand around pumping fuel into it.

    • 0 avatar
      SSJeep

      Its not all about infinite range. In my case (and many others), I have a 40 mile one-way commute. The current 70 mile range is too small, even with office charging, in the event that I get snarled in 3 hours of traffic. 200 miles is a magic number for EV adoption.

      In my case, the EV will be a third vehicle, so I will have the Jeep and SS for longer trips. The EV will allow me to commute to work and back with zero gas and zero emissions. It will also insulate me from the next oil shock, which is coming sooner rather than later if you watch what is happening in Venezuela and the middle East.

      • 0 avatar

        @SSJeep.

        I agree with a 40 mile one way commute the LEAF is marginal.

        I have a 72 mile round trip. Charge near work. Even with a battery that has degraded to 66% of original capacity the trip is still doable, just.

        The 3 hour traffic snarl up?
        I relax when I hit a traffic jam with little or no margin to get home. The slower you drive, the longer an EV’s range. It’s the opposite of what one would expect from a gas car. Stop/go traffic is an EV’s friend. Its the days when the kids are out of school with little or no traffic that I hear the low battery warning chime approaching the off ramp.

        • 0 avatar
          SSJeep

          @JPWhite – The slower you drive, the longer an EV’s range.

          That is true – unless the AC is on in 100 degree heat, or the heat exchanger is on at 0. Traffic on my route is one of the top 3 worst in the country, so minutes count as well (even with an ICE).

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            >>That is true – unless the AC is on in 100 degree heat,

            I have a heatpump in mine and it really doesn’t hurt my range. I can still manage to get in the upper 4 mile per kWh range. In traffic, 5 miles per kWh with climate control blasting is doable.

            @jp I’m doing 50 miles+ one way without a problem. Had 51 miles guestimate on the range meter left. If you can master B mode on newer Leafs, you can get amazing range.

        • 0 avatar
          Alex Mackinnon

          How about an i3 with the range extender? That would do the trip on battery entirely, the gas motor would give you some buffer.

      • 0 avatar
        Asdf

        You’re right – it’s not about infinite range. It’s about range on par with that of a petrol-powered car. That’s not much of an expectation, but the EV manufacturers cannot even deliver THAT. And if the range issue wasn’t bad enough, it takes significantly longer to recharge an EV than it takes to refuel a petrol car.

        Today’s EVs don’t deserve to be on the market, and should be withdrawn until the manufacturers can be bothered to figure out how to make decent ones.

        • 0 avatar
          SSJeep

          Respectfully disagreed @Asdf – EVs are just another way to get a job done (moving from point A to point B). EV buyers dont expect gasoline-like range and convenience, at least not today. That hasn’t stopped a number of commuters from buying an EV, or considering one in the future. Tesla has a mile-long waiting list for their next model (3). No other auto manufacturer can make that claim.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          @Asdf I’ve managed to put 31k miles on a Leaf in a year and a half. Gee, how could that happen? Isn’t that comparable to an ICE car? I’ve taken it from Boston to Vermont and Boston to Berwick, Me. So if it can do all of that, it deserves to be on the market.

  • avatar
    tsoden

    I am not convinced that Tesla will be out to pasture in 3 or more years. In fact I hope that Tesla is smart enough to innovate smartly to stay ahead of the game. As it stands now, Tesla has been and continues to set themselves up to be the true EV ONLY manufacturer,

    I mean all research and development goes into Ev’s, batteries and charge stations. Other manufacturers seem to be treating Ev’s as a side business, but not putting as much effort into it. They have one compelling EV vehicle, but is that enough to be drawn to if you are in the market for an EV? Would you be drawn to a company that is not full heatedly into the EV game? GM should have been at this stage years ago if they had kept the EV1. In fact, I can’t even begin to imagine where GM would be today if the EV1 was still in production on its 4th or 5th model iteration.

    I think Tesla really needs more competition though… Knowing they have competition should help them shine more especially if they can focus on simplifying their vehicles and focus on what matter most – quality and reliability, instead of on the wizardry gadgetry. People want to have confidence in the vehicle they purchase.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      Good point. Let’s not forget that GM has a long history of dropping products. The Bolt could turn-out to be another Cruze diesel, or Saturn Astra, or Chevrolet Epica. You’ll go to the Goodwrench counter, and the high school dropout will claim that GM never even made one of those!

      • 0 avatar
        tsoden

        I remember when the Epica came out, sure it was a Daewoo under the hood, but Daewoo was not a total failure – they just couldn’t sell cars in North America…

        I was really excited by that car ..and then they dropped it and failed to produce replacement parts.

  • avatar
    carlisimo

    My wife says she needs 120 miles real-world range. 200 on paper will satisfy that. She likes the size and exterior styling of the current Leaf, but not the interior (I’m not sure anybody could love that interior). For some reason she doesn’t like the Bolt’s looks.

    Hurry up, Nissan, this replacement’s overdue…

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “Hybrids and EVs are a tough sell these days”

    True, unless your name is Tesla, which currently has 27% of the plug-in market in the US – much more if you count only BEVs.

    http://insideevs.com/monthly-plug-in-sales-scorecard/

    As for Nissan, if Leaf 2.0 isn’t beautiful, available, affordable, spacious, and good-performing, they will continue to lose market share.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    That simple math is only good if the extra battery capacity adds no weight. Doubling the battery capacity does not double the range.

    • 0 avatar

      You are right, not in the way you might expect.

      As battery technology advances we can double capacity *without* doubling weight. Therefore doubling the capacity may result in *at least* double the range.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        One of the techniques battery technology companies are employing to increase density is to remove inert material that doesn’t contribute to the storage capacity of the battery. It’s a basic low-hanging-fruit way to increase storage density.

        While the exotic technologies grab the headlines, there are companies quietly making huge improvements to current lithium battery technology. Not just something I read. I have direct communications with some of these guys. The range increases might be coming faster than anyone is predicting.

  • avatar
    415s30

    Leaf Nismo??

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Flipper35: Will the bumpers stay on in the rain?
  • Pig_Iron: Who built the “the most extensive and inclusive VOTER FRAUD organization in history” Joe?
  • Pig_Iron: I rather like those Nissan wheels.
  • Lie2me: Whenever I think of a basic generic “car” this is the car that pops into my head. If there was a...
  • Pig_Iron: No, the media has not been “fair and honest but critical” toward non-Democrats since forever. I used to...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber