By on June 23, 2016

Daewoo Lanos

I’ve gotta hand it to Edmunds. Whenever we at TTAC talk about a car produced in the last 15 or 20 years, I can usually find at least one photographic example of it within our media library. And it seems in the many, many years since TTAC switched to WordPress, we’ve not once needed a picture of a Daewoo Lanos …

… until now.

According to the aforementioned automotive site, Generation Z has a pretty odd taste in cars. Of the top 20 used vehicles bought by the 18-24 year demographic, the Daewoo Lanos — a car that’s been out of production since 2002 — topped the list.

Only one vehicle slated for continued production is a member of the list, claims Edmunds, and that’s the Mitsubishi Lancer. All other vehicles listed were either cancelled when Clinton or Bush were president, or are slated for death before Obama leaves office.

The reason for Generation Z’s shameful taste in vehicles? Well, 18-to-24 year olds have no money, and vehicles wearing dead brands or nameplates can be had for cheap, cheap, cheap.

“For most young car buyers, it’s price first and then everything else is gravy,” says Edmunds.com Director of Industry Analysis Jessica Caldwell.

“There’s no doubt that you’re probably getting a good deal these days on an Eagle Talon or a Ford Aspire, both of which ceased production in the ’90s. It’s easy to look at this list and have a good laugh, but the kids buying these vehicles see them almost like a fashion statement. If you can drive a Daewoo while all of your friends are driving newer Hondas or Toyotas, you can kind of stand out from the crowd.”

Since when did driving a Daewoo Lanos become a fashion statement?

Regardless, here’s the entire list of Generation Z’s automotive baes in order of demand:

  1. Daewoo Lanos
  2. Eagle Talon
  3. Nissan 240
  4. Acura Integra
  5. Honda Prelude
  6. Mitsubishi Lancer
  7. Acura RSX
  8. Kia Sephia
  9. Ford Aspire
  10. Daewoo Leganza
  11. Saturn Aura
  12. Pontiac G6
  13. Scion tC
  14. Dodge Dart
  15. Suzuki Forenza
  16. Mitsubishi Galant
  17. Pontiac Aztek
  18. Dodge Caliber
  19. Suzuki Vitara
  20. Dodge Neon
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112 Comments on “Edmunds: Generation Z Will Buy Almost Anything If Price is Right...”


  • avatar

    Student Loans have essentially ruined the economy.

    These kids DEBT-To-INCOME ratios are so blown that they mostly have no chance at a car or house- not to mention insurance costs.

    These kids have essentially lost 10 to 20 years of their life to the economy.

    Just look at marrriage rates.

    Birth rates.

    “Adulthood” has been “pushed back”.

    Mom’s basement: crowded.

    • 0 avatar

      Z also tends to see children as an unecessary crimping of their lifestyle; children have been commoditized again. It’s one of the many factors that will lead to social programs imploding.

      • 0 avatar

        If I had children right now, there’d be no Hellcat…there’d be no SRT Jeep. There’d be no global vacations at will…

        I’d have a regular V6 with AWD and I’d be a normal person with entitlement kids who demand everything they see on TV while underperforming in this nation’s communist-core day-care centers for hyperactive savages with uncertainties about which bathroom to use.

        My savings would be constantly challenged by clothing, tuition and extracurricular activity costs like gymnastics and swimming.

        A living, breathing, time-investment with identity issues trying to avoid cyber-bullying.

        I’ll never have to worry about my HELLCAT falling into a gorilla cage or getting eaten by a gator.

        I’ll never have to worry about accidentally leaving my Hellcat in a hot car with the windows up.

        • 0 avatar
          threeer

          Wow…just, wow. I’ll never look at my (now) 25-year old son, a 1LT in the Air Force and pilot who flies C-17s around the world, or my newly-adopted 10-year old daughter (actually my niece who has seen and had more crap done to her in her short ten years than most adults will ever see) the same way again. Here I thought they were joys to behold, examples of at least a few things I’ve done right and either currently productive members of society, or soon-to-be when they reach adulthood. Nope, I was wrong…apparently my kids were only impediments to my ability to buy a muscle/sports car.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            I don’t see it as giving anything up. Prior to marriage and kids I had 2 street bikes, 2 dirt bikes, a quad, a truck, a little boat and an empty house.
            I’m now down to a truck and a little boat.The house is full.
            I gave up material possessions and some personal freedom but gained something a billion times more valuable. I’ve been able to nurture two boys and watch them blossom into young men with the world as their oyster.
            Nothing can beat that.

          • 0 avatar

            “My dad’s a YouTube star”

          • 0 avatar
            bikegoesbaa

            “Here I thought they were joys to behold

            apparently my kids were only impediments to my ability to buy a muscle/sports car.”

            They can be two things.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

            Amen threeer & Lou.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “My dad’s a YouTube star”

            You said you had no kids.

            Paternity testing come back positive?

          • 0 avatar

            Certainly raising our 5 children was mo’ betta than the stuff I discovered I didn’t want all that much anyway. But having transported 4 kids at a time in my Z28, I see a Hellcat as being even more of a family car then my Camaro.

          • 0 avatar
            LIKE TTAC.COM ON FACEBOOK

            A big Youtube star,
            That’s a-what I are
            Yodel-deedle ay-hee, you oughta see my car
            I drive a big old Hellcat, baby, with wire wheels,
            Got rhinestones on the spokes
            I got credit down at the Chrysler store
            Even my barber thinks I’m a joke
            I’m the Number One first-one poster on TTAC dot com
            I’m the King of Youtube, baby, no thanks, Jalopnik, thanks a lot

            (With profuse apologies to Roger Miller, he rest in peace)

        • 0 avatar
          thalter

          Apparently your parents thought differently…

        • 0 avatar
          mike9o

          Maybe, but you could end up with someone that you love more than yourself. :)

        • 0 avatar
          e30gator

          Frankly, I’m rather glad you’ve decided not to procreate. On behalf of all the world’s future generations, I applaud you.

    • 0 avatar
      "scarey"

      Due to handing over the reins of the World’s Largest Economy to a capitalist-hating commie from out-of-town, who before this current job had run nothing as complicated as a lemonade stand.

    • 0 avatar
      Willyam

      I think it was time. In the long, long ago, when I owed the state a LOT for my education, I exited college right into an hourly wage. I found my way into different jobs and eventually a career, but mortgaging your twenties and thirties that you pay back with Uber and Starbucks is NOT a workable solution.

      Gen Z doesn’t see the value in car payments, as they run a new economy through phones anyway. These kids are smarter than we were. If they can’t change the economy, they can change the way they react to it. Debt is a freedom-killing anchor, and this is what I teach my kids.

      • 0 avatar
        JustPassinThru

        I didn’t see the value in car payments at that age, either. Fact is, I couldn’t have GOTTEN car payments – getting an auto loan was not at all an automatic thing in the 1970s/early ’80s.

        I paid hard-earned, sweaty-from-my-hands CASH. I traveled by Pinto – and occasionally by Jeep Postal DJ-5C.

        The Pinto cost me $750 and I had it four years, 40,000 miles. It taught me mechanics and the economics of car ownership. Also of the derision of snobs, and of how much to value their opinions.

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          By God, THIS!

          And when the jack punched through the rusty floor pan of my old Civic wagon did it stop me from getting to any of my three jobs?

          No! I learned to FLINTSTONE!

          Grrr..Arrgh

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            That is what lumber is for ;)

            I had a friend that worked economically challenged jobs and could make any rusty beater survive a long time. He had one where he ran pieces of 2×4 across the floor pan to keep the driver’s seat from ending up on the ground.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Yabba dabba do!

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      There’s an insider consultant (to the auto industry) who writes articles on Tuesdays and Thursdays who can get automakers/dealerships to fundamentally flip this list to mostly new, much more expensive vehicles, through clever marketing tactics.

  • avatar
    MrGreenMan

    They really must be yanking you. Nobody purchased any of these vehicles. Defunct and forgotten cars from defunct car makers like the Daewoo Lanos, Mitsubishi Galant, and the Pontiac G6 wouldn’t even fetch $300 at the scrap yard.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      I assume you live in the rust belt? I see those kinds of cars downtown all the time (I live in Florida, near Orlando).

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        I also live and work in Orlando and I absolutley do not see the Lanos “all the time”. I see like maybe 10 actual Daewoos a year.

        G6 and Galant? Meh, I guess sort of common.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

          Look at craislist, there are some around. There is a guy in town with one I see regularly but I’ve seen others. I wasn’t just talking about the Lanos, but my real point is the cars we are talking about are in use elsewhere and can be sold for higher than $300 unless it is scrap material for crash/mechanical reasons. I understood that if it was the rust belt, no way you’re gonna pay to put a new clutch in a swiss cheese Lanos, so yeah, crunch worthy. Here and elsewhere, since it wasn’t rusted to death, a shadetree will pick it up for $500-700, fix it and sell it or give it to a friend/family member, and it’ll be on the road another few years at least. That was my point, man.

          I live 30-45 minutes north of Orlando, so we are probably not driving in the same neighborhoods. :)

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      MrGreenMan, the Pontiac G6 and Saturn Aura are not that unusual in the Dallas area and they’re worth considerably more than $300. Just a Malibu from defunct brands. I see an occasional Mitsubishi Galant too. Midsize sedans from the discount rack. The G6, Aura, or Galant could be a good choice for a first car if you got one at a good price.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        I think the 4cyl Galant is massively underrated as a cheap but effective mode of transportation. The biggest caveat is finding a used one that hasn’t been ruined by some mouthbreather. Old tech engines and transmissions with no serious faults, no DI, dual clutch transmissions, or infotainments. Super bad resale due to the stigma of many of them getting ruined by the 0%0%0% first owners.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I still feel like you’re taking a risk on a Mitsu product with the added bonus of who the heck wants to buy it from you later. You’re in a similar situation with many of the smaller and disc brands excepting Mercury and Pontiac. Will you have sufficient support for your Saab/Opel-Saturn/Volvo/Mitsu/Suzuki product in the future?

          • 0 avatar
            e30gator

            I’ve owned older Volvos and an Aura we bought new in ’09. The Volvos typically have a lot of parts sharing between models and are numerous enough at junkyards that parts are pretty cheap and available.
            Finding parts/service/support for the Aura is no more difficult than for its Malibu cousin.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            I’m talking about cars down low enough on the depreciation scale that it really doesn’t matter. Likewise parts support is a non-issue. Mitsu’s 4cyl engine lineup is so longstanding and they do a lot of parts sharing that I wouldn’t worry one bit about supporting a Lancer or Galant for the next 10+ years.

  • avatar

    I have 19 years and the thing I look at a car and the price
    mainly because I live in Brazil and here car and absurd the Mitsubishi lancer costs between R$100.000,00 a R$ 150.000,00

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      Oh man, would I love to raid a Brazilian junkyard. Lots of cool stuff that’ll fit our older US cars. Like the our 1967-1972 US F-Series was produced down there into the 90s with different front styling, dash/interior, etc. Very cool to have one in the US for a unique look.

      The Argentine Ford Falcon is another favorite of mine, but in Brazil, GM produced its sweet 250 I-6 with EFI and a Vortec head into the 90s in pickups, Tahoes and Suburban.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        They even had a performance car with the 250 I6 called the Opala…something. Opala SS? Opala GT? I forget.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

          The Opala was AWESOME! Like a shrunken Chevelle (its first gen). Yeah they had performance versions, not sure if they were EFI.

          Ford’s “Falcon” (200 CI IIRC) Inline-6 was also updated and such (used in the Argentine Falcon). Of course the Aussies REALLY expanded Ford’s Inline 6 for cars, very high out put from modern (and earlier) examples.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        “The Argentine Ford Falcon”

        I’m sure Argentinians have fond memories of that car too. /sarc

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

          They do, its role in what happened is only in one’s memory is when the car is in that particular style (the front and rear clips were updated every few years, as was the interior) and in that shade of green.

          Modifying them, racing them, etc. still goes on, and their car culture is still centered around them. Being “the car of Argentina” for several decades is not going to be erased by its unfortunate role in a terrible and tragic time in the country’s history.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N – apparently green was the main colour of those “disappear in the Night” Falcon’s.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

            Yes, exactly. It wasn’t like the KGB who (to my understanding) often drove cars nobody else had access to. In Argentina, Falcon was a runaway best seller at the time.

            F’in scary that sh¡t like that happened and could happen again. Same with Hitler and the Nazis. Really sobering when you stop to think of the amount of terror a government can bring down upon its people. Look at Rowanda in that 1990s massacre, sheesh.

  • avatar
    PeriSoft

    They must have used some truly bizarre methodology, because in all of my years I’m not sure I’ve seen a single Daewoo Lanos. They have to exist in order to be popular. According to cars.com, there are only four of them in the *entire country*. How the hell can they possibly be at the top of any popularity list?

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I’m not sure the poll wasn’t rigged or something. Or duplicated a single entry 200 times.

    • 0 avatar

      Yeah, I’m skeptical too. I’ve seen a Lanos maybe once in the last year.

    • 0 avatar
      NoGoYo

      I saw this a little while ago, didn’t check to see what kind of Daewoo it is, but I’m sure it’s not a Nubira so it must be a Leganza or Lanos.

      http://i257.photobucket.com/albums/hh222/rockmanDX3/IMG_20160513_151900.jpg

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        That’s a Leganza. I have a bunch of pics of my Lanos in my photobucket from when I went to sell it, but I can’t get on that site at work.

        But links will show up in my email, ugh.

        • 0 avatar
          NoGoYo

          It’s the first Daewoo I’d seen in an incredibly long time. I’ve probably seen more Suzukis than Daewoos, I remember seeing a sweet performance-looking trim of the Kizashi.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

            Well, if you see Suzuki Ferinza (sp?), Reno or Verona, you are seeing Daewoos! Lol I know it doesn’t count on this list.

            Mmm-m-m-my-VERONA!

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      These kinds of cars aren’t on for-pay sites like cars.com.

      Try craigslist. There’s a helluva lot more than four, I promise. Yes, most of them look to be garbage, and it may show links to recently deleted ones (sold or ad expired).

      To search all craigslist sites everywhere, copy and paste this (all off that below) into a google search bar:

      site:craigslist.org cto Daewoo Lanos

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

        This is not far from me.

        https://orlando.craigslist.org/cto/5620581355.html

        No, its not on my list of potential beaters, lol, I’m evidently too old to appreciate it being a gen Xer. Oh well.

        I would check out a 3 door, 5-speed Aspire, though.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      Add me to the list of skeptics. Just hopping on craigslist and searching for bottom feeder cars, I’d mostly find cheap cavaliers, neons, worn out ex-ricer Civics, beaten to death camries and accords, a boatload of W-bodies, N-bodies, mid 00-s Ford Tauri, chrysler cloud cars. Domestics SUVs (GMT330, GMT360, 2nd and 3rd gen Explorers) are also massively prevalent. It is quite frankly what sold the most new is more or less proportionally what’s still on the roads the most, even once we account for pattern failures prematurely taking certain models off the road in disproportionately high numbers.

      Simple exercise: search for “lanos” or “daewoo” on CL and see how many pop up. Then do the same for “cavalier” or “taurus” or “civic.” This list is obviously BS.

    • 0 avatar
      brenschluss

      It’s because they read the thing wrong as far as I can tell.

      This isn’t saying X% of cars purchased by this age range are of a certain model; it’s saying X% of a certain model are owned by this age range, i.e. 7% of all Daewoo Lanos (Lanoses?) on the road are owned by yoots, regardless of what that number may be.

      I’m pretty certain more kids are going to be driving Corollas and Civics than any of these, but since those are also owned by lots of (boring) adults as well, they won’t show up here.

      • 0 avatar
        kobo1d

        I’d like to see the original data. My theory is that the numbers are the deviation in likelihood for Gen Z to own these models vs. the general population. I.e. someone 18-24 is much more likely to own a Lanos than any other age group.

        • 0 avatar
          brenschluss

          There’s a table that I assume is on the press release because it’s on every other site. It has a header that says, “Vehicles with Largest Share of 18-24 Year Old Registrants,” and the percentage numbers are in a column called “Share of Registrations by 18-24” which again, sounds like the percentage of the car’s registrations by owners in that age range.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      I’ve seen one Daewoo in a parking lot. Can’t remember if it was a Lanos or Leganza. I only stopped because it wasn’t a badge I’d ever seen before.

    • 0 avatar
      garuda

      Someone has pointed out already in other article that it is the highest percentage of ownership by 18-24, not the car owned by most 18-24. So if there are 4 registered Lanoses in the US, and 2 of them are registered to 18-24, then it would top the list. By volume of number of 18-24 registered owners, I’d bet a toe that Foci, Civics, Corolla, Camrys would top the list.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Owned a Lanos sedan in South Korea. What an awful conveyance. It was a silver ’97 with no airbags, and a 3-speed GM automatic from 1970 or whenever. Did have AC, and power windows (front only) and a power mirror (passenger only). While it also had 1.4 liters and four cylinders, it managed a stunning 19mpg in town.

    Course it had something like 80,000 miles on it, so it was understandably used up. $1,100. I think it was worth it, getting to see Koreans gawk at a white person driving a car.

    Anyway, I simply don’t see how the Lanos tops the list because of their lack of availability and (presumably) parts support. That seems like a very poor choice to make indeed.

    When I was 19 I had a ’97 I30, and at 23 I had an A8. These kiddies need to do better.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      So much cost cutting going on, front power windows like a Neon, three soeed gutless like a Corolla (of that time), manual drivers mirror like a Benz, a bean counters dream car.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        They used a Chevy Lacetti, which was the Suzuki Forenza here. And on the KDM it was the Daewoo Lacetti. But that’s newer and quite a bit bigger than the Lanos.

        • 0 avatar
          TMA1

          And the Lacetti is a Buick Excelle in China. They can’t get enough of them Buicks, even when they’re Daewoos! I’m surprised the Excelle didn’t kill the brand there.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Interesting that the Excelle GT is actually a different car (Verano). Wonder what the price difference is there. Certainly the GT is a better car.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Also, there are (per the list) half the number of young people with Neons vs. the Leganza. I find that hard to believe, given I see Neons almost daily and Leganzas once per year, if that.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I’m guessing the bulk of folks in this age bracket are driving cars their parents bought. My first car out of college my parents didn’t help me with was a Maxima.

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      Or their grandparents bought. Lots of families have some low-mileage old-person car sitting around from some elderly relative that quit driving. Reliable cars at the lower end of the insurance cost range.

  • avatar
    ajla

    First, I join in calling BS on this list. Production numbers and general attrition make a Lanos and Eagle unlikely as 1-2.

    However, if the list is accurate then these kids are acting stupid. A Lesabre or Taurus is barely (if at all) more money while being infinitely more maintainable than some of the stinkers on this list.

    • 0 avatar
      NoGoYo

      Around here used beaters are usually one of a handful of things.

      1. Old subcompacts (but oddly enough, very few Neons)

      2. GM FWD sedans from the early 90s through early 00s (LeSabres, Impalas, etc)

      3. Beat to hell Camrys/Accords

      4. Rusty pickups (with the Dodges being especially rusty)

      None of those things are Eagle Talons or Daewoos.

  • avatar
    thelastdriver

    I get it! Until a ’98 Corolla VE fell into my lap for $300 I was actively searching Craigslist for things like “Daewoo”, “Suzuki”, “Tercel”, “Prizm”, etc.

    Being broke sucks. At least having an oddball shitbox that’s easy to work on can be a fashion statement — of a sort.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    Maybe they only had 20 respondents to their survey and the list is in no particular order. LOL

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I do think most young people finally get their driver’s licence money is scarce.

    They tend to buy what they can afford, and that will be the cheapest options.

    Not all are lucky enough to have parents give them or buy them a car.

    Even when I was young only a quarter or even less of the people I knew had the resources to buy a vehicle that sort of fitted what they really wanted. To most of us having the money to buy what you wanted was just out of reach.

    Because cars were easier to maintain, with a much greater maintenance load you learnt how to fix your vehicle ……. or walk.

    First and foremost to anyone whether you are buying your first vehicle is to have a vehicle able to get you to and from work. It doesn’t matter what the vehicle was, so long as you didn’t rely on others.

    This is what we called independence, whilst still being dependent on others to feed us, bed us and wash our clothes.

    Then we grow up, sort of, and finally buy a vehicle that is much closer to the mark or what we want, in lieu of saving for a house.

    Most first vehicles really are all that is needed for us to survive. From then on our vehicles become more wants. so when you submit a comment on the necessity for a huge SUV or pickup remember it’s a want.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      “This is what we called independence, whilst still being dependent on others to feed us, bed us and wash our clothes.

      Then we grow up, sort of, and finally buy a vehicle that is much closer to the mark or what we want, in lieu of saving for a house.”

      Or one can join the military where they clothes you, shelter you, tell you when and where to eat and sh!t.

      Is that still considered independence?

      LOL

      My apologies to any servicemen and women other than Big Al who find this offensive.

      • 0 avatar
        garuda

        Nope. That’s what I call it. “Being adopted by Uncle Sam”

        It’s my punchline too: “I was sicked and tired of my parents telling me to do this and that, setting all kinds of rules for me to follow, so I got out the house and joined the military.”

  • avatar
    JustPassinThru

    This really isn’t anything new. Young drivers are NEW owners – and don’t have the perspective.

    Sometimes it has worked well. The Volkswagen Type 1 was mostly rejected by 1950s adults – who connected imported goods with shoddy construction and backwards societies. Who remembered the Nazi era with fear and loathing.

    The first Baby Boomers had no such memory; the VW was cheap – and they bought. And liked.

    The Subaru 360 was a less-happy story – the car was as crappy as adults figured it would be. But it sold enough that Subaru was able to plant the basics of a future network to market REAL cars.

    The choice, forty years ago, was more slender. You had Ford/Chrysler/GM or AMC. There weren’t many old Studes around; but if a kid wanted to be different, he could get an old Kaiser Jeep Universal, cheap.

    The Japanese cars were seen as risky – until the stories worked down that even though the metal was thinner, construction was light-years ahead of Detroit iron.

    We sneer at Daewoo buyers, now; but how are they different from those long-ago kids who bought secondhand Renaults or Fiats? They didn’t know then; and today’s kids don’t know either.

    After a lot of heartache, they’ll get an orientation around the auto market. If there is an auto market when they reach full adulthood.

  • avatar
    Willyam

    Ok, follow up question. No PT Cruiser on this list? If you do a search on Autotrader or whatever for cheap transportation, the list is mostly PT Cruisers and Accents and such, with the PT at the top. Maybe its just the midwest?

    Also, cheap as they are, you never see them on the street much unless driven by much older poor (Gen X to Boomer).

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    I went searching through to find what’s available for $1000 or less in my area and found this.

    http://allentown.craigslist.org/cto/5635970254.html

    It…speaks to me.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      Nice! Love me some B-body. In my old stomping grounds on the Indy East side, box chevies, along with larger Gm C-bodies, were a daily sighting. Both as ragged out daily drivers, and as done up donks. Sometimes something in between.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        This is the first one I’ve seen in a while, the last few I saw were all whales.

        If I can figure out where it is, I plan on going out tomorrow to look at it.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    This is pretty interesting to me because I’m about to embark on a beater shopping adventure, now with my newish Civic sold along with my motorcycle on the chopping block. I’m not quite scraping the bottom of the barrel, I’m hoping to land in the $1500-$2500 range, maybe $3000 if I spot something I can’t resist.

    My focus is on 92-96 camries, gen 1 Avalons, 95-99 Maximas, or maybe a 93-97 Prizm or Corolla if the right one comes up. It’ll be an interesting exercise in putting myself into the shoes of a first time car buyer, be it a young adult or perhaps a recent immigrant. When my family first moved to the states, we bought a rusty ’82 Civic Wagon for $750, and later a slightly less rusty ’85 Civic sedan for several thousand (this was the early 90s). So in a way I’m getting back to my roots :)

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      You JUST missed this one!

      https://www.ebth.com/items/3540566-1992-toyota-camry-le

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Oh man that is literally the car I’m looking for! Awesome price too. how did you find this?? I vastly prefer the more expensive look (IMO) of the full width taillamps of the 92-94. My understanding is that there were a few cost cutting changes made on the 95-96, and then with the new generation in ’97 is where things really started going with the “built to a price” sort of attitude that continues on to today.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Here’s a Maxima that’s worth looking at:

          http://indianapolis.craigslist.org/cto/5649230232.html

          My understanding is that the Camry will ride softer and quieter, and the interior will be sturdier and with fewer rattles. Maxima’s got the rock solid and powerful VQ30 going for it, and more precise steering and sharper handling (I’d rather have the softer ride).

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Wasn’t Bball’s grandma trying to unload a Camry from that period?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I still own it. Less than 50K miles. In her garage. Shes over 90 and not driving.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Heaven knows I don’t need another set of four wheels but hmmmmmm.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            @gtem

            Generally speaking, the I30 is better maintained through the years than the Max, by the way.

            Other thought: Camry from 93-94 is probably better bet than ’92 because of changeover to 134a refrigerant?

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Ball, just out of curiosity, how much might you want for said Camry? You’re within easy diving distance from what I understand.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I haven’t thought about it. The vehicle is in super good shape. It’s a 1990 Camry LE with the automatic seatbelts. Lol. My grandmother bought it new and drove it to Florida and around her small Michigan town. My parents are out of town, but I’ll talk to my dad when they get back. We’ve kept it in the garage because my grandmother still thinks she may drive it one day. Lord knows I don’t have the room for it and my parents don’t want it. I’ll make you a fair deal when it’s time.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Very cool, thanks! Just sold my motorcycle tonight for $2k, so I’m primed and ready for my search for a Japan Inc. Golden era sedan!

          • 0 avatar
            kit4

            1990 Camry LE with 50k and good shape? If it’s dark blue, take my money now. I’ve been searching for a dark blue 90.5 or 91 Camry for a long time now.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I monitor EBTH regularly, but I was off for a couple weeks as I was busy. BUT if I had known you were looking!!

          You gotta keep me informed! That one was in nice shape, and that’s a reasonable price.

          …And matches your 4Runner.

  • avatar
    dwford

    Millennials WILL buy anything if the price is right. Witness now many millennials bought Bernie Sanders’ schtick – you know, because its FREE……

    Feel the burn…

  • avatar
    IAhawkeye

    Wait, are we no longer considered Gen Y? I thought Gen Y went up to kids born a little before year 2000?

    Secondly, I know someone said this list was based on the % of kids who own these cars.. but still. I’ve seen a Daewoo like once or twice, the Talon, Aspire, and 240 HAVE to be getting to the point where their all used up and nearly junk. If not from the rust that’d kill them here, just overall breakdowns/repairs would take them off the road sooner or later.

    And Daewoo Lanos a fashion statement?! Maybe for your nearest gross hipster. Although most hipsters I know have parents far too wealthy to let them drive something like that. Their automotive bae is probably more like a Camcord/Corolla/etc. There’s a big list of cars I could list that are pretty popular at least around the U of I, but I’ll spare you the details since NoGoYo made a good list already of popular beaters and it’s exactly the same.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      You were promoted!

      Oh and I agree with your assessment, hell the 240SXs were gone ten years ago in these parts.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        I still see a handful on CL whenever I look. They’re almost all shells or partly- or fully-completed engine swaps by now, though. I did find a super-low-mile stock S13 listed for $6k a few months ago. It sold in a week.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I can’t speak for Canada but Daewoo was only available in the USDM from 1997-2002 when it went bankrupt and was sold to GM. I haven’t found any sales figures but in the 04-06 period when those were still new and trading at the auction, I saw maybe three Daewoo branded cars (at least one being a Nubria). I don’t think anyone is seeking out a Lanos to look different, I doubt many still exist.

  • avatar
    jpolicke

    Yeesh, not one but 2 ‘Woos on the list. At least owning one of these diaper pails will teach Gen Z that the internet is good for more than posting pictures of yourself at Bernie rallies. Namely, product research.

  • avatar
    scott25

    I’d kill to own an Aspire, haven’t seen one in years but I’ve always loved them. Probably see one Daewoo a year still, usually a Lanos, even in Ontario where they should’ve disintegrated long ago.

    As pretty much everyone else is saying, this list is garbage, the Cavalier and Sunfire were THE cars for teenagers when I was in high school, since then they’ve been joined by the Cobalt/G5, and of course the Corolla and Civic are also popular due to the number produced, as well as Rangers and S10s. Still a lot of Neons being driven by teenagers as well somehow. The more car-loving ones generally drive Integras/Preludes/Jettas which they proceed to destroy. So some of the cars on this list make sense. But most of them there just weren’t enough produced. Most of the cars on this list are most likely to be driven by bearded men who look far older than they actually are and own used book/antique stores, and they’ve owned them since new.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Along with the Cav/Sunfire and the others you listed, I’d add first- and second-gen W-bodies, N-bodies, and (since I’m in a rural area) full-size pickups of every brand and year to the list of typical high schooler cars.

  • avatar
    Shiv91

    I live in the Snow Belt and so half of these cars are long, long gone. As of 2016 the (non-affluent) Millenials here mostly drive 1st Gen Focuses, 1st Gen Fusions, Cobalts, G6’s, ’06-’11 Civics, Calibers, ’03-onwards Corollas, late ’00s Hyundais and Kias, ’00-’05 LeSabres, Epsilon Malibus, Aleros, W-Body Centuries and W-Body Impalas (although everyone drives those where I live, from 16 year old Pizza Delivery drivers to 40 y.o. Middle Class suburbanites to 90 year olds). Cavaliers, Grand Ams, Grand Prix’s, ’96’-’06 Taurus/Sables, and Neons were common “first car” beaters here up until recently but they’re rapidly disappearing.

  • avatar
    turf3

    If this study purports to be from the US, I call maximum BS. Nissan 240? It hasn’t even been made in 40+ years. Daewoo Lanos? Huh?

    I can tell you right now some cars that I guarantee are ACTUALLY among the most common ones bought by 18-24 year olds. They are the cars that are available in large numbers cheaply.

    Honda Civic
    Toyota Corolla, Tercel
    Chevy Corsica
    Ford Taurus (the old ones)
    Hyundai Excel, Accent
    Old Ford and Chevy pickups – full size and smaller

    I don’t know if all of these would be in the top 20, but at least a major fraction of them should be. Your list shows none of them. I call BS.

    • 0 avatar
      turf3

      OK, I see you must have meant the Nissan 240 SX. Maybe…

    • 0 avatar
      LIKE TTAC.COM ON FACEBOOK

      Even in California, the Tercel, Corsica and Excel are practically extinct – the first because they all have over 300K on them, the other because they were quick to dilapidate or just fall apart.
      And why would someone short on money buy a full-size pickup when they use so much gas?
      The Civic and Corolla are both very common here, but pricey because they tend to be in high demand, by “ricers” and because of a reputation for quality.

  • avatar
    Corollaman

    When I go to the poorer side of town, it’s like stepping back in automotive time with all the still running older cars that i just don’t see where I live.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      When I drive through the side of town I used to live in (and still go to church in), it’s like stepping onto the set of a rap music video. On my last drive through there, in addition to dodging potholes I had to dodge a weave that was left laying in the street. 1st gen Expeditions on dented ’24s, Avengers with ample body damage, “whale” B bodies. Hands down the single most popular platform is the W-body. I’ve pulled up at a light and seen 4 wbodies lined up in a row: Grand Prix, older regal, 06+ Impala, and a tinted out 00-05 Impala on rims. Very typical scene.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      I call that “returning to NE Ohio.”

      Rusty Cavaliers as far as the eye can see!

  • avatar
    zoomzoomfan

    What an odd list.

    I don’t recall the last time I saw a Daewoo, even in my western Kentucky hometown where the median income for a family is $31,000-ish. Mostly, around here, it’s W-Body Impalas. Especially the ’06+ ones. You can finance those through Buy-Here-Pay-Here lots with high miles and exorbitant interest rates even if you have abysmal credit, and a lot of people do. They proceed to have 3 or 4 kids, cram them into the Impala, and drive the car into the ground. For what it’s worth, Impalas seem to be very tough cars.

    Otherwise, it’s the Cobalt/G5, the G6 and Malibu, and the Taurus. Not a lot of imports since for some reason people around here think that selling a non-GM/Ford/Chrysler car means they can set an asking price double what it should be.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I think any time you’re in the Midwest and head out past the suburban bit into the country, the number of import vehicles drops precipitously. The rural folks buy American.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Which generation of Dodge Dart are they referring to? The current FCA one or the pre 1977 one?

    Here in Canada the list would be much different as most of those are now off the roads, victims of road salt.

  • avatar
    jhughes

    With the exception of the Lanos, I think the top seven cars on that list are pretty darn cool, and good examples that you don’t need a ton of money to have a fun car.

  • avatar
    MWolf

    I see a Lanos or two around. They weren’t really all that plentiful when new. The G6 and Mistubishis are common enough, and the Vitara I’ve seen proof of. The only cars on this list I’d run from are the Aztec, Sephia, and maybe that Acura. Then again, I left this demographic just a few years ago. And I was the odd one out at that age with my love for luxury coupes that could be had for a few grand.


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