By on June 16, 2016

Chevrolet vs. Ford rock drop

After watching General Motors drop 825 pounds of rock into the beds of a Chevrolet Silverado and a Ford F-150, I wasn’t caught up in fairness or relevance or with the advertisement’s status as a marketing stunt. Some observers asked whether GM crossed an unwritten line shared by Detroit’s cross-town truck rivals, as if in a year when presidential candidates toss deeply personal insults around like water balloons at a summer picnic a pickup truck critique would be over the line.

To me, it simply seemed clear from the moment of the ad’s YouTube launch that the Chevrolet Silverado’s apparent toughness advantage would be more frequently viewed than a traditional truck commercial. As of this writing, Chevrolet’s YouTube channel has racked up 4.4 million views with “Silverado Strong: Steel Bed Outperforms Aluminum Bed,” ten times more views than the channel’s 22 previous ads have generated in the last month, combined.

The Silverado could use the increased attention. U.S. sales of GM’s best-selling model line are flat despite a six-percent sales increase in the truck market so far this year.

GM could also stand to see the Ford F-Series taken down a peg. F-Series sales are growing faster than the sector as a whole.

In calendar year 2015, GM’s full-size pickup twins — Silverado and Sierra — combined to outsell the Ford F-Series lineup for the first time since 2009. But the Ford family was picking up steam after sliding 2 percent through the first-half of the year, a boom period for pickup truck sales. Second-half F-Series volume jumped 12 percent, and the F-Series hasn’t looked back since. Through the first five months of 2016, year-over-year F-Series volume is up 7 percent in a full-size pickup truck market that’s grown only 4 percent.

U.S. sales of the Chevrolet Silverado, meanwhile, rose to an eight-year high in calendar year 2015, climbing by 71,000 units compared with 2014. In early 2016, however, while U.S. new vehicle sales volume is rising steadily and the truck market appears very healthy, Silverado sales growth has stalled.

GM, fortunately, has seen a noticeable uptick in sales of the GMC Sierra, which has helped the twins to a 2-percent increase despite the Silverado’s slight downturn. But after outselling the F-Series by roughly 5,000 units in the first five months of 2015, the GM full-size twins trail the F-Series by 11,000 sales during the same period one year later.

The fickle U.S. sales race, fraught with all-encompassing figures that group lower-volume heavy-duty trucks with their light-duty brethren, isn’t the be all and end all of an automaker’s daily operations. But it’s reasonable to believe that General Motors, after making such headway last year when the F-150 was an all-new model, wants to take the resurgent Blue Oval down a peg in 2016. In so doing, if the soft glow of rugged, durable toughness casts a positive light on the Silverado’s bowtie grille, so be it.

From a strict sales perspective, the Honda Ridgeline’s subsequent performance — far less staged and consequently more believable — won’t result in hundreds of thousands of truck buyers shifting their allegiance to Honda. But the battles being waged are not at all dissimilar.

Chevrolet is determined to make the Silverado appear as the tougher full-size pickup truck. Honda must convince truck buyers that the Ridgeline is tough. Perhaps the er can come later.

[Image Source: General Motors]

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

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198 Comments on “Is Chevrolet Attacking Ford’s Aluminum Because Silverado Sales Are Flat And The F-Series Is Surging?...”


  • avatar

    STEEL is stronger than Aluminum.

    PERIOD

    You can increase the strength of aluminum to make it “as strong” or “stronger” than steel, but that requires MORE ENERGY and planning.

    However, where Aluminum wins is the reduced mass which grants higher fuel efficiency for both the vehicle itself and any vehicle that has to transport said vehicles (example: Boats shipping trucks to other countries).

    What I am waiting to see is what TESLA can build in terms of an EV truck where the energy is specifically devoted to instant torque rather than high-speed performance.

    Plug-in trucks BABY

    Recharge your truck in 2 hours while hanging out with the lot lizards on i95.

    Get yourself some bacon, grits, sausage and some more bacon while your truck recharges itself and emits no polluting gases.

    RIDE SILENTLY through town in a 25,000 pound rig capable of 0 – 60 in 3.9 seconds.

    • 0 avatar
      bikegoesbaa

      Generally speaking, on a per-volume basis yes it is.

      An aluminum part can be much stronger for a given mass.

      Guess which is more of a constraint in vehicle design: volume or mass?

      • 0 avatar

        #1 There are plenty of people WHO DON’T CARE ABOUT MASS.

        Mass is attacked at weighing stations and naturally it takes more energy to haul larger mass, but in countries that have inexpensive oil, this isn’t a concern.

        I agree that less mass is better, but for long-term reliability and structural rigidity, I believe steel has PROVEN ITSELF.

        (No one better say anything about the WTC towers)

        #2 The cost of aluminum production is decreasing, but it’s still higher than steel. This economy isn’t helping.

        #3 The cost of insuring aluminum body vehicles is currently expensive. In time that will change.

      • 0 avatar
        CarnotCycle

        Not an expert on metallurgy, but I do believe aluminum suffers from long-term metal fatigue over repeated stress-cycles. That property is why airliners are constantly checked for cracks with X-rays, why aluminum alloy con-rods are not way more ubiquitous in everyday engines, and why aluminum is not used in big civ-engineering like skyscrapers, bridges, and the like.

        Cars from the past which use aluminum either employ it in low-stress stuff like body-panels or in chassis setups which (from engineering perspective) can flex under loads.

        Perhaps Chevy (and their insufferable hipster pitchman) will make a commercial that shows Ford bed buckling after the ten-thousandth load of dirt or something.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Science!

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          GM was planning an aluminum truck but the 2008 bankruptcy killed the plan.

          Ford uses aluminum in body panels including the box and suspension and driveline components.

          I don’t see an aluminum box as an issue because anyone I know that actually uses a pickup as a truck gets a liner of some kind for the box. That would be spray-in, plastic insert, thick rubber mat,aluminum checker-plate or plywood.
          Guys who really expect to abuse the box area remove the box and use an aftermarket deck or custom box.

        • 0 avatar
          ahintofpepperjack

          The Audi A8’s entire unibody has been aluminum for nearly 20 years.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Aluminium is a great metal for the correct application.

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            Thank goodness BMW and MB hold themselves to higher standards than to dump rock on it to see how it compares to their cars :)

            The A8 Alu panels “feel” sturdier than the very thin sheet steel used by the competition. Because Alu’s lower specific weight allows for, and lower tear strength and stiffness demands, thicker sheets being used.

            Ford is touting the same thing about the F150 bed. Theoretically, this added “stiffness” “should” result in the final sandwich of polyurea(spray in) + underlying bed having advantages over steel, since there would be less flexing of the bedliner. But the actual thicknesses used, as well as the supports under the bed, could sway it either way.

            Regardless, only idiots and admen dump rocks into the bare metal bed of ANY light duty pickup. Dumping rock into a bed with a spray in liner would demonstrate something useful. Something I’m sure most Chevy guys realize as well. Hence, chances are the two trucks don’t differ materially in that kind of more realistic and relevant test.

            And, of course, as Honda is demonstrating, once you suck it up and accept a liner, why bother with a painted metal bed underneath it in the first place?

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @BAFO – “Aluminium is a great metal for the correct application.’

            Wow.

            No rants about Ford loosing sales at a horrific pace due to aluminum.

            Can’t use that argument since sales are 2% greater than market growth and GM sales are down.

            OH….. OH……

            It must be those steel HD’s flying off the lots.

            LOL

          • 0 avatar
            BoogerROTN

            Yeah, but like most full size trucks, it’s unnecessary because very, very few people use the vehicle as intended. With a F150 or Silverado, it’s hauling a load of air; with the A8, it’s a cabin full of vanity.

    • 0 avatar
      yamahog

      Do you want to bet your hellcat’s title for the title of my hellcat slayer that we won’t see a mass-produced 25000 lb rig capable of 0-60 in 3.9 seconds?

  • avatar
    bikegoesbaa

    The whole notion of “Tougher Trucks” is confusing to me.

    Does the truck do what you need and not break or fall apart or prematurely look like crap? Then it is sufficiently “tough” for your application.

    Paying extra for theoretical (but non-functional) toughness seems like a sucker move.

    Q: Which truck holds up better to 825 pounds of rock being dropped in from top of the cab height?
    A: WGAF, I’m not going to do that to my truck.

    • 0 avatar
      jjster6

      Did you watch the whole video? I’d never drop the rocks in my truck but a relatively light tool box dropped in the bed of the Ford punctured it!!! A toolbox!!!

      That is way more of an issue than rocks puncturing the bed!!!

      As for the Honda, sure the bed was undamaged. But try to get up a slippery incline with 825 pounds in the bed and front wheel drive. And good luck getting to the spare tire with those rocks in the bed. A great car (the Accord) makes a lousy truck.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        jjster6 – yeah. I routinely drop my tool boxes on an angle into the back of my truck. /sarc

        Please read my comment posted earlier in the thread.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        A tool box on a corner is likely to puncture sheet steel, too, ain’t it?

        I mean, truck beds aren’t 1/4″ Armory steel; they’re slightly thicker mild steel, nothing all that “tough” for resisting punctures.

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        That “relatively light” tool box weighed 28 pounds and if you read the fine print in the disclosure it punctured the bed on the Chevy twice too.

    • 0 avatar
      LeMansteve

      Exactly.

      jjster – who perches a tool box like that, crooked, on the edge of the bed in the first place? Do people make it a habit of just haphazardly dropping their toolbox into the bed like that? Wouldn’t someone regularly carrying tools also typically have a liner in the bed? How many people regularly carry metal tool boxes with hard corners like that anyway?

      Yes – carelessly dropping a metal toolbox directly on it’s corner from a couple feet up, on an un-lined bed, will not be a good day. It put a hole in the Ford’s bed and dented the Chevy’s bed. The question is, how often does this specific thing happen?

      • 0 avatar
        shaker

        “The question is, how often does this specific thing happen?”

        When a worker hefting a toolbox into his boss’s new F150 (over the locked tailgate) gets stung by a swarm of bees?

        • 0 avatar
          jjster6

          As someone who often carries very large and heavy loads in my truck (last weekend it was a 48 roll pack of toilet paper AND 2 watermelons) I think the toolbox drop is a very plausible situation. I would hate to drop something in by accident and find a hole in the bed.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            When you place a heavy steel tool box with sharp corners, teetering on the side rail, that hopefully lands *just right* so one of the corners hits first for maximum damage, how do you know it’s NOT gonna fall to the outside, gouging the paint on the way down?

            That sounds more expensive to fix.

            And hasn’t anyone ever heard of PLASTIC tool boxes??? What year is this? And who has the exact right tool box for the job of piercing the unlined, no bed liner bed?

        • 0 avatar
          dukeisduke

          Africanized bees?

    • 0 avatar
      formula m

      “I’m not going to do that to my truck”… But plenty of employees wouldn’t think twice about dropping that in a truck in one shot like in the commercials.

      I think it would be better for when you return a leased truck. Even if you have the $3500 Damage protection, that $3500 will go quick working with aluminum.

  • avatar
    ReSa

    As a City livin’ European I have no truck experience, but am I wrong to assume that anyone that plans to seriously/professionally use their truck bed, will use a bed-liner for sure?

    If so, problem solved.

    • 0 avatar
      Higheriq

      Here in the U.S., any truck buyer with half a brain buys a bedliner (ranging from $300 to $500, or a cheap alternative being an $80 sheet of marine-grade plywood) when they buy a truck. Those who don’t are the one who deserve what they get because they simply don’t care.

      • 0 avatar
        CarnotCycle

        And lets not kid ourselves – 80% or so of full-size trucks sold will never see so much as a pebble land in their beds.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        My old Toyota pickup never had a liner.

        Yeah, the bed got some dents and surface rust.

        It was still fine and intact 18 years later when it was traded in, despite lots of cargo dragged over the paint, wearing it down, and stuff rolling around from time to time.

        I credit the canopy, and, well … “is truck, is not pretty”.

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      You are correct about bed liners. This is all marketing because Ford has been destroying GM in Consumer Report ratings and sales. Not that GM makes complete crap pickups. It is just there current build quality is extremely poor.

      • 0 avatar

        GM has made quite a few crap trucks. My buddy’s 2014 Silverado would overheat the transmission pulling a 4000lb trailer driving on a 100 mile route he’s driven for 40 years with a lot of different pickup trucks pulling similar loads and similar trailers. The Silverado put him on the side of the road several times due to the transmission overheating.

        He now has a 2016 Ram Ecodiesel 1500. Doesn’t even strain it. I recently drove it 600 miles pulling a car trailer with a Town Car on the back. It’s awesome.

        I suspect that the checkered past GM has with owners that actually use a truck for serious work is the reason their sales are waning. Well, that and they’re ugly.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          WhiskeyRiver,
          You can’t beat a diesel when work is involved. Gasoline is nice for 75% of the daily driving no working pickups you rarely see because they are in the parking lots at work.

          But, if you are serious about off roading, then it’s diesel again. Work = diesel.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Obviously you got the “75%” out of your A$$. Around 40% are straight, official “Fleet”, and you’re buying 10 pickups at a time, or within the calendar year, or own 10 total “work” vehicles/equipment, proof required. Most regular, mom/pop business, smaller farms/ranches, and obviously one-man operations aren’t “Fleet” by any means.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Actually you CAN beat a diesel. You’ve no doubt, never towed or been off-road in a gas/petrol 4X4. Diesels lack instant throttle response, which you want for *both*.

            When you’ve got a heavy load and you mash the pedal, you don’t want to sit there and wait for a diesel to spool up, to finish crossing the damn intersection. They’re worthless without a turbo, by the way.

            With rock crawling, assuming that’s the hardcore “off-road” you’re referring to, you want surgical precision with a touch of the gas pedal.

            The bigger disadvantage to diesels is the “upgrade” price, added maintenance and other diesel drama.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “You can’t beat a diesel when work is involved”

            I agree to a degree. (maybe 1 degree..LOL)

            My dad owned DIESEL logging trucks and gravel trucks. He ALWAYS said that diesel pickups were a waste of money. This is coming from a guy who used pickups for work.

            The company my brother works for is CANFOR. The biggest Forest resource company in Canada and 3rd biggest in North America.

            They have NEVER purchased a diesel pickup. Corporate bean counters can NOT show a positive ROI.

            Diesel pickups do have their place especially in heavy use applications but how many 1/2 tons are heavy use?
            I have yet to see a Ram Ecodiesel hauling more than air.
            I’ve seen 2 new Nissan Titan XD’s and both were also hauling air. 1 of those 2 I’ve seen multiple times.

            As long as “western” emissions standards and low gasoline prices remain the same there isn’t any real benefit to a small diesel.

            I have nothing against diesels but I’ve never been able to come up with a personal positive ROI. Until then, I’m not spending the extra cash for one. Same can be said for “big” V8’s. I don’t tend to overbuy.

            (Cue rant about full sized pickups being an “overbuy” )

            and the usual commentary about pen!s size.

          • 0 avatar

            Well, I can report this about a 1500 Ram Ecodiesel. I pulled a Town Car on a trailer 300 miles up 69/75 out of Dallas and across I40 with the cruise set on 80. It got 20 MPG. And it’s a nice truck. No telling how many cows they had to kill to upholster it.

            Not really applicable here but I have to add that the Nav unit switching over and showing lane changes on the speedo is just pure dope when you’re busy in traffic pulling a sled.

  • avatar
    shedkept

    Galvanic corrosion. Waiting, patiently.

    • 0 avatar
      RS

      Will you see it before Chevy has their rockers, wheel wells and door bottoms rust away?

    • 0 avatar
      Higheriq

      You will be waiting patiently for quite a while.

      • 0 avatar
        Madroc

        In fairness, galvanic corrosion can result from QC problems rather than environmental exposure. Ford had problems with the aluminum hoods on S197 (through 2014) Mustangs, due to trace iron contamination from the steel stamping tools. My late-production 2013 was getting bubbling on the hood within a couple years. Fixed under warranty, but one hopes that Ford got that issue sorted before they started making all the body panels for a much higher-volume vehicle.

        • 0 avatar

          Galvanic corrosion is common where electricity flows between two dissimilar metals. Shouldn’t be the case here should it? I mean, I don’t know for sure but done right it shouldn’t be a problem should it? And I’m guessing Ford thought about that. They’ve got an engineer or two.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            F-150 still has a steel frame, steel fasteners, and I believe the firewall is steel. I’m really curious how they pulled that last one off.

          • 0 avatar
            dukeisduke

            That’s usually called dissimilar metal corrosion – where steel and aluminum are in contact.

            Recalling my three years spent training to be an airframe mechanic, a million years ago.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Ions

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            The dissimilar metals thing is overrated. The aluminum hood on my ’04 F-150 is bolted directly to steel hinges, no gasket. Just paint in between, as any other parts. Steel bolts obviously

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            you need both dissimilar metals plus an electrolyte. Aluminum and steel can touch each other for a century so long as they stay dry.

        • 0 avatar
          tresmonos

          Madroc, you’re hitting the nail on the head. There are also 2 other factors: shared pre-treat baths and suppliers meeting the substrate specifications (or not meeting them).

  • avatar
    Fred

    I read somewhere that in advertising you never mention your competitors by name. Maybe this is a act of desperation by Chevy.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Last time GM went after Ford, with Howie Long, it didn’t work very well. This time will be no different.

      Also, I find it curious that they even use Howie Long as a pitchman. Sure, he’s a NFL Hall of Famer, but most people see him weekly on Fox NFL Sunday. There is often a Ford logo near him during that show because it’s sponsored by Ford. F-Series ads seem to happen like twice a commercial break as well.

      (Howie isn’t in this particular commercial, but he has been in other spots this year)

    • 0 avatar
      IAhawkeye

      I remember those Howie Long commercials, funny they went after the honestly nice to have features Ford had on their trucks by trying to make them seem less manly – lol. Instead of just trying to you know, improve their own trucks.

  • avatar
    EquipmentJunkie

    The GM truck dealers in my area have begun to prominently display the factory-supplied BroDozer package in front of the dealerships within the past couple of months. Coincidental? I doubt it. For some buyers, these jacked up trucks may look more tough. I find them comical.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Funny you mention that. My GMC/Chevy dealer has always been the local king of the brodozer.

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        One of the local Jeep dealers around advertises “free” lift kits with every vehicle.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          dukeisduke – my local FCA dealer usually has a few fully modified Jeeps on the lot.

          My local Ford dealer now advertises Tuscany pickups. 135k for a Shelby F150 and 116k for a F350 Black ops truck.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            I had to Google “Shelby F150” – ya got a be freaking kidding me.

            Raptor wasn’t enough? Limited/Platinum/King Ranch wasn’t enough? In 20 years these suckers will be looked at like we look at a Corvorado now.

            I know Shelby did the Dakota convertibles many years back but a 700 hp Shelby F150 is cognitive dissonance at the level of “Donald Trump announces he will move to Mexico and become a luchador.”

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            PrincipalDan – the local dealer had 2 Shelby F150’s. The red one sold and the blue on is still on the lot.
            I had to laugh when I went to look at it and it was covered in crow sh!t.
            There is a metaphor in there somewhere. LOL

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Was there ever a time when men defined toughness through conviction of their character instead of the resilience and material of their truck beds? What a miserable ad campaign.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    Can’t you just Line-X the bed on any truck to help protect it?

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      People who put stuff like cement blocks in the beds of their new trucks have liners. They do not do it to unpainted metal.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Ford has two different factory bedliner options; drop in and spray in. Both cost under $500 on the option list and are probably on 80%+ F150s on dealer lots.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          The rental ProMaster City I had for a couple of hours had bare metal, and it bothered me to even put chairs against it.

          I had this thought pinging in my head “This is gonna rust!”

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            Seeing unprotected beds or floors affects me worse that nails on a chalkboard, squeaking styrofoam or rap.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            You know the one that always gets me? When the dentist puts cotton in your mouth after something and you end up chewing it.

            Eeeeee

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            That’s not even the worst dentist thing. I hate when they polish your teeth and get that stuff all in there, and then you bite down and it’s like chewing minty sand…blech.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Ugggh, then fill your mouth up with sandy water. And scrape with little pick axes before that. I hear that crap inside my head and it bothers me so much, I just want to get away from the scraping.

            However, none of that comes close to my experience for 2.5 hours having periodontal surgery in January. Thirty or forty stitches, that was.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The Truth about Dentistry.

          • 0 avatar
            Sigivald

            Per upthread, I had a Toyota pickup with a canopy, never had a bedliner on it.

            When I got rid of it 18 years later, there was paint scraped off the ridges of the bed, and a few big dents (20# propane cylinder got loose…), some surface rust.

            That’s *it*, and I live in Oregon where it rains.

            Is truck; is not pretty.

  • avatar
    mcarr

    I’m surprised we haven’t seen a composite bed yet. Stronger, lighter, and dent resistant. Also, no corrosion. I’m in the market for a new pickup, and it will probably be a GM due to the discount I get, but I’m waiting for the next transmission to become available on all trim levels. I personally am not buying because GM has fallen behind in their powertrain offerings.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Honda demonstrates their standard composite bed in the ad, above ^^.

      It’s impressive.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/08/when-gm-couldnt-think-outside-the-box-remembering-pro-tec/

        AGAIN, GM had a composite bed and had no effin’ clue what to do with it. Couldn’t market it properly to save their lives.

        • 0 avatar
          detlump

          Another great of example of GM Engineering coming up with a great idea/solution, but GM Marketing not knowing what to do with it. Same thing for 4-wheel steering. The V8-6-4 was a great idea, but the technology wasn’t ready. I am sure GM Mgt got wind of it, and rushed it to market.

          • 0 avatar
            Dave W

            Actually the V8-6-4 was GM marketing. Ford realized they weren’t getting the bugs out of it and sold it to GM.

        • 0 avatar
          Madroc

          What I recall from that article was that dealers refused to stock it, because it precluded them from selling overpriced bedliners as an add-on.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      My ’15 Taco has a composite bed. It came that way from the factory.

    • 0 avatar

      Seems to me that an F-150 with a composite bedliner would be the bees knees. The aftermarket needs to fill that hole so to speak. It’s a big hole.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      mcarr – the Tacoma has a composite bed and so does the Ridgeline. GM tired it briefly.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        What composite material is that? If you read his comment you will understand he’s discussing a fiberous composite.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          “What composite material is that? If you read his comment you will understand he’s discussing a fiberous composite.’

          I’m sure an autopsy will show fibrous composite within your cranial cavity.

          Or perhaps just cavity.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      The Tacoma is on its second generation of composite beds (since 2005). I looked one time, just for grins, to see what it costs for a replacement bed (6′) for mine. It was $1,100.

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        I also added a rubber Toyota bed mat to mine, to keep things from sliding around. I just have to remember to take it out before going through the automatic car wash, because it does the magic carpet thing when you go through the dryer (the first time I forgot, I had to get out and pick it up off of the concrete).

  • avatar
    Jason

    I would love it if thousands of potential truck-buyers see this ad, sit bolt upright, and go “Wait a second, Ford has a lightweight, rustproof, adequately-tough bed in the back?” and dash to the blue oval dealership, money in hand.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I mean, really, how many people dump giant loads of rock into their half-ton trucks? Isn’t that when you use a trailer?

    This ad seems pretty pointless to me.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      And you also say “F*ck this toolbox I’m mad!” and shove it from the railing into the bed. :D

    • 0 avatar
      CarnotCycle

      “I mean, really, how many people dump giant loads of rock into their half-ton trucks? Isn’t that when you use a trailer?”

      Many moons ago I worked loading-dock and forklift for big contractor home-improvement place. Cynicism is warranted when it comes to what some think their truck will haul. There were always customers who insisted we try loading something like a pallet of Portland on the quarter-ton.

      It was always the same Mr. Wizard lesson: You tell customer the Silvy 1500 can’t handle it. Customer thinks it is man-challenge or something, and insists you try. So you lower pallet with the forklift, and customer’s eyes get wider and wider as they realize truck is just about on its back axle and the forklift is still bearing the load.

      But it’s become a man-challenge in their eyes (this psychology applies to the girls, too BTW) so they wear a brave face as you keep lowering it, until the leaf-spring creak takes on ominous kind of popping noise, then customer realizes this isn’t happening because physics, and Mr. Wizard experiment is over.

      Relinquishment forms every time for that rare customer who couldn’t take a hint by that point.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Kyree S. Williams – those are bricks not rocks and a stone mason would be real pissed if that is how you loaded his bricks. They don’t fit well together if you break off all of the edges/corners.

      I’ve seen “soft” aggregate loaded that way i.e. top soil, sand , and fine gravel.

      Any supply yard would refuse to load rocks etc. that way because of liability concerns unless you show up in a 70’s era beater.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I get what Honda was trying to do/is doing with the new Ridgeline, which appears to be a 100% improvement over the Cracker Barrel parking lot prowler original.

    But the ad comes off as disingenuous to me because it has a full bed liner. It’s not a fair comparison – though I guess it does highlight if the Ridgeline comes with a bed liner as standard.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    F-150 does several things differently including aluminum, unless there is research or customer feedback to say differently I say this is more than steel vs aluminum.

    Here’s a question, what is the total percentage of lease vs buy for BOTH models and of that sum which model has the greater lease percentage? F-150 strikes me more as the urban cowboy’s look faux tough lease special. AL much more expensive to insure and repair, long term on motor/drivetrain more iffy, more gadgets to break etc.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      I don’t think you’ll ever get that data. He!!, neither company breaks HD trucks out from half tons, let alone lease vs buy.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        To your point there, do car insurance companies actually charge differently for aluminum vehicles? The A8 I had was not more or less expensive to insure than the steel vehicles before and after it.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I’ve read, I believe in this august publication, the aluminum F-150 was more expensive to insure than its predecessor and the competition. Perhaps this was inaccurate or has since changed?

          Additional: Did you carry collision on your A8?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Perhaps there’s differentiation in trucks rather than passenger vehicles.

            Nope no collision on it. Just comp.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Ah. So no collision means they would not have to repair it for you… this is where the additional costs come in as body shops charge more for AL vehicles.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Ah ha. I figured the costs would be spread over all coverages for such cars.

            I did have a repair done to the driver’s door, after an errant cart put a quite deep ding in it. Something like $2100 for a door skin and repaint of the door and fender. Not my money!

          • 0 avatar
            Higheriq

            “More to insure” amounts to just a few (4 or 5) additional dollars a month. It is certainly NOT hundreds of extra dollars a month according to the people that I Know who have new F-150s.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Collision insurance on the F150 isn’t any more expensive than similar vehicles. It’s more expensive than the previous generation, but the current Ram and Silverado/Sierra cost more to insure than their previous generations.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            BTW, rode in a new Silverado yesterday for a couple minutes (crew cab short bed). That rides solid and nice, didn’t really feel trucky.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The Silverado/Sierra and F150 are very nice trucks. I don’t like Ram as much as either, but that’s just me.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            The difference in ride quality between that Silverado and the 04 RAM 1500 my dad has is very noticeable. The Silverado is closer to Highlander in ride quality now.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            Edmunds did a piece about (deliberately) dinging the bed with a sledgehammer, then seeing how much it cost to fix. Problem was, the truck they had was loaded and had the tail lights with the integrated radar sensors, and they broke the tail lamp housing which added like $1500 to the repair bill.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            http://www.autonews.com/article/20140203/RETAIL05/302039915/body-shops-say-aluminum-costs-more-to-repair

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            False rumors, aluminum body work costs the same. I know body shop techs, they’re paid no different, aluminum or steel. It takes more/redundant tools, and it’s up to the body techs to own them. There’s no real premium increase to insure aluminum.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Whenever I get up close to, or drive a RAM, I feel like the build quality and attention to detail are a step down from Ford/GM. And those RAM boxes, while in theory are good idea, look like crap.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I just called my insurance company and got quotes. Collision insurance wise, the F150 quote was less than the Silverado but more than the RAM. All were with $20 a year of each other. The RAM’s liability and comp coverages were much higher than either though. This is Detroit. Urban gentlemen about town prefer Mopar.

          • 0 avatar
            True_Blue

            I found that my insurance actually went *down* on my aluminum F-150 – but a lot of that was due to the Sync 3 System.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            In Detroit, Mopar or No Car-jack.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @bball40dtw – agree. Ford and Chevy feel more solid. I saw a Ram box yesterday that was warped due to the owner carelessly closing it with a thick piece of material hanging out the corner.
            It reminded me of people who slam the door shut on their car with a foot of seatbelt and buckle hanging out and banging against the side.
            I test drove a Ram 1500 last year. A Pentastar with 8 speed. It down shifted roughly into 1st and had an odd rattle in the back somewhere.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      28-Cars-Later – that would be an interesting statistic to review.

      As far as the “urban cowboy’s look faux tough lease special”, most of the 1/2 ton trucks I currently see used for commercial applications are Ford. A regular cab F150 with heavy payload package is approaching 3/4 ton payloads and is cheaper to buy and insure.

      The company my brother works for has a fleet of F150’s and GM HD’s. They don’t have any aluminum F150’s yet. I’ll find out soon enough how they hold up once they get them. They haven’t had any issues with the EB 3.5.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Ford sells a decent amount of XLs because you can get them in every cab configuration, bed length, and engine. The 3.5TT XL regular cab long bed with the HD payload package has a payload capacity of over 3200 lbs and can tow over 12000 lbs.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I’ve never been involved with a commercial fleet but I would imagine the trucks ordered would be the simplest and cheapest to do the job asked of them. Seems this assumption isn’t accurate in this case.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @28-Cars-Later – fleet trucks tend to be low spec.
          I find that small contractors all tend to buy the opposite for themselves. They all roll in the highest trip package possible.

          My brother has had to rent higher trim crewcab trucks on a few occasions to tour corporate “big shots”. His fleet spec truck obviously wasn’t good enough for them.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Fleet trucks are low spec (XL for Ford). However, Ford makes all cabs, beds, and engines available. You can end up with a $40K truck with vinyl seats, a rubber floor, and a radio from 1997 if you so desire.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            bball40dtw – In Canada a Chevy retails for a couple of grand more than an F150. With that being said, i haven’t examined the spec sheets to see if content is the same.
            Costing less or having the ability to “de-content” is a definite advantage when buying fleet trucks for guys who will abuse the living daylights out of them.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al From 'Murica

      I traded a 2013 Frontier for a 2015 F150 and my insurance dropped. I didn’t have any tickets or anything factored into either vehicles rates. Something to think about…The insurance vale on the truck caps out at what…like 65,000 bucks if you load up every option known to man? But the F-150 is the best when it comes to crash test ratings. In an accident, you can cost far more than that 65,000 to repair. I am sure the F150 was rated higher than my Frontier in this department and I figure that is why the rates went down. I discussed this with friends with full-sized trucks and I am smack in the middle rate wise so I think the cost to repair jacking up rates is either urban legend or balanced out by the fact that if you do wreck one you and your passengers are less likely to need expensive repairs.

  • avatar
    Gardiner Westbound

    A sheet of three-quarter inch pressure treated plywood will moron-proof the Ford’s bed at minimum cost.

    • 0 avatar
      jjster6

      So then why go to the extra cost and trouble of aluminum. Just make it out of steel to begin with. The plywood negates the weight savings of aluminum.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        “The plywood negates the weight savings of aluminum.”

        Not really. Ford is saving up to 700 lbs by going with aluminum in its many uses throughout the truck. A 3/4″ plywood sheet weighs only 60 lbs, and it’s disposable.

        • 0 avatar
          jjster6

          Ford saved 700 pounds on some models of their last generation truck. It’s only 300 – 400 lbs lighter than the Chevy. And they didn’t save 700 lbs on the bed. Probably 60 lbs there that the plywood just negated.

          But maybe you have a idea? Skip the bed metal altogether. Just bolt in a piece of plywood that you can replace at home when it’s trashed.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Better to use planks rather than plywood. They’re more durable and less susceptible to rot when left out in the weather, especially when un-painted. If I recall, the ’50s vintage trucks used 2x4s with square steel tubing between boards for added strength. Aluminum bars would probably work as well and still be lighter than that steel.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            “Planks”? Are you sure?? You’re gonna have to screw them to plywood anyway.

        • 0 avatar
          bunkie

          You don’t even need 3/4″. I’m guessing that 1/4″ would be fine. All you want to do is spread out the impact over a larger area. The structure of the plywood, even at 1/4″ would do that well enough.

          Plywood is amazing stuff. I would go with pressure treated, however. One other advantage is that it has a less slick surface and the loose stuff in the bed won’t slide around as much.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        jjster6 – anyone who works a pickup will do something extra to protect the bed. That applies equally to steel or aluminum.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Is Chevrolet Attacking Ford’s Aluminum Because Silverado Sales Are Flat And The F-Series Is Surging?

    Yes.

    http://tinyurl.com/gufepyu

    Link to the Lincoln ad where “the line was crossed” back in 1986.

  • avatar
    madman2k

    I have a white F150 with the aluminum body/bed – it doesn’t feel as hot as a steel vehicle which is nice for when it’s out in the sun and you lean against it or touch it.

    Or put a kid on the tailgate to change his diaper when you’re at the lake.

    I might end up getting a bed liner put on, but having the bare metal makes it easy to hose out, I’m not sure if spray-on liners gather gunk or if they are easy to clean. I would like the way it keeps things from sliding, but I usually put bungee cords around things if they would slide around.

    With my old GMC truck and previously with my old F250 I got a few loads of gravel dumped in, but I’m about to be moving someplace where it makes much more sense to rent instead of own and won’t be needing to do any landscaping. If I needed gravel or rocks, I’d rent a uhaul trailer just in case. It wouldn’t really cost much more than getting a thick sheet of plywood for the bed anyway.

    I like the front-end styling of the new Chevy trucks, but for everything else I preferred the Ford.

    The engine was the main thing I wanted. About to see how the 2.7L and 3.31 gears will do, MPG-wise on a roughly 3200 mile road trip in a couple weeks.

    Aerodynamic changes probably would’ve helped more than aluminum panels for fuel efficiency alone, but I’m sure the engineers considered that and styling/regulatory concerns ruled out making the trucks more aero-slick.

    Longevity concerns are still on my mind because there’s little doubt a plain old V8 will last a long time, but time will tell how long the EcoBoost engines last.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      My friend just got a 15 F-150 with the aluminum bed. He also got the OEM optional bed liner, which the dealer proceeded to install incorrectly (joints lapped wrong, misaligned bolt holes).

      He had to go back and teach them how to do it right.

      Otherwise, it’s a very nice combination – aluminum with liner.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Spray in liners are easy to clean. The plastic liner in my truck is a pain to wash out due to the deep ridges in the plastic. I lay an old tarp down when hauling sand to make clean up easier. The previous generation tailgate step is also a pain when hauling loose materials. The new tailgate step is a much better design.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      The current F-150 already is more aerodynamic than any F-150 that came before (even my beloved jellybean).

  • avatar
    ajla

    The odd thing here is that GM is almost certainly planning to introduce an aluminum truck in the next few years. Steel probably isn’t the hill to plant your flag in.

    It’s like when Lexus did an ad that made fun of ze Germans for having a standard turbo-4 and then made a turbo-4 IS and GS soon after.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      The sweet spot on the IQ curve advertisers target is very forgetful and forgiving.

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        JimZ – I’d LOVE to see them try and execute that process at a production rate higher than a Corvette.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          They do that on the high volume Cadillac CT6. GM sold 647 of them last month.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            If I’m within 10% of my estimated SWAG projection of the 1st full year sales flop that is the Cadillac CT6 selling 8,900 units annually (to decline in subsequent years), everyone here owes me a craft-beer, mix-and-match six pack.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I figured they would sell at least 25,000 units annually, since the 6 model is about as close to a Cadillac as we’ve seen in some time.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            It’s like an even more expensive CTS, with only slightly more rear seat leg room (seriously).

            Unless Cadillac either a) aggressively pushes it on rental agencies and other fleet companies, and/or b) does a fire sale 25% off no-questions-or-haggling red tag clearance, they will NOT sell more than 1,000 per month in the most unicorn hopium case possible.

            I’ve seen real world sticker on these, now (Serra, Suburban, Novi) and even the 2.0T is over 64k with the equipment dealers are stocking them – the 3.6 (MASSIVE CHEVY-SHARED V6 MOTOR, BRO!) is closer to 74k+.

            Cadillac is a wooden ship aflame on the sea headed straight towards a gigantic iceberg, with the Escalade and maybe CT5 as its sole means of propulsion.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            According to the Googles, the “luxury” msrp with a V6 is 60K with “premium luxury” coming in at 64 (my what stupid trim names). The two “platinum” trims come in at 83 (3.6) and 87 (3.0TT) respectively.

            The wise move is to accept Alpha platform Cadillacs suck and just move to make the CT6 your basic Cadillac sedan for volume’s sake. I can’t imagine 12K units per annum is going to be in any way profitable, especially when there presumably be no BPG or Chevy equivalent.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Even buried in a truck thread, the very mention of Cadillac raises DW from the dead. LOL

            The farce is strong in this one ;)

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      almost certainly, since they’ve patented a method of spot welding aluminum. Ford uses rivets for the F-150.

      http://media.gm.com/media/us/en/gm/home.detail.html/content/Pages/news/us/en/2012/Sep/0924_welding.html

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Marketing is running their own race. They’ll pimp aluminum GM pickups without missing a beat.

  • avatar
    Tinn-Can

    I’m a bigger fan of the elastic deformation properties of steel over aluminum (steel is real yo) in bike frames, but I just can’t figure out why trucks don’t come from the factory with a spray in liner… We get the big thick rubber bed mats for all our work trucks to protect equipment and keep stuff from sliding around as much, but the tailgates still get scratched to hell and back. The spray can stuff doesn’t work all that well either.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Many do. It’s a $400-$500 option on the F-150. A healthy percentage of the F150s on dealer lots have that option checked.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Tinn-Can – get a checkerplate cover for the tailgate. They work well for protecting the tailgate.
      http://www.autoanything.com/bed-caps-rails/60A2603A0A0.aspx

      I’ve had one on every pickup I’ve owned except my current one due to the tail gate step.

    • 0 avatar
      jim brewer

      Because a customer choice has to be made between ‘slick’ and ‘grabby’ on the bed liner surface. If you are moving furniture or equipment you want ‘grabby’ if you are hauling compost you want ‘slick.’

  • avatar

    Who drops a load of bricks in the bed of a pick up, except for a commercial. Most if not all pick ups have some sort of bed liner for protection.

    Back in the day working pick ups had a wood floor in the bed, since everyone knew that a steel (at the time) bed floor would dent, and wave between the cross members under the bed.

    Last year Ford did not have enough pick ups due to production constraints. Drive by any Ford dealer today, they have a “ton” of pick ups.

    The brick drop is perhaps good PR, and generates eyeballs, folks that need a pick to work, and drop bricks will have a sheet of plywood on the floor of the bed to replicate the wood floors from back in the day.

    • 0 avatar
      IAhawkeye

      Seriously. It’s about having the right tool for the job, a bare bed of a pickup, steel or aluminum, isn’t the right tool to get a bucket load of bricks dropped in it. Really. How are they planning on getting those bricks out with any sort of speed once they get where their going? I could tell the guys I work with to do that and once I got where we needed to go and I needed to get them out of my 250’s bed I’d hate myself for doing something that dumb. Not even mentioning the possible damage.

      If those bricks are going to be used for something, they need to be palletized. If it’s scrap material a dump trailer, or a truck with a dump box are way way better options. Even a utility trailer if there really isn’t much to haul, can do the trick.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    If Silverado sales are flat, this ad won’t help them.

  • avatar
    True_Blue

    Aluminum has more of a tendency to tear, rather than deform like steel. That said, these two run neck-and-neck capability-wise to probably 98% of each other. GM’s not happy about Ford beating them to the aluminum punch though and the ads don’t seem to be fooling anyone except GM diehards.

    Good band name, Aluminum Punch.

  • avatar
    JaySeis

    My Adrenalin has a comp bed, works fine though like all comp beds..a little slick.

    Here on the SW WA Pacific coast new boats under 70′ are virtually all aluminum. Includes oyster dredges, crew boats, crabbers, work barges under 50′-60′, guide/charter boats, sport boats, USGS motor lifeboats. Why? Superior life service, constructibility, easily modified, etc. Steel? Rare now. Old work barges, old hopper dredges, much bigger vessels.

    So some dude arguing about the toughness of his bed while towing a brutalized aluminum crew boat…hilarious.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    It took GM 2 years of desperate scrambling to come up with this? If anything, it reminds sane truck shoppers they have an aluminum choice, in case they didn’t know.

    Except pickup consumers that actually shop with zero “brand” loyalty/bias, have no clue, F-150s are actually, all-aluminum. It’s news to them, and these are the exact consumers GM is trying to reach.

  • avatar
    shaker

    Next Chevy ad:

    “Which of these trucks do you think will float away first in 2 feet of flood water?”

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    I really couldn’t care less WHY Chevy is attacking Ford; the commercials won’t entice me to purchase either truck because they are too stupidly large. These things, despite their lower weight, are so close to Class 4 capabilities that they should be considered Class 4, even the half-ton models. That half-, three-quarter- and one-ton rating used to at least somewhat accurately represent their capabilities; the new mid-sized trucks now at least somewhat fit the old full-size designations and are a better vehicle overall for most now driving a full-sized truck.

    Yes, there are some few that need that size and capability; that’s why Class 4 trucks exist.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      So no one should have bigger needs than good ol’ “Vulpine”, or if they do, they should step up to a friggin’ class 4/5 Freightliner or mini Pete??

      I hope you didn’t think this though.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Um……..

      Payload not GCWR(towing)

      Class 1 – compact (6k max gvw)
      Class 2a – 1/2 ton (6001–8500 lb)
      Class 2b – 3/4 (8501–10000 lb)
      Class 3 – one ton (10001–14000 lb)
      Class 4 – one ton”ish” i.e. F450 ( 14001–16000 lb)

      Since when did 1/2 tons skip straight to class 4?

  • avatar
    redliner

    So now I want a Honda. Forget truck beds made out of metal, I want plastic baby!

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      Hello… Helloooo…. Is this thing On?

      Tacomas have had plastic beds for a few years now. No bedliner required.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        I get the impression that the Honda engine is nicer than the V6 currently offered in the Tacoma though. OTOH, you can get a manual transmission in the Tacoma in certain trims, which appeals to me more than just about anything else having to do with a vehicle.

      • 0 avatar
        redliner

        Tacomas are so… reliable, and the resale value is so… predictable.

        I prefer to gamble on an unknown quantity that will most decidedly have lower resale value and street cred.

  • avatar
    ktm_525

    All this talk about wood plank beds. I want to see this rock drop test on a Lincoln Blackwood.

  • avatar
    Joebaldheadedgranny

    Having owned my aluminum F150 for almost a year now, the new GM ad did raise an eyebrow. I’m one of those people who don’t really need a truck, though the bed already has come in handy at least a dozen times. The very first thing I did, even before accepting delivery, was to have a bed liner installed. It’s as obvious as floor mats. I’d like to see the same test with a basic Duraliner in both. That said, GM seems like they crossed an unspoken line with this particular campaign.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    From my recollection GM has outsold FoMoCo in the pickup arena.

    What about the Colorado/Canyon twins? This is quite poor journalism, selective and biased.

    Also, from my recollection I do believe that the Colorado can outperform some so called full size pickups, ie, payload and tow.

    So, why not just produce an unbaised article? Oh, I don’t want to hear, “this is how it’s done ….. always”.

    Is a Colorado/Canyon less a pickup than a Ram, or whatever?

    Really, the performance of a Colorado/Canyon is much closer to a half ton than a 350/3500 pickup. Is this not correct?

    So, get with it!

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      “Full size” and “smaller than full size” are, here in Americaland, different things.

      Even if the sizes are close and the capabilites are similar.

      The Canyonero is just NOT in the same category as the Sierra; this isn’t TTAC being unfair, it’s the way Americans categorize trucks, uniformly, all over.

      (Note per a quick search the Tacoma and Colorado have overlap in their GCWV ratings [5,600 vs. 5,400-6000] – does this mean we should compare Tacoma sales with the F150?

      No.

      See up-thread; “compact” trucks are GCWV 6000# and under, and ne’er the twain shall meet.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Sigivald,
        So, were there more F-150s sold than Silverado/Sierra 1500s??

        I don’t think any HDs are aluminium yet.

        So, why not include midsizers into the fray?

        F Series Surging is in the title.

        Like I stated I think you’ll also find more GM 1500s were sold than F-150s.

        The author has a misleading title to the article.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      This is about “fullsize”, not “all sizes”, but it’s true GM’s midsize twins cannibalize the Silverado/Sierra.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @BARFO –
      “From my recollection GM has outsold FoMoCo in the pickup arena.”
      Um, yes, sort of.

      Even with the Colorado/Canyon, GM’s pickup market share dropped 2.3%.

      “Is a Colorado/Canyon less a pickup than a Ram, or whatever?”

      Nope.
      The Colorado/Canyon twins can outperform the majority of Ram pickups and some GM pickups and some Fords when it comes to tow/haul specs.

      BUT

      They are still within Class 1.

      @Sigivald – BARFO small diesels and small trucks. He is fixated on small. That is probably why he keeps mentioning small d!cks.

  • avatar
    jimbob457

    The commercial will help Ford to better market its aluminum bed with useful alternatives for those to be sold to heavy duty users. Ford beats GM once again. Yawn.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    This reminds me of ads that successfully ruined the market for the Chrysler Airflow. The ads by GM emphasized that the Airflow had an all steel body that wasn’t reinforced with wood. They showed how a thin-walled steel tube could bend, while the same tube with a wooden dowel through it could not. The implication was that Chrysler’s all steel line of Airflows were weak and dangerous. I’ve read that the other automakers weren’t using any wood in many of their bodies by that time either, but the advanced Airflow was associated most with all-steel construction. The part that’s important to GM is that the car buying public ate up their BS stunt and the Airflow withered on the vine, even if almost every advanced feature of the car would later become industry standard. A good BS stunt is better than being a pioneer in the market of ignoramuses today. If they can sell their conventional trucks a little longer by scaring people, they’ll benefit now and nobody will remember when every pickup has to be aluminum with a time bomb for an engine.

  • avatar
    Shawnski

    What a ridiculous stunt. You reap (rip?) what you sow if you load an unprotected bed like this, regardless if it’s steel (with scratches through the paint) or aluminum.

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