By on May 5, 2016

2016 Lincoln MKX EcoBoost Exterior, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

2016 Lincoln MKX

2.7-liter DOHC V6, turbocharged (335 horsepower @ 5,500 rpm; 380 pounds-feet @ 3,000)

Six-speed automatic transmission, all wheel drive

17 city / 14 highway / 19 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

18.9 (Observed, MPG)

Base Price: $39,185

As Tested: $58,605

All prices include $925 destination charge.

The Lexus RX isn’t a sales success; it’s a sales phenomenon. It’s a magical cash generating unicorn that can seemingly do no wrong. The RX outsells every other luxury vehicle in America. Despite sales being down 6.5 percent in 2015, the RX crossover nearly outsold the entire Lincoln brand. When the numbers were tallied, Lincoln brand as a whole beat the single Lexus model by just 617 units.

Why do I bring up the Lexus RX so early in a review ostensibly about a Lincoln crossover? Two reasons. We might as well talk about the elephant in the room and I genuinely don’t understand why the RX outsells the MKX by nearly 5:1. As I discovered during a week with the latest incarnation of Lincoln’s MKX, the Lincoln is quite simply a better Lexus than the RX.

Lincoln’s styling team has had a hard time finding its mojo. The first MKX looked like a Ford Edge with a ghetto grille, and the second toothier than a Disney villain. Fortunately, third time’s the charm, and the 2016 front end makes this the most attractive MKX ever. Helping the Lincoln stand out further is the new 2016 Lexus RX, whose looks are, shall we say, polarizing. (It looks like a sardine feeding.) In contrast, nobody found the MKX’s new front end or Dodge-esque tail lamps offensive. Since this midsize two-row crossover segment is Lexus’ to lose, let’s keep a tally. This win goes to the MKX.

2016 Lincoln MKX EcoBoost Side Exterior, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

While the exterior is finally luxury appropriate, some felt the interior had room for improvement. Plastics and materials qualities are a step above the crossovers from Ford, but not up to the level of the Euro competition. Still, the benchmark in this segment is the Lexus RX and there are just as many questionable plastics in that cabin. The ultimate level of “premiumness” ends up slightly higher in the Lexus because of two factors: Lexus’ liberal use of wood trim and attention to panel gaps. Panel gaps aren’t an indicator of reliability, dependability or luxury since you’ll find perfect gaps in unreliable Range Rovers, but they do smack of sloppy assembly control.

Thankfully, Ford’s designers finally realized that the real trick to perfect alignment is not having seams that carry from the door to the dash in one line. As you see in the picture below, panel misalignment between the dash and doors is much more difficult to spot when the design is intentionally crafted without seams that meet horizontally as you see in the Ford Explorer. Interior win: Tie. (RX: 1 – MKX: 1)

2016 Lincoln MKX EcoBoost Interior Passenger Side, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

Gap quibbles aside, the Lincoln MKX’s interior comes across as a proper luxury vehicle when you opt for the 22-way power front seats, a strangely inexpensive option at $1,500. (It does require the Reserve 102A package at a minimum to be added to the vehicle, which bumps the MSRP to $47,770 after destination.) The 22-way seats are similar to BMW’s excellent multi-contour seats in that they offer inflatable bolsters, power headrests, and the ability to adjust the curvature of the seat back, but Lincoln takes them to a new level. The MKX offers more control over the lumbar support bladders and more ways of motion than you’ll find in an X5 costing $10,000 more.

This simple seat option highlights the divide between the two brands. Lexus is so conservative that an extending thigh cushion on a seat with four-way lumbar support (for the driver only) is the most opulent throne available in the RX. Lexus passengers have to make do with a good book, while the MKX passenger can unwind in a 22-way massaging seat. Comfort win: MKX. (RX: 1 – MKX: 2)

2016 Lincoln MKX EcoBoost Interior Center Dash, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

For the longest time, Ford’s all-new body and an all-new drivetrain releases weren’t in sync. We’d see new drivetrains in older vehicles or new vehicles would launch with old engines that would get replaced in 6-12 months with the latest and greatest. That same thing is happening with the MKX, but in the cabin rather than under the hood. Our tester still had a MyLincoln Touch system in the dash, though it appears SYNC-equipped MKXs are headed to dealers now.

SYNC3 is supposed to up Lincoln’s infotainment game by improving response times, adding features and introducing a platform that will shortly support Apple CarPlay, Android Auto and integrated apps like insurance driving monitors. While I’m not the biggest fan of the new graphics Ford has used in SYNC3, the system puts the MKX ahead of Acura and Lexus and within spitting distance of BMW and Audi in terms of infotainment. The Lexus RX may have a 12-inch LCD, but the software that drives the gorgeous screen is one of my least favorite in the segment. The input method is clunky, the graphics are old school and it lacks the modern smartphone features you see in the competition. Infotainment win: MKX. (RX: 1 – MKX: 3)

2016 Lincoln MKX EcoBoost Engine, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

Despite the transverse engine layout, Lincoln’s engineers have figured out a way to get European power levels out of its V6 engine options. The base mill is a 3.7-liter naturally aspirated V6 good for 303 horsepower and 278 lbs-ft of torque. The 3.7-liter mill bests the Lexus RX 350’s 3.5-liter engine by a few ponies, but that’s just where things start.

Next up is a 2.7-liter turbocharged V6 borrowed from the F-150 pickup truck and rotated 90 degrees. Normally, when an engine is switched from longitudinal to transverse mounting, some power and torque are lost to help keep the transmission from imploding. The MKX is different.

Thanks to a six-speed automatic with strengthened internals, Lincoln was able to increase power by 10 horsepower to 335 and torque by 5 lbs-ft to 375. But that’s not the interesting part yet. Unless you check the $2,000 option box for all-wheel drive, the MKX will send all 335 ponies and all 375 twists to … the front wheels. Despite lacking the snazzy eight-speed transaxle we see in the RX, this win goes to the MKX. (RX: 1 – MKX: 4)

2016 Lincoln MKX EcoBoost Interior, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

Gobs of torque channeled through the front wheels of a 4,200-pound crossover is a recipe for, you guessed it, torque steer. On the other hand, I nearly bought a new 2000 Lincoln Continental, so apparently massive torque steer isn’t a problem for me. The rest of you will no doubt check the all-wheel-drive option box that transforms the MKX’s driving dynamics.

Lincoln’s engineers have taken a page from Acura’s playbook lately and programmed the all-wheel-drive center coupling to engage fully and frequently. The result is a more neutral-feeling crossover than the AWD versions of the RDX or RX. The system can’t overdrive the rear wheels or torque vector like an MDX, but the MKX will plow less in corners than the average transverse-engined crossover.

As with the smaller MKC, AWD comes with Lincoln’s active damping suspension system. If the suspension is in comfort mode, you get the softest ride in this segment by a mile. With the suspension in normal mode, things feel more buttoned down, but there is still plenty of tip/dive and body roll. “Sport” firms up the MKX, but the feeling isn’t the same as you’d find in a traditionally sprung vehicle. The reason is that although the dampers can restrict motion, the springs are still pillowy soft.

2016 Lincoln MKX EcoBoost Instrument Panel, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

The soft suspension and incredibly quiet cabin make the MKX the ideal highway cruiser. According to our decibel meter, the MKX was 1 dB quieter than both the Lexus RX and the BMW X5, giving the segment a new low-noise floor. The variable-ratio steering is precise, moderately weighted and as numb as any in this segment. When it comes to classic Lexus values of an isolated ride and a quiet cabin, the MKX beats Lexus at its own game. (RX: 1 – MKX: 5)

The soft suspension and somewhat disconnected steering mask the athletic abilities of the Lincoln. Push luxury crossovers in the corners and you realize that the MKX actually handles well for this segment thanks to a relatively light curb weight. The X5 may be better balanced, but it’s also 15-percent heavier. As much as Cadillac has recently touted the new XT5’s lightweight construction, the MKX is just about the same weight with notably more power.

2016 Lincoln MKX EcoBoost Front Wheel, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

Despite having two fewer gears than most of the competition, our tester ran from 0-60 in 6.2-6.3 seconds depending on the run. That makes the Lincoln faster than the X5 powered by the 3.0-liter turbo, faster than the Audi Q7 or Volvo XC90 T6, and notably faster than an RX 350. Performance win: MKX. (RX: 1 – MKX: 6)

Starting at $39,185 (after a $925 destination charge) the MKX isn’t the deal it used to be, but it is still significantly less expensive than a European crossover. Perhaps more importantly, however, it’s also $3,800 less than a Lexus RX despite being comparably equipped. That pricing delta grows as you add options with a fully loaded 3.7-liter naturally aspirated MKX being nearly $6,000 less than a comparable RX 350. Our twin-turbo MKX out accelerates, out handles and delivers a more polished ride than the RX 350 and was still $2,000 less than an RX with a similar feature set. Value win: MKX. (RX: 1 – MKX: 7)

2016 Lincoln MKX EcoBoost Rear 3/4, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

Are there areas where Lincoln could improve the MKX? Without question. Using SYNC3 or MyLincoln Touch isn’t a problem in my book, but the screen should be larger and the interior better differentiated from other Ford family products. The actual parts aren’t the problem; Lexus shares plenty with Toyota after all. Fuel economy during our week averaged a lackluster 19 mpg, which is toward the lower end of the segment, although that is offset to a great extent by the MKX being at the top of the pack in straight-line performance.

The MKX is a return to what Lincoln’s used to be in my mind. The cabin is eerily quiet, the thrust is endless, the ride serene. In other words, Lincoln has created the perfect Lexus.

We must now circle back. Why then does the RX outsell the MKX by nearly five to one? I have no idea. While it’s true that Lincoln’s vehicles are statistically less reliable than Lexus, brand reliability is above average and essentially identical to Acura. Resale value in the MKX is poorer than the RX, but the Lincoln is less expensive and dealer incentives will likely level out much of the three-year resale difference. In the end, the answer lies not in the vehicle itself but in the brand. If this were a contest based strictly on the virtues of the vehicle, the MKX might not be first in the segment, but it’d be at the top of the pack and well above the RX.

Lincoln provided the vehicle, insurance and one tank of gas for this review

Specifications as tested

0-30 mph: 2.3 seconds

0-60 mph: 6.3 seconds

1/4 mile: 14.9 seconds @ 93 mph

[Images: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars]

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298 Comments on “2016 Lincoln MKX Review – Lincoln Beats Lexus at Its Own Game...”


  • avatar
    threeer

    Self-licking ice cream cone…RX outsells currently because it has sold so well in the past. And it isn’t exactly like folks are rushing to swarm Lincoln dealerships. Kind of like why my mother bought three Toyotas in a row without ever test driving them. She knew what she was getting and bought into the brand (until she bought her last new car, a Buick Verano, at my suggestion. And at least she test drove it before she bought it!).

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      I knew some people that buy new RXs every time they add airbags or other safety features. Lexus has those customers because their cars meet customer expectations. Lincoln doesn’t have customers like that.

      • 0 avatar
        pbxtech

        My aunt and uncle have purchased at least three of the Lexus CUVs. They had a Ford Elite in the late 70s and both it and the dealer were very disappointing. The Lexus experience for them has been flawless. They have always had equity at the end of the lease and they use that to upgrade features on the next one.

        The lesson here is treat your customers well on the way up, and don’t sell junk.

    • 0 avatar
      laserwizard

      Toyoduh and Honduh buyers are the least intelligent on the planet – they assume what was the past is now the present and that these brands are just as good as they used to be; they aren’t. But the fools that rush to buy without testing don’t have standards; they have traditions.

      Meanwhile, the rest of the world is passing Honduh and Toyoduh at all levels – noticeably in styling. Both brands are designed by blind people; the rest of the industry (save for GM) are designed by talented people. GM uses whoever isn’t hired by someone else.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Laser I think your blind if you think Toyota and Honda are no longer selling quality products, especially if you want to compare them to Fords quality. Ford doesn’t make anything interesting for someone that buys vehicles to last. I don’t even like Honda but the notion that they’re being left behind is silly.
        I tested my 4Runner before buying, explain to me what product Ford has that compares? Nada. The closest competitor is the Wrangler, but then I’m buying into a brand that redefining itself from an offroad brand to a new beetle cute-ute-esque brand.

        • 0 avatar
          cgjeep

          Honda and Toyota used to be so far ahead of everyone reliability wise but I don’t think their products are anymore. They aren’t producing junk but I don’t think the quality is 3x better than the competition anymore. Ford’s has risen as well in the mean time. The exception I think is the 4 Runner. That is still built to the “old standards”. Funny there is a lot of overlap between the Tacoma and 4 Runner owners on the various forums and the consensus is the the Tacomas are built to much lower standard than the 4 Runners. I have always has at least one Jeep in the family since 1993 and am about ready to switch to a 4 Runner myself.

          • 0 avatar
            Dave M.

            I wouldn’t disagree – most others have drawn very near to Honda and Toyota in a number of ways. I believe they still top the charts, both in reliability and resale.

            It’s not to say Toyonda haven’t had their past problems – Honda 5 speed auto transmissions, Toyota power window switches, etc.

            They still are considered the gold standard – that will take a long time to surmount.

        • 0 avatar
          SC5door

          Where are you going with this, Hummer?

          First it’s about product quality then you’re about product availability?

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            I was making the point that The American manufacturers are building unappealing (i.e. Low quality unibody) products where the Japanese still offer full framed high quality vehicles in their lineup, the one bright spot for America being Wrangler.

            Though I will admit it took me a second to figure out where in fact I was going with that when re-reading it.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Hummer, the RX in question here is unibody, and far outsells Lexus’s BOF products. In fact, the single thing Lexus dealers want most is a three-row unibody crossover, that would have the family-size interior room the GX lacks at a lower price point than the elephantine LX.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Understood, but my point really wasn’t focused on the vehicle in the article or its competitors, it was more focused on the Japanese vehicle rant.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            The LX looks disgusting now and should be rejected for the LC on that basis alone.

      • 0 avatar
        threeer

        I sincerely appreciate you implying that a majority of my family to be part of the “least intelligent” people on the planet. My parents bought three Toyotas consecutively and not a one gave them issue. My father was a 26-year Army vet, my mother served as a Protocol Specialist for several General Officers. My sister, currently a Division Chief (and holds a Masters Degree…hardly unintelligent) owned two Hondas that were stellar. My uncle, a retired Warrant Officer, owned two Hondas and two Toyotas before his passing, and if I had been on the ball, I would have taken his 1992 Toyota pick up that was STILL running as new when he passed in 2014. His son (my cousin), holds a Doctorate and is currently Chairman of utility organization and just recently sold one of his Hondas (his son still drives the other). And finally, MY son, a C-17 pilot, refuses to part with his Tercel.

        There’s probably a good reason why they all drove Hondas and Toyotas…lack of intelligence WASN’T one of them.

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          LazyWizard is a broken record and a boring, uninventive one at that. I wouldn’t waste your time getting irritated or replying to anyone who thinks it is clever to replace the ‘a’ with ‘duh’ every post, both here and on other websites.

          There are some folks on this site who have created interesting branding for themselves, laser. You’ve chosen “Duh”. Seems about right.

        • 0 avatar
          SC5door

          My Mom finally switched after driving domestics for 30+ years. Most of her brothers and brother-in-laws worked for GM, Ford or Chrysler in some capacity (mostly mechanics and parts managers). As Mom got older and money became tighter the thought of continually taking the car to the shop with nickle and dime repairs pushed her into a Toyota and KIA Soul.

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        @laserwizard

        Toyoduh and Honduh screams the same type of critical thinking as a person who says democrap or republicunt when talking politics, but I’ll look past that for now.

        Can you tell me how Toyota and Honda are not as good as they used to be? Because they still offer reliable transportation, good fit and finish, class competitive power and mileage, good pricing, and top of class reliability, all while still having good driving dynamics and maintaining top resale values.

        Case and point – I just helped my mom buy a new CUV, a CPO Hyundai Tuscon. For a RAV-4 with similar age/mileage/options, she would have paid almost $7k extra. That resale value didn’t come from people being stupid, it was built from continued quantifiable quality over decades.

        The line “there are no bad cars anymore” gets thrown around on this site often, and it is 99% true. The thing is, reputations are earned, and the rest of these cars that are basically good haven’t been doing it to warrant a good reputation yet. Honda and Toyota have. When you buy one you get exactly what’s on the box, and people know that. That’s why they buy them.

        > the rest of the industry (save for GM) are designed by talented people. GM uses whoever isn’t hired by someone else.

        Except for any transverse-based Chrysler platform, Nissan, or most of VAG that’s not Porsche, at least if we’re talking about long term predictable cost of ownership and reliability.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        You can prattle all you want, but Lexus continues to dominate the reliability ratings year in and year out, and that hasn’t changed. Other manufacturers have improved — a lot — but Lexus is at the top of the heap.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          Thing is, the heap is pretty flat these days. And if I have to have boring and ugly to have the most reliable car, well, I just don’t care about reliability THAT much.

    • 0 avatar

      Good Luck getting the routine Lexus buyer to crossShop to a Lincoln.

      When PRESIDENT TRUMP imposes tarrifs on these things I’m gonna sit back in my Hellcat and LAUGH SO LOUD I might be louder than my Supercharger whine.

      Lets see how well Toyota and Honda sell when THE SCALES ARE BALANCED.

      IT’S TIME AMERICA STOPPED GETTING THE SHORT END OF THE STICK.

      We are GOING to MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN.

      Through FORCE.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        Where is that Hellcat made?

        There is real irony that the blowhard who is so opposed to imports is a shill for Hyundai, Kia and Fiat.

        And just to interject some fact into your diatribe, are you aware that Honda actually exports more vehicles from North America than it imports. FCA can’t say that.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Doesn’t technically make the Lincoln any better than the mess it already is, now does it?

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

          Things do make Lincoln better than the “mess” you think it is. Its better products that go further than matching the competition, increasing sales and positive reviews like this one. But, oh yeah, its still Lincoln, and it isnt a 4Runner, so MESS.

          Your rants show your head to be just as far up your you-know-what as the likes of lazer and BTSR. No American BOF vehicles except Wrangler? Lol Are you high?
          There is no direct 4Runner compeditor, yet (Ford may change that with Bronco), but Nissan, Mitsubishi, Isuzu and Toyota’s own FJ Cruiser have already abandoned that same market segment as well. Arent they all Japanese? Could be wrong, maybe theyre African, cant remember.

          Youre b¡Г€ing about the Americans no longer offering similar vehicles, but clearly the market went in a different direction, and virtually all automakers, with their crazy ideas of actually selling vehicles and making a profit, followed.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            I had a very nice 4 paragraph response written up before my phone died, so let’s retry this with an abridged version.

            It’s not a mess because it’s a Lincoln, it’s just that I refuse to buy a throwaway vehicle, and this Lincoln is an absolute throwaway vehicle.

            The 4Runner and Wrangler are the only affordableish offroad ready SUVs available to Americans. With about 400lbs of steel and a MIG welder I can turn a Tahoe and Suburban into an off-road vehicle by building actual bumpers that have true approach and departure angles.
            The manufacturers may have left but the group of consumers never went anywhere we’re stuck in compromised vehicles or old vehicles. The 4Runner has serious issues that keep it from getting 200k+ sales, and even the well selling Wrangler has issues that keeps away some buyers.

            Americans may be willing to give their money to Manufacturers for vehicles that have no particular consumer market (and therefore resale) in 15 years, however I refuse to buy an overpriced car that is designed to be thrown away.

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        The last time the US imposed strict, sweeping trade sanctions against an Asian power the results were, shall we say, less than optimal.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          You know what they say, Bunkie,

          “Those who do not know history are destined to totally profit from it anyway, and will win so much they’ll be bored from winning.”

          • 0 avatar
            bunkie

            Yes, that’s true. Too bad about all the misery suffered by the millions that goes along with the profit by the few.

            While not a perfect, comparison, there are historical parallels between Japan and China:

            1) Rapid modernization
            2) A sense of their own importance and a desire to counteract historical marginalization
            3) Rapidly growing military along with an out-size military influence on the government
            4) Expanding spheres of influence and territorial claims
            5) A sense that the existing powers are limiting their ambitions

            But, hey, this time will be different, right?

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Decades in the making, the oil embargo was simply a catalyst to kicking off the long term plans.

          “During the war, the war with Japan had been re-enacted in the game rooms here by so many people and in so many different ways that nothing that happened during the war was a surprise—absolutely nothing except the kamikaze tactics towards the end of the war; we had not visualized those.”

          —Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, 1960

          https://www.usnwc.edu/Research—Gaming/War-Gaming/Documents/RAGE/Gaming.aspx

          also see:

          http://www.amazon.com/Imperial-Cruise-Secret-History-Empire/dp/B007MXCB6Y

      • 0 avatar
        yamahog

        Look man, I support Trump too but you’ve got it all wrong here.

        The Hellcat is made in Canada. The RX350 is made in Canada. And the ES350 is made in Kentucky. Making luxury cars is not really the problem with imbalanced trade. Japan’s yen devaluation is a problem but it’s functionally similar to the Fed’s QE so that’s a wash. The problem with trade is countries like China and their intellectual property theft or illegal aliens who repatriate all their wealth without paying taxes on it and drive down wages for the working class.

        Lexus and Toyota are an American success story – it’s what you get when you work hard, make a product the market wants, and give a crap about the company values of making affordable, safe, reliable transportation.

        And throwing stones about unfair trade on the behalf of Chrysler is the apogee of ignorance. Chrysler today exists because of the Federal Government. The market was ready for Chrysler to face creative destruction and Bush/Obama intervened.

        • 0 avatar
          zamoti

          A reply that contains reasonable logic and any amount of fact downstream from a BTSR comment is like singing opera downwind from a sewage treatment plant. I’m not sure exactly how it will turn out, but I can’t imagine that it would be a worthwhile endeavour.

      • 0 avatar
        deanst

        Not sure where President Trump is building his fence, but I doubt it is between Brampton, Ontario (where the HELLCAT is made) and Cambridge, Ontario (where the RX is made).

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Right, BTSR, Trump is gonna unilaterally impose tariffs. Unfortunately, you need an act of Congress for that (U.S. Constitution, Article I, Section 8).

        So…he either a) plans to become dictator, b) hasn’t read the Constitution, or c) is just full of s**t. I’m going with the third choice. What I can’t believe is that people are dumb, gullible or desperate enough to buy into his bulls**t.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          And just think through what happens when a country unilaterally raises tariffs. Do the leaders of effected countries say: “Yeah, we were really screwing the American worker, but that Trump is a brilliant reality TV star, so I guess we’ll just pay the tariff and tell our workers they’re losing their jobs”?

          Or will these other countries maybe retaliate and declare their own tariffs on US exports, throwing American workers out of their jobs?

          Yes, this is a primary cause of the Great Depression in the 1930’s.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            I don’t support tariffs per se, but the idea that they caused the Great Depression is a baseless myth.

            The crash was caused by excess leverage, which was made worse by the gold standard and a failure to prop up the banks.

            2008/9 had similar causes, but at least we had a policy to prop up the banks and had no gold standard to get in the way.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            I wrote A primary cause, not THE cause. The exact impact of Smoot-Hawley and the like is difficult to measure, but sure as hell did not help matters.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Tariffs weren’t even a minor cause. You’re confusing correlation with causation.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            You know, PCH,let me know when you learn to disagree without being condescending.

            I graduated an Ivy League school at 20. I’ve supported myself since 17. I too graduated from a “top tier business school” and drive a “German luxury car.”

            And yes, I get the difference between causation and correlation. And having studied the causes of the depression for myself at said Ivy League school, I concluded that reductions in international trade were a factor.

            Your welcome to your own opinion. It may well be valid. But you don’t have to be so insulting to others.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Trump, just like Bernie Sanders, makes promises without any regard to whether he can actually follow through on them or not.

          • 0 avatar

            #1. Anyone who stands in our way will have their long-time private phone numbers read aloud in a speech. Ala Lindsey Graham.

            Furthermore: BY EXECUTIVE ORDER, I’d have replaced Flint’s pipes.

            Anyone who stands in my way- see rule #1

            #2. We are going to make America GREAT AGAIN.

            First we will launch policies to bring jobs back THROUGH FORCE.

            Second we will stop the hemorrhaging and waste.

            God help those who attempt to stand between THIS COUNTRY and greatness.

            As for Hellcats…

            Supercharger production will be ramped up in the poorest American areas.

            EVERYTHING will be supercharged.

            4 cylinders.

            6’s

            8’s.

            Speed limits will be raised by 20 mph in non-residential areas.

            you will have the option of applying for drivers license that allows you to exceed the speed limit by 40% for a cost of $400 which will make you impugn to speeding tickets .

            Poor people don’t have time to riot when THEY HAVE JOBS.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Eh, that pesky Constitution, who cares about it? Those stupid laws, who cares about them? The Great Leader is beyond all of that.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            Bigtrucks, you crack me up. Supercharger production and speed limits presented as equal planks to the economy in your platform. Only you. And you let B&B criticism just roll off your back without getting perturbed.

            Like WATER off a DUCK. YOU ARE IMMUNE.

            I cannot tell if you are serious or just having a good time parodying yourself, and you know what–it just doesn’t matter. Your comments make me smile almost every time, keep them coming.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Choice c) is accurate for everything the man ever says.

          BTSR and Trump are very similar in reality. They’re both playing a character for the highest bidder. Money funds their pride and vanity, and they need look no further beyond it.

        • 0 avatar
          SayHiToYourMom

          If you can’t believe that BTSR is stupid enough to be spoon fed Trump’s lies then you’ve never had the misfortune of watching 30 seconds of one of his sad videos where he mistakes an income in the low six figures as the equivalent of being JD Rockefeller in the 19th century.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        MKX is made in Ontario lol.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      You can’t beat the domestics at their discounted prices these days, especially if the only engine from the last decade has been a sub-300 horsepower, normally aspirated V6 like Lexus.

      Even with the XT5 priced at Black Label levels, the lessor MKX trims can be had at a discount putting at a similar, advertised price point as the RX.

      Those of us that shop contents, quality, and costs don’t always stay with one name brand.

    • 0 avatar
      onyxtape

      I know 3 realtors (female, or course) who have RX’s (hybrid and not), put 200k miles on them (usually in about 10 years or so) then go and buy the newest RX. It’s amazing how few things break on them despite the damaging abuse they go through with their work demands. One of these RXs had zero defects in these 200k miles – not even a wheel bearing or something like that.

      Their spouses may have Teutonic steel in their driveways, but for work there is no worthier substitute than the RX.

    • 0 avatar
      philadlj

      I think Lexus figured out it doesn’t really MATTER anymore what the RX looks like on the outside; it will still sell and sell very well.

      I actually prefer the bold edgy looks of the newest RX, far more than the comparatively bland, generic MKX.

      It’s a return to the quirkiness of the first generation RX, which was actually a far more daring design than any since, until this latest one.

      The Predator grille looks ungainly on the sedans and coupes but dare I say actually works on the tall wagons.

      But yeah, Lexus RX owners are most likely going to buy another RX. No amount of faux-deep Matt McConawhatever-riffing will change that.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    Well, this ought to be good….

    Nice looking vehicle. Does it have room for four adults on the tallish side?

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    Lexus sells quality. Ford sells blank-faced smiling idiots saying that they like the new ones and you will too if you know nothing about cars, except when they’re the butt of too many jokes and they tell their stoned pet actor to keep his mouth shut.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Well, you have to start somewhere.

    • 0 avatar
      laserwizard

      Todd is one of those Honduh Toyoduh fools. Thinking is foreign to him.

      • 0 avatar
        heavy handle

        wizard,

        Go to a Lincoln dealer and order a dealer-only part for a 10-year-old model. You’ll get a whole lot of excuses. Go to Lexus and do the same, and you will get the part you wanted (or it will be in the next day).
        That’s why people prefer Lexus. They get support from their makers, which means that they hold their value. It’s blatant after 10 years (Lexus = real money, Lincoln = scrap value), but the effect is clear from day 1.

        You call the people who have figured this out “fools,” but maybe they aren’t as rich as you and can’t afford the higher depreciation.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          If I wanted a part for a Lincoln, I would go online like everyone else. In a pinch, I’d go to a large, local Ford dealer, knowing that 90%+ of parts are in common.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Lincoln owners fix their own cars?

            Not likely.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Most Lincoln owners probably don’t do much wrenching. I don’t change brake pads, but I always buy them online and have the mechanic I trust do the install.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Yeah, I don’t think Lincoln owners would even do that, VoGo. Folks with money don’t want to deal with that noise – they just want their cars fixed with as little hassle as possible.

        • 0 avatar
          bills79jeep

          There are a myriad of reasons the Lexus outsells Lincoln, but 10 year old parts availability ain’t one of them. The customer base that can afford an SUV that starts at over $40k is not concerned about the wait time when they go to the parts counter.

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            It’s not the wait time, it’s the fact that some parts can lead to scrapping a car when they fail.

            One example, involving a friend’s Conti. brake proportioning valve fails (leaking). It was only used on that model, no aftermarket available unless you want to adapt a racing part (which could rust, seize, etc). The car was 10 years old, but it was scrapped because he didn’t want to drive his kids in a car with “surprise-me” brakes.

            Scrap and resale value were the same. Scrapping the car was easier and had no potential liability issues. The reason why resale was so low is that every Lincoln at that age has one foot in the grave. Any small failure could send it to the crusher, and used car prices reflect that.

            I’ve asked Ford parts guys about this and they say it’s corporate policy. No support after 10 years. You just have to hope that whatever part failed on your car was also used on a later car.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I still don’t think people buying luxury vehicles new give a crap about part availability in ten years. Most lease anyway.

            And the last Continental was built in 2002. I’m guessing it’s not easy to get unique parts for a 2002 Cadillac Eldorado or a 2001 SC from the manufacturers either. I’m guessing the SC would be easier because there were versions built later that probably share parts.

          • 0 avatar
            fvfvsix

            @bball-

            Actually, Toyota still sells every part that was unique to the 2001SC. Also, the 1997 ES300 that my family bought new and still owns. I could go on…

            From what my client advisors tell me, their support timeframe is 25 years for Lexus models.

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            bball,

            Leasers don’t care about long-term parts availability, but lease payments are based on residuals, and resale is influenced by parts availability.

            The US 3 are the worst for long-term support. Japanese brands do a lot better, and German/Swedish brands are outstanding.

            Hyundai is hit-and-miss. Sometimes it feels like you could build a 2000 Elantra using factory spare parts, and sometimes they don’t even have pads and rotors for a five year old car.

            I’m talking about high-volume passenger cars and light trucks here, not commercial or exotic. Those are different.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Well I am impressed with Lexus supporting the SC still. 25 years of support is excellent.

            I know Mercedes is excellent. They have whatever weird part you want from your 1975 Mercedes diesel if you so desire.

    • 0 avatar
      pbxtech

      His smarmy demeanor puts me off too, but I may not be the target audience. I think they are trying to sell this to women, maybe their take on it is different than mine.

      • 0 avatar
        zamoti

        Well, I believe the target demographic for these things are mainly women, so it makes sense to me.

        On the car itself, while I have not sampled an MKX, I did get an MKC as a loaner while the Navi was in the shop. I didn’t feel too strongly about it, but BOY OH BOY did my wife sure like it. Has a purse holder, the fancy foot sensor for the tailgate, the remote keyless works (in my mind) as it’s supposed to; just walk up and open the door, walk away it locks itself up. Push button shifting leaves more room for stuff, easy to see and drive around; overall very friendly package. She was actually disappointed to get the Nav back.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Interesting, because every woman in my life (significant other, mother, daughters, friends) thinks that guy is a 100% skeezeball. Just sayin’.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Yet women love his romantic comedies. Especially when he’s opposite Kate Hudson.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Confirmed. On the other hand, my wife will openly admit that she’d break her vows if asked by Matt Damon. Maybe he needs to be the one selling Lincolns.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            He did a great job in True Detective season 1!

    • 0 avatar
      Boff

      My wife is considering a Lincoln ONLY because of the McConaughey ads. Maybe I don’t things so seriously as some people, but really I think the ads are dope. I especially like the one that strongly implied that our man Matthew drove away from an inter-racial threesome in his Lincoln.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Although I’m not exactly a CUV intender, I really like the MKX. Definitely worth the premium over the MKC and Edge, IMO.

  • avatar
    dwbf11

    This will be a good value proposition on the used market. While Lexus is re-leasing its off-first-lease RX’s (yes, that’s apparently that’s a thing now), this will have taken a depreciation bath.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      Was thinking the same. Alex mentioned that the price of the MKX isn’t the value it used to be and has crept closer to Euro competitors. This seems like the wrong strategy. Keep prices in check, offer greater value and sell more. Get more introduced to a changing brand a la Hyundai.

  • avatar
    Corollaman

    I don’t think this will make a dent in the Lexus sales numbers. Lexus has way too many repeat customers, who are not gonna take a chance on a new Ford product.

  • avatar
    VoGo

    Alex,
    You’ve previously noted the Acura RDX to be superior to the Lexus RX, and quite a bit cheaper. If it were your money on the line, would you pick the Lincoln over the Acura?

    • 0 avatar
      laserwizard

      By all means – the A-cure-a is ugly.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        I asked Alex specifically because I really respect his opinion. I didn’t ask you, because you tend to focus on insulting people and brands, rather than on sharing facts and insight.

    • 0 avatar
      Alex L. Dykes

      Here’s how I would describe them. The RDX is a better value by far but the MKX is the better car.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      The RDX, like the RX, is an old mule that has gotten caught and surpassed in some areas by the competition. Even the latest V6 Terrain test by Motor Trend has it run figure-eight and acceleration times with the RDX.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        In what world do buyers of $45K luxury crossovers rush to Motor Trend to find out the latest Figure 8 times?

        OMG if you think the Terrain is in the same league as the RDX and RX, you are truly lost, Norm.

        Also, the Terrain is much older than the RDX and RX. At least it isn’t quite as ancient as the Enclave!

        We get it: you are desperate to convince us of the charms of the Verano and that Mokka cute ute thing. Tiny Buick FTW! Trifecta Tuning rules!

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          The Terrain is terrible and ancient, and horrible value. It should only be compared against an Equinox, which beats it on most accounts.

        • 0 avatar
          NormSV650

          The Theta platform is ancient, but updated where it counts. The RDX starting price is the second notch down from a Denali.

          Plus the Terrain and Equinox, combined, still outsell the CR-V.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Norm,
            You have an affinity for the sh1ttiest cars on the planet and you aren’t ashamed to admit it.

            I’m not sure if that is a sign of courage, or mental illness, or just plain terrible taste. But you are who you are.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            “[T]he Terrain and Equinox, combined, still outsell the CR-V.”

            Yes, and the Sierra and Silverado combined outsell the F-150. But as long as GM considers the two to be seperate marques, you may as well say something like “the Fusion and Sonata combined outsell the Camry.*”

            *Disclaimer: I don’t know if this would be true, but hopefully my intended meaning is understood.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        But the Terrain comes with basketball jersey looking cloth or leather that smells suspiciously like plastic.

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          Not if you class it up with the Denali trim level. Denali earns you respect. It convinces you that plastic is how leather should smell.

          No one has to know that it is FWD with a wheezing 4 cylinder.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Denali is an ancient Inuit term, meaning “he who pays $10K for chrome”

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Denali is a descendant of the classical “Ultra,” and I believe before that it was pronounced “Regency.”

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I like all of these comments.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Ah yes, you speak Broughamum?

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            At some point, we’re going to have to publish some sort of Rosetta Stone so newbies can properly interpret trim levels and special editions.

          • 0 avatar
            SSJeep

            I like many GM cars, but placing “Denali” trim levels on a POS like the Terrain is an insult to the buyer, and driving one demonstrates how easily one will throw away their money for superfluous styling built on a very “average when first released” 9 year old platform.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        This might be the most B&B comment I’ve ever read here. Christening the Equinox, a rental counter groan inducing turd in its own segment, superior to ANYTHING based on its MT figure 8 time….

        I am feeling like the Maxell tape guy. This was an H-bomb of fanboiism.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Also, on the torque steer thing, the 2017 MKZ offers the 3.0T with FWD.

    That is 350hp and 400lb-ft of torque through the front wheels (AWD versions are 400/400).

    Either Ford worked some serious magic or the epic torque steer will make the 3.8L Eclipse and 5.3L Impala look tame.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    And yet, the RX will still outsell the MKX. But not for lack of effort on Lincoln’s part. As you highlighted, this is a seriously competitive mid-sized luxury crossover. The one with the 2.7-liter is essentially the Lincoln counterpart to the Edge Sport, which has excellent driving dynamics.

    Of course, there’s also Cadillac’s new XT5, which I saw on the street for the first time earlier this week.

    • 0 avatar
      laserwizard

      Lincoln is slowly building in sales – doing it the right way – unlike Cadihack which is building non-luxurious ugly products with outrageous price tags.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        I don’t think Cadillac’s new wares are ugly, but I agree that Lincoln’s plan is better in the long run. Here in Oklahoma City, Reynolds Ford / Lincoln is right next to Eskridge Lexus. If traditionally-Lexus people would only stop by the Lincoln dealership and test-drive the MKX before signing another RX lease, I can easily see them opting for it instead of the RX.

        But Lincoln does need to work on its brand image, and repeat customers. Lexus has that down pat, especially with the RX.

        • 0 avatar
          derekson

          The XT5 will massively outsell this.

          But I think Lexus is opening the door to lose sales to both by not adding a third row and by keeping a mostly outdated model going with a restyle that makes it aggressively hideous. I think it’s ugly enough to put off some conventional Lexus buyers even with their historical brand loyalty. Certainly not all, but some.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    The question is: is this new model working?

    Answer: modestly, based on 2016 sales so far.

    http://www.goodcarbadcar.net/2011/01/lincoln-mkx-sales-figures.html

    That’s surprising – given how hot this segment is, I’d expect a bigger sales bump from a new model that’s clearly a major improvement over the old one. So, has Lincoln made any inroads here? Jury’s out.

    I haven’t driven it, but honestly, I found absolutely nothing to be excited about here.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Tbey had huge discounts this time last year. A modest increase is okay if it continues. Transaction prices are up significantly. Edge sales were actually down last month.

  • avatar
    TDIGuy

    Would consider it once they start showing up on the used market. However the big question to me and I’m sure many buyers is other than the improved engine, how much better is it than the Edge for the price?

  • avatar
    John

    Last year, your Mr. Baruth wrote a story about a man who was driving a Lexus with almost one million miles on the clock – with the original, unrebuilt engine and transmission. When Lincolns go a million miles without major failure, they may sell as well as Lexus.

    • 0 avatar
      jmo

      There is a guy with a Volvo with 4 million miles on it. It doesn’t mean Volvo’s are all that reliable.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Well, no, but you have to admit that Toyota and Lexus wares are typically in it for the long-haul. I wouldn’t even think twice about dropping some money on a 10-year-old Lexus LS as long as it had been maintained; by contrast, even a mint decade-old German, British or Swedish luxury car would seriously give me pause.

        I’m not sure about the electronics, but the version of the MKX with the 3.7-liter Duratec and the 6-speed automatic ought to last quite a while, indeed. The jury is still out on the 2.7-liter twin-turbo and the other EcoBoost powertrains.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          The other issue Lincoln faces is that the naming scheme is pretty confusing. Whenever I see a Lincoln mentioned, I am asking myself, is that the tarted up Escape, or the Taurus? The only reason I know the MKX is that Lincoln made it sound like the Acura MDX. I have the same issues with Infiniti.

          I liked Lincoln’s original idea to pronounce the names “Mark X” or “Mark C”, but I read that Lincoln chickened out on that scheme at the end.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The MKZ was original the Zephyr and the MKX was originally supposed to be pronounced “Mark-Ecks”. When they changed the Zephyr to MKZ they changed everything to phonetic spelling because of confusion with dealerships and focus groups. They should have known it was a bad idea when everyone was confused before the cars even hit dealer lots.

          • 0 avatar
            Mandalorian

            The first few years it came out I called it the “Mark Ten” without knowing any better.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Thanks for the clarification. I get why a lot of brands have gone alphanumeric – there are so many models today that consumers could never tell them apart if they all had unique names.

            Audi got it right when they switched: A for car, S for sporty car, RS for really sporty car and Q for crossover. Got it. And then a number indicating relative size. Right.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Well, that would make since, because with every other “Mark” car, the letters after the Mark part were Roman numerals. Silly Ford executives.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            MKZ = MK Zephyr
            MKX = Mark X
            MKT = MK Touring
            MKS = Mark S
            MKC = MK Compact CUV?
            MKR = [email protected] you Ford, why didn’t you build this?!?!?!

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            I am guessing the MKR is code for the stretched Mustang with a GT350 engine?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            It was a stretched/modified previous-gen Mustang with a hi-po 3.5TT engine. It was stretched 6 inches and given an independent suspension. It was a concept car that debuted in 2007 and was never built because of the economic collapse that occurred shortly afterwards.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Was the MKR ever anything more than a concept, though, Bball? Was it ever actually in development? I’m thinking it wasn’t, and was just a sneak preview of the styling of the MKS.

            (I also see a lot of MKZ in that concept too – particularly the rear end treatment.)

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            It was in development. It was never approved for production. The MKR wasn’t just a styling show though.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “I am guessing the MKR is code for the stretched Mustang with a GT350 engine?”

            MKR was an auto show concept from several years ago which introduced the “split wing” grille style and the twin turbo 3.5. Though it was called “TwinForce” since they hadn’t announced the “Ecoboost” branding yet.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          You mean you’d question buying a 2006 Jag XJ?!

        • 0 avatar
          55_wrench

          What Kyree said.

          in 2014 we picked up a gently used LS430 with 68K.

          In a year and a half, it’s needed a battery, rear pads and an O2 sensor. Batteries and brakes, in my book, are maintenance items that would apply to any car.

          No regrets whatever. California smog test reported zero measurable pollutants, and it uses no oil between changes.

          THIS is what the rest of the pack needs to emulate before I’d consider another brand.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            “No regrets whatever. California smog test reported zero measurable pollutants”

            Congrats, you purchased the only hydrogen fuel cell LS430.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            There you go. I always thought the LS430 looked clean. And it was one of the first cars with adaptive-cruise.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      The verdict is still out on hoe many eengine and transmission transplants the Lexus has had. The owner, Matt Farah, says his grave floor is the black as in black from oil leaks where ever it sits.

  • avatar
    Jacob

    Alex,

    Lexus, BMW, Mercedes, and others outsell Lincoln because Lincoln is a dead brand for almost dead people. Nobody with pulse in still their veins or semen still in their scrotum would ever consider a Lincoln. That’s the sad truth. Lincoln is designed to be a brand for the affluent conservative white folks who are retiring right now. It’s the same niche that Cadillac was counting on in the 90s, but GM was very smart to realize that all these retiring affluent white folks will buy a new car only once before they peacefully pass away. That’s why GM re-positioned itself into a BMW fighter, because most BMW owners will never own a car for 15 years, drive it for about 15000 miles, and then pass away.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      How long until the new “very smart” Cadillac brand BMW-fighters don’t have 20%+ sales decrease each month?

      If the GM stuff was selling I’d be the first to admit I didn’t know what I was talking about, but the only thing keeping the lights on over there is the Escalade.

      Rebranding is one thing, but at some point they need to move some product.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Exactly. It’s like Cadillac is building cars for the auto journalists. Praise has been heaped upon the ATS and CTS, but at the end of the day, no one is buying them. I suspect it will be the same for the CT6. The XT5 should prove popular, but Cadillac needs a couple of other crossovers.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Well, again…yes, Cadillac sedan sales are down.

        But everyone else’s sedan sales are down too.

        Is that indicative of what’s really going on with Cadillac, or a larger market trend? I’d vote for the latter.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          It is indicative that Cadillac’s strategy of being dynamics-driven, car heavy, and priced at parity was a terrible move.

          GM’s own sales numbers with the Thetas and Lambdas showed that CUVs were the hot future segment yet the best they could over these years is fart out a rebadged Saab. And, they can’t improve the Escalade because that would cost money and they need the huge margin from their bling-frosted Tahoe because everything else hemorrhages cash.

          But, they will sell you a $60K large sedan with a $4K stereo and the turbo4 from a $26K pony car.

          In order to fix it, they basically have to rebrand (again, still) everything and all the money spent on these V-Series, Alpha, and Omega follies will go down the toilet.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I’d say the move was terribly timed, but not terrible.

            But agreed, what Caddy needs right now is more CUVs. It needs a MKC fighter and a Mercedes GL fighter.

            I’ve also long argued that they should have exclusive engines, or at least heavily modified versions of ones found in more plebeian cars.

            At the same time, though, for it to sell as a real prestige brand, it has to make premium sedans, not just a version of what’s already in showrooms. Say what you will about the Cadillac sedans (aside from the XTS), but they’re all unique platforms you can’t buy in any other GM showroom. I think they’re on the right track.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “But they’re all unique platforms you can’t buy in any other GM showroom.”

            The Camaro is on the Alpha platform. However, I don’t think that really matters as GM did a decent job on differentiation.

            For now anyway, the turbo V6s are unique to Cadillac. They just don’t seem to knock anyone’s socks off.

            We’ll see what happens, but I’m not predicting great things from Cadillac. I say Lincoln outsells them 20 months from now.

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      Jacob, you’re off by a generation. Lincoln’s were bought in droves by the WWII generation. They’ve pretty much all died off. The retiring generation now are the Baby Boomers – raised in the 60’s on the Beatles and in Beetles. They are the ones buying Lexus RX’s on repeat now.

      Everyone still thinks Town Car when they think Lincoln, which means grandpa to most people and therefore a no go on sales.

  • avatar
    slance66

    As the owner of a 2007 RX350, nearing 140k on the odo, my wife wants a replacement. What does she want? An RX. She likes the looks of the MKX a lot, but I don’t know if I can steer her there. The MDX is too wide and long, and the Euros too expensive (she likes the X5 and Q7, though the latter may be too big). It doesn’t help that there is no Lincoln dealer anywhere near me (and I’m in the Boston suburbs, not the boonies).

    I’ll add one practical consideration not covered by the review. The RX is right sized. Smaller than the cumbersome 3-row monstrosities and bigger than the “compact” 5 seaters offered by others. It holds quite a lot of stuff (more than a GJC for example). The MKX and X5 do the best job targeting that size category.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      She likes the Q7 but not the Q5? Hardly anyone can tell them apart at a distance, never mind express a preference based on anything other than size.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        The Q5 is rather small inside for its size outside. My wife loves the looks of it but admits there is a lack of interior space.

        The RX, with its transverse bones and slightly larger size, doesn’t have that problem.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          She loved the RX so much you got her a C-Max!

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Dal likes the look of the paper money he’s saving.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I always thought lawyers preferred to deal in gold bars and mixed securities.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Actually, part of the reason we ended up with a C-Max is that she didn’t love the RX. She found it too big and heavy-feeling, and not worth the very high prices for good examples. She liked the drive of the RAV4 Hybrid much better but we choked on the cheap interior and the price of the Limited model. She actually liked the NX300h best, but prices on those are absolutely outrageous whether new or used. The C-Max on lease solved all problems. Definitely not as premium as a Lexus product but it doesn’t feel as aggressively cheap as the RAV4 (or our Forester).

            I’ll take that money in index fund shares, thanks.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I’m not a fan of the current RX’s interior, but I’d expect it to feel big and heavy in any event – it what Lexus do!

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            C-Max solves all problems.

            (Hey Ford, I need a job.)

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Ford is always there, from cars to vans, trucks and employment.

            Ford Cares (TM).

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            I like the C-Max. My only issue is that it’s the nickname that some people gave to a girl in our dorm back in undergrad days. It was not a complement. Some theorized that she may have given birth before going to college.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Even without those unique connotations it’s a particularly bad name. If I owned rather than leased the C-Max I’d debadge it.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I’d replace it with the model badge from a Skoda Yeti. Very appropriate, and Ford Yeti sounds great.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            It is a bad name. But they seem to be okay with the name in Europe and Ford had a bunch of badges that say “C-Max”, “Hybrid”, and “Energi”. Ford also ruined all of their heritage names for vans/MPVs in the US. No one here wants a Freestar, Windstar, Aerostar, etc. Maybe they should have called it Urban Squire or something silly.

            Focus Max would be better than C-Max.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            By Urban Squire, did you mean to say “Hood Knight?”

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Hood Knight is a Charger trim level. It comes with 24s, a console mounted handgun holster, worse sounding exhaust, a locking compartment for drugs/money, BTSRs autobiography “Hellcat and Me”, and extra chrome badging.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            LOL

        • 0 avatar
          slance66

          Bingo. The Q5 is similar in size to my Mazda CX-5 on the inside.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Well, with the latest version, the MDX became something like a minivan replacement, and is now closer to the Infiniti JX and Buick Enclave in terms of purpose than the X5 (although it drives noticeably better than those first two vehicles).

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I hate the Infiniti JX.

      • 0 avatar
        slance66

        Exactly, not what she wants. She wants a Range Rover Sport actually, but that’s not in the budget for sure. So RX is likely to replace the RX. I see how it keeps happening.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I think if she wants RWD luxury SUV then you should get you some GX. Have some rarity and V8 with your prestige.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            The one and only problem with the GX is the fact that the V8 output is only competitive with 2003 LS V8s

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I only view that as a problem if you’re using all the power a lot of the time. GX owners use what, 35% of the engine’s power? How many of my 310 HP do I ever use in my car – I’m guessing maybe 190 of them.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            The biggest issue with the GX is that it is completely mismatched to the market Lexus wants to serve. Consumers are looking for a larger RX with 3 rows, but still a soft crossover. Not a tarted up proper BOF SUV.

            For the few people who want an offroad SUV like a 4Runner, but are desperate for more prestige and leather, the GX is just fine.

          • 0 avatar
            Sigivald

            GXes aren’t RWD, they’re full-time AWD.

            Beyond that, yes.

            (I was just idly shopping a 2006 GX470 today, actually.

            Not gonna buy one.

            But if I needed something in that segment? Hoo boy, yes.)

            Per below, it’s about equivalent to the 4.3L LS in power, which is the closest in displacement LS – (297/330 for the LS, 201/329 for the GX460).

            If you want “big V8 power”, but the LX with the … bigger V8.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    Perception in the market place is Lincoln’s problem, same as Chrysler. The 200 could handle like an E36, run sub 7 minute laps on the Nurb and be cushy as a Bently and it still would sell poorly. No one wants a 200 because it is a 200. No one wants a Lincoln because it is a Lincoln.

  • avatar
    Steve Lynch

    I have no idea where the Lincoln dealer is in my city. Lexus, Ford, and most of the other dealers, I do know.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Same building as Jim Click’s east side Ford store. That is part of Lincoln’s problem.

      • 0 avatar
        Steve Lynch

        Long way from Oro Valley, dualed with Ford AND owned by Jim Click? Yikes.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Hey, I never said that it wasn’t a problem…

          When my wife and I lived in Tucson, I felt the east side was far from everything. We lived at Oracle and Orange Grove and then in Starr Pass. I hated going to Chapman VW. I had to plan a whole day around it.

          Make sure you get that Desert Protection Package!

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        And that problem started with the discontinuation of Mercury. Now around here the Lincoln stores are in the Ford stores where they aren’t well represented because the focus of the dealer is on the much higher volume Ford side of the store. Heck the signage is often much smaller, and/or obscured like the after thought it was.

        When they were at Lincoln Mercury stores the sales were about even so the dealer didn’t favor one brand over the other or leaned to the Lincoln side as they had higher margins on higher prices.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Ha, Jim Click was my great uncle’s name. He’s dead now but only drove Cadillacs as a Texas oil man. He changed them almost as often as he changed wives.

        His last one was a K-Body Deville, and he was pulled over doing 102 in it for no good reason, at age 74 or so.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Jim Click in Tucson is a man that puts a $1200 Desert Protection Package on all his dealerships’ vehicles. He also owns a majority of the auto dealerships in Tucson.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Is the protection package like, scorpion repellent?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I think its Scotch Guard, some crap they spray on the paint, and some Armor All on the tires.

            They also charge way too much for window tint. Last time I tried to buy a car, they were charging $599 for tint on every car. I bought a car at a different dealership for $300 under invoice + $299 for window tint. Maybe $299 is too much, but it’s better than $599.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            And you don’t have the option of not having it, they do it before you purchase?

            Here’s an impression of my dad, at that dealership.

            “I’m not paying for that.”

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            They put it on everything. You can force them to take it off, but I doubt many do.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            $1200 is enough to justify buying out of town instead.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Dal-

            I agree. I purchased a number of vehicles in Phoenix, instead of Tucson, because of those issues.

          • 0 avatar
            SSJeep

            Jim Click is aware that one of the largest jumbo jet mothball yards is in Tucson/Phoenix, correct? And the reason why planes are mothballed there is because the weather has a very minimal effect on paint and metal degradation? Why they would try to push off a “desert protection package” unless they were putting double-sided tape on the tires in order to trap scorpions…

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Because they can and people pay.

            (Also, the Davis-Monthan Boneyard is awesome)

  • avatar
    bachewy

    This isn’t a review, it’s a sales ad. “Truth” about cars???

    Lincoln has been the deserved butt of many jokes and bad reviews for, ever, which explains why they don’t sell.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      If you disagree with points Alex made, you should be specific and point out the flaws in the review. Just because Lincoln made mediocre products in the past doesn’t mean the MKX isn’t a better vehicle than the RX. Alex would know – he’s driven everything in this class and provided reviews here.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      yet another yokel who believes “The Truth About Cars” means taking an “everything and everyone sucks” attitude.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      They’re not selling because the brand is damaged and it’s a pricey risk to take. The suv’s they’ve rolled out recently appear to be pretty good.

      Lincoln, fix the pricing, or lengthen the warranty to show you have confidence in what you’re selling. Consumers need a reason to darken your door, and we don’t trust you because of the past.

  • avatar
    Jeff Waingrow

    So you and maybe your friends have been buying Lexus vehicles for years. They’ve given no trouble, the dealer experience has been excellent, resale values were always high, there was plenty of comfort, plus lots of prestige attached to owning one (for the average person). So why then would you even think to look at a Lincoln? My friend just bought a new RX and Lincoln wasn’t even an afterthought for him.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      Well, some people are likely to be turned off by the grill (seriously, WTF were they thinking), and start asking about alternatives.

      Marketing *is* something Ford should be doing, though, to make it clear that you might want to maybe at least think about a Lincoln…

  • avatar
    cartunez

    This is not to hard to figure out Alex. The RX is rock solid and predictable with great resale value. You can easily put 250K miles on it without even trying.

    • 0 avatar
      Alex L. Dykes

      In truth most modern cars can do 200K without much effort. I address this point at the end:

      While it’s true that Lincoln’s vehicles are statistically less reliable than Lexus, brand reliability is above average and essentially identical to Acura. Resale value in the MKX is poorer than the RX, but the Lincoln is less expensive and dealer incentives will likely level out much of the three-year resale difference.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        Over what time frames and from what sources are you getting this reliability information? Hopefully not from a 3-year dependability survey if you want to extrapolate to 200K miles?

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        Well said on the incentives leveling out the playing field a few years down the road domestic vs foreign. It is the time value of money and personally I’ll take my cash today on the hood rather than risk not getting anything in the future.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    Well I doubt the RX sales will suffer, they have plenty of repeat customers, they are reliable , hold their value, and are well put together, and have a great dealer experience. Lincoln has a sub par dealer network, no real brand indignity to 99% of folks, drop like a stone in depreciation . Most of these are leased and that is where the RX will kill the MKXis this Mkx a good CUV, more than likely but is it much better than a loaded Ford , maybe , maybe not and that is the issue , Lincoln has a long way to go to catch up to the Lexas brand.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      The MKX’s depreciation is slightly higher than the RX (57% for MKX vs 60% for RX on 36 month residual values). It value doesn’t drop like some of the other Lincoln products. Used MKXs sell for higher prices than any Lincoln besides the Navigator.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        Because the Edge is popular?

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        I think that 57% is highly optimistic and intended to ensure lease payments aren’t too out of whack with the segment.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Edmunds has the MKX’s depreciation, in their True Cost calculator, as about $3000 more than the RX over five years. I’d bet I could make up some of that $3000 on discounts when purchasing. The point is that the MKX’s depreciation isn’t horrific compared to the RX. It shows that the RX is the segment leader, but the MKX does MUCH better depreciation wise than other Lincolns.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      The RX doesn’t hold it’s value better than anything else in the class. We were looking at 5 year SRX 2.8T that were still selling for more than 50% the selling price! Way too expensive compared to a XTS VSport with more of everything on it.

  • avatar
    zip89105

    Is Lincoln still in business? Where’s the Town Car? Where’s the MK VIII?
    Lexus has established itself well and will continue to sell in a volume that a Ford with a little extra chrome and leather seats will never see. As a Ford stockholder, potential vehicle buyers are clueless as to what a MKA, MKB, MKC, MKD, etc., might be. When folks talk about an M car, it’s either a BMW or a Mercedes, but never a Lincoln.

  • avatar
    Steve_S

    Its brand cache whether it is deserved or not. Lexus built it’s brand on reliable, comfortable and luxurious cars. It doesn’t matter if there are other cars as reliable or better that is not the perception.

    You average luxury buyer wants a car that is quite and comfortable that doesn’t give them any issues. they also want a dealer network to fawn over them and make them feel special and Lexus does that.

    Lincoln is trying and I think the continental and Navigator will help but it has a long way to go.

  • avatar
    legacygt

    Buying and owning a luxury car is an experience. It is more than a comparison of specs or even a fair evaluation of the merits of the car. If it were just about what the cars are capable of or how well they meet the needs of customers, we’d be talking about the Edge and the Highlander rather than the MKX and the RX.

    People pay for luxury cars because of the way the entire experience makes them feel about themselves. Lexus understood this from the minute they opened their first dealerships…luxurious stores that seemed to have nothing to do with Toyota. (Lexus managed to capitalize on Toyota’s reputation for quality and reliability and distance itself from Toyota in every other way.) Lincoln doesn’t really do this. Many Lincoln dealerships are shared with Ford and other brands. Lexus customers are surrounded by a sense of exclusivity. Lincoln customers are surrounded by Fiestas and Transit Connects. It’s a big difference. It’s not logical. It doesn’t appear in this comparison. But it completely explains why the RX continues to outsell the MKX.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    While the ’15 MKX is still Ford CD3, and of course costs much less than Lexus as pointed out, it seems at extra clean/low miles the MKX trades about 30-32 to the Lexus’ 36-38. If the initial price parity is only about 5K, and Ford was NOT putting cash on the hood, this means they are both depreciating at a similar rate which is astounding (even with cash, still not bad for a domestic in year one, almost year two). This should sink like a stone as did the other CD3, yet it does not out of the gate (demand?). Time will tell, but its possible Ford will get its lease residuals up on this model in the current CD4.

    MY15 Lexus RX FWD V6

    04/11/16 ORLANDO Lease $41,200 284 Above BLACK 6G A No
    04/06/16 ORLANDO Lease $36,700 3,089 Above BLUE 6G A Yes
    04/11/16 RIVRSIDE Lease $38,600 3,659 Above WHITE 6G A Yes
    04/19/16 ORLANDO Lease $36,000 4,576 Above GRAY 6G A Yes
    04/07/16 ATLANTA Regular $37,800 5,816 Above TAN 6G A Yes
    04/06/16 CALIFORN Lease $35,000 5,877 Avg WHITE 6G A Yes
    04/06/16 KC Lease $35,800 7,656 Above SILVER 6G A Yes
    04/27/16 CALIFORN Regular $34,500 7,696 Avg WHITE 6G A Yes
    04/19/16 ORLANDO Lease $36,600 7,819 Above RED 6G A Yes
    04/20/16 SAN DIEG Lease $34,000 8,197 Avg SILVER 6G A Yes
    04/18/16 RIVRSIDE Lease $32,700 8,250 Avg BLACK 6G A Yes
    04/27/16 CEN FLA Regular $34,600 9,087 Avg RED 6G A Yes

    04/26/16 ORLANDO Lease $32,000 21,476 Avg GRAY 6G A Yes
    04/27/16 ATLANTA Regular $34,600 23,169 Avg BLACK 6G A Yes
    05/03/16 ORLANDO Lease $33,000 23,305 Avg RED 6G A Yes
    04/27/16 NASHVILL Regular $33,500 24,382 Avg BLACK 6G A Yes
    04/06/16 PALM BCH Regular $33,400 24,760 Avg BLACK 6G A Yes
    04/25/16 ORLANDO Lease $33,900 24,802 Avg WHITE 6G A Yes
    05/04/16 DALLAS Regular $29,800 25,172 Below TAN 6G A Yes
    04/14/16 ATLANTA Regular $34,400 25,219 Avg BLACK 6G A Yes
    04/27/16 CEN FLA Regular $34,000 25,299 Avg BLACK 6G A Yes
    05/03/16 ORLANDO Regular $30,600 26,019 Below GRAY 6G A Yes
    04/27/16 ATLANTA Regular $33,750 28,692 Avg WHITE 6G A Yes
    05/04/16 DALLAS Regular $32,250 28,867 Avg BLACK 6G A Yes
    04/20/16 PALM BCH Regular $32,000 28,947 Avg BLACK 6G A Yes

    MY15 Lincoln MKX FWD V6

    04/27/16 TAMPA Factory $26,000 3,852 Avg RED 6G A Yes
    04/06/16 SAN ANTO Factory $29,500 9,869 Above TAN 6G A Yes
    04/08/16 FT LAUD Lease $32,000 10,161 Above TAN 6G A Yes
    05/04/16 TX HOBBY Factory $33,100 12,101 Above TAN 6G A No
    04/15/16 FT LAUD Regular $24,200 17,361 Avg SILVER 6G A Yes
    04/21/16 PA Factory $29,300 20,562 Above TAN 6G A Yes
    04/28/16 NASHVILL Factory $29,500 26,082 Above RED 6G A Yes
    04/28/16 NASHVILL Factory $29,900 29,648 Above RED 6G A Yes
    04/20/16 DENVER Factory $28,000 31,136 Avg BLK/UH 6G A Yes
    04/07/16 DFW Lease $25,800 31,956 Avg MAROON 6G A Yes
    04/27/16 TAMPA Lease $28,300 32,285 Avg BLACK 6G A Yes
    04/18/16 GEORGIA Factory $28,600 32,354 Above SILVER 6G A Yes
    04/18/16 DIGITAL Lease $26,600 32,936 Avg White 6G A Yes

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      This is the only Lincoln, with the possible exception of the Navigator, that doesn’t have a depreciation problem. We’ll see what happens with the MKC too.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Even the MY12s are pricey. What kills me is this is the SAME thing as the CD3 Zephyr, which makes the Church’s recommended list for great value for small money due to its resale issues.

        04/07/16 CARIB Lease $21,000 21,852 Above WHITE 6G A Yes
        04/13/16 TAMPA Regular $22,300 32,400 Above WHITE 6G A Yes
        04/20/16 NJ Regular $19,400 38,281 Avg RED 6G A Yes
        04/27/16 NASHVILL Regular $16,800 43,682 Avg BLACK 6G A No
        04/27/16 DALLAS Regular $19,400 53,803 Avg MAROON 6G A Yes
        04/27/16 CEN FLA Lease $17,500 54,316 Avg WHITE 6G A Yes
        04/06/16 DALLAS Regular $17,100 60,366 Avg WHITE 6G A Yes
        04/13/16 NASHVILL Regular $19,500 69,492 Avg WHITE 6G A No
        04/28/16 DETROIT Lease $17,000 76,703 Avg RED 6G A Yes
        04/06/16 SAN ANTO Regular $15,300 84,252 Avg GRAY 6G A Yes
        04/12/16 ORLANDO Regular $14,500 86,795 Below BLACK 6G A Yes
        04/28/16 TX HOBBY Regular $13,500 90,129 Below RED 6G A Yes

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Right. The MKX is not a used recommendation of mine. It’s typically goes for more than an MKT on the used market.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            The problem with the MKT is their colors. Black ones look like hearses and white ones get nicknamed “Moby”. Do they sell them in any actual colors?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I think only in the Detroit area…

            I saw a red one this morning. I’ve also seen gold, blue, champagne, and maroon. I bought a black MkT because of price. It was the vehicle the dealership was willing to deal on. I wanted a light blue or champagne MKT though.

            If I buy another one, I will be pickier about the exterior and interior colors.

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            The MkX has been generally the volume leader of Lincoln since it came out.

            I agree with your assessments, bball.

            The MkX is the midwestern state retirement vehicle. Because of this, you will also find more pristine used examples of it as well. Your average RX user will have less depression era ownership values and more rug rats to beat the sh1t out of it’s trim.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I’d pay more for a MKX than a MKT based on looks alone. I just can’t get past the MKT’s back end. The market seems reasonable to me.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I agree with the market. I’m just indicating that the MKX is not the used car value at the Lincoln dealership.

  • avatar
    Verbal

    “17 city / 14 highway / 19 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)”

    Astonishing.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Agreed, but that’s mad turboz powah for you.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I think that should be 26 HWY

      But yes these turbo V6s have it all, worse than V8 fuel economy, space shuttle complexity, and Ford reliability.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        17C/26H beats [barely] my XC70 T6, which has less power than the 3.5TT.

        What V8 gets 17/26 in a midsize+ SUV?

        The GX gets 15/20.

        The Tahoe gets 23 on the highway and claims it’s the industry’s best.

        The GLE400 gets 18/22 out of its V6TT, in practice a bit worse than the Lincoln.

        It’s not awesome fuel economy, but … these are big, heavy cars shaped like bricks. None of them have great fuel economy, especially not in the over 300HP ranges, do they?

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      It’s a heavy thing with AWD that’s not too aerodynamic.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      That’s about what Car & Driver got on their RX. The $10,000+ 450h got only 3 mph more.

  • avatar
    yamahog

    This car is good but the luxury SUV game isn’t about building the best car, it’s about projecting status.

    People don’t buy the RX because they want best in class agility or best in class power or state of the art. They buy it because it’s a known quantity and for a few years it projects success. People who lease RXs enjoy the low lease cost (thanks to the high residual value because Lexus / Toyota age very well). And people who buy RXs can count on about a decade of trouble free driving. And Toyota / Lexus really set themselves apart on long term quality. A lot of times, people seem to buy RXs to keep them in the family – go to a well-to-do high school parking lot / sports game in a place where people buy AWD vehicles and tell me how many teenagers are driving RXs. It’s a non-trivial amount.

    The problem with having the best-in-class vehicle in a forgotten brand is that you really only appeal to people who are thinking with their head and not buying some feeling (e.g buying a sense of familiarity because this is their 3rd Lexus RX, buying the feeling that you bought a dependable car, ect.) And people who are thinking logically about the merits and demerits of the vehicle probably aren’t buying luxury vehicles, and have a hard time swallowing the pill of depreciation. Lincoln depreciation is bonkers. A really rational person might just wait a year for a used MKX with ~10k miles and a 10-15k discount.

    This is a good try and it might be better than the RX but people don’t buy the RX because they tally up the score and decide it’s best in class.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      They have to start somewhere though. Building a good looking car that compares well against the competition is the first step. Lincoln can do this in the CUV game. As far as brand perception and all that, it’s going to take a long time. This is a good step from the previous MKX that shared all it’s sheetmetal with the Edge.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        There are far too many people who pop up on Lincoln stuff around here, make a lot of complaints and whining statements – and then offer zero suggestion for improvement.

        • 0 avatar
          S2k Chris

          “then offer zero suggestion for improvement.”

          Here’s a question that’s really a suggestion: what do I get buying a Lincoln that I don’t get buying a top of the line Ford Titanium? That’s what Ford needs to fix, because from where I stand, it’s basically F— all aside from more chrome on the grill and a laughable brand, and a higher price.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            You make a cogent point, and until recently I’d say a V6 and some other gingerbread.

          • 0 avatar
            bunkie

            One word (okay, two): massaging seats. Not available on the Edge and seriously awesome. If you have a back problem and regularly take three hours trips, it can make all the difference.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Bunkie,
            What cars do you recommend based on their seats?

          • 0 avatar
            bunkie

            VoGo-

            It’s my wife who has the back issue. I used to have a back problem but I had it surgically corrected 20 years ago and have been fine since. She *loves* the massaging seats. It has made a big difference for her. I find that I’m not as stiff when I get out of the car.

            I’m pretty comfortable in most car seats considering that I’m 6’2″ with a 36″ inseam.

            In general, I find the front seats of most CUVs and SUVs to be more comfortable, but that has more to do with the more chair-like seating position.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      Yamahog,
      Nothing wrong with your analysis. But to survive, Lincoln needs to get in the game somehow. Starting with strong product is a good step forward. What else can they do – Matthew McConaughey can only take them so far.

      • 0 avatar
        yamahog

        You’re absolutely right and I’ll bite –

        I think Ford’s going to have to pony up. There’s a huge opening for plush luxury cars as Lexus pivots towards BMW. The Continental is a step in the right direction but the full size luxury sedan is dead. Lexus sold more LS400s in the first 4 years of production than they’ve sold LS460s since 2006/2007. And it would take a moon shot project for Ford to bring their vehicles up to W222 standards with Ford reliability.

        Lincoln should invest in the secondary market – they should lease CPO lincolns and cover every repair and most wear items (probably everything except tires) and make Lincolns affordable at the loaded Camry/Accord price points with a better ownership experience. If they gave owners fair prices for cream puff used lincolns, new owners would have an incentive to take care of them (so there weren’t ratty new lincolns driving around) and it would really help their resale value. It might help the resale so much, they could single handily make the used lincoln market better and not take a bath on the CPO leases.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Lincoln actually has a good CPO program. They are starting to invest a ton more money into it. I would suggest to anyone looking at a new sedan to head over to a Lincoln dealer and check out a CPO MKZ. My parents were looking at the Accord, 200, Fusion, CRV, and Escape before they bought a CPO MKZ with under 20K miles.

          • 0 avatar
            bunkie

            Funny you should mention this. Just picked up a lease-return 2014 MKZ with everything we wanted with 17K for $28K (original sticker was north of $50K). The one issue with the CPO warranty is that there is a $100 deductible.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I hope you’re happy with it, a little rich for me.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      you have to start somewhere, though. Lincoln was left to languish for too long thanks to Ford distracting itself with Jag, Land Rover, Aston, and (to a lesser extent) Volvo. You’ve got to have the product on which to try to build credibility, there’s no “chicken or egg” conundrum here.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Yup they need excellent product to get their foot in the door and gain market share. They are not going to bring in significant numbers of new customers with mediocre or even average product.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Lexus lease residuals are good because Toyota subsidizes them. They hold their value, based only selling price, like most cars in the segment.

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    First, Lincoln’s quality has been pretty good.
    If I am not mistaken, it has been pretty high on most quality list these past few years. Right up there with the very best.

    Truth be tld I do and have issues with my MKS quality on really small but irritating things.
    The leather seats seem to be extremely sensitive and have poor wearing. The auto rain/whatever black box on the windshield fell and had difficulty getting Ford to fix.
    The shift leather simply wore away.
    The leather like side material around the center consul pulls back from the fake chrome and needs to be glued and pushed back.
    The small actuator/blend motor behind the gages is making clicking noise every once in awhile. And although the Ford dealer told me to save money and leave it till it completely fails AND that t has suddenly stopped making the noise AND the airflow is fine…I am still worried a 25.00 part will cost me 400 to replace.
    You know…these are bothersome for the quality of a 48/52K car.

    Next, the MPGs is kinda poor. I wish they could get just a few more. Perhaps this will come about once Ford start introducing the newer trans.

    Will the cars ever see an 8 or the new 10 gears?

    I do like this look over the Edge. I would like to test drive the V6 to see how it performs.

    • 0 avatar
      yamahog

      The powertrain quality seems alright (although I’d expect to see more 3.5 Toyota V6s make it to 300,000 miles on routine maintenance than 2.7 Ecoboost).

      But Lincolns seem to have as many niggling issues as Audis/BMWs (messed up cup holders, buttons that work intermittently) and their long term quality is definitely sub-Lexus. Whether or not that matters depends on the buyer – but look at the price of a 2007 Lexus vs a 2007 BMW/Audi/Mercedes/Lincoln and tell me that doesn’t matter when it comes time to lease a car or a buy it new.

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        Don’t get me wrong…I really like my MKS ecoboost, especially for the price for what I got compared to what was available from all at the time.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    While panel gaps may not be a good indicator of long term reliability, just ignoring it as “statistics can’t be trusted” sounds a lot like…

    HEY: Editor, where’s the disclosure blurb on this?

    I’m headed to CR if I want to compare cars. This is smelling a little too vertical scope and not enough tTac.

  • avatar
    ccc555

    To me a lot of it comes down to the dealership experience since all of the brands make good cars now. I think that I am in their target demo – early 40s, married, kids, good job and disposable income. I recently cross shopped for a luxury mid-sized sedan or 2-row CUV and visited Cadillac, Lincoln, BMW, MB and Huyndai in the North Jersey suburbs of NYC.

    Outside of not really liking the Caddy CTS appearance and thinking the MKX was too expensive (didn’t like their sedans) for what it is (could get a loaded Edge and save like $10k), the dealerships of Lincoln, Caddy and Hyundai are nowhere near those of MB, BMW and Lexus. The Genesis was very nice, but the dealer targets Elantra buyers and is very low rent. I know they are in process of spinning off a brand (which none of the salesmen seemed to know). I want the dealer experience to be pleasant, provide a loaner when needed, be easy and flexible for scheduling appointments and also have the ability for the dealership to come get my car and leave me a loaner if needed. I also want it to be a pleasant place to hang out for an hour or two if necessary and have salespeople that aren’t stereotypical car salesmen (no offense to those here who sell cars). MB and BMW in my area do that well and though I have not had a Lexus, the dealership and salesperson was pleasant. Until Lincoln and Caddy up their store-experience, there is not much reason to buy a Lincoln over a loaded Ford or a Caddy over a loaded Buick, GMC/Chevy Truck if you really want one of their cars/trucks.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      The Lincoln dealership experience is very spotty. I will say that the Lincoln dealership I take my car to is excellent. It’s a stand alone Lincoln store with significant volume, so that probably has a lot to do with it. Lincoln is putting a priority on stepping up it’s dealership game, but stores that share space with a Ford store will always have a problem.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    I can’t speak to the ancillary factors of luxury car ownership such as dealership experience and brand cachet, but looking at the vehicle in isolation, I’d much prefer the Lincoln. Stronger available engine, more features, better ride/handling balance, and less psychotic styling inside and out—seriously, the new RX is a vulgar caricature of the Lexus styling language. I like the looks of the Lexus IS and am OK with the GS, but the new RX is way, way too far.

    Assuming depreciation isn’t out of line over the time frame I’d want to own/lease it (nowhere near 200K miles, so that kind of reliability is of little concern), I see no downsides. Seeing the Lexus “L” instead of Lincoln star on my keyfob certainly isn’t going to move me.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    “Panel gaps aren’t an indicator of reliability, dependability or luxury since you’ll find perfect gaps in unreliable Range Rovers, but they do smack of sloppy assembly control.”

    This is gonna be the issue with upcoming, great Civic wagon. Too bad

  • avatar
    Rday

    What is wrong with the writers on this web page. people buy Lexus, Toyota, Honda, etc because they are sick and tired of being screwed over by the Detroit car companies/mafia and the rip off artist dealers that sell their products. Plain and simple. Toyota doesn’t have to have the greatest products but they do have to treat their customers right and have the most reliable products that outlast the competition. But there are so called automotive experts out there that still do not understand business and how to keep and please customers.
    All of the Detroit gangsters have recently been caught ripping off the American consumer in some way or other. GM with their ignition key scandal, Ford with their mileage lies and their leaving important steel parts out of the front ends of some of their f150 pickups, and Chrysler for too many problems to even mention here.
    Many consumers are not as stupid as automotive writers think they are. Just because a model looks nice And rides nice doesn’t mean that it will stand the test of time and have the customer relation support when it get old and arthritic.

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      ” GM with their ignition key scandal, Ford with their mileage lies and their leaving important steel parts out of the front ends of some of their f150 pickups, and Chrysler for too many problems to even mention here.”

      Honda knowing about exploding airbags…………

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      You are aware that your pals over at Toyota were also involved in a major scandal for hiding there killer accelerator pedals and worse continuing to make cars with parts the FBI and Toyota themselves knew were deadly, lied about power and torque ratings on there 2.4 and 3.5 liter V6 engines, lied about mileage ratings on it’s Prius and continually covers up problems with it’s truck frames in Winter belts of the US. As FBI assistant director George Venizelos put it “Toyota put sales over safety and profits over principal”. Most consumer’s have no idea about anything to do with cars or trucks and mainly go with what sounds like a popular brand or mimic what the neighbors buy. Most people I have talked to don’t have any clue what engine they have or even how many cylinders, what drive wheels they have or even how to operate half of the electronic crap loaded into today’s vehicles. Working in the computer and retail industry for years has taught me just how dumb the average public really is.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        Killer accelerator pedals.

        Seriously.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        I hope, you understand – Toyota accelerator is totally made-up stuff. I actually had this in Mercury Villager. A factory floor mat went under brake pedal and I almost failed to brake. But no one made any big deal about it. In Toyota, floor mats have 2 hooks. No matter what I was trying with it, I couldn’t get pedal to get stuck if those mats are properly placed.

        As far as Honda – yes! Honda just too many times gave us junk but people still go back and say, “oh, never had a problem, only replaced transmission once”

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          And in my experience, brake rotors 4X, gas lines, fuel lines EGR valves, on and on. But that Honda was just the BEST car evah!

          I do think Toyotas are amazingly reliable, just life is too short to drive something like that.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Drive up to the school pickup line in a Lexus, and you fit in easily and everyone knows what you’re trying to say.

    Drive up to the school pickup line in a Lincoln, and no one knows what it is or what to think.

    That’s the biggest reason for the sales difference.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Well Lincoln hasn’t really known what it’s trying to say for awhile either.

    • 0 avatar
      DevilsRotary86

      Drive up to the school pickup line in a 10 year old Acura RSX coupe, and the other parents think you are “special”.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        My son’s future elementary school is within easy walking distance (about 3 blocks with good sidewalks). If you really want some parents to think you’re “special,” pick up your kid on foot.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Not in my neighborhood. A very large percentage of parents pick their kids up on foot (especially on nice days). But that’s what you get when the catchment area for the school is less than one square mile.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Sounds like an appealing neighborhood. I’m in an inner-ring suburb that’s quite walkable but there is still a large contingent of people who hyperventilate about the idea of taking a five-year-old anywhere outside the house without being belted into a Suburban.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            It is. Realistically, it’s the only thing keeping us in the Detroit area. It’s almost impossible to replicate the neighborhood somewhere else, especially for the money. My only complaint is that too many lawyers live here (just kidding Dal).

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Way too many lawyers live in my neighborhood.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            They could do a reality TV show in my neighborhood called “Jewish Lawyers of Oakland County”.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Oy vey!

        • 0 avatar
          DevilsRotary86

          Walking wouldn’t be entirely out of place. The catchment area is about 2 miles long North/South by just under 1 mile wide East/West. The school is about centered on the North/South line, but about 1/4 mile off the West boundary. I live on the far Southern boundary of the catchment. This results in a slightly more than 1 mile walk. Which is doable, but is a little far for a Kindergartner. Especially on a hot 100F Texas Summer day.

          Pretty much everyone who lives North of a certain road in the neighborhood generally walks. Everyone who lives South of that generally drives.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          Better yet, make the little darling walk to school on his/her own. I had to K-3 in the mid 70s, and a good bit farther than three blocks. Sucked in a good New England snowstorm too. Luckily flat, so no uphill both ways – and I had shoes! 4th grade on I could take the bus, we moved. Nothing like standing around waiting for the bus at 0-dark-30 in Maine when it is 0F and the wind is howling. Today precious gets to sit in a car with Mom, from what I see in my neighborhood. Baffling.

          I don’t get this whole shuffling kids to and fro thing. My parents were too busy working for a living to take me anywhere. I could walk, ride my bike, or take the school bus until I got my license my senior year of high school.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            When CPS is getting called — and then intervening — because a 10-year-old is alone in public, as recently happened in Maryland, no sane parent is going to let their 6- or 7-year-old go alone.

            I was biking all over my town at ages 9-10, but that was the 1980s and a different world.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Yeah, the world is measurably safer now. But people are more paranoid. Thanks, CNN et al.

  • avatar
    McGilligan

    Upscale neighbourhood. A long line of parents in their CUVs waiting outside the elementary school, all discussing the most recent PTA meeting, field trip, curriculum and other nonsense. Most are in RXs, MDXs, GLEs and X5s. One mother rolls up in her shining new MKX. With a horrified face, one concerned mother asks the driver “Is everything ok???”

    That’s why Lincoln won’t outsell Lexus

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    At the Chicago auto show this year, I got in the latest RX almost by accident, just waiting to sit in an RC. I was absolutely blown away when I got in, the interior was gorgeous, huge Nav screen up top, beautiful way the wood curved up the console side down low, beautiful leather on the seats, just a fantastic looking car inside. It was the only vehicle in the show (under $60k) where I was high guessing on the price instead of 10%+ low. Felt like it was worth every penny. I truly left WANTING an RX, which is basically everything a car guy should be making fun of, but as a commuting pod (to replace my Acura sedan) looked fantastic.

    That Lincoln…does not give that impression. Features, sure, but otherwise how is it better than the Edge? It looks like the same thing. And that doesn’t impress at the $45k+ level.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Lexus’ new “1986 Nakamichi Tape Deck” interior theme is only second to Mercedes in the business now. It’s a shame it’s ruined by their god awful infotainment control. Lincoln delivers on content but they need to do a big rethink on interiors. The RX, RC, IS and GS interiors are my favorites in their respective classes.

      • 0 avatar
        S2k Chris

        I find it better than the Mercedes “Garmin nav stuck on the top of the dash” style on all but the highest level cars (S Class is nice, new E probably will be too).

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Lincoln needs to

    – get people into their dealerships
    – make these things visual staples among the tastemakers of the suburbs
    – let go of the 1986 Ford Taurus button and text design in their center console

    Other than that, Lincoln is looking really strong and moving some decent metal. MKC is on the short list of rides to replace wifey’s hatchback when the babies start coming.

  • avatar
    SC5door

    The nearest Lincoln dealer looks the same as it did in the 90’s. When Mercury went away they took some paint and painted over the Mercury lettering on the awning outside; it looks like a 4 year old did it. It honestly looks like a shady used car dealer, let alone where I would purchase a “Luxury” car. The Cadillac dealer that is directly next to is brand new from the ground up which is much more inviting than the Lincoln dealer. Hell the Hyundai and KIA buildings down the road are remodeled inside and out.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      The should be required to remodel/redo things soon. I’m surprised they haven’t been forced to update already.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Ours is a corner of the Ford store. It’s a pretty nice Ford store, but still. Used to be across the street when Mercury existed (and was a different owner). But to be fair, the Lexus dealer is a corner of the Toyota store around the corner (and it isn’t very impressive). Acura is also a corner of the Honda store in town. MB and BMW have both built brand-new standalone retail palaces in the past few years. Oddly enough, I see a LOT more German cars than Lincolns or Lexus or Acuras. The Audi dealer is a VERY old VW dealer, and sells Mazda as well. And Porsche, though I think they moved the Porsche and Audi stores across the street. Haven’t been by there in ages, it’s out of my way on the other side of the city in a different suburb. The rest are all very near me.

      The REALLY sad one is the Infiniti store. Used to be in a shared building with BMW, but they built the new BMW dealership standalone next door. So now it is half of a tiny empty building. They don’t sell very many here. I don’t know why they don’t ditch them for a Mini franchise.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Part of the Lexus vs. Lincoln thing is the ownership experience and the service experience. I think a lot of the cost difference between Toyota and Lexus is the ownership experience – the overhead expense of the dealer, free service loaners, etc. My mother-in-law used to drive Cadillacs, and the last two (a ’94 Fleetwood Brougham, and a ’01 de Ville) were absolute crapwagons. She asked me what I thought she should buy next, and I said, “a Lexus”. Of course I thought she was going to buy an LS430, but, she bought a new ’05 ES330.

    The quality was so much better than the Cadillacs she was used to, and so was the service experience. Sure, the 30/60/90/120,000 mile services aren’t cheap, but it’s a luxury brand, and the service is comprehensive. The dealer even replaced the rear main seal which was just beginning to seep oil (a common problem on the MZ engines) for free, just before the 70,000 mile powertrain warranty ran out, saving her a big repair bill. When it came time to trade again (in 2011), she bought another Lexus, this time an ’08 ES350 CPO car. It’s got over 100,000 miles on it now, and has been trouble-free.

    People get spoiled by reliability and good service from Lexus cars, so Lincoln has to match that to steal customers away.

  • avatar
    kit4

    The interior is better than the old RX, but under no circumstance is it better in materials, fit and finish, design, or usability than the new RX. The new RX interior is outstanding.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      For decades, the RX set the tone and standard for this class. I know a lady who has had three Leased RXs in the past nine years.

      I don’t see her switching over to anything else, and certainly not an MKX. That would be like a step down.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    We had a loaded out 2010 Ford Edge Limited. To be honest, I was never enamored with the car, especially the way it drove – it was heavy and non-responsive to input; it was my wife’s car, and she loved the design. It was our first domestic car in 30 years. By 110,000 it had gone through it’s third HD cooling system ($12-1500 repair) when we finally threw in the towel. Oddly enough we got an RX-350….

  • avatar
    TMA1

    1. Why, on such a large car, are the footwells so narrow? It looks so incredibly cramped. The nice thing about moving up from a compact car is the increase in space, especially width. This isn’t just a Lincoln problem, but it really stands out in those photos.

    2. This car already looks outdated, given that the sedans have dumped the angel wing grille to copy Jaguars. I don’t know that fits on a Lincoln SUV, but now the MKX looks outdated compared to other Lincolns on the lot.

    3. On the taillight issue, I too have mistaken Lincoln SUVs for Durangos. Is that what Lincoln was going for? Probably not.

  • avatar
    Sigivald

    Doesn’t look super ridiculous.

    Available keypad for entry.

    Advantage: MKX.

    (I’m not even kidding; having the keypad on my SuperDuty has revealed how utterly wonderful it is.

    “Oh, something in the car I need? Don’t need to grab the keys. Just use the code to enter. And unlock or lock all four doors.”)

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Yup key less entry is very convenient and we use it on our cars with it frequently. It was particularly nice when the kids were young. They could leave their homework or what ever in the car go out and punch in the code and be done.

      Of course the remote entry still gets used more since most of the time it is unlocked is when it is going to be driven.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      My friend has a 2013 Fusion, and when we go to the gym, he can lock his smart key in the car and use the number pad to secure it, so that he doesn’t have to keep his keys in his pockets while he’s there. Meanwhile, I have a smartphone app and could lock my keys in the car, but (a) it takes forever for those smartphone apps to lock / unlock the car, and (b) my Golf SportWagen won’t let me lock the keys inside at all.

  • avatar
    SELECTIVE_KNOWLEDGE_MAN

    It is a shame that the reviewer insists on trying to force a victory to the Lincoln instead of looking into why the RX outsells it 5:1.

    Take a look at the sales numbers. If Lexus only relied on repeat customers, the sales would be flat – they are not. The latest month was brutal for Lexus sales. The RX? Up 24%. YTD: Up 11%.

    The reality is that while the exteriors of newer Lexuses is polarizing, the polarization is extreme. You either hate or love the exteriors. With the Lincoln you get “Oh. I suppose it looks like a Lincoln SUV…”.

    And when it comes to the interior, you know, the place where you are going to spend the most of your time, the design and quality seen in the latest RX simply blows the competition out of the water. Try it out. It is quite possibly the best interior of the entire Lexus range! Now add reliability, resale value, customer experience, and it should be clear why slightly more modern UI, slightly more adjustable seats, slightly more powerful engines, etc. doesn’t help much.

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      “And when it comes to the interior, you know, the place where you are going to spend the most of your time, the design and quality seen in the latest RX simply blows the competition out of the water. Try it out.”

      Exactly. Looking at the pictures of the Lincoln dash, it is 100% generic Ford. It’s not that different than the dash of the $25k Fusion. The author ranking them as a tie is completely laughable. Maybe the quality is the same (I doubt it, but maybe) but aesthetically it’s a world apart. The Lincoln couldn’t be more bland if it tried.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    “introducing a platform that will shortly support Apple CarPlay, Android Auto and integrated apps like INSURANCE DRIVING MONITORS”

    I’m surprised more people didn’t comment on this. Insurance apps built into the car, what could go wrong?

    *ding ding, you have been monitored doing 65 in a 55, your insurance rates have been adjusted.

    Upwards, of course.

  • avatar
    5280thinair

    The domestics occasionally produce a model that’s as good or better than Toyota or Honda’s operations, but unfortunately they never seem able to keep it up over time or across the entire product line. While Toyota does produce the occasional lemon, in general they’re among the most reliable cars in their class. This applies from the most expensive Lexus to the cheapest Corolla.

    What Lincoln, or any of the domestics, need to do is to produce competitive vehicles with high-quality across the board and across the years. Lexus became the safe choice here due to multiple decades of good customer experiences. Getting on par with that is going to take at least a decade of concerted effort, and not changing course constantly when you don’t catch up as fast as you would like.


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