By on May 23, 2016

2015 Honda Odyssey EX

8,000 trouble-free miles ended in early April when our 2015 Honda Odyssey EX began squeaking, squawking, and groaning.

An intermittent rattle in the glovebox this was not. The noise was growing worse by the day. Sounding like a flexing structure when turning into an uneven parking lot entry, like a handful of golf balls bouncing around together when traversing a rougher section of road at very low speed, and like a dying crow in nearly every other circumstance, our Odyssey went from refined to cacophonous in a matter of days.

All blame was laid at the feet of our minivan’s power sliding doors, large apparatuses responsible for shuttering two vast orifices in the sides of a 17-foot-long pod that lacks the inherent structural rigidity of a traditional three-box saloon car.

We all know the issue with taking your vehicle to the dealer to complain about a noise. Formerly distinct, easily located, and consistent, the rattle or squeak or scrunch is silenced when the service technician who normally swaps tires can’t hear anything.

But I was certain that wouldn’t happen in this case. In fact, I knew the noises would be more prevalent in the dealer’s parking lot than it would be on a proper test drive, where the higher speeds of highway driving mask the sound and the type of road imperfections that amplify the noise aren’t common.

Two staff members at the dealer where I dropped off our Odyssey, Portland Street Honda in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, are responsible for sound checks. On board with me and only half a lap of the store later, the creaking and groaning was abundantly obvious to the first technician, and I was returned home to await a fix.

(Full Disclosure: I was very briefly a sales consultant at Portland Street Honda in 2003. The dealer has long since been under different ownership and turnover has largely removed many employees from that era, none of whom I knew particularly well to begin with. I’m not sure a single person at the dealer even knows this, though some are aware of my current profession. The Odyssey was acquired from Centennial Honda in Summerside, Prince Edward Island, where the owners are personal friends.)

Both rear sliding doors were lubricated, but the second technician’s test drive around the store suggested the remedy was not sufficient. Both rear door sliding strikers were adjusted. Again, the noise was still prevalent. More lubrication was added to the rollers all around both sliding doors, and the noise was gone. Offered to go for a test drive with the technician to confirm the absence of the noise, it was obvious from the first manhole cover we traversed that this was the van I remembered so fondly. It also made clear that prior to the dealer visit the noise was worse than we realized — we had simply adapted. It had been ages since the Odyssey was this quiet.

The service experience was notable for a few reasons. First, the issue was resolved quickly. Second, the degree to which I was encouraged to return for warranty repair on the rollers if the noise returned or for any other noise that caused annoyance was a pleasant surprise. Both the technician and the service advisor insisted that they want people to return to the dealer when niggling issues have the potential to create festering resentment. If the dealer can fix the problem quickly, you’re back to being happy with your car. But if left to rattle, you enjoy your car less and less and perhaps consider another automaker when the time for replacement arrives.

2015 Honda Odyssey EX

Based on forum complaints, noisy doors on fourth-generation Odysseys aren’t unheard of, but when repaired once, the issue seems permanently resolved. Wondering if the noises in your Odyssey’s doors indicate more rapidly advanced aging than you would have expected in a Honda van? Visit your dealer, get your Odyssey back to like-new condition.

Once again then, our low-mileage 2015 Honda Odyssey feels — and sounds — like a brand new vehicle. The six-speed transmission about which I’ve complained in the past is far less likely to offend than it was when new. The Odyssey’s 248-horsepower 3.5-liter V6 engine feels like a 285-horsepower V6. Urban fuel economy of 24 miles per gallon is more than tolerable in a 4,500-pound eight-seater. Back on Michelin Primacy MXV4 all-season tires after a long season on soft winter rubber, the Odyssey has regained the Accord-like handling that separates Honda’s minivan from the pack.

And the doubts about our van’s long-term quality created by the serious sound of a flexing structure at only 8,000 miles? Erased.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

79 Comments on “Long-Term Update: 10 Months In, Our 2015 Honda Odyssey Finally Has A Problem...”


  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Does it constantly rain in your part of Canada? It looks so dang muddy all the time!

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      Might be a cause to loss of lubrication for the door… IF the track acts as water drainage.

      Alex may want to ask for the process should he hang onto the vehicle post warranty. Amsoil spray grease is probably what I’d use to avoid debris build up.

    • 0 avatar
      brettc

      Parts of Nova Scotia can be extremely foggy for extended periods of time. (family is from Western NS and it can get depressing there)

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      It’s certainly a moist area. We live smack dab on the Atlantic coast. Even a quarter-mile inland, the weather can be markedly different. But it makes for milder winters and slightly cooler summers. We eat lunch and supper outside most days from mid-May to the end of September. This winter there was way less snow than last, and spring has been sunny enough.

      https://twitter.com/timcaingcbc/status/733672705912897536

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        That’s a cool photo. Tell somebody it was Scotland or something and they wouldn’t argue.

        • 0 avatar
          Timothy Cain

          There are reasons they called it Nova Scotia, which means, New Scotland. Although those reasons are more obvious in the northern part of the province and on Cape Breton.

          • 0 avatar
            Shinoda is my middle name

            Ahh….Cape Breton. Not auto-related, but is there a more lovely place on the planet in July? Some may think so, but not this son of Nova Scotia.

  • avatar
    tresmonos

    This is a good example what of brand reputation coupled with consistently positive dealership interactions yields. An issue that is quickly resolved becomes reinforcement of perceived ‘good’ quality.

    It behooves dealerships to keep loaner cars for warranty work. I’m unsure if OEM’s sponsor these or not. I’m sure a prudent OEM will reimburse a dealership for loaner mileage.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Some dealerships will give you a loaner for -any- work you have done. I always assumed at higher level brands that this was forced upon them by the OEM.

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        From my limited knowledge – it’s up to the dealer to justify the account to receive credit. The quantity is justified by warranty repair frequencies, etc. Whether the dealer actually utilizes it, requests for it in the first place or is held accountable would be left to someone with better knowledge.

        But they are reimbursed for it.

        From my limited and anecdotal experience, I say dealerships all need to be shutdown and ran by the OEM.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Interesting.

          I took my M into the dealer for a recall repair which was going to be a couple of hours.

          “Hello Mr. Lewis, did you want a loaner vehicle today?”

          I wasn’t prepared for them to ask me, so I turned it down and just waited.

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            My experience is with 2 OEM’s. Dealer associations negotiate the daily rate. So if Dealer associations negotiate it, would that mean that all OEM’s do this? Regional rates vary, I’m sure of that.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        It definitely depends. For BMW, it’s at the discrepancy of the dealer. Jackie Cooper BMW, where I live, didn’t give out loaners for routine things like oil changes that could be done within an hour, but they did provide loaners for any kind of work that left you without your car, as I experienced several times.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      Smart thinking. Realistic buyers accept that they will have an issue, especially given how complex vehicles and their electronics are today. But if you can fix it correctly and quickly, then you build serious brand loyalty.

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        Dealerships can bring back any buyer to a brand in spite of the level of quality of vehicle. So long as the vehicle doesn’t strand/kill/maim the customer.

    • 0 avatar
      BufferOverflow

      @Tres: “It behooves dealerships to keep loaner cars for warranty work. I’m unsure if OEM’s sponsor these or not. I’m sure a prudent OEM will reimburse a dealership for loaner mileage.”

      I was pretty pissed when I had to take my new FiST (less than 2000 miles) in for a software update on the ACC and they told me that If I wanted a loaner car I could rent one from Enterprise. On a car with 2000 miles. :(
      Pretty weak Ford.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      I can’t speak for most brands, but I have a little experience with GM, about five years ago.

      In that case, GM didn’t directly reimburse the dealer, but they do make it easy for them. When it comes time to sell the loaner, it’s technically still a new car. Warranty starts at the time of sale. If the loaner has 20K on it and the car has a 50K warranty, it’s extended to 70K. The dealer also gets a kickback (I forget if it’s per mile) on the amount they pay the factory for the vehicle.

      So yep, it’s up to the dealer, but GM absorbed much of the added cost.

  • avatar
    VoGo

    I have a 2012 Ody, and always worry about the doors, esp. as they are powered. It seems like every trip to the beach results in the tracks getting full of sand, and I worry this will result in a costly repair at some point. But so far, at 45K miles, no issues.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      Every minivan–heck, every van, mini or nor—has sliding-door problems eventually*. Even for reliable makes like Honda or Toyota, it’s usually the first black mark in Consumer Reports’ tables.

      It’s huge hole in the structure with a finicky alignment mechanism and ticky locks: either you engineer it to accept a wide range of tolerance (and end up with the crude, loud, clunky things that fullsizers have) or you go the minivan route and have more precise doors that seem to work better but are a problem when they misalign.

      Add power doors to the mix and you’re guaranteed failure.

      * it’s possible the Mazda5 might be fine. All six that sold seem to be okay.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Ya know the Odyssey version where ya don’t gotta worry about door track issues?

    The Isuzu Oasis.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      I want a first gen Ody. It is in the top five on the list of vehicles I’m considering as our second car.

      • 0 avatar
        redmondjp

        Good luck finding one that doesn’t have 265K miles on it already!

        And it’s the one and only Odyssey that uses LEDs in the CHMSL – so in this respect, Honda went backwards in technology, still using an incandescent bulb there even in the new ones. For shame, Honda.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

          Well, I found a couple with over 200k and one with like 190k. I’m just narrowing down to something with cargo capacity that the Taurus (sedan) lacks. No, it won’t be a Taurus wagon. Having over 200k on a Honda or most Ford’s does not bother me (my Taurus has 217k and performs well, I trust it explicitly). We also need to be able to pay cash for it, which is why the list doesn’t include anything newer.

          The list thus far includes a mid 90s Explorer 4wd/AWD, with either the bulletproof 5.0 or the OHV 4.0 (the SOHC 4.0L has timing chain issues and I’ve spent plenty of time with an OHV 4.0 in an Explorer and Ranger so I’m satisfied with the power). Also thinking about a Mitsubishi Mighty Max, but the one I found is gone. It had under 100k, needed minor stuff like tires and A battery. A single cab compact truck won’t do my back any favors, but the Mighty Max is a damn good truck. Also thinking of an I-6 F-150, though it’ll probably drink gas without the benefit of 4wd that the Explorer would have (I frequently travel to the PNW, and that means mountain passes which is why the Explorer is on the list).

          I would go with another Aerostar, but I’ve already had four previously and I’m just in the mood for something else. If we end up with another car, a 5 speed Accord would do nicely, but I do want something with more cargo capacity so I won’t have to rent a van or something.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Smart man with the jellybean Explorer with smallblock or OHV Cologne choice. They are truly the “cockroach SUV” of working class (and welfare class) neighborhoods, the damn things just won’t die. Go down to Mexico and every 4th vehicle will be a jellybean Explorer on 4 mismatched tires and front wheels with 5 degrees of negative camber, but still trucking along. I’m a Honda car/Toyota truck guy but that generation of Explorer (and the boxy one before it) have my undying respect.

        • 0 avatar
          Carfan94

          @redmondjp
          I always thought it was odd that the 1st generation Odyssey had an LED third brake light, but every generation afterwards use all incandescent brake lights even the 2016’s! This is not the first time Honda has done this, the face lifted 2006-07 Accords had all LED brake lights, but when it was redesigned in 2008 they went back to incandescent brake lights. Same thing happened to the Camry when it was redesigned in 2012. Cost cutting as usual I guess.

  • avatar
    FOG

    Isn’t 8,000 miles way too early for problems like this? I agree the dealer service truly helps, but I have a 2015 equinox with 20K , only oil changes, and a ’14 Journey with 50K with no problems at all for the past two years. Needing something fixed at 8,000 miles is unacceptable.

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      Seems that the issue arises largely with low-mileage vehicles, as best I can tell. Once fixed, it’s good to go. We’ll keep you updated.

    • 0 avatar
      yamahog

      Congratulations, you have two wonderful vehicles.

      Let’s make a distinction between needing repair (as in the door isn’t operable) and desiring a repair.

      There’s something to be said for buying high volume cars. As far as Hondas go, the Oddessy and Ridgeline might be two of the lowest volume vehicles and they can take a trip or two to the dealer to get right. My dad and brother both have Ridgelines and each had some issue manifest in the first year (the sunroof wasn’t draining properly on my dad’s truck, and my brother’s truck had a rattling TV screen). But they’ve both gone 150k miles on routine maintenance and the dealer was more than helpful each time – they’d drop off the truck before work, drive a loaner to work, and pick up their trucks on the way home. It was perhaps a 20 minute ordeal for both of them. And they’re both happy with their trucks. I don’t think anyone has had a car work perfectly for them, but many people agree the cars they have work for them and that’s fine.

      If a car that ‘needs’ service in the first 8k miles is going to work you into a tizzy, I’ll make you the deal of a century! You can sell the ‘unacceptable’ car to me for $1000. Yes, for the low price of $1000, you can rid yourself of any car you find unacceptable. Just sign the title over to me and bring some cash or a cashier’s check. And you can wash your hands of the ordeal. I’ll even drive you home!

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      My one Subaru I have owned, a WRX 02′, was in the shop 2x in 9k miles. The second stop was for the rear gear that shattered. That was enough for me.

  • avatar
    Redshift

    Glad to see the service experience there has improved with the current staff.
    My experience at that dealership (in 2003 funny enough) was bad enough that I haven’t looked at a Honda since.
    The owner at the time actually had the service manager apologize to me.

  • avatar
    Big Al From 'Murica

    I have never owned anything that needed service within 8000 miles to include the otherwise dreadful Saturn Ion

  • avatar
    Corollaman

    What’s wrong with having manual sliding doors? Or a rear hatch that you operate yourself? Society is getting so damn lazy.

    • 0 avatar
      gearhead77

      Nothing, but being able to walk to the car and hit a button to open the doors or hatch when your hands are full of stuff (or little hands) is worth it. And the kids enjoy opening the doors themselves when they can.

      I will say, our Mazda 5 does not have power doors and it throws me off slightly when I go to use them. But at the same time, I appreciate not having to wait for them to close either.

      • 0 avatar
        Professional Lurker

        We enjoy these features on our Odyssey for exactly the reasons you describe. My only complaint is the power rear hatch: sometimes we just want to throw something in the back but that door is sooooo slooooowwww.

        The keyless ignition also spoils me. There is the issue with batteries (they last 2 years in my case) and possibly security issues, but oh man is it nice not having to fumble with keys–especially when trying to keep track of a 4-year-old boy.

    • 0 avatar
      LeMansteve

      Have you never paid for any kind of convenience?

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      You tell that to a petite mom who has a child carrier in one hand and a grocery bag in the other, let us know how that works out. Also, there is an age where children can buckle themselves into a booster seat but will still struggle with an unassisted door. Once they do get strong enough to close the door they tend to slam the hell out of them, which can be detrimental to both the van and any nearby fingers.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      (This bait doesn’t even taste good, but here I am eating it.)

      “The children now love luxury; they have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise. Children are now tyrants, not the servants of their households. They no longer rise when elders enter the room. They contradict their parents, chatter before company, gobble up dainties at the table, cross their legs, and tyrannize their teachers.”

      –Socrates (attr. by Plato)*

      *Actually not Socrates, but it’s so old that it might as well be. Can you provide any empirical evidence of laziness?

    • 0 avatar
      mikedt

      In a previous life I would have agreed with you. But it was nice being able to push a button and open the door for our daughter or to have her being able to close the door herself – toddlers aren’t going to be able to close a manually sliding door. There were also the times my hands were full yet I could still click a button for her to get in. The whole minivan concept it perfect for families with younger children.

      • 0 avatar
        Corollaman

        Man, I recall how me and hundreds of other students rode our bikes to elementary and middle school everyday rain or shine; there were no mommies with their electric door equipped minivans dropping us off right at the school entrance with some school aide waiting there with an umbrella to cover us. We’re are indeed raising a generation of pampered wusses.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          Once again, Poe’s Law must be invoked. You had a bike? A really tough kid would walk barefoot through broken glass!

          • 0 avatar
            Zackman

            Also walking to school 7 miles uphill both ways… in the snow…

            My mom, sister & brother actually did, about 6 miles – by rail – they walked the RR tracks from Berger, MO to Hermann, MO, so it was basically level.

            Me? I had to walk or ride two blocks… my last two years I rode a bus 25 miles each way from Jennings, MO to Sunset Hills! Got lots of sleep in the mornings.

          • 0 avatar
            fishiftstick

            This says not so much about kids being lazy as it does about society being paranoid about unsupervised children.

            Here in Canada there was a recent case where child protective services got involved because kids were playing by themselves in a fenced backyard.

        • 0 avatar
          LeMansteve

          “there were no mommies with their electric door equipped minivans dropping us off right at the school entrance”

          That’s because minivans with electric sliding doors didn’t exist. If they did exist, I’d wager your parents and several of your peers would have one in their family.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            I’m Jewish. Coddling children has been in our blood for centuries. But now we can just push buttons. Much easier.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      My wife had back surgery last year. She’s mostly recovered now, but in the initial nine months or so after the operation it was hard for her to close the manual hatch on our Forester. She’s a big fan of the power hatch on our C-Max (and the power trunklid on the other car).

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    At 20k miles, our 14 EX-L isn’t as quiet as it used to be. There are some squeaks, but trips to the dealer have been “unable to duplicate”. Western PA roads leave much to be desired though, but since it goes back in a year, I’ve stopped worrying about it. I’m sure the new van will have a stiffer structure, but I’ve been pretty impressed by the new Siennas I’ve been in. Considering the SE trim Sienna and also the Pacifica. I share Tim’s opinion on the 6spd auto in the Odyssey.

    Our Odyssey was delivered with the front doors misaligned with the back of the fenders. I’m not sure how it left the factory like it did, or if it happened during transit. Nothing like showing off your new vehicle to family and hearing the “gronk” of metal on metal contact as you open the drivers door. 37 miles and it was at a body shop being fixed.

    I was disappointed to say the least(would have been more so if I had bought and not leased), but it’s a machine built by humans for a cost. It won’t be perfect. My 16 Cruze has 2000 miles on it now and has a suspension noise too. I expected it from the Chevy though. ;)

  • avatar
    cwa107

    I’ll be interested to see if it stays “fixed”.

    Honda has been using a type of weatherstripping that seems to be particularly noisy when it dries out or is otherwise weathered over time. I had a similar set of circumstances with my 2007 Accord EX-L V6. It was dead silent for the first 10,000 miles or so, and then it squeaked and clicked and clacked like crazy…. from the driver’s side door.

    I could tell that it was the weatherstripping because you could literally feel the door move at its own distinct rate from that of the body, when the car went over bumps. It simply wasn’t secured/aligned right. But the answer from the dealer was to lubricate the door seal with some Shin-Etsu silicone grease. It solved the problem alright, but after a few car washes, it came right back.

    I eventually bought a tube myself so that I wouldn’t have to keep bringing it back to the dealer. The stuff has a million uses, so I’m glad I discovered it. Loved that car except for that one annoying flaw.

    • 0 avatar
      windnsea00

      Same thing on my 2015 M3, I use Gummi-pflege as the door seals make a ton of noise, need to do it every few weeks.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      There was a TSB for the issue which involved lubricating the inside of the weatherstripping using a pipe-cleaner. Supposedly it worked. I was relieved when I saw the doors on the later generations of Accord which got away from that design. (Although that same design seems to be back in the new Civic.)

      Rattles drive me straight up the wall, until I find the source. In the case of my 2006 Accord, I knew I could have it fixed if it got to be a HUGE bother.

      Oddly enough, the Civic has had a door latch design that allows for just enough “play” that the doors will move just a fraction of an inch, enough to make a noise, after say, 10k miles or so.

  • avatar
    bricoler1946

    Corey,that’s why it’s called Nova Scotia

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Repeated failure of the power sliding doors was the source of my lemon lawsuit against American Honda in 2005-7, which I won. The car also had numerous other problems, but in this case, the doors wouldn’t open. Not very nice to have happen the day after purchase. Of course, broken turn signals, brake problems, a detached 3rd seat cable, and a few other goodies didn’t help – all on a new car.

    The dealer experience was horrible.

    The district manager gave me a stunned look when I told him I should have bought a Chrysler product again, instead of his. After the (small) settlement check arrived, I promptly traded that turd for a 99 Grand Caravan and no payments.

    • 0 avatar
      Carfan94

      Your experience with that Odyssey sounds very similar to the experience my parents had with a 1996 Grand Caravan ES (with the gold wheels!). Ours had stalling problems,(maybe a few other issues too, I was to young to remember). Of coarse ours was a first model year, and my parents bought one of the very first ones the dealer had in inventory, in early 1995. My dad wont touch a Chrysler product with a ten foot pole after owning that van, and has a very negative opinion of the brand even after 20 years.

  • avatar
    BufferOverflow

    From Article: “Both the technician and the service advisor insisted that they want people to return to the dealer when niggling issues have the potential to create festering resentment. If the dealer can fix the problem quickly, you’re back to being happy with your car. But if left to rattle, you enjoy your car less and less and perhaps consider another automaker when the time for replacement arrives.”

    This! An automaker that gets it. You can make a mistake, but if you do right to rectify it, then you’ve more than earned a customer’s loyalty back.

    I suspect that the root of this is in the warranty reimbursement rate from the manufacturer. If it’s high enough, then the dealer techs will be happy to find and fix things for the customer.
    Skimp on the rate or fight each claim and the dealers will avoid doing warranty work. After that it’s only a matter of time before market share starts falling. (I’m looking at you GM and VW.)

  • avatar
    tubacity

    Hope the grease job holds up. Had bad experience with Honda and mechanical problems which helped me avoid their products since then. Did not finish new car prep. Ineffective actions for drift to one side in a new car. Over tightened lug nuts. Some would not come off with a breaker bar. Did not have impact wrench so had to take it back and waste a trip as I realized if I break a wheel lug, I would be blamed no matter what. Sure enough, a wheel lug did get stripped later. Transmission breakdown, timing belt tensioner. Several other systems including doors, all engine mounts, AC relay. Had problems after warranty but did not have them fixed at the dealer.
    Only got a loaner once when Takata air bag inflators were replaced.

  • avatar
    fry_pan

    I have not been too happy with our 2012 odyssey. First the left front wheel bearing went about a year after we purchased it. Then the EGR valve went bad soon after. Then the engine needed to be rebuilt last fall because some rings went bad due to an issue with the variable cylinder management. Then a couple of weeks ago the right front wheel bearing went. The car just crossed over the 50k mark and it is less than five years old. Prior to this one we had a 2010 Ody that had its window washer pump ripped out the day after we purchased it due to a hose that was too long getting wrapped up around a CV joint.

    I hate to say it but my 97 Dodge Caravan did not go to the shop for the first five years of its life. Not that I am heading back to the Chrysler dealership but this may be my last Ody/Honda.

  • avatar
    laserwizard

    I don’t think Honduhs ever have problems – just like Apple crap – when something goes wrong, it is never the product.

    Gloating at a problematic Honduh. Even my 20 year old Ford has not had structural issues.

  • avatar
    Joss

    An Odyessey from Lincoln, Alabama. Too long for the home market in Japan. If it had been built in Japan, it would be flawless.

    God bless american waistlines. Now move along there.

    • 0 avatar
      iNeon

      Man I miss smoking out with my Honda-building buddies out in ‘dega!

      Hillbillies get the good isht.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Oh, you’ve not seen JDM vans, then?

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      “If it had been built in Japan, it would be flawless.”

      My Japan-built Forester never had a mechanical problem, but it sure had a lot of rattles, creaks, and flexing. My Japan-built LS460 had the standard LS460 issue with Swiss cheese control arm bushings. “Built in Japan” is not some magic elixir.

  • avatar
    Felix Hoenikker

    I had the strangest problem ever with the power sliding doors on our first gen Honda Odyssey. At about 12 years and 110K miles, the passenger sliding door wold not always completely close. This was fixed by someone in the front seat getting out and pushing the back of the sliding door to fully engage it into the locking mechanism.
    Late last March, my wife complained that the door was no longer operable from either the dash mounted switches of the door handles. When the problem first started, I bought a new latching mechanism on line, but do to other priorities, never swapped the old one out.
    In a rare moment of clarity, I started to read the manual and completed the re-syncro steps to get the controls and the door back on the same page. It didn’t work. In fact, I couldn’t even manually move that door as described in the official repair manual. Finally, I decided to see if there was something holding the door closed. Sure enough, some cretin had applied some black, hardening glue to the seam between the sliding door and the rear frame. I used a pointed paint scraper and remove the three inches of glue from the crevice, and lo and behold, the door worked perfectly.
    I have no idea where someone had the opportunity to apply the glue to the door. My wife drives the car to work five days a week, and I occasionally use it to pick up building supplies. If one of the hacker nerds at her software support company didn’t do it, it would have been in the Home Depot parking lot. Those are the only places it was parked in. It is always kept in the garage at our hose so that is not where it was attacked. Go figure.

  • avatar
    windnsea00

    I’m quite disappointed with the amount of squeaks and creaks in my 2015 M3 with 14k miles. I can tell BMW really cut some cost as previous generation platforms like the E46 were much quieter inside in regards to this department.

    I presume one cause for this is the fact that the rear subframe is solid mounted (no bushings) and the chassis is very rigid with the large carbon fiber strut brace up front among other factors, the normal 3-series I would be willing to guess suffers less from this issue.

    Also I drive over terrible LA city streets everyday, that certainly must play a role. I can’t imagine what this interior will sound like with 100k+ miles, thankfully I won’t have the car at that point!

  • avatar
    Professional Lurker

    We have a 2014 EX-L with almost 19,000 miles on it now. The only problem I’m noticing is that the window in the passenger-side sliding door is a little slow to go up compared to the other. I feel a bit of play in the window, so maybe that’s the source of the trouble.

    I really ought to get it to a dealer before the basic warranty expires in October, but I’d been dragging my feet about getting it done. One reason is procrastination, but another is my fear that the dealer will dismiss it and charge me with a diagnostic fee.

    Overall, I’m pretty happy with the van. The only problem I have is that being used smaller cars, I occasionally have trouble dealing with its prodigious girth in narrow streets, particularly with the huge mirrors it has.

  • avatar
    JLGOLDEN

    My brief ownership of a ’14 Kia Cadenza was haunted by roof structure creaks, also brought on by passing over uneven driveways at very low speeds. The dealer and regional manager compared it to other creaking Cadenzas and said “…this won’t get fixed, it’s a trait of the car”. Unacceptable. I suggested that the dealer drop the headliner to add structural adhesives and foam filler material between the roof structure and bracing. They would not even attempt it. A week after a traded it, Kia engineering released a bulletin suggesting that in response to creaking Cadenza roofs…dealers should drop the headliner and add structural filler material…


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • JohnTaurus: Very nice Corey. Depending on when you were near Little Rock, I wasnt far away as I was working in Pine...
  • Corey Lewis: The dealer pics had a filter on them which made it look more flat white. I was pleased to see the level...
  • FreedMike: I like that color too, particularly with the bone-colored leather. Very nice.
  • Corey Lewis: Wonder how I would find that out. A5 Sportback super rare! Only seen one.
  • Corey Lewis: Gah, you’re right. A320. I do that a lot with plane numbers.

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States