By on April 22, 2016

1992 Toyota Previa in Colorado Junkyard, LH front view - ©2016 Murilee Martin - The Truth About Cars

Living in Colorado, I have become something of a connoisseur of low-sales volume, all/four-wheel-drive versions of otherwise commonplace vehicles. The rarest one so far has got to be this ’87 Ford Tempo AWD, but I also have managed to find some fairly unusual All-Trac-equipped Toyota vehicles.

There’s this ’90 Camry All-Trac, a car that’s a rarity even in this state and just about unheard of anywhere else, and a few examples of the Corolla All-Trac wagon. Now we have this gleaming gold Previa All-Trac.

Previa Chassis - 800x450

The Previa featured a bunch of very interesting engineering under its conservative-looking minivan exterior. The engine is a mid-mounted straight-four laid on its side under the front seats, with a weird remote-reservoir oil system (not a dry-sump, despite the urban legends you may have heard, but still different), and the engine accessories are way up front and powered by a long shaft from the engine. Later North American models were supercharged, though this ’92 just has the naturally aspirated 2TZ.

1992 Toyota Previa in Colorado Junkyard, All-Trac Emblem - ©2016 Murilee Martin - The Truth About Cars

All-Trac Previas are nowhere near as rare, here in Denver, as are All-Trac Camrys; in fact, most Previas you see here have the All-Trac system. They’re uncommon in wrecking yards, though, because it’s worth fixing Toyota minivans when they break.

1992 Toyota Previa in Colorado Junkyard, radiator air intake - ©2016 Murilee Martin - The Truth About Cars

The mid-engined Toyota MR2 is well-known for overheating problems, but Toyota got it right with the Previa and this big radiator air intake gulping air through the grille and sending it rearwards.

1992 Toyota Previa in Colorado Junkyard, front seats - ©2016 Murilee Martin - The Truth About Cars

The interior in this van is not too tattered by used-up-minivan standards, so a combination of body damage and some expensive mechanical problem is the probable reason for being parked here instead of the mall.


It’s a suburban-early-1990s time capsule!


In Japan, taking the golden retriever for a balloon ride.

[Images: © 2016 Murilee Martin/The Truth About Cars, Toyota]

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86 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1992 Toyota Previa All-Trac...”


  • avatar
    ...m...

    …nothing conservative about the previa!..that suburban utility vehicle was about as progressively forward-thinking as they came in 1990; practically a type 7 shuttlecraft straight out of the next generation…

    • 0 avatar
      tremorcontrol

      I totally agree — this has always been the best minivan exterior design to me, and I think it would still look up-to-date on the road today if they were still making them. Toyota should bring it back!

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      I think it is a unique combination of forward-thinking packaging/styling, with some very durable and tried and true drivetrain components (solid rear axle). Having driven and owned a competing van with a similar sort of quirky design (1st gen Mazda MPV), I find these Previas very fetching.

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        Some models were offered in Europe with IRS, which was pretty cool. Europeans could also get a split three-across bench second seat (the right third tumbled forward for access through the sliding door), which made them eight passenger vans.

        One weird thing is that with quad seating, you get a three-point belt for each of the swiveling buckets when they’re facing forward, and a seat-mounted lap belt for when they’re facing rearward. Our first one (’94 S/C) had quad seating with leather. Pretty swanky. I still miss the Previas (so do my wife and kids). If I could find a pristine, low-mileage ’97 with quad seating, I’d buy it.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      More like a type-7 without warp drive…these things were beyond slow.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    These things are just freakishly durable. 300-400k miles seems to be no problem at all, and fairly typical for taxi applications. That durability extends to the interior as well, as we can see. Definitely not the most straightforward things to work on in terms of engine access, and a jackshaft running to the front of the car to drive accessories as I recall. Despite that, these are very long lived, there simply aren’t many “Achilles heels” to it. Underpowered lower torque engine keeps the transmission understressed, not much to go wrong with the solid rear axle out back, and Toyota’s classic “STD-1” fulltime AWD system, occasional viscous coupling failures now that these things are 20+ years old. but overall a very durable/reliable system.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      The Previa was very expensive when new: you could get a pair of Chrysler vans for what they cost.

      For that matter, so was the Hiace/Toyota Van before it: it was really durable and well-built, but just hideously expensive. You can get away with high build quality like that when you’re charging what would be, in today’s dollars, Lexus money for a Toyota product.

      The other issue with these is the crash ratings: even for the era, they’re atrocious.

      • 0 avatar
        ammom_rouy

        In watching a bit about the re-design that led to the Sienna, a guy at IIHS (or equivalent) performed/witnessed a Previa offset crash that sent the tire and wheel directly into the driver’s shins, and immediately took the keys of their own Previa away from his wife, never to be driven by them again.

        • 0 avatar
          psarhjinian

          My parents had a Toyota Van. I was struck by someone running a light when I was making a left in it; they were driving some kind of late-80s compact, probably a Golf or similar.

          So we’re talking 35-50km/h, tops.

          I walked away, but if anyone was in the front passenger of Van, they’d be legless and/or dead.

      • 0 avatar
        Shiny Things

        No, for the era they were on par or better. They were THE first minivan to meet passenger car safety standards.
        http://www.pvsheridan.com/Minivan-Customer-Letters-TRUCK.pdf

        • 0 avatar
          guy922

          It did meet federal standards, However, it failed the IIHS Offset test miserably. The only van worse at the time was the Chevy Venture/Pontiac Montana/Olds Silhouette combination of death. Here’s a link to the Dateline episode where they talked with the institute about how they conduct their tests.

          Toyota did redeem themselves with the 1998 Sienna, however, which the IIHS called their “Best Performer Ever” at the time.

      • 0 avatar
        CaseyLE82

        I still have the original window sticker for my 1991 Previa that has been in the family since the mid-90’s. It has very few options other than the bucket seats (they didn’t offer the swiveling bucket seats until 1994 but I have regular buckets).

        The cost in 1991 for my base LE van with one upgrade? $21,790. That’s just shy of $39,000 now, which is crazy expensive. But, I’m glad someone bit the bullet and bought it so that my mom could pick it up for $8,000 a few years later.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      re: there simply aren’t many “Achilles heels” to it

      Rust. These things rust like a ’78 Corolla, and they don’t have that much metal to begin with. The A pillars are thinner than anything you would find on a sub-compact these days.

      It’s the last of the “old-school” Toyotas. It’s got an engine that lasts forever (reputedly borrowed from Toyota’s forklift division), and a body that can’t wait to crumble away.
      The Camry-based Sienna that replaced it was less cool, but had a much better mix of engine vs. body durability.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Actually not really. I’d actually argue that these, along with the ’92 Camry and ’93 Corolla, were the ‘turnaround point’ for Toyota’s rust-proofing woes. Yes they eventually get rear rocker rot, but this is on 15+ year old examples living in the Northeast.

        “These things rust like a ’78 Corolla” my family owned a ’77 Corolla in Ithaca NY in the mid 90s, I can tell you comparing that to a Previa is patently false.

        • 0 avatar
          heavy handle

          I wrote that from personal experience. A friend tried to keep his SC AWD Previa from rusting away, to no avail. He loved that van, but the 1st-gen Sienna that replaced it proved to be way more durable.

          It isn’t an isolated case, I haven’t seen a clean Previa in 10 years, or a running one in 5. Early Siennas are ubiquitous.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Previas barely sold to begin with, and the newest one is now 20 years old, of course they’re thin on the ground, always have been. The survivors I do see here in Indiana typically have some rear quarter panel rot, but no more. Again, they are 20-27(!) years old at this point. Yes Siennas are even better rust proofed, but I’d argue Previas are no worse at rusting than any other mainstream car from the 1990s that I can think of, and better than many.

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            gtemnykh,

            They were fairly popular back in the day, here in minivan-crazy Canada. They disappeared within a few years of being discontinued. Contemporary Camries are quite common. Corollas would be as well, but those all got painted white and shipped to Afghanistan and Pakistan.

            It has been 20-27 years, but the bulk of these vans got scrapped 15 years ago. Even Cavaliers lasted longer.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            “20-27 years, but the bulk of these vans got scrapped 15 years ago”

            By your logic, Previas lasted an average of 5-12 years ie with typical use, no more than 100-150k miles or so. Utter nonsense. Both our family MK1 Mazda MPVs, which I’d argue are much more prolific rusters than similar vintage Toyotas (and believe me it shows) are still on the road now, an ’89 with 240k, and a ’98 with 180k miles. This is in road-salt crazy Central NY. Now, maybe Canada is stricter on failing cars for visible rust-through and a small hole in a rear quarter panel is enough to scrap something.

        • 0 avatar
          Shiny Things

          I’ll second this. Previas were not rust prone, especially given the use they saw.

          It was nothing to see a 4WD one with 400,000km on it, and that is up here in the salt belt.

          I say this a tech that worked on a zillion of them.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      How much of a PITA is it to try and service a Previa?

  • avatar
    golden2husky

    Contrast this to the engineering and build quality of my father’s 2002 Avalon…old Toyota vs the drive for market share.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      Toyota couldn’t keep building cars like that: they’d get killed on cost, especially if (and as it turns out, _when_) the Americans and/or Koreans got their shit together.

      You can still buy an over-built Toyota: they’re labelled “Lexus” and they carry almost the same price premium that over-built Toyotas did back in the day.

  • avatar
    spreadsheet monkey

    Dashboard shape still looks futuristic, even 25 years on. As others have said, this was a good example of a Toyota from the “fat product” years.

  • avatar
    thattruthguy

    Enima is my new favorite car name.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    We have a winner. Paint this brown, give it a 3rd pedal and the B&B would be lining up to buy one.

    The design, the durability, the reliability, the longevity, the functionality all better than many current vehicles.

  • avatar
    PRNDLOL

    Look at all that unrusted fender goodness.

    The supercharged last of the line ’97 model would be a great sleeper, and much more desirable than the Previa that replaced it.

  • avatar
    Corollaman

    This replace the unsafe ToyoVan and was way ahead of its time

  • avatar
    VW16v

    I still see a few of these awd Previa’s around SLC. Cool vans that just keep on driving. A fee have lift kits with off road tires. Awesome stuff.

  • avatar
    crtfour

    I grew up riding around in minivans….2 Chevy Astro vans to be exact. When this Previa came out I lusted over them and practically begged my parents to get one but my mom didn’t like the shape and my dad thought they were too expensive. If I had to drive a minivan one day, a nicely preserved early Previa would be my first choice….simply to be different and to partake in the Toyota quality of this vintage. It would go well with my ’97 T100 which I refuse to part with.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    My ex’s family had one of these, and I did drive it. I loved the design, but my God, was it slow.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      There are still a few of these running around the mountain country in my area. They’ve held up remarkably well.

      They were never bought for speed. They were bought so that some could go where others feared to tread in winter time.

      For mountain snow country if one of your vehicles isn’t a 4X4 or AWD, your mobility stops at the first snow fall.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        And, yes, that Previa my in-laws had ran for probably 15 years, so the durability factor was definitely there. Toyotas of that era were magnificent mechanically, for sure.

        And for TRUE mountain driving, particularly in rural areas, I’d pass on AWD. I typically rent a mountain cabin in the summer for a mini vacation, and if I lived up there, there’s no way I’d do those steep, unpaved roads with anything less than a true 4X4, preferably a HD pickup with a turbodiesel. Even in the summertime, my old Buick 3800 strains noticeably on roads like that.

        Here in Denver, AWD is helpful but not really necessary – winters aren’t that bad, and any storm bad enough to stop anything without AWD is probably going to shut the city down anyway. The last truly big storm we had was in ’06, and the only people getting around in my neck of the woods had jacked-up pickups or Jeeps (or a Hummer H1, which one of my neighbors used to ferry people back and forth to the grocery store in emergencies). Folks with “regular” 4wd pickups and standard SUVs (Grand Cherokees, Blazers, Explorers, etc) were all just as screwed as I was with my old Focus.

        AWD is helpful on ski trips, tho.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Yeah, I familiar with your area.

          We’re lower in latitude at the Sacramento Mountains, the Southern tip of the Rockies, so we get less snow and can make do with regular AWD and standard on-demand 4X4 vehicles.

          So my wife and I were able to run Meals-on-Wheels to shut-ins using just our automatic 4×4 Grand Cherokee because my 2011 Tundra RWD could not make it, when I still drove that truck.

        • 0 avatar
          guy922

          I remember 2006. I lived in Green Valley Ranch back then, took us 2 days to shovel out our driveway and I walked to King Soopers on 48th and Tower Road and it was positively apocalyptic. No food hardly in the store. You jogged some good old memories. My dad had a Dodge Ramcharger still at the time. We got around in the snow in that.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      The S/C is better in that respect. Roots-type supercharger that uses an electromagnetic clutch controlled by the ECU (engages as soon as you come off idle), air-to-air intercooler (under the left front corner of the van), and 6psi of boost.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Driving one as a teen (my aunts) it felt quicker and more zippy than my N/A Audi 5000. I really didn’t think they were that slow.

      Loved the dash.
      Loved the space inside.
      Loved the sturdy tweed seats.
      And loved how solid the doors thonked when you closed em.

  • avatar
    jmo

    Adjusting for inflation this thing would sticker at $43k today. So, cloth seats and under powered 4 banger for the price of a Lexus RX.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Different time then, other cars were not up to the quality standards of this Japan-produced Previa. Think of how much better it was than the Aerostar or the Caravan.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Quirky, more reliable VW Eurovan. With a silly spot for the motor which limited commercial applications..

    Was it an extra long dipstick or just a warning lit?

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      There’s an access hatch under the driver’s seat (and a latch to flip the seat back first) that gives you access to the oil and ATF dipsticks, and an oil fill cap for oil changes. Inside the oil pan (which is mounted on the side of the block, since the engine lays over at a 75 degree angle – the bottom of the block has a “crankcase cover” on it), there’s a float and a sender, like a gas gauge.

      You see those two rectangular reservoirs under the hood, at the far right? The dirty one is an oil reserve tank, which holds about two quarts. It has a pump on the bottom, and if the oil level in the pan drops low enough, the float and sender will tell the ECU to turn the pump on, to pump oil from the reservoir, into the pan, until the float reaches a certain level, shutting it off. Unless your Previa leaks or burns a lot of oil, it will never come on. But, the senders have been known to go bad, turning on the pump and dumping all the oil from the tank into the engine. In which case you disconnect the sender or the pump, and ignore the oil level warning light that gets turned on as a result.

  • avatar
    tobiasfunkemd

    I still remember when my Dad brought home our new 1991 Previa for the first time. LE model, but the same color combo as the one Murilee found. All the neighborhood stopped by to ask about what it was – it was so futuristic looking! The second row captain’s seats were perfect for two boys 20 months apart, and the third row folding up on the sides gave it a lot of vertical clearance to load odd items. It went well over 300 grand with no major issues, although towards the end it had some wiring harness problems which sealed its fate. I learned to drive in it, drove the carpool to school in it; it really was a workhorse all around. It’s also notable in that my dad traded in a 1986 Cutlass Ciera station wagon that required a new engine at 70,000 miles for the Previa – I can actually trace the day the General screwed us one too many times and my Dad went to the Japanese side and never looked back.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      Yeah, I started having electrical issues with our last one, like the low beams going out, which required bypassing four pins in the combination switch connector down the steering column. That plus the a/c failing, and the second set of SADS revolvers wearing out. And it need struts and strut mounts.

      • 0 avatar
        tobiasfunkemd

        Yeah, that overhead A/C control unit between the front and middle row passengers really was fantastically futuristic but quite problematic. We regularly bricked new batteries on vacations to Las Vegas due to the power draw acting in concert with some wiring harness gremlins that never really got fixed. We ended up having to do repairs on vacation in LV for two consecutive summers, damning the vehicle in the eyes of my mother.

      • 0 avatar
        Shiny Things

        Struts and mounts were often a misdiagnosis when all one needed was front sway bar bushings.

        Change the bushings (12$ each?), and noise gone.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    Here’s an Estima with limo seating:
    http://japaneseclassics.com/vehicle/1990-toyota-estima/

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    I owned three of them, all ’94 or ’95 model S/Cs (supercharged 2TZ-FZE motor). The NA motor is the 2TZ-FE. Ours all had Quad Seating, like the setup pictured here (except that the seats switched to conventional head restraints for ’94 and later models). Two buckets that recline, and can swivel 180 degrees. The thing that my kids still miss is the way the seats reclined – the pivot point between the cushion and the backrest allows the buckets to go almost flat, and the third (split) seat to recline completely flat. The seats in our Sienna won’t do that, since the pivot points were chosen with folding in mind, not reclining.

    My guesses as to why this one’s in the junkyard? A blown head gasket (fairly common after 150k), or since it’s an AllTrac, the transfer case went south (pretty expensive to fix/replace). Also, I’ll bet that the SADS (Separated Accessory Drive System) revolvers are shot, which will make the van vibrate and eventually rattle at idle, especially when the a/c compressor is running, due to its pulses, and rattle when driving.

    Previas will easily last 300,000 or 400,000 miles when properly cared for, and there’s a very active Yahoo group mailing list (which I’m still on).

  • avatar

    I dunno. There’s a lot of love for the Previa here and I don’t want to knock it, but I must be the only one that sees an unholy union between a suppository and a Ford Aerostar.

  • avatar
    kinsha

    I had a 1995 Previa supercharged alltrac for quite a few years. I loved that van! With the SC it seemed fast enough for me. These were really easy to work on. Remove the front passenger seat, and about 10 screws to open an access panel after you pulled the carpet back. Instant full access to the sideways fourbanger. The auto tranny in these is from the same one used in the lexus ls400. I remember how smooth the gear shift selecter was in these ( like butter ) Had a few problems with it over the years, but still plugging along when I sold it with about 200,000 on it.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      I don’t think any vehicle that has “remove front passenger seat” where others would have “open hood” qualifies as easy to work on. Livable, maybe, once you’ve done it a couple times, because the vehicle was so reliable.

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        You don’t have to remove the passenger seat and the large access cover that often – I only had it off on one of mine (the first one), just one time, to replace the cam cover gasket and the spark plugs/wires/cap/rotor. Spark plugs used by Toyota were Denso platinums, with a 120,000 change interval (I replaced with NGK Iridium IX plugs). The accessories (alternator, PS pump, water pump, a/c compressor, supercharger on S/C models) are under the hood.

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        Better to do a little bit of easy work to have great access to an engine, then to just open the hood and be struggling through the whole job due to the tight confines. As long as it’s not necessary for frequent, routine maintenance, anyway.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I love these things. Only Toyota could have come up with such a bizarre mechanical arrangement and have it end up being near-bulletproof. The styling inside and out was far ahead of its time. But for a family carrier the safety issues are real, and I wouldn’t drive one today even if I could find a perfect one.

  • avatar
    A09

    My uncle bought one of these new in 1990. He gave it to my father in 2003 when the 1988 Ford Aerostar quit. The odometer stopped counting around 233k miles and my parents kept it for another four years when the engine finally died. I would speculate the Previa lasted at least 260k miles between my uncle and father. The Previa was far superior to the other minivans in my family (Aerostar, Villager, T&C); it had tight construction, was much easier to drive and had the best styling. I called it “the bean”.

  • avatar
    Russycle

    I rented one of these(although not an All-Trac) for a looooong road trip once. Blew out a tire on a rock that was hidden in snow. Have to say it handled the blow out very calmly, no drama. As I recall the spare was mounted under the vehicle, which was kind of fun to unmount on a cold Christmas Eve.

    It was pretty slow, but most minivans were back then. If you weren’t in a hurry, it was a pretty good place to spend a couple thousand miles with your family.

  • avatar
    gespo04

    I audibly shouted “oh no!” upon seeing this beautiful Previa in the scrapper. Someone save it!

  • avatar
    sckid213

    Did anyone watch the first video above? Aside from being a frighteningly accurate reminder of my childhood, it’s 8 minutes long and the production value is pretty high for what it is.

    Why TF would they produce something like this? Where would it be shown? It’s obviously consumer-oriented, so doesn’t look like something for dealers. It’s too long for a commercial, too short for an infomercial. Maybe on loop on a TV in some corner of the Toyota booth at the 1990 LA Auto Show? Such a bizarre piece of video production.

    Separately, there’s a tire shop on Sepulveda in Venice / Culver City area of LA that loans out a ’92 Previa as a “courtesy loaner.” My co-worker takes his car there just so he can borrow the Previa and re-live his childhood.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      My brother loans out his ’89 240k mile gen 1 MPV (rwd, 2.6 12V 4cyl, auto) with copious amounts of rust and clearcoat failure (it’s normally his parts runner) to any customers that want it… there’s a limited number of takers lol

  • avatar

    One of my favorite recurring features of TTAC. I don’t know if it because I am old enough to recall them new, or because I’m fascinated by how they aged. In any event, Murilee has the eye for the interesting chassis in the row of “crush me next”.

  • avatar
    gmialumnus

    My current ’97 SC has 356k miles and counting. I’ve had it since 100k and it’s never been to the shop. My prior ’93 NA gave similar service. Power is all relative. It compares favorably with cars from youth–air cooled VWs, 4-cyl Chevy II, 510s, Capris, etc. I rarely need to achieve zero throttling loss to keep up with traffic. It’s easy to drive; the SC provides a flat torque band.

    Its best virtue is space utilization. It’s much shorter and narrower than a new Sienna, yet has virtually the same cargo/seating space. A newer minivan would require me to shorten my workbench to fit in my garage (never!).

    The mid engine architecture enables nimble handling. And with my Addco rear sway bar, I actually look forward to the twisties (when my better half isn’t along for the ride!).

    Other virtues include decent mileage (22 mpg overall, mid 20s on the freeway), double DIN head slot to keep electronics modern, and old school stuff–mechanical throttle, hydraulic power steering, etc. Heck it even has directional wheels.

  • avatar
    kinsha

    Also forgot to add that Toyota making this mid engined achieved almost perfect 50/50 wieght distribution.

  • avatar
    macmcmacmac

    I remember we had a yellow Previa on the lot way back in 1992. The only thing I remember about it was that it had a built-in beverage, I mean, foodstuff cooler right next to the driver.

  • avatar
    laserwizard

    This was garbage when new and nothing has changed. Toyoduh thought it could get by bringing their home market garbage here until they developed their bloated non-mini-van thing they sell now.

  • avatar
    wantahertzdonut

    The guy that runs Lextreme.com has a UZ-FE V8 swapped into one of these. I’m sure he surprises a few people with it!

    That said I thought these were the ugliest things on the road, but I thought the same of the similar jelly bean shape of the 92-96 Camry. Now that they’re drying up I don’t find them so offensive.

  • avatar
    CaseyLE82

    We have three Previa minivans in our family.

    I have a 1991 that my mother bought in 1996. It has 225,500 miles on it. I drive it about once per week just because I like it and it’s different. The thing is BULLET proof and NOTHING is wrong with it.

    My mom has a 1994 that she bought in 2001 when she gave me the 1991 Previa. Hers is her daily driver and has been since 2001 and last time I drove it a few months ago it had 330,000 miles on it. She has no problems hopping into it and driving from her home in Northern California to Los Angeles and back.

    My sister loved the Previa and was jealous of mine so she purchased a 1992 a few years ago. Hers had 220,000 miles when she bought it and now has about 270,000. Her’s has had a few issues (fuel pump, air conditioner, window leak) but has otherwise been pretty good to her. She only paid $2,000 for it so I guess it’s to be expected.

    We love our Van’s and I’m ALWAYS in the market to pick up another Previa. I’m actually in talks with a guy who has a beautiful 1994 White Previa with 160,000 miles. But he wants $3,850 and that just seems a little high for me.

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