By on April 6, 2016

viperacr

Jeremy writes:

I’m making about $60,000/year after taxes as a recent college grad and I’m still living with my parents. My expenses excluding student loans are minimal, and those loans are small enough that I should have them paid off this year.

I want to buy a car with limits far beyond mine and try not to kill myself with it. I’ve settled on the Dodge Viper ACR.

This is where you come in: I need you to talk me out of it.

Normally I’d wait a couple of years to get a really nice down payment together and consider buying used, but since Dodge is ending orders for the Viper next year I don’t have time to get a lot of money together.

Over the course of a 48-month loan, the payment alone would eat a full paycheck each month, excluding the cost of storing the car (no space at my parents’ house), insurance (I can’t even get any companies to give me a quote for a policy online), and consumables (fuel isn’t a big deal now, but what about in two years?). I figure all-in I’d spend about $4,000 per month, leaving me about $1,000 each month to live on. It’s doable, but tough even with my low-cost living.

This probably wouldn’t be enough dough for me to live on by myself, so I’d still be at home while paying off the loan. I don’t think my parents would be too enthused with me buying a six-figure car while living at home.

I’ve looked at alternatives like the Corvette Z06 and Ford Shelby GT350R, but the Z06’s engine issues give me pause and the GT350R doesn’t look “set 12 production car lap records” good.

So this is where I stand: I have a large number of relevant and important reasons not to handicap myself at the beginning of my adult life. On the other hand, to hell with Baruth’s disapproval — I can buy a car with six-point harnesses from the factory and put a tag on it. Basically racecar. No, fuck racecar — ‘MURICA!

Please help convince me this is a terrible idea and I should buy this low-mileage Mazdaspeed Miata I’ve been looking at on Craigslist instead.

This is a terrible idea, and you should buy that low-mileage Mazdaspeed Miata that you’ve been looking at on Craigslist instead. Are we good?

Okay, seriously, let’s get into why this is such an awful, terrible, no-good, very bad idea.

First of all, the very notion that you think it’s okay to mooch off of your parents while you make $60,000 post-tax is downright offensive. Seriously. As a parent myself, I’m personally offended. If my son or daughter ever came to me with such an abhorrent idea, I’d break all sorts of corporal punishment laws on his or her ass.

Look, I get that you’re a car enthusiast. So am I. And if I could convince my dad to let me come live above his garage at his retirement home in Hilton Head, SC, I bring home enough money to buy a McLaren 675LT. But I wouldn’t do that, because I’m a grown fucking man. And, like it or not, so are you.

So, here’s what you should do with your $5,000 monthly take-home pay:

  1. Move out from your parents’ house into a nice, upscale apartment for about $1200/month.
  2. Allocate about $400/month for groceries, and another $400/month for utilities.
  3. Get some silk sheets.
  4. Download Tinder.
  5. Spend lots of money on alcohol and dating. Get laid as much as possible. You’re only young and single once.
  6. Give yourself about $900/month to spend on a car, including insurance.
  7. Save a grand each month since an H-1B worker who lied about his certifications on his application will replace you at your tech job.

You can buy a lot of car for $900/month. Like, a lot of car. Don’t act like the choices are a Viper or a clapped-out Mazdaspeed Miata with shitty gear ratios. Here’s a list of all sorts of wonderful cars you could be standing in front of in your Tinder profile pic for $900:

  • New Mustang GT/Camaro SS
  • New Audi S4
  • New Dodge Charger SRT 392
  • New Nissan 370Z NISMO
  • New Subaru WRX STI
  • New BMW M235i
  • Used Aston Martin (JUST KIDDING)

American muscle, JDM l33tness, European sensibility. Take your pick. Any and all of these cars are fast enough to make you soil yourself on a track, will pull immense amounts of action, and wouldn’t make you a douche who lets his parents pay for his existence.

Let’s be honest: you can’t drive a Viper ACR around a track any faster than you can drive any of the above. In fact, I could probably get in my Fiesta ST and beat your ACR-driving ass around a track. So stop it. Seriously.

Congrats on the good gig. You deserve a nice car. But it should be a car you can actually afford. Move out from mommy’s basement. Go be a man. And if you think I’m being hard on you, just wait until you read the comments.

Want Bark to yell at you, too? Then email him at [email protected] or troll him on Twitter. He’s got his Dad voice ready to go. He also can offer you sensible car buying advice. 

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195 Comments on “Ask Bark: Living In Mom’s Basement with a Viper ACR...”


  • avatar
    Tomifobia

    “I’m making about $60,000/year after taxes as a recent college grad and I’m still living with my parents.” And that’s where you crashed and burned. Get out and grow up.

  • avatar
    CaptainObvious

    Not to mention the balls to even ask the question in the first place.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    Are we sure this isn’t 5 days late?

    • 0 avatar

      I’m pretty sure it is.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      This is is what a well-funded Millennial looks like. Fascinating specimen isn’t it?


      My parents would have kicked my ass out the day I got my first paycheck. This kid is a joke.

      • 0 avatar

        I had a happy home life with my parents. When I got a paying job I moved out on my own…they didn’t have to boot me out. It was just the natural order of things, and while mom was sad, she was also proud.

        I second the chase women and party comment….you’ll be old, you’ll have a mortgage and critters, and you’ll look back fondly on that crazy weekend, or the beach house share, or the ski house, or, or, or. Those things might even help you find “the one”, or in the alternate, learn what doesn’t work…but the process can still be a blast !!

        Spend the money traveling. Go to Europe. Drive the Autobahn. Dive a coral reef before they are all destroyed by global warming. Navigate the Tokyo subway system. Your only ball and chain now is a job, which, if it your only thing, is actually not so much, no matter how you feel now.

        Your deathbed quote should be “I spent a fortune on wine, women and song…the rest, I just wasted”.

        Buy a used vette, it will have enough power to scare you, or spend some money at a Driving School, where the instructor will show you 11/10, 12/10, and beyond.

        A female will care way more about your own Apt, than about a fast car…I hate to stereotype, but they will only care if it is a big 3 German brand name or equivalent. (koff $$$$ koff)

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          I was at home though college and paid my share of expenses. When I got my first stable full time job I bought a new truck and started looking for a house to buy. I was in my own home a year after graduating. The truck I kept for `15 years but over that same timespan went through dirtbikes and street bikes.

          My advice is to look for a home to buy especially if rent is comparable. Get a few room-mates and they can pay part of the tab.

          Have fun but keep an eye on your future. You’ll wake up one morning wondering where the f^ck the last 30 years have gone.

          I can guarantee you that an ACR isn’t going to be rewarding in the intermediate or long term.

        • 0 avatar
          Drew8MR

          90% of girls couldn’t care less about your car. Hell, most of them don’t give a shit about THEIR own damn car.

      • 0 avatar
        MeJ

        My how times have changed….
        When I was young I couldn’t wait to move out of my parents’ house.
        I remember having it out with m Dad and he told me out!
        No problem. I worked and found a cheap little apartment at 17.
        I’ve lived on my own since never once living with my parents again.
        Honestly, this “Millennial” generation is pathetic. I would have been embarrassed as hell (as would any of my friends my age) to be living at home anywhere near the age of 19-20.
        But today they leech off their parents into their 30’s!
        I guess they all figure they’ll invent the next Facebook and everything will work out fine. Trouble is, that really isn’t going to happen…

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          It is disappointing generally, and I don’t like being a part of this generation. I lived with my parents for four months after finishing college (summer 08, dandy job finding time), was gone a year working overseas, then came back and lived there five months til I got a job. After that, I had an apartment within a couple of weeks.

          They weren’t even pressuring me to move out – but the high school level nagging doesn’t work for me.

          • 0 avatar

            It started before the millenials. The current trend seemed to start in the 80’s when housing prices made dramatic increases. Lot’s of Gen Xer’s I knew lived way to long ( some into their 30’s) with their parents. I stayed a year after trade school. I basically just slept there, I was never home and hardly ever saw my parents. After that I used the savings from staying there to buy my house.

  • avatar
    Quentin

    Are used Vipers not available or asking more than new? As I understand it, the Vipers are selling terrible right now. That should mean that the used prices would be depressed even though the Viper is going away.

    My advice: you probably aren’t as good of a driver as you think you are. I’m certainly not. Get something revvy, RWD, 4 cyl, and get to the track. With a Viper, you will instantly get depressed that you are only allowed to go so fast on the main road with it.

    • 0 avatar

      There are a ton of used Vipers on Autotrader, many with only a few thousand miles. If he really wants one, he could probably find a used one for significantly less, especially if he’s willing to get an older one.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Which Baruth wrote this again?

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    You want to buy that Viper? I have one suggestion: put it up on blocks and store it immediately. Don’t drive it any farther than needed to get that thing under cover, protected and insured. It’s going to be worth far more as an investment than as a daily driver and your chances of surviving to old age will be much greater. You want a daily driver? Buy a CPO Tesla.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      So loose money and not get to drive the car, sounds like a grand plan. The reality is that it takes some people driving them and destroying them to thin the herd enough to make the remaining examples appreciated in anything but the really really long term. Take a look at the asking prices for all those GNX and various Corvettes that were “guaranteed to appreciate as collectables”. People payed lots of money to store them for 10-20 years or more while not driving them only to find out they depreciated, not appreciated. Why because so many people stored them meaning that the supply far exceeds the demand.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        The problem with your argument Scoutdude is that the Corvette is still in production and GM is unlikely to ever stop production simply because it is an iconic car for them. With this being the last year of the Viper…perhaps forever… its value can ONLY go up. Sure, there may be some short term depreciation, but once it becomes obvious there won’t be another re-start of the model, any remaining will suddenly appreciate and one with almost no mileage will be worth far more than a high-mileage version.

        • 0 avatar
          notwhoithink

          Sure those vipers will appreciate. Unless Dodge/FCA decide to make more of them one day in the future. They already ended production on them once. They even sold a very rare series of 50 Viper SRT10 “Final Edition” cars. Then three years later they were back in the market.

          The only time buying a car as an investment works is if there is a TON of demand for it and very limited supply. Buying something that has excess supply and very limited demand now and hoping that in 20 years it will be worth twice as much is a fool’s mission. You’d make more money investing it in an index fund.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            “The only time buying a car as an investment works is if there is a TON of demand for it and very limited supply. Buying something that has excess supply and very limited demand now and hoping that in 20 years it will be worth twice as much is a fool’s mission. You’d make more money investing it in an index fund.”

            Or Apple?
            Or Tesla?

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          No they won’t go up because every other yahoo will “put one away” for a number of years and there will be a ton of unused cars out there for sale. Sure they will ask high prices but they won’t get it.

  • avatar
    rev0lver

    Dear Jeremy,

    You are the reason people hate millennials.

    Sincerely,
    The real world

  • avatar
    balreadysaid

    Hahaha!

    Sharp learning curve in that choice. Better off with a 70’$ vette 4 spd. Once you total that then you graduate to a viper…

  • avatar

    “Give yourself about $900/month to spend on a car, including insurance.”

    I realize a lot of this article is tongue and cheek, and I’ll probably get crucified on a car forum for saying this, but I’m thinking a young guy making 60k a year ought to shoot for $300-400/month total for a car and sock away a big chunk of the rest of his pay into investments. I mean, have fun, but recognize that most of the advice in this article is better suited for the financial realities of a 20-something in the 70’s, not 2016.

    Max those investments now. It’ll only take some pressure off you later.

    • 0 avatar
      ExPatBrit

      If he isn’t 25 years old any sports car insurance is going to be at least $300 a month. That’s assuming he is not planning on being on his parents policy.

      If he were my kid, I would book a long vacation and change the locks.

      • 0 avatar
        David Walton

        I pay $325 / mo to insure my sole car (2015 911 GT3); I’m 27 with zero at fault accidents and 1 minor ticket (6 years ago). Coverage limits are $500K/$1MM/$500K with a $2MM umbrella.

        I’m sure Geico or someone else who advertises on TV will write him.

        • 0 avatar
          Cactuar

          Sometimes you see something that defies convention so much that you’ve got to look into it. I’ve got to ask: a 27 year old with a new 911 GT3 – how is that possible?

          • 0 avatar

            It’s real and it’s spectacular.

            jalopnik.com/yes-you-can-do-your-first-track-day-in-a-supercar-1725137313

          • 0 avatar
            David Walton

            I’m typing on a phone so I’ll be brief. I’ve written about most of it in articles on this site.

            Went to an elite liberal arts school on a merit scholarship, so no student loans.

            Worked as an investment banker in Atlanta for an NYC-based firm (NYC pay with ATL COL). Then moved to a local bank and got paid well. Moved to Chicago last November for a promotion and substantial pay bump with a third bank.

            Financed 1996 Porsche 911 in 2012; paid $28.9k, drove for 3 years and sold it for mid $40s in May 2015. I paid it off just before I sold it.

            Paid cash for 2007 GT3 in April 2014; $79.5k, which was a bargain. 16 year old girl failed to yield and I hit her in an intersection in May 2015 (right after I sold the 993). The car appreciated and I got paid out $118k for it.

            I test drove a few cars, including a 991 GT3.

            I paid cash for a 2015 GT3 last summer. Left it in ATL for the winter – have 2 good, trustworthy friends who are young Porsche owners who’ve stored it for me and driven it a few times a month to maintain the battery – and plan to bring it to Chicago soon.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Stocks/money jobs.

          • 0 avatar
            Cactuar

            That’s fantastic, congrats on your success!

        • 0 avatar
          Chan

          Geez that is eye-watering.

          Our three cars combined add up to just under the worth of your GT3, but our total insurance for two drivers in California is less than yours.

          • 0 avatar
            David Walton

            Makes sense to me:

            I’m 27 and my ONLY means of automotive transport is a ~$150k car that will run the quarter mile in the same elapsed time as genuine supercars of a decade ago.

            It’s unlikely that your three cars would be damaged simultaneously in an accident on the road.

            I have very high coverage limits with a high quality carrier; IMO buying insurance from any company that advertises on TV is a poor decision.

    • 0 avatar
      Driver8

      Yeah this. Never, ever discount the value of having F.U. money.

    • 0 avatar

      Nicely done, David.

      Here in the Atlanta market, I’ve found Auto Owners to be pretty good. Though to be fair, I’m picky and limit my carriers to those with good consumer satisfaction ratings.

      • 0 avatar
        Snavehtrebor

        So, just to be clear DW, that’s three different jobs your first 5 years out of school?

        • 0 avatar
          David Walton

          More accurate to say very similar jobs, 3 employers in 5 years. That is the norm for high finance roles in general, but in particular for younger workers. Moving around allows you to interact with and encounter more people, plus the labor market is volatile.

          I know a girl who’s 7 years out of undergrad and has had 5 employers. We’ve been co-workers twice.

          • 0 avatar
            Snavehtrebor

            You clearly have this whole employment game figured out, so good luck Encountering All the People in your industry. Wonder what’s making the labor market so volatile…

          • 0 avatar
            NetGenHoon

            RE: Labor market volatility, the only real raise you’ll get is changing to a different employer.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Unfortunately, you are correct. Still on job three after eleven years in the industry (four and twelve if you count my internship).

    • 0 avatar
      DrGastro997

      Insurance can be a definite deal breaker on a super sports car. At just under 30, I was paying $397 a month for a 911 Turbo. Now at 40, I am paying $297 a month for my daily driver 911 S. I guess older the better in some aspects.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        It doesn’t have to be though. I’m 31 and pay ~$130/month to a company I trust for 500K/500K/500K on a 2013 Viper (and no, I don’t live with my parents). Multi-car/house discounts and clean driving record make a huge difference.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    This was good. Really, it was. I was sort of depressed about crashing the Golf SportWagen last week (it’s being repaired), so I needed the laugh.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    Do you REALLY want to spend the next four years living in poverty in Mom’s basement for a car you have to DRIVE TO A STORAGE FACILITY to even access?

    I’m not exactly Don Juan (was a late bloomer, and now happily married 14 years), but I’m pretty sure that “Well yeah, I actually OWN a Dodge Viper but you can’t see it just yet because I can’t park it in the driveway in front of Mom’s basement” will only be a successful pickup line if she thinks you are making a joke.

    Growing a Pair and Making It On Your Own are about fifty times more important to your success in life than buying a car you can’t afford so you can infrequently fail drive it anywhere near the limits of something half the price.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Uh… Indeed, what are you thinking? Apparently you aren’t thinking at all. Grow up!

    1. GET OUT OF THE HOUSE… NOW! Yes, I’m shouting intentionally.

    There is no second option. Period.

  • avatar
    VenomV12

    I feel like this is a troll article. lol

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      It must be.

    • 0 avatar
      Trichobezoar

      I trollolol’d . But brilliant way of getting instant $100% approval to buy that used Mazdaspeed Miata.

      I’ve been prepping my wife for one for our upcoming midlife crises, and after a couple of years I’m finally to the point where I have her saying stuff like “yeah, it’ll be safer for our kids because they can’t take as many passengers to goad them into doing stupid stuff”.

  • avatar
    tresmonos

    Obvious troll is obvious

  • avatar
    David Walton

    Jeremy,

    Perhaps I’m old and out of touch – I turned 27 last Friday, so I’m about 5 years out of college, but please bear with me.

    I can understand the desire to have a badass, swag automobile at a young age, and I’ve had three performance cars over the past 4 years myself. What I cannot understand is your interest in owning one and living at home. That’s shameful, and I am embarrassed for you and your parents.

  • avatar
    bachewy

    Several reasons not to buy this car:
    1. It’s a Dodge, and the value declines rapidly.
    2. You need to work up to this level of performance.
    3. You’re a grown a$$ man, get out of your parent’s house.
    4. Leaving yourself with $1k a month for living expenses leaves very little room for upgrades and especially for repairs to a high end car like that.
    5. Insurance – HAHAHAHAHAHA
    6. Ticket magnet.

    • 0 avatar
      baconator

      I’m envious of this guy’s relationship with his parents. I ran away from home when i was 16 and never went back.

      Having said that, Mr. OP, this is a *horrible* idea. Here’s why: Car-wise, if you start at Viper-level performance, there’s nowhere to go but down. There is immense satisfaction in driving a slow car fast on a track. There is also immense pleasure in strapping yourself into a very fast car after you’ve honed your driving skills in slow cars. If you start with a Viper, you’re depriving yourself of lots of pleasure in the future for one speedball hit now.

      Go buy yourself an E36 M3 ($6k), or even splash out $20k for an E46 M3 or C6 Corvette. These cars are more than fast enough to get you in trouble on a racetrack.

      Live with your parents if that’s okay with you and bank the extra $2k/month. You’ll need that money later, believe me. Once you have more savings and a house – ideally, enough passive income to pay for the monthly payment on your Viper – *and* you’re consistently in the A run group at your local track day, then spend $100k on a car that wants to kill you.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Corvette or a Mustang is a much better buy and probably easier to offload. Viper from the little I know about it, is essentially a specialty car with a limited audience. MY13s are still trading between 47K and 86K, in contrast a MY13 Corvette C6 Coupe LT2 low to mid 30s (Most Vipers are under 10K miles though while the Vettes are being driven).

  • avatar
    jdmcomp

    That is what I call Barking up the wrong tree.

  • avatar
    notapreppie

    Mother. Of. God.

    Get your freaking priorities in order.

  • avatar
    01 Deville

    All good advice.

    It might not be your situation, but sometimes I want to do something totally stupid for the heck of it. Try something small that won’t keep you in poverty long term. Maybe a used 911?

    Many replies will presume that impressing fair sex is a factor, but in case it isn’t, my financial advice would be to stick with parents for four years and then buy your own place cash.

    Best of luck with whatever you do, but don’t sign away next four years at the first whiff of real cash.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      If one were to continue living at home while making that kind of money then I agree the only acceptable reason would be to pay of the student loans and amass the cash to either buy a house outright or at least a substantial down payment on one.

      Seriously the average person’s largest expense is usually housing and having a place to live free and clear would mean that you’ll have money to buy those crazy toys for the rest of your life. Or at the least be insulated from job loss as you can get by on not much if your housing costs are only taxes, insurance and utilities.

      Actually the smarter thing is to buy a duplex with enough money down that the person renting the other half pays the mortgage, taxes and insurance for the entire building. Then save up some more cash so that you can put a substantial down payment on a nice single family home. Then let that second renter in the duplex pay for your primary residence.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      This. You can get a good used 911, maybe an early 997 for around $30k, maybe $35k after taxes. With good credit, that’s under $600 a month on a 5 year loan. It’s still too much car for him, and probably not a great financial decision because expensive consumables like brakes and tires are probably due soon, but it’s a hell of a lot smarter than a new goddamn viper.

  • avatar

    GET AN APARTMENT AND GET OUT OF YOUR MOM’S BASEMENT.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    1. Move out
    2. Buy a simple but sporty vehicle with cash
    3. Invest steadily in simple index funds

  • avatar
    Upthewazzu

    I don’t normally tell people what to do with their lives, but I have to make an exception for this one. Dude, priority #1 should be to get the hell out of mommy and daddy’s house. Geez, I can’t believe that even needs to be said. If you’re absolutely dead set on staying there for a year, then every last penny should be going into a savings account for a down payment on a house. The rest if gravy, who cares. GET OUT OF MOM AND DAD’S HOUSE NOW.

  • avatar
    VW16v

    Is Jeremy related to BTSR? He often talks about purchasing things people can’t afford to live the life of one that has a life.

    • 0 avatar

      BTSR is wealthy.

      Cars are small potatoes to BTSR.

      He hasn’t lived with his parents since he was 20.

      • 0 avatar
        VW16v

        Na, was not personally talking about you BTSR. Was speaking to your points of people buying over their salary or lack of salary. Only to have the autos taken back by the lender. This little troll tool with the Viper seems like a great example.

      • 0 avatar
        SayHiToYourMom

        You don’t know what wealth is. I have clients who make $70,000 a month – they aren’t wealthy – you certainly aren’t. Wealthy people don’t have to work, and their kids don’t have to work, and their grandchildren never have to work, or worry about paying for college. You aren’t even rich – you gross under $250,000 a year – that doesn’t even make you a 1%er, let alone rich.

        Furthermore, it’s gauche to brag about your money. It’s sad when someone does it and they drive a Dodge :(

  • avatar
    Quentin

    Is the homeless caddy from Happy Gilmore going to steal the wing off that viper?

  • avatar
    JimZ

    “Download Tinder.
    Spend lots of money on alcohol and dating. Get laid as much as possible. You’re only young and single once.”

    that takes a lot more than Tinder and money.

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    Yous guys is a-holes. The guy wants to kill himself financially and physically. What right do you have to interfere? Who made you the Gods that choose who gets deleted from our combined gene pool? He must buy the Viper. Just take my advise, feller: the Viper has paint and plastic parts that will deteriorate in the sun. Therefore, while you intention to garage the car is admirable, you should also plan to not drive it on sunny days. Any time there is a rain cloud, or even better a snow cloud, take the Viper for a spin. Make sure you experience the DRIFT. Thank you.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      let me explain to you how this works. young guy comes in and asks us (the older and wiser) for advice. We offer the sensible way to go. Then he’s supposed to *ignore* the advice we give and do what he wants anyway, while we point and laugh from afar.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        Absolutely priceless!

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        “let me explain to you how this works.”

        You left out the part where he ignores all the sage advice, learns the hard way and, perhaps, picks up a few cool stories to tell his grandkids (assuming he gets that far).

        Jeremy: Most of this is good advice. I would suggest that you explore the 80% rule: look for the sweet spot on the curve where you get 80% of the experience for 40% of the price. The most important part? Don’t let anyone talk you out of experiencing joy. Life is short, there will be many, many days of grinding purpose. Make sure they are not all like that. But, definitely, move out of your Mom’s house. That part I really agree with.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          “cool stories” don’t get you through life.

          in my experience, the “Cool stories” my elders have told me have been mostly useless bullsh*t, if not outright lies. the “good parts” get embellished and the bad parts get glossed over or ignored entirely.

          I clearly remember (when I was a kid) my grandfather bitching about how terrible kids were these days, because all they did was hang out and play video games. then later, when I was in my teens, I overheard stories about my grandfather and his peers working in coal mines, where they’d grab stray cats, dunk them in water, and toss them on the electrified rails. So me and my friends were awful because we played video games instead of murdering cats.

          It was at that moment I realized adults were just as full of sh*t as everyone else. so don’t try to dump that nonsense on me.

          • 0 avatar
            bunkie

            I really do feel sorry for you. Maybe I was lucky, but in my life, I’ve been surrounded by people who did interesting things, took chances and, in summary, really enjoyed their lives. I do my best to be like them. I speak four languages, learned to fly an airplane in my late fifties, rode a motorcycle across the country, chased a woman I loved halfway around the world, went to school in a different country, sang lead in a rock band, burned through an inheritance, co-owned a recording studio, taught myself woodworking and guitar, ran my own software company, wrote a column for a very high-end technical journal, re-booted my career in my mid-40s becoming an expert in banking IT, appeared on Jeopardy, I could go on. Life is so much more than bitching about other peoples choices in life on the Internet. TTAC is a bit of dark attraction for me as, when I think about it, is peopled with an awful lot of judgmental folks (not all, but quite a few) who get pleasure from looking down on other people, often using the most crass stereotypes. I find it ironic that so many of these folks are telling a young person to “grow up”. You, I’m certain will decide that I”m full of sh**, if so, good for you for missing the point.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            My grandpa had those stories, life events like that. They never had any “advice” aspect, just a “Listen what happened to me!” one.

            Highlights:
            -Argued with Jane Fonda in the woods in Indiana.
            -Had a long conversation with barely-famous Dolly Parton on a cruise.
            -Went gambling in Las Vegas with old Conrad Hilton.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “I really do feel sorry for you.”

            I’m not asking for your pity, so save it.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @JimZ – quote of the day.

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    Really enjoyed this article.
    I like when we get away from the reporting of already reported auto news.
    And the replies were awesome….

    A little harsh…but great.

    Stay with the hot hatches as they will provide the fun as well as the required cargo the early constant movings will demand.

  • avatar
    06V66speed

    My ex-wife used to tell me that it was OK for Italians to live with their parents well into adulthood, because it’s what Italian folks do. Lol That “its part of their culture”. (What a load of horse sh*t, and no offense to those Italian members of the B&B.)

    But yes, yes. Seriously though. It don’t matter what kind of car you drive and how many ladies you can get in said vehicle.

    Because once you bring them home to your super sweet room in Mom’s basement, game’s over son. I quote Pink (and no, I’m not a fan): “It’s just you and your hand tonight”.

    (Furthermore, if you do happen to be successful in getting one of those ladies in that awesome room of yours, be sure to tell her to keep it down when you are all participating in certain “adult activities”, as you don’t want Mommy to hear such nonsense. Lmao)

    Grow up, boy! Lol

    If you can earn a grown man’s paycheck, you can pay *your own* grown man’s bills, shelter being one of such. It’s part of life, donchaknow.

    And oh yeah, by the way… you remind me of my stepson. You see, HE lives in my basement.

    He is also eleven.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “kicking the kids out at 18” is a uniquely Post-WWII America mindset. and that only worked when unskilled, decent paying jobs were plentiful. but, I’m sorry to say, it’s not 1960 anymore.

      many other cultures will have multiple generations living under one roof.

      • 0 avatar
        suspekt

        amen

      • 0 avatar
        DevilsRotary86

        The 50’s and 60’s really did spoil us didn’t they? I do believe that life is supposed to be a bit of a struggle, and it shouldn’t be easy. If the economy is so good that an unskilled worker can afford a home, wife, kids, and 2 cars on one income before 25 then maybe times are too good and a correction is coming. I think we are in the middle of that correction right now.

        I suspect that the 21st century will look a little bit like the late 19th century for most Americans.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        Uniquely postwar, and often urban too. My closest friends have chosen ag-related fields of work (no pun intended), and both still live with their parents.

      • 0 avatar
        06V66speed

        I have no problems financially helping my children when they are young adults. Hell, even when they are older. Because IMHO it’s just what parents do. It’s a lifelong commitment to help your kids.

        That being said, if you’re an adult, I’m not giving you money and supporting you while you live in my basement, eat my food, watch my cable, put your dirty ass shoes up on my furniture, use my soap and sh*t in my toilets. Why, you ask? Because you’ve been doing exactly that for the past 18, 19, or 20 years. Thus, it’s time for you to spread your little wings and give me some dammed space. It’s time for my break.

        Please, please, come to the family dinners. Holidays. Bring the grandkids *anytime*.

        But when the event, holiday, etc., is over… time for you to go. :) See you next time.

        You’re a big boy/girl. You get your own place. I’ll be more then happy to send a check to you (if you need it).

        My days of putting a roof over your head are over. But I will be more than happy to help you keep YOUR roof over YOUR head. Because I don’t want your ass moving back home. Tough love… which, in 2016, seems to be falling by the wayside. And you can blame the “gubmint”, job situation, Obama, China, and whatever sort of rather convenient economical factors to help you arrive at this “times aren’t like they used to be” /I’m a Millenial who needs endless help determination. I don’t want a bunch of needy, mooching adult children that claim they can’t find their own place to stay.

        We need independent, hard-working young adults. Who will strive for their own independence.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @JimZ – true but multiple generations under one roof isn’t for the expressed point of buying a super car.

        With that being said:

        I don’t have a problem with my sons staying at home until they are established is education and/or career. That is my current job in life; get them ready for theirs.

  • avatar
    RHD

    Being young means making dumb decisions and learning from them. Buying a new Viper would be one of those dumb decisions.
    First priority would be to pay off all your loans and be debt-free. That will make you feel very good, 24 hours a day.
    Second, save up a year’s salary, which is called the Eff You Fund (tip of the hat to Tom here). You will need that money if you ever can’t stand your job for another minute.
    Third, seriously consider a vasectomy. I’m not being rude to you – one of life’s great pitfalls is that phone call: “Honey, guess what? We’re pregnant!” If you ever get that call you can ask her who the real father is. (Best done at the dinner table with her parents).

    So now you’re debt free, have a year’s salary in the bank and no dependents, you can do whatever on this Earth you feel would make you happy. Travel, invest, buy a house, get a Viper, or maybe an original Shelby, whatever you want, maybe even move up to the ground floor somewhere.

  • avatar
    DevilsRotary86

    I guess I am the odd man out here. If him and his parents are OK with him living there then I see no problem with it. I assume that they have an arrangement set up that all are happy with. For my family, my daughter is free to live with us as long as she likes. Of course, when she is an adult I would expect her to cover her share of expenses and to contribute to the maintenance and upkeep of the home. I have no problem whatsoever with the idea of multiple generations under one roof working together to ensure the health and prosperity of the whole family.

    Back to the subject of cars, I do agree that the Viper is a little much.

    • 0 avatar
      Chan

      The author doesn’t seem like he is paying for his adult share of occupying his parents’ house. I suspect that is how he justifies the Viper.

      • 0 avatar
        DevilsRotary86

        True, I guess I am more objecting to the attitude of “you live with family, so you must be a loser”. It’s one aspect of our society that I find to be insane.

        And even if he did live with his family and doesn’t pay for expenses, it’s not really my call. If his parents are happy with it then OK. I mean, I wouldn’t be fine with it personally but I am not them. As a rule, I judge other people as little as possible.

        • 0 avatar
          Quentin

          I have no beef with the kids staying with the parents for some period after getting their real job. It gives the kid a chance to save some money before going out on their own. Having the kid pay rent to the parents, with the parents giving it back to the kid to support a down payment on a house when they do move out, is a good way to teach them budgeting without putting them in the hole immediately once they have a chance to get ahead a bit.

          • 0 avatar

            I think living at home as a young adult for a while so you can save money to buy a house is great, as long as your parents are OK with it.

            I think living at home as a young adult for a while so you can buy a really expensive sports car is a horrible idea.

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      My wife lived with her parents for ~2-3 years after she graduated and had a good job. She didn’t contribute a dime to them financially (they don’t need it) and neither she nor they saw any good reason for her to go get an apartment and live on her own just to say she did. She moved out when she and I moved in together when we got married. OTOH, she bought a Jeep Liberty, not a Viper, and banked a lot of cash, so there is that.

      I might rip on a guy for living with his parents, but when it comes down to it, I have no rational reason for why he shouldn’t. I wanted to live on my own desperately, but if he doesn’t, there really isn’t any good reason to until he’s ready to start his own family.

      • 0 avatar
        DevilsRotary86

        The arrangement is certainly not for everyone. I say that my daughter is welcome in my home for as long as she likes, but other families are different and that’s OK. I moved out early, and I am glad that I did. I won’t go into reasons why; in fact I may have put a toe slightly across the line even hinting at it publicly. I will just say that I want to provide the most welcoming home possible for my family that I can.

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      I agree 1000%.
      And this new way of implying anybody who lives with a parent is afraid or unable or sponging or late blooming is horrible.

      The really good families support each other and understand this support.

      The modern way of leaving home and eventually leaving your parents to care and survive for themselves is what resulted in the elderly being abandoned and why child care is so difficult today.
      This is why we have babies being dropped off at childcare centers before they should and even when ill. This is why the children know the childcare centers as moms more so than the real mom or grandparent.

      We shouldn’t kiss off this as the old, bad ways.

      It is a terrific luxury to have grandparents around to help raise and care for children.
      And the elderly would be better off as knowledge and care givers than left alone in retirement homes.

      The modern self sustaining adult is nonsense.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      I lived at home for a few years after school. I didn’t pay rent, my folks certainly didn’t need the money. My brother and SiL currently live with my Mom. I have a little more of a problem with that given he is 39 and she is 41, but it is Mom’s decision, not mine. My Mom moved back in with my Grandparents when she was in her mid-50s, though that was mostly to take care of them, not because she couldn’t make it on her own. Family living together is no big thing.

      I think the Viper is a little silly, but the time to do silly things is when you are young. So go for it, get it out of your system.

  • avatar
    KevinB

    Forget the silk sheets. You can’t get any traction with them.

  • avatar
    everybodyhatesscott

    If you want to maximize your tinder experience, get a motorcycle. Show up to said dates on motorcycle. Now all you have to do is not talk too much. After 15-30 minutes of not talking too much say “have you ever been on a motorcycle?” When she says ‘no’ say “Lets go back to my house and grab a helmet for you and go for a ride”

    If you can’t figure it out from there, I’m not sure I can help you.

    • 0 avatar
      06V66speed

      I hope this “kid” is seeing this. Lol

      Sound advice for our bachelor-in-training.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      no, just please no. you ever see what utter a**holes 18-21 year old guys can be on motorcycles? We have too many reckless squids already.

      • 0 avatar
        everybodyhatesscott

        He’s making about 80k a year (that’s 60,500 approx after taxes) and he has almost paid off his student loans which suggests he’s gone to college. I’d say this ‘kid’ is at least 22-25 years old (Or a 45 year old Jack trolling his brother). Chicks dig risk takers (what’s riskier than a motorcycle) and you can get a decent bike for under 5k.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          still there are way too many inexperienced riders out there who think a high-powered literbike is great for their first ride. Didn’t you see Jack’s article from yesterday or the day before?

          • 0 avatar
            everybodyhatesscott

            I’ll agree with that. Do not buy a literbike as your first ride. Get a Used Ninja 250/300 or a Yamaha r3. It’s more than fast enough for a first bike and go used cause you’ll probably want something bigger within 2 years.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Well… I guess you don’t need any savings if you buy a Viper ACR as your first performance car, because you won’t live to use them.

    Financial issues aside, buy something within your limits or only slightly beyond them. If you’ve never had a real performance car, a Mustang GT is at the very far end of that spectrum, and buying anything more is just dumb.

  • avatar
    r plaut

    ” 5. Spend lots of money on alcohol and dating. Get laid as much as possible. You’re only young and single once.”

    Actually, you can be single more than once. It’s just really, really expensive.

    Question: Why are divorces so expensive?

    Answer: Because they’re worth it.

  • avatar
    Chan

    OK, forget the parents and the investments and “doing the right thing.” Forget the fact that the writer forgot to budget taxes, registration, insurance, track insurance, and consumables like fuel and those astronomically expensive PS Cup tires which will probably be $1200+ every 3-4 track days.

    Forget all of that and assume the writer has the $ for all of it. Now, here’s a slightly different perspective:

    You’re fresh out of college. The Viper will be fun for, say, 3 years. After that, your friends start buying houses and you’re flat broke because of the car.

    Your friends, I’m assuming they know you do well and what line of work you’re in. They ask you when you plan on getting your own place. What are you going to tell them?

    You pick up a nice girl and go on a date. Forget that women generally don’t like uncomfortable cars. Assume she tolerates your Viper and she wants to go serious. Actually forget about going serious. She just wants to check out your place, since you’re a nice gentleman with a solid career. Where’s your place?

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Meh, making decisions to “impress friends” is about as miserable and silly as spending every last dime of your disposable income on a car. Doing right by his parents and positioning himself to get laid are far more legitimate reasons not to go this route.

      • 0 avatar
        Chan

        Oh, I fully agree. His own parents are the first people a single guy should care about, and if you ever want to get serious with any desirable member of the opposite sex the Viper is still a terrible idea.

        In the unlikely case the author didn’t care about those things, then he would at least care what his friends think.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    When I was a kid, early teens or so in the late 90s, there was a guy on my friend’s block who had a Viper and lived with his mother. Even at ~15 we all knew his priorities were screwed and laughed every time we saw him. Don’t be that guy.

    And if you are going to literally spend your last $$$ on a car at least get something that will get you laid. A Viper ACR has all the sex appeal of a straight piped picnic table winged Miata, at ~50x the price. I’d suggest a 991 Carrera instead, but then for the purpose of getting laid a 1/4 price 997 will work just as well and actually be in your budget.

    But yea, if you have the means, for Christ’s sake man do right by your parents and move the hell out ASAP. An expensive car is not a priority.

  • avatar
    cbrworm

    1st. You should not buy a car that consumes 50% of your salary. Maybe your house could cost you 50%, but not your car.

    2nd. You do not buy an expensive car while living with your parents unless you are contributing significant money and labor to the household, which, if you were, you would not have enough money leftover to buy a Viper.

    3rd. You will look like an idiot to your parents, your boss, your friends, etc. They will form impressions about your decision making skills based on this one purchase.

    Your job could change at any moment (hopefully only for the better). Your housing situation could change at any moment(hopefully only for the better). I don’t know where you live, but 60K a year probably won’t go as far as you think it will. You should save what you can (while you can), buy a reasonably priced fun car and have some fun. You will have more fun living on your own with a decent car that you can take to the track.

    I would even recommend buying a slightly used car.

  • avatar
    suspekt

    It amazes me the cultural attitudes regarding living with parents.

    Many cultures, including my own, it is an honour and privilege to remain with your parents and take over the household. We are raised by OUR PARENTS to have this thinking and belief system and in many many ways it makes a lot of sense. It isnt about “living in the basement”, its about forging ahead with the family as one unit.

    I wont get into all of the pros and cons of this issue (as both sides of the issue have merit), but I think it is a fallacy to mock it.

    Now with respect to this post, I think the car is a mistake.

    Save the cash, and by real property first. Build a base of either real estate or other tangible assets that will appreciate and yield cash flow.

    After a few years, I would then go out and look at buying somegthing.

    The situation he is in can either set him up for life or lead to a lot of wasted cash on depreciating and ultimately useless toys.

    • 0 avatar
      DevilsRotary86

      Hear Hear! I agree entirely.

      We kick kids out of the home at 22 after college, expect them to find a job, assume a mortgage, and everything else “having your own place” entails and then wonder why they don’t start having kids until they are 35.

    • 0 avatar
      Chan

      And that’s fine, I think there are many ways to achieve and assert your own independence. In my culture this is also fairly common, provided that the parents actually have a place big enough to house multiple generations of nuclear families.

      We all agree that the author of the letter will not find anybody impressed by his choice of a depreciating toy to fulfill his life. The money should be spent on an affordable fun car (the “Slow Car Fast” school of thought says this would be even more fun than a Viper) and saving towards value-retaining property like housing. Whether he chooses to live with his parents is a separate issue from flushing good money down the toilet.

      Achieving and asserting your own independence, within your particular societal or cultural norm, are vital to long-term health. The Viper will ensure that he is still a “taker,” not a “giver,” well into his late-20s and early-30s.

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      Don’t much care which cultural he’s from; his momma might let drinking some beers around the house slide. His momma won’t put up with some hootchie woman in panties and his t-shirt poking around the kitchen early in the morning; momma will go ballistic if hootchie woman tries to make breakfast. Move out, get a life and learn to fix breakfast for the latest hootchie woman.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      I don’t have a problem with living with one’s parents or extended family. I have a problem with doing it more with the idea of getting a supercar.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I’ll play devil’s advocate here.

    If I had a kid making that kind of money, I’d go along with him living at home…for one (1) year, with the stipulations that 1) he pay me at least $1,500/mo as rent, and 2) pretty much ALL disposable income goes into a 401k or IRA. No partying, no fancy cars, no six brand new phones a year.

    Plus housework…yes, lots of that.

    Otherwise…

    No.
    F**king.
    Way.

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      I’m not sure what rent is in your area, but $1500/mo to live with mom and dad and they get to control my budget? No F’ing way. My mortgage on my first house (1700sq ft, 2 car garage) was less than that with basically nothing down. Unless this is a subtle way of saying that you won’t allow your kid to live with you, you’ve definitely offered them a deal they can and will refuse.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        “The deal they can and will refuse” is the point!

        Full disclosure: when I was that guy’s age, I did live with my parents. More accurately, I had a job where I traveled for probably 250 days a year, so I kind of flopped there on weekends. I did pay them rent, even though they didn’t need it.

  • avatar
    NoID

    Good night, when I was your age I had three kids and was renting a 1600 square foot house. Bear in mind, this wasn’t 30 years ago, I graduated college in 2012.

    Is this what we’ve come to? Seriously? I hope I’m being trolled. I hope we’re all being trolled. I can’t believe that this can be reflective of the level of man-childishness existant in the world today.

    But what do I have to complain about, I get to drive my dream cars on a regular basis and get paid for the priviledge.

  • avatar
    DanyloS

    1) Buy Viper or other “dream” car
    2) Move yourself and worldly possessions into storage unit*
    3) Winning: you get a place, get to live on a cot of futon next to your car

    *this depends on the legality of the area you are in on living in a storage unit. Consider a small warehouse in a more industrial part of town. You can rent additional space to other car owners and pretend you have a garagemahal

  • avatar
    balreadysaid

    Unless this dude can really manhandle a car the question isn’t valid. Like a gun shop owner selling an ar15 to a person with a swastika on his forehead. I doubt attaining the car would be much easier. He probably would end up with some sort of hell kitty anyway. More likely to be in stock..

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    If I was making $60k a year I certainly wouldn’t be living at home any more. I’d be living as far away from home as possible.

    As for cars, I wouldn’t mind a new orange Mustang GT…

  • avatar
    Nick_515

    Shallow imaginations. From Bark and B&B.

    What’s wrong with living with mom and dad?

    Hint: the majority of humanity does it, and so does a significant amount of NYC because the platitudes of the American Dream crash and burn at the realities of the real estate market. And guess what. Not everyone is concerned about “the personal offense” of Bark-who-cares. It CAN be nice.

  • avatar
    mustang462002

    *uck it. Buy it and live and learn. Worse case scenario you sell it at a loss of $40k. Sounds cheaper than a lot of people with underwater mortgages.

    All of you are assuming this guy is a tinder type. Probably a nerd with a passion for cars.

  • avatar
    98horn

    I’m going to have to disagree with Bark, here. Don’t move out and pay 1200/rent. Move out and buy a house, and get 2-4 roommates, pour all the money they pay in rent to paying down the principle. Pay it off as soon as possible. Avoid getting married as long as possible. Save 40-50% of your paycheck for 10 years. Live in a paid off house, with fat stack of cash. Then, and only then, buy what you want, because money is no longer a huge problem. Pouring all of your capital into a rapidly depreciating asset is worse than dumb. It means you won’t ever be able to afford the cool things that come down the pike as you age.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      That depends on the housing market, and if he has people he knows and would enjoy living with already lined up. If he were here in Canada, where housing prices are destined for a major correction, and if he doesn’t mind his situation I think he’d be better off staying home and contributing his fair share of the living expenses (taxes, utilities, etc.) instead of sharing walls, ceilings, and floors with annoying strangers in an apartment. But then, I’ve had more than enough experience with sluts in my lifetime and I think he’s better off just keeping an eye out for a decent girl. As long as he has a healthy and functional relationship with his parents, any decent girl isn’t going to care if he’s saving his money for a future home while reducing his parents’ financial burden.

      Either way, the whole Viper idea is ridiculous to the point of being unbelievable. I have noticed some great deals on C6 Z06’s though . . .

  • avatar
    Synchromesh

    Dear Bark M,

    I don’t mean to burst your bubble but where I live, this kid would be on the poverty line with a salary like that. Of course it’s all relative and in whatever Alabama you live in $60K is probably decent money but if he lived around here… Well, let’s take a look, shall we?

    1. you can hardly get a tiny room with 6-7 roommates in this city for $1200/month. IF you can even find it. Figure $2k/month on rent minimum. If you want to live closer to center where all the action/dating is – $3000/month is your starting point. You’re not in Kansas anymore

    2. $400/month for groceries and utils each should cover it but then if you want to eat out you’ll spend more

    3, 4, 5. Dating is a tremendous waste of time here (been there, done that) but if you MUST figure at least $100-150 per date. And I’m not talking Lady of the Evening but average night on the town to impress local ladies (which, again, is a major waste of time)

    6. I probably make more than you do and I drive a ’72 VW Beetle. Why? Because I get more thumbs up in it than another 35238433438th silver BMW. And because insurance is insane. And because you have to be an idiot to daily drive and park in this city in anything more expensive than $10K. Btw, the Beetle (which looks quite ghetto) got broken into twice in the last few months

    7. There are plenty of tech jobs around here as long as the applicant has brains. Doesn’t matter what his other language is ;)

    Now can you guess what city I live in? Should be quite simple. Of course I agree with you about the kid getting out of the house but honestly your car choices are atrocious.

    Charger, Mustang and Camaro make me want to puke. Sure, they’re fast but they’re ugly, bloated and very rednecky. Also, try parking one of these boats around here, I’ll come watch you do it.

    235 and S4 are lease fodder for a reason. Personally, I wouldn’t touch either with a 10 foot pole.

    370Z and STi are the only ones ok in my book. But anyone of these cars will cost thousands to insure for a driver like this kid. Why not point him towards a nice used car that won’t cost nearly as much to operate and insure?

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      If the Beetle gets broken into so often, why don’t you just leave it unlocked with nothing inside of value?

      • 0 avatar
        Synchromesh

        Sometimes they break in just to look. First time around they stole a roll of quarters in the glove compartment. Second time they stole all my tools which was sort of my fault as Beetle’s trunk lock is tricky and sometimes doesn’t lock properly unless reset. I think that was the case here, they just tried all doors and trunk opened. But the fact that there are people going around looking for unlocked doors in cars speaks for itself.

    • 0 avatar
      everybodyhatesscott

      He specifically says after taxes. If he lives in a state with no income tax, that’s about 80k pretax income or closer to 90k in NY or Calif (where I assume you live)

      If 90k isn’t enough to do ok in California as a single guy, I’m glad I don’t live there.

    • 0 avatar
      ItsMeMartin

      Why did you stop there, Synchromesh? Tell us more irrelevant details about your life that noone cares about!

    • 0 avatar

      Mount Laurel, New Jersey? I mean, that’s just a wild guess.

      • 0 avatar
        Synchromesh

        So close! San Francisco, CA. ;) Also, there are expensive places in Jersey? Shocker!

        To explain the long post, I was trying to apply the logic in the article to San Francisco but it just didn’t work well. Of course we don’t know where that kid lives presumably but if he lived in a big city it just wouldn’t make any sense.

        • 0 avatar
          06V66speed

          Syncromesh, that’s one Hell of a blanket statement there.

          You *just so happen* to live in one of THE most expensive areas in the US.

          Perhaps your logic also applies in Manhattan, but- hehe, most of us don’t live in an area where a one bedroom home costs 600k+.

          Now I understand your situation may apply to .001% of the B&B, but for the rest of us, your logic doesn’t apply.

          Thank you, come again.

        • 0 avatar

          Your IP address suggests otherwise.

          • 0 avatar
            Synchromesh

            Is that so? And what does it suggest? Kind of curious considering I actually do live in San Francisco.

  • avatar

    Wow. Bark’s advice is spot-on. But one or two people have already mentioned this as well.

    After flunking out of my freshman year of college and moving back home, I was in a similar position. I was making decent, predictable money and needed a car, and spotted a nice one I thought I could afford the payments and insurance on.

    I talked with my dad, and he said, “I’m not sure you’ll be able to make the payments after rent, utilities, food, etc.”

    “What do you mean?” I asked.

    “Maybe before you obligate yourself to make payments for something you want, you ought to make some payments on something you’re getting already. Your mom and I don’t get the house and food for free, and we’re OK helping you get on your feet. But you don’t get to do that if you go out and spend a bunch of money on a car that’s nicer than mine. You’re either broke and need a place to stay or you’re an adult who can take care of his own crap.”

    Judging by the 130 or so comments above mine, Dad was on to something there.

  • avatar
    KixStart

    Jeremy,

    I don’t have any particular advice for you but you could pass along some advice to your parents…

    Dear Parents,

    You should be charging Jeremy a considerable sum for room and board.

    Best Regards,
    KixStart

  • avatar
    danio3834

    I’ll go against the grain here. You go buy that Viper ACR and kill it. Think about how much fun that will be. If responsibility ever catches up with you, you could always sell it for a good residual.

    • 0 avatar
      Chets Jalopy

      Yeah, the hell with it! Buy the Viper and live with mom. Don’t let Bark ‘n’ most of the posters harsh your realm. Just promise to keep us updated. Game on, bro!

      Provided, of course, this isn’t some shameless, cynical click bait fiction.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      P.S.

      I’ll go one step further and supply my kid with a Viper when they start driving. They’ll be the coolest kid around. Might as well get a head start at being awesome.

      • 0 avatar
        everybodyhatesscott

        I know it’s tounge in cheek but we had a clients 16 year old son wrap a corvette around a pole so he could be cool. He didnt survive

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          Dead kid in a BMW season is coming up soon. Seriously every year I hear a few stories of the recent HS grad who wrapped the brand new BMW, often a M, he got for graduation around a telephone pole, tree ect killing himself and passengers.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          I knew a kid who did something similar to himself in Saturn SL. The kid in your story was obviously much cooler.

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    What does a Viper ACR do that a Camaro SS cant? Besides allow the driver to see out?

    I dont think a person who makes $60k cant make rational economic decisions.

    Buy a place to live or rental investment, assuming you dont live in $1 mil. plus san francisco etc.

    ‘Get by’ with a GT86 (LOL) or a Jap CUV (LOL).

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    This dude is obviously trolling, and y’all have lost your GenX gift for recognizing irony.

  • avatar
    kuman

    Putting ego aside, perhaps u should just buy that car, yes the expense are great, however based on my eastern upbringing, perhaps best person to talk to would be your parents.

    Discussed with them if u are going to do this massive undertaking, u get the car, u get to stay in their house and at the same time u share that Viper acr with your parents.

    IMHO any parents would be happy to see their kids achieve their dreams, and what better ways than being involved in that dream.

    Heck, im sure your dad wants it too deep inside his heart!

  • avatar
    JustPassinThru

    Whether this article is clickbait or not, Bark nails it.

    A car is JUST a car. We love them; but a car can only do one thing…move people around. There may be the odd situation where it may ease a young lady (not very sophisticated) out of her delicates; but – as I saw in San Francisco while in the Navy, on the cusp of the Tech Boom…there are just as many sweet young things impressed with the self-confidence of a man who drives a dirt-cheap Geo Metro.

    Life is to be lived; and paying off a huge bank loan for a car one cannot afford to drive, is not living. DO what Bark says. Get laid a lot. Get a nice home OF YOUR OWN. Buy a car you can afford – I’d argue Craigslist and cash, and save for its replacement. Beaters can be interesting, too.

    But…in all ways…GROW UP.

  • avatar
    NoID

    This troll has been beaten to death, but one item that hasn’t been discussed is the cost of ownership for such a vehicle. Premium fuel guzzled at rates that would make Al Gore swoon, tires that wear down like chalk on a sidewalk, parts with up to 1000% mark-up…

    Step one is buying your dream car, step two is maintaining it, which is why I haven’t bothered to dump a salary bonus or tax refund on a fun car for myself. I’d drive it for 6 months, then have no money left over to keep it on the road. I can barely keep up with maintenance on my daily drivers.

  • avatar
    SomeGuy

    I feel like TTAC just got trolled. No one is this dumb…right?

  • avatar
    balreadysaid

    On my 15th birthday 17 years ago I got a mint chevelle ss ls6 1970 from my mother. Red black stipes, craiger ss wheels. 4 spd manual with 2 12 inch Pyle drivers in the back.

    My parents bought me this because I knew what it was and could drive it. I grew up racing all over nys (mx). I think he should let his parents decide what his next car should be. There idea of what is appropriately purchased might surprise everyone. They also might get him what he actually needs.

  • avatar
    ATLOffroad

    Get your own place. Max out your IRA or your companies 401k. If you max out your retirement beginning in your twenties by retirement age you’ll have over $5.5 million in the bank.

    • 0 avatar
      DanyloS

      Will take a bit of the other side on this one. It sucks saving away money to retire for 40ish years, only to get be too old to play with the toys you bought. I’ve seen too many 60yr olds finally buy the Corvette or Harley they always wanted/dreamed of because now they have the time to play with it only essentially stop using it because they are uncomfortable using it or scared to drive/ride it anymore.

      Serious suggestion:
      Put away a bit more than your comfortable for Retirement Funds
      Buy a “vacation/retirement” property somewhere cheap and let your parents use it for a few months a year
      Start looking for an early Viper ACR to hide away or pick up a Motorcycle until you can outright buy a dreamcar

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    I’m not gonna tell you to move out of your parents’ house immediately. However, if you are going to live there, put that $ saved to good use. My recommendation is to save up to buy your own place. I lived at home for years despite being a college graduate and working adult, but the understanding was that it was so I could save up for a down payment on my own place. This is the best investment you can make into your future. My mortgage is less than $800/month and(because of Florida property tax laws) not likely to go much higher. It’s less than the cost of a one bedroom apartment now. Even better, 20 years from now, I’ll still be paying $800/month, and it will be nigh on impossible to find any place for that cheap. At the end of 30 years, I’ll be retired, have no housing payment (just insurance and property taxes), AND I’ll have an asset likely worth at least what I paid for it ($130k), but most likely worth more.

    Also, interest rates are the lowest they’ll likely ever be. You’ll save thousands of $ in interest over the life of the loan by getting one now. On a $150,000 loan, the difference in interest paid between 4.5% and 5.5% is about $33,000 over the life of the loan, so get in while the rates are low. Also, your mortgage interest and property taxes are federal tax deductions. I was able to write off over $5,000 last year because of my home loan.

  • avatar
    Frylock350

    Wow at all the people telling this guy to move out asap. I’m sorry but as long as his parents don’t want him out (and in many cases its the opposite) its financially stupid to move out just to do it. Stay at home and save money for a house. Rent is pissing money away. $1200 rent is a goddamn mortgage payment. Pocketing that for just two years is $30,000 towards a down payment on a home.

    You want a cool car? Buy one. As long as you do it with your parents blessing who cares what others think? I personally would buy a Challenger Hellcat because Hellcat. At some point you’ll get to be my age and you can’t buy Challenger Hellcats because you need a 4 door bigger vehicle to haul your family and the piles of detritus required for trips around.

  • avatar
    tanooki2003

    How about this for advice……”Grow the F*** UP”
    You are seriously asking us for advice on this nonsense? WTF is a matter with you?? Seriously??

    I can understand if your making $20,000-30,000 /year living with your parents but if you make over $40,000 a year you really need to re-evaluate your priorities!
    I would respect you more if you went out and got your own place, got a reasonable mortgage, pay off your student loans, start putting away money for retirement, and learn to make some healthy investments.

    Whining about what rocket-on-wheels you should get when you have not even considered the other priorities, things most of here that has experienced and lived life with families. People here will tell you the same thing. Stop thinking like a half baked millennial, get your act and priorities together.

    Driving a fancy car while living in your mom’s basement is just NOT COOL. No sane woman would realistically want to start a family with you.

    To sum it up…”get a life”

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Marriage? I know the type and you’re way off. He’s talking cruising the high school with wheels for the max babeage. They’ll think he’s a rock star or record producer and believe the bit about his mansion being tented for termites. He’s a predator is all, not a car enthusiast. Or what sports car does he have now? Or has ever had??

  • avatar
    HellcatPeterbilt

    Get that VIPER up on YOUTUBE and cover the costs with the REVENUE. Life’s too SHORT.

  • avatar
    jbigda

    Part of me relates to the OP in that I would love to own a Viper ACR. But then I snap out of the fantasy world that is my dream garage and realize that I could never afford it at my age (23). Also I would never want to be the guy who brings his date home (in his “racecar”) and introduces her to his parents. That and I could never live with my parents. I think I would go insane if I did.

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