By on April 18, 2016

2017 Acura NSX Exterior-004

I remember it like it was yesterday.

I was working for a crazy little company in Fremont, California in 1995. One day the boss-man pulled up in a shiny new Acura NSX. It was low. It was foreign. It was cool. Little did I know the bitchin’ Acura in the parking lot would upset the supercar apple cart.

Twenty-five years ago, Honda put the big-boys on notice with a fast, economical and reliable supercar. Yes, reliable and supercar can be used in the same sentence without irony when speaking of a first-generation NSX.

If you set the way-back machine to 1990, you’ll realize it was a different world. Supercars were rear-wheel drive, few made more than 300 horsepower, and a modern Volvo wagon would probably eat them alive on a track. By the time the NSX was euthanized in 2005, the competition had more than caught up and Honda decided its resources were best used elsewhere.

For 2017, Acura has resurrected the NSX name and applied it to an all-new mid-engine coupe, but can it fill the big shoes left by its predecessor?

Acura claims the NSX is the only supercar made in America. I’m sure FCA and GM would like to argue with that. But a supercar made in Ohio is, without a doubt, a novelty. Perhaps more interesting is that the NSX isn’t just manufactured in Ohio, but engineered in Ohio and styled in California. While the drivetrain has a Japanese pedigree, the lack of a Japanese focus is somewhat surprising as this will be Honda’s worldwide halo car.

Yep, the Ohio-built NSX will be sold in Japan and other world markets. Ohio this is the only place where the NSX is built.

No supercar would be complete without an insane drivetrain, and the folks in Japan obliged. Like last time, the NSX uses a V6, but that’s where the similarity ends.

Instead of taking the TLX’s V6 and kicking it up a notch, an entirely new 3.5-liter engine was created with the cylinders set at a 75-degree angle to lower the center of gravity. Then the engineers fitted twin turbochargers, a dry sump lubrication system, port injection and direct fuel injection. With everything working in harmony, the V6 cranks out a healthy 500 horsepower and 406 pounds-feet of torque.

A unique in-house designed double-shaft dual-clutch transmission sends the power to the rear wheels via a limited slip differential. According to Acura, the NSX project didn’t exactly set out to create a hybrid supercar in the same way that BMW had electrification high on the i8’s design priority list. Instead, the NSX’s hybrid system was used to help the vehicle meet the team’s performance objectives.

The first performance benchmark that’s the easiest to explain is the problem of the first 1/10th to 2/10ths of a second in an acceleration run. In a vehicle without a DCT, the start of any launch run hinges on the engine speed being just right and a clutch dump executing to perfection for the best 0-30 time. To help “fill the gap,” the NSX uses a pair of motors up front that can deliver 72 horsepower and 106 lbs-ft of twist instantly from a stop. Once the clutch engages out back, a 47 horsepower electric motor helps the engine drive the rear wheels to eliminate any turbo lag.

Acura rates the complete system at 573 horsepower and 476 pound-feet of torque. That’s good for a TTAC timed 0-60 run of 3.38 seconds with launch control, at 91 degrees, after 20-30 back-to-back launch control 0-60 mph runs had completed. Clearly, the NSX has little issue with heat soak, although I do anticipate a faster run to 60 if we ever get the NSX to our secret coastal California test grounds due to the cooler climate.

The real winner here was the impressively low 1.5 second 0-30 mph time, however.

If the two-motor axle up front sounds an awful lot like the rear axle in the RLX hybrid, you’re right. While Acura’s engineers say that this isn’t the same part, it functions in exactly the same way. If you recall in my review of the 2014 RLX Hybrid, my main complaint about the dynamics of the vehicle is that the system just couldn’t mask certain front-wheel-drive tendencies like torque steer. While the same can be said of the RLX’s electric SH-AWD system, in the NSX this is a good thing. The NSX has a strong rear-wheel bias, as shown by the theoretical maximum power split graphic above, and it’s simply not possible for the Acura to send as much power to the front axle as an all-wheel-drive Porsche 911 or Audi R8.

As a result of the power split, the NSX can’t AWD power slide in the corners and it’s likely to be less sure-footed than a 911 in an Ohio winter. On the flip side, it preserves the rear-wheel dynamics that some supercars have lost in the quest for traction.

2017 NSX Torque Vectoring

Acura could have used a torque converter inside the DCT to solve the launch problem, like they do in the eight-speed DCT they built for the TLX and ILX, but the hybrid system introduces another interesting trick. The design allows the NSX to power one wheel while regenerative braking the other. While in theory this could be done with a mechanical AWD system under power using the brakes, that generates excess heat, which is a problem on the track. In addition, the NSX will actually torque vector up front whether the power is on or off.

Acura’s software boffins crafted four hybrid system drive modes: quiet, sport, sport+ and track. Quiet causes the NSX to close exhaust valves to make the car quieter outside and close a valve in the intake system to make the car quieter inside. (The NSX literally pipes induction sound into the cabin rather than relying on digital engine noise a la BMW.) Quiet mode also causes the hybrid system to be more aggressive in shutting off the engine and operating in EV mode. Sport mode maintains a higher battery charge and stiffens the suspension. Sport+ causes the DCT to hold gears longer, disables the start/stop system, stiffens the suspension yet again, and causes the hybrid system to be more aggressive at its torque vectoring game. Track reduces the stability control program, holds low gears so the engine is screaming like a banshee, keeps the exhaust valves open, and sets the dynamic suspension to its stiffest mode.

The NSX’s interior is likely showcasing a few things that will trickle down into other Acura models. As you’d expect from a car costing over $156,000, cowhide is slathered galore. In addition to the requisite seats with Alcantara inserts (to keep your behind planted) the NSX uses a leather dashboard, leather coated doors and leather center console.

As we see in other high-performance cars, the NSX borrows plenty of parts from the Honda and Acura parts bin. The shifter, buttons on the steering wheel and the window switches see duty in other Acura models. Borrowing the two-screen infotainment system from the TLX would have made the dash too high, so they swiped essentially the same system used in the Honda Civic Touring to deliver the first Acura with CarPlay and Android Auto. To reduce weight, Acura made navigation and satellite radio optional, a move that strikes me as penny pinching, but everyone else does the same thing to save a few ounces. While some owners may complain that their supercar uses a subcompact’s nav system, remember that Ferrari uses the same systems as the Dodge Dart and Caravan.

As we saw from Lexus in the LFA, Acura’s conservative ethos is apparent even in its “think outside the box” halo car. This manifests itself in everything from the select parts shared with other Honda and Acura models to the decision to use an ELS-branded audio system instead of something from an exotic and unproven supplier. The result is a pragmatic interior that doesn’t scream luxury the same way a $180,000 Bentley does, but it’s likely to withstand the rigors of daily driving and parking in the sun better than the average exotic.

2017 Acura NSX Exterior-002

Acura’s pragmatism is instantly apparent when you drive the NSX on public roads. Despite having similar suspension travel to a Ferrari 458, the NSX’s suspension is daily driver suitable in “Quiet” mode. In fact, the very existence of a “Quiet” mode demonstrates Acura’s intention that the NSX be something you can drive every day. Out on I-10, the NSX soaked up road imperfections as well as a BMW M235i. On the mountain highways, selecting Sport+ changes the NSX’s character turning it into a corner carving machine, but one that feels immediately in tune with the driver. The “easy to live with” nature of the original NSX is present in the new NSX in a way that I hadn’t expected. I’m sure it’s all in my head, but every time I drive a car like a Viper or Ferrari, driving them requires more attention, more “respect” and on the track it seems that it’s easier to make a wrong move. The NSX, on the other hand, and quite like a modern AWD Porsche 911, is forgiving thanks to expertly programmed software.

Part of our day in the NSX was spent at a private track in the Southern California desert near Coachella. (Yes, that Coachella.) I’m not normally a fan of track events like this since you’re not usually free to explore the limits of a car’s ability — and for good reason. The small collection of pre-production NSXs, all labeled number 000, are the only ones in existence at the moment since the factory won’t start production for another few weeks. Crash one of these babies and there would be 20-percent fewer cars for the next group of journalists to sample. It therefore surprised me that so little actual instruction or “babysitting” was employed. Mid-apex, the right-seat Acura engineer said, “Just mash the accelerator.” Doing so in a classic RWD 911 (or NSX for that matter) would have ended badly, but the modern NSX’s front motors dug in and helped control the NSX as its ass kicked out.

Simply put, the car went exactly where it was pointed.

2017 Acura NSX Exterior-001

Acura regularly referred to the NSX’s ability to “line trace,” or follow the intended line on the track without additional driver input. You may recall videos where a hot lap driver is practically see-sawing the steering wheel on a car to correct the trajectory; that doesn’t happen to the same extent in the NSX. The resulting steering feel on the track or out on a winding mountain road takes some getting used to in the same way that Infiniti’s steer-by-wire system feels a hair unnatural at first. While Infiniti corrects the “trace” by turning the steering wheel, Acura nudges the front of the NSX around with the motors.

The NSX is the first hybrid that has brake feel on par with a traditional vacuum-assisted system. Acura uses a partial brake-by-wire system that allows the software to directly control the application of the friction brakes and the regeneration by the front motors. The result is pedal feel and consistency of deceleration that BMW’s i8 can only dream of. The ability of the system to control the regen braking on each front wheel independently likely adds to the stable braking feel.

2017 Acura NSX Exterior-003

With a starting price of $156,000, the NSX can be seen as an incredible value — or insanely expensive. Take your pick. For the price of the NSX, you could get three well equipped MDX crossovers or a well-equipped Porsche 911 4S. On the other hand, a Porsche 918 Spyder is an astronomical $689,000 more expensive. What of BMW’s i8? It marches to a different drummer with skinny tires (for a supercar), a front wheel drive pure EV mode and a three-cylinder turbo engine. Although “NSX” has cachet as a brand, I’m not sure how many of the Ferrari or Lamborghini faithful will jump ship.

I think the best comparison for the NSX is Porsche’s 911. The Acura’s price tag slots between the 911 4S and 911 Turbo while 0-60 mph performance and handling are more Turbo than 4S. The Porsche has an interior that’s more harmonious and consistently more luxurious than the NSX, and it can also be equipped with luxury car features like radar adaptive cruise control, mahogany wood trim, and 871-watts of high-end stereo … but it won’t handle like an NSX, look like an NSX or be as exclusive as an NSX. With comparable pricing being a virtual wash between the models, I have to admit I would lean towards the NSX because of it’s “LOOK AT ME!” styling, easy to live with attitude and expected high reliability. Does that make the NSX the best supercar buy or just the most pragmatic supercar available?

[Images: © 2016 Alex L. Dykes/The Truth About Cars, Acura]

Acura provided the vehicle at a launch event which was inexplicably located in Thermal, CA. Transportation via Southwest Airlines, lodging and two snazzy dinners at the Ritz Carlton were also provided.

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86 Comments on “2017 Acura NSX First Drive – The Pragmatic Supercar...”


  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    This is a vehicle that, both in terms of design (especially the interior) and power output, is about six years too late. It would have been neat in 2009, but isn’t so much now. I also think it would have been a better halo car to the Honda lineup even in N. America now that the Civic Type-R and probably other such fun vehicles are coming back.

    That said, I appreciate the review. It’s not often we get an exotic. And I’m sure it will be just the right car for *some*. Still, I can’t help but notice the irony that Acura promised for the last ten years to produce some kind of supercar, and the end result was something rather mediocre on paper….while Ford said nothing, and just surprised us all with a new GT that is easily one of the most unique and impressive designs of the modern era (although *that* car costs more than twice what this one does).

    On another note, if you all want to be honest, the beloved NSX nameplate is actually what started Acura’s current alphanumeric nomenclature madness. Think about that one.

    • 0 avatar

      THANK YOU

      I could destroy that thing with ease.

      Or get a P90DL for $140,200

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      Disagree on power. To me, it’s more about how it’s used. The Porsche GT3 and GT3 RS are perfect examples. The former makes 475 hp. The latter 500.

      Take a look at their overall performance and tell me if you can honestly say that they don’t have enough power?

      As for the car itself, I’m intrigued by the power-train and it seems like it would be a more engaging drive than an i8. And, other than the i8, the only production sports cars using this type of power-train cost just about seven figures.

      So to me it seems like the NSX engineers had two targets. They’ve said they used the 458 Italia as a performance benchmark but also used the trio of hybrid hyper exotics for what they wanted to do power-train wise.

      It won’t sit well with everyone. Especially those that think it must rigidly adhere to what the first generation car was.

      As for me? This car is intriguing and if you’re interested in the power-train tech (which I would imagine would be a major reason why most would be looking at this car) you can pick up one of these for a fraction the cost of a P1.

      Does it have the panache, performance, or prestige of a P1? Nope. But you gotta pay to play.

      • 0 avatar
        baconator

        I don’t get it. The i8 and Tesla S have more interesting technology and more clearly telegraph their future-tech with styling. A 911 or AMG GT is a far more realistic daily driver.

        As a mid-life-crisis dream car, a used McLaren, Gallardo, or 430 is a more exciting proposition. If you want a track-day car, all the fancy hybrid technology will just create reliability issues and the batteries will deplete well before a 30-minute lapping session is over.

        They’ll sell all they can make at well over MSRP, so I guess the Acura dealers will remember this car fondly 5 years from now. But will many other people?

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I’d say the nomenclature silliness isn’t what hurt Acura, Kyree…the product wearing the badges did.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Fair enough. I was looking at the TLX, but I can’t think of one good reason to buy it when I could have:

        – A Charger R/T
        – A Genesis
        – An MKZ 3.0T AWD (soon)
        – A CPO 5-Series
        – An Accord Touring for quite a bit less

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Meh.

    At $156,000, bleh.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    That blue is HAWT.

    As a unapologetic Honda fan, I’m glad Honda’s got its halo back…and a Ohio-engineered and built halo at that!

    I do fear the trunk wouldn’t be big enough to house Gov. Kasich’s Brooklyn doggy bags, however…

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      That blue makes me go RAWR. That color works on BMW coupes, and also on the Corvette.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        It is a pretty color. It also reminds me of Deep Impact Blue, on the Mustang.

      • 0 avatar
        56BelAire

        I saw the dark red version at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale in January and thought it was absolutely gorgeous. Large crowds around the car all 3 days I was there. I think it looks better in the flesh than in pictures.

        • 0 avatar
          fvfvsix

          Saw it there too. Got to cop a few feels. Fantastic looking car. I’d pay $160K for it if I had it. After spending more than a few minutes looking at the pair of prototypes they had on display, I think most of the “too little, too late” comments aren’t quite on point. I suspect they’re all due to the gulf of opinion between the car Honda has built and the car most of the pundits expected. I’d definitely take it over a Porsche 911 or an Audi R8. A McLaren 570S? Not sure.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I suspect people actually having $160k to spend might feel a bit differently than those exercising judgment using theoretical dollars.

    • 0 avatar
      Fred

      I remember the original NSX wasn’t much thought of when it came out. V6 power, reliable, easy to drive, what kind of super car is that?

  • avatar
    JimZ

    “The NSX literally pipes induction sound into the cabin rather than relying on digital engine noise”

    the Mustang GT started doing this for 2010MY.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    Can I have a screaming orange McLaren instead?

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    The good thing about picking the NSX is that it provides other people later with an opportunity to buy a used NSX. And on that used car, all of the things will still work – after the Porsche has long been coated in VAG-itis and electrical infidelity.

    And the point about exclusivity will draw some buyers. I see 911s all the time. At least 2-3 a week.

  • avatar

    That has got to be the most disappointing interior of any sports car much less a ‘supercar.’ Its like removing your prom date’s bra to find six boxes worth of Kleenex.

    Seriously.

    $156,000.

    HVAC vents from an Accord.

    $156,000.

    I do appreciate the TFT screen between two old RSX gauges.

    $156,000.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      Now, now, those vents could just as easily have come from a 2009 TL. The fake metal buttresses running from the center console through the dash certainly did.

    • 0 avatar

      +1

      I thought “naw, I’m being too hard on this”. But I just don’t care for the interior. Maybe it’s a case of having to be within it to appreciate it, but if you’d told me this came from the new SI, I’d believe you, save only for the presence of that tach display and the leather.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Nice review, and a nicer vehicle than I expected to read about.

    But still prefer the i8’s hybrid technology, looks, and lower price.

  • avatar
    mcs

    Well, it at least it doesn’t cost $450k and require you to answer stupid essay questions on an application to buy it:

    “Ford goes as far as asking applicants to provide a 60-second video explaining why they’d be a good candidate to own a GT. On the application, you’re also asked to list the cars in your collection and to “briefly describe your role as a public influencer.”

    http://www.foxsports.com/motor/story/2017-ford-gt-order-application-041616
    https://www.fordgt.com/content/brand_ford/en_us/performance/gt/wired/application/welcome.html

  • avatar
    hotdog453

    They’re neat looking cars; I’ve seen a number of them driving around Dublin, OH, right outside Marysville.

    There’s a market for it, I’m sure; rich people gots lots of moneys, yo. It’s not my cup of tea, but it’ll be a livable, fun, fairly “practical” supercar. Not where I’d spend my money, but… I don’t have 156k to drop on a car, either :P

  • avatar
    hubcap

    “The Acura’s price tag slots between the 911 4S and 911 Turbo”

    I know Porsche options can be expensive. I know they can add a considerable sum to a car. But, the base price of a 911 4S is $110,000. The base price of a Turbo is $153,000.

    Both prices are below the $156,000 base price of the NSX. Yes, I know the Porsche’s can be optioned up but so can the NSX. A loaded NSX will go for a bit more that 200K.

    I don’t understand how, price wise, the NSX falls between these two cars when they’re both less dear from jump.

    • 0 avatar
      Zykotec

      I guess (without going through the whole ‘build your own’ ) it would fall between those two cars when they are optioned up to standard NSX spec ,interior and gadget wise. It won’t surprise me the least when Porsche one day decides to make tires an option in the configurator…

      • 0 avatar
        hubcap

        Yeah, but you could add $40,000 worth of options to the 4S and it’d still cheaper than the NSX’s base price.

        Build one on the configurator. Pick the options you’d choose and be somewhat generous. I don’t think you’ll reach $156,000. It’s certainly possible, but most won’t go there.

        It makes me wonder what options GT3 buyers choose. That car comes pretty much loaded (for a Porsche). I wonder how many go out the door higher than 156k.

        • 0 avatar
          Zykotec

          Actually I would be a horribly expensive customer for Porsche, as I would honestly like my car with as few options as possible, (but seriously, charging extra to paint the side skirts on a 110K car?)
          The Porsche comparison is maybe not the best, except for similarish performance, as the NSX is definitely easier to recognize on the streets, and is highly likely to be mroe reliable, and is quite a bit more advanced than the 4S.
          I’m not sure I can tell a 2011 911 from a new one, and if I did, I could not tell which one is which (except from the rear, as the Aston Martin/Ford Fusion tailights are a giveaway), and I would not raise an eyebrow at anything less than a GT3 RS…

          Edit: PS, I would honeslty like the NSX with an honest to god manual, and an actual NA engine without the electrical motors, but I will also most likely never spend more than 7k on (buying, not modifying) a car again…

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            I would’ve thought that Acura would have wanted to offer ALL it’s tech goodies as options.

            Yet I can’t get Adaptive Cruise Control like I can in a Civic, if I chose.

            WTF??!!

  • avatar
    carguy

    This is priced right in line with the Porsche GT3 and Turbo. The turbo is a hair faster than the NSX and the GT3 is most likely more engaging to drive and both have better interiors. Unless you are very attached to the NSX badge, I just can’t see much of a reason to choose the NSX over a fast 911.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    It should also be noted how typically the term “supercar” isn’t -supposed- to be associated with “pragmatic.” This car creates its own contradiction.

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    You won’t find a bigger fan of Honda’s sports cars than me, but for +/- $200k (the sticker on my online build was $180k) I’m looking at the McLaren 570S over the NSX in all likelihood.

  • avatar
    Truckducken

    I’m going to beat BTSR to the punch and point out that this costs more than TWO HELLCATS.

  • avatar
    Nedmundo

    I’m impressed by the performance and technology, but I’d really like to see a back-to-basics version, which would delete all the electric motors and have an available manual transmission. It would be lighter, and would probably provide a more visceral experience, especially if Acura dialed in some actual steering feedback. It would also be less expensive. All of this would bring it closer to the spirit of the original.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      Here you go, the Evora 410:

      I think it’s going to cost around $112,000.

      http://www.automobilemag.com/news/lotus-evora-sport-410-brings-more-power-less-weight-better-handling/

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      As mindblowing as the NSX was in almost every way when it was released, my most immediately vivid memory of it, was that riflebolt of a two finger shifter. Worth the purchase price alone, compared to anything else out at the time. And since, for that matter. While nowadays, no gears at all, Tesla style, is hailed as something to aspire to. And Honda is busy stuffing automatics into even their motorbike lineup.

  • avatar

    So you can’t shut off traction control and the car covers for you when you do stupid things like punch it mid-throttle.

    This is the complete opposite of vehicles I’m interested in. I’m sure they’ll sell a ton to the Country Club set.

    • 0 avatar
      SunnyvaleCA

      Yup. And it’s automatic only. They may sell a ton to the Country Club set but they’ll mostly be garage queens. In 5 years we’ll see used ones for sale that have 5000 miles. Sad.

      • 0 avatar
        tedward

        Even with a traction control off option almost none of the modern supercars float my boat. I’m starting to make peace with the fact that their new car customers are old men who drive automatics, but that doesn’t mean I’ve kept my respect for the cars. A fast car that does what it thinks best is way less impressive to me as an engineering accomplishment than an entertaining sports car, it’s also a less entertaining car overall (to me at least). No lust at all here.

        I don’t know if the car companies fully realize that their halo projects are having a polarizing impact due to drivetrain decisions. I’m not saying that financially it’s the wrong move here, more that they are less of a halo and more of “just a car” as a result. Oh well, looks like I’ll be a corvette or Porsche owner when my time comes in the 100k+ buyers seat.

    • 0 avatar

      You can disable VSA. I did it.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I’d only buy one if I could reserve the “STARK 33” license plate, like the one in “Avengers.”

    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/mnbv0ovfbXw/maxresdefault.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      It’s funny how right GTA got the styling on their version of this car (Dinka Jester), which has been there since 3/4/14.

      http://gta.wikia.com/wiki/Jester?file=DinkaJester-GTAV-Frontquarter.png

      http://gta.wikia.com/wiki/Jester?file=DinkaJester-GTAV-Rearquarter.png

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Honda has just been missing plot after plot after plot. This thing is a $160K CR-Z. Maybe not as bad, but definitely worse for all its hybrid tech.

    Response to it would have been totally different if it had, at worst a mild between the engine and transmission style hybrid system, at best the first road car use of KERS, with a curb weight under ~3300lbs, a 500HP 4L NA V6, RWD and the option for a manual transmission. Honda’s fleet is clean; they can afford some dirt in their lineup. But this thing… forget about it. I’d rather pay $80K for a clean NA2.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Well, it’d be a CR-Z if a CR-Z could do 0-60 in three seconds…

      Hybrid sports cars are a thing now. Ferrari and Porsche both make them.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        Ferrari made the 408 and Porsche makes multiple SUVs. They are not necessarily precedent setters. Remember the original NSX made them step their game up, not the other way round.

        I get the New Sports EXperimental concept and I guess this fits in with that. But for $160K plus…. I just feel like there are such better options for the money. The 911 C4S they seem to have benchmarked gets you 95% of the way there performance wise, with about 400-500lbs less curb weight and $40-50K less out of pocket. With the option for a god honest stickshift.

        Again I get the point. This hybrid stuff will probably trickle down to future Civic Sis and Acura Type-S models. But I feel like they could have accomplished the same goals with a 2 seater that didn’t weigh 3800lbs.

    • 0 avatar
      kuman

      Actually this car is kinda impressive as a technological tour de force, but design was just ok. not bad but nothing great either.

      Price is rather steep however… i just hope it sells. I do realize its 1/2 the price of similar kind of hybrid supercar. However it just felt wrong.

      Im not sure anyone with Honda mindset would be willing to spend the cash for that car.

      Not bad in any stretch of imagination, but the price is just unlike Honda.

      I had a hunch they would be better received with an updated S2000 or a slightly bigger S660 that they sell in Japan.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Well, a LaFerrari weighs 3500 pounds and costs about a mil and half…that hybrid equipment adds weight.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    That pretty blue paint is a $6,000 option. Six thousand!

    Sorry, NSX, but we can’t be friends. Besides, you’d never survive the speed bumps in my neighborhood.

  • avatar
    laserwizard

    Looks like a Honduh.

    And there is the rub.

    A-cure-uh has no design language whatsoever except an ugly shield on the front end.

    Now this thing has essentially a watered down ugly Honduh front that is less tacky than the bloated new civic or bloated new Accord. But there is no mistaking that this is a Honduh.

    The original NSX was original. It didn’t look like a Honda.

    The new NSX is a HONDUH.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy

      The Acura nameplate is mainly a North American marketing experiment for Honda. Everywhere else in the world the NSX has always been a Honda.

    • 0 avatar
      Zykotec

      The original NSX definitely looked every bit like a Honda, that was definitely one of it’s coolest features in my eyes back in the day. Hondas designs were as cohesive throughout the ineup back then as Audis designs are today, just without all the boredom…(also Hondas cars had different silhouettes depending on what type of car they were, so no ‘dog taking a shit’-styled A7, or CUV without rear headroom Q5)

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      “HONDUH”

      Gainful employment can actually help your spelling.

      I know, I know… it sounds crazy…. but you’ll see when you’re in your 20s.

    • 0 avatar
      Chan

      If you want to be taken seriously, at some point you’re going to have to share what you believe to be good cars. Then we can point out which equivalent Honda model is better than each of those cars.

      I honestly think Honda aimed at the wrong price point, but we do live in an era of clever financing solutions.

      It’s wickedly fast. It’s wickedly nimble. It has a clever powertrain. It has Honda ergonomics and a reputation for reliability engineering. How anyone can declare this to be an objectively bad car is beyond me. Whether it appeals to a significant market is an unrelated concern.

  • avatar
    Zykotec

    I think Honda and Acuras biggest ‘fail’ lately is that they think people who buy luxury cars care about stuff like reliability and advanced technology. Either that, or they just don’t care, and only want to sell cars to the ‘fanbois’ .
    This car is most likely brilliant, and the only people who are going to know, or care, are Honda/Acura fanboys with loads of cash.
    People today don’t buy luxury cars to keep them, they lease them to look good while driving the ‘newest’ car, and then to replace it after 3-(max)5 years.
    Luxury cars are a fashion item, that needs to be renewed every 3rd year at least, but if I know Honda correctly, they will be satisfied then all the fans have bought one, an then they will stop building it (like they did with the original NSX and then the S2000, and arguably the Element and CR-Z)

    • 0 avatar
      fvfvsix

      “People today don’t buy luxury cars to keep them, they lease them to look good while driving the ‘newest’ car, and then to replace it after 3-(max)5 years.”

      That makes no sense though, and I’m sure you agree. I’m happy that there are still Hondas and Toyotas of the world that will sell me a nice enough product that won’t fall completely the he$! apart after a few years, necessitating replacement. IMO, that’s luxury. But I’m more Land Cruiser than Q7 anyway, so I’m probably not in the target audience for most “Luxury” cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Sketch

      “if I know Honda correctly, they will be satisfied then all the fans have bought one, an then they will stop building it (like they did with the original NSX and then the S2000, and arguably the Element and CR-Z)”

      So you’re saying they’ll sell it for 15 years like they did the original NSX, because that’s how long it took for all the fans to buy one?

  • avatar
    Von

    While it’s kind of meh for a super car, especially given the price. They only plan on selling 800 of them a year in the US, it should easily hit that target. Now if that’s a profitable target or not is another matter.

    It’s out of my price range, but if I were shopping at that price range, it would be on my list because of how livable and reliable (most likely) it would be. And it’s fast enough for me since I don’t track anything. An occasional spirited 8/10’s in a twisty road is about the most I ever do.

  • avatar
    Eyeflyistheeye

    I have been one of the most critical people in regards to Honda from 2002, once they came out with that bloated new 2003 Accord and lame ass 2001 Civic, lambasting them for losing their way which they haven’t really recovered from until the 2013 Accord.

    But I like the new NSX, and in terms of livability, civility and engineering, this seems to be a worthy successor to the original. If Honda created another midship ICE sports car with a manual, then everyone would be complaining that they ripped off the 911. If you’re approaching this from the perspective that it’s a 911 competitor, of course you’ll think this is overpriced, personally I think this is a McLaren P1 at a discount much like some likened the visceral feeling of the OG NSX to the F40.

    Some of the complaints here don’t make much sense, Lamborghini gives you switchgear from the Audi A4, and just like nobody would seriously say a 275 horsepower 1993 Trans Am was better than a 270 horsepower 1993 NSX, I don’t know why anyone would compare this to a Hellcat.

    This is a very Honda way (and good Honda) of making a sportscar. Personally, as an old-school Honda guy, they nailed it and I’d spend my imaginary sportscar budget on one of these. The original NSX saved supercars by forcing Ferrari et al to step their game up, not to mention the deliberate influence it had on refining the Corvette to become world-class. I can respect people wanting something else in the class, but respect Honda for putting up a worthy competitor and legitimate alternative.

    • 0 avatar
      kuman

      I understand your point perfectly, but in this kind of economic condition, wouldnt it be better if they just come up with a discount 911 instead of a discount mclaren P1?

      i know its great, but its just sad… u know…

      kinda fueling the apathy that we commoners can only afford of civics n accords and none of the good stuff

  • avatar
    kuman

    Sure its good, its fun, its undeniably very advanced, but its too expensive for its own good. Loose a bit of the tech, loose some digits off its price and it would sell like a hot cake.

    Im just sad the price is a tad over the level of comfortable spending.

    I just wished for a refreshed S2000 or some sort of RWD coupe to rival Miata /BRZ / GT86

    Heck, even S660 ( if they can sell it for cheap )will do!

  • avatar
    Russycle

    Loved the original NSX. This one just doesn’t have the looks, it doesn’t grab me.

  • avatar
    John

    Satellite radio and nav are optional to save weight? Horsefeathers. The two together probably don’t add one ounce. If this was a car with a bare carbon fiber and metal interior – maybe – it’s got a fancy-dancy leather interior, which adds pounds, not ounces. Satellite radio and nav are optional to make more profit. I’ll bet the sensors are in the car – choosing the option just means they are turned on with a software program. Heck, the stupid tube that connects the engine compartment with the interior probably weighs more than the hardware for satellite radio and nav.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      yeah, no. if you want to offer satellite radio, you have to incorporate a chipset (which you need to buy from SiriusXM.) If you offer navigation, then you also need a GPS chipset. and because automotive requirements state those chipsets/modules need to be able to operate in ambient temperatures up to 65C or 85C, they need thermal management (heatsinks.) adding those features brings way more than an ounce.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        I took a quick look at a Trimble Copernicus II GPS Module and it weighs .6 grams and can operate between -40C and 85+C. No heatsink. If it needs one, I’m looking at one that’s 12 grams. The Sirius XM STMicrolectronics STA240 chip can operate at 85+C, but I can’t find a weight on the data sheet. As a worst case example, I just weighed a post stamp sized web server with wifi, antenna, support circuitry (reset switches, status leds, just add 5v and you’re good to go), memory, and encased in an FCC approved metal case, and it’s only 7 grams.

  • avatar
    wintermutt

    i like the original (early 90’s) NSX styling better. of course the tail lights and that airfoil on the back would need to change, but other than that the original is better looking! but… i am a boomer, maybe this one was designed for gen x . regarding performance and reliability, turbo 911 AWD and the new NSX are probably equivalent for a first year NSX – there are always going to be problems out of the gate. Honda lost $$ on every NSX they built – methinks they got smarter. they might make a few bucks on this one. wonder what the baby NSX will cost?

  • avatar
    ccd1

    I’ve read the comments here as well as TTAC’s review and the reviews of others. My conclusions are as follows:

    1) Honda/Acura wanted to produce a cutting edge car. We can quibble over the need for all this tech, but Honda set out to put as much potentially high poerformance tech in this car as possible and they largely succeeded.

    2) For a first iteration of this car, it appears from all reviews that the tech mostly works which is no small feat.

    3) This car is a bargain, given the amount of tech inside it. There is nothing like it at anywhere near its price point. The real question most of us are asking is whether all the tech produced a better sports/super car especially given the weight penalty all this tech produces.

    4) Acura cut corners on the interior and that is disappointing, but if you accept that all the tech in the car is expensive and Acura was trying to keep it as inexpensive as possible, this is where you would cut a few corners. Complain all you want, but this thing has 3 electric motors, a battery pack, a specially designed 9-speed DC transmission AND an engine specially designed for this car!

    5) The NSX probably represents a new standard for daily driveable supercars. That does not address the question whether anyone really wants a DD supercar. Supercars generally do not clock a lot of miles annually and my guess is most people who can afford a supercar have at least one other car which is their DD and are not looking for a DD supercar.

    6) My guess is that success for this car will be judged more in terms of its halo affect than anything else. Given the current Acura line-up. Hard to see how the NSX will impact customer perceptions of the brand.

    7) Personally, a 3-year old NSX could be on my shopping list if decent examples were available for around $80,000. Much more special than a 911 and probably far more reliable than offerings from McLaren, Ferrari and Lambo.

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