By on December 2, 2015

Location Front Quarter Volvo S90 Mussel Blue

Forget waiting until 12:30 p.m. Eastern for the official reveal, here’s the new Volvo S90 right here in all its glory.

In addition to everything we’ve already known: Thor’s Hammer headlights, large 9-inch touchscreen, Pilot Assist semiautonomous driving and twin-charged four cylinder engine (with plug-in hybrid coming later), the S90 will get large animal detection as part of its City Safe features.

The moose of Gothenburg fear no more.

Volvo’s large sedan is the follow-up album to its XC90 hit, which last month was named Motor Trend’s SUV of the year.

The S90 will be built on Volvo’s newest shared architecture that’ll it stretch and shrink for upcoming applications. A wagon, V90 version will be coming based on the sedan, but it’s unclear if that’ll make it stateside.

The plug-in hybrid version will sport a 9.2 kWh battery that’ll power the sedan for up to 27 miles and delivers 407 combined horsepower and 472 pounds-feet of twist, according to Volvo’s specs. Without electrons, the twin-charged four produces 320 horsepower and 295 pounds-feet of torque and motivates the sedan up to 60 mph in under 6 seconds.

According to Volvo, the plug-in hybrid version will manage 123 mpg in a combined cycle, the twin-charged four will manage 32 mpg.

Both engines are mated to an 8-speed automatic transmission.

Diesel and a manual version of the sedan will be offered, but it’s highly unlikely that those models make their way to the States, sever.

There’s a lot more to look at so you can watch the reveal here at 12:30 p.m. Eastern.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

105 Comments on “The 2017 Volvo S90: This Is It...”


  • avatar
    dwford

    Looking strangely similar to the new 2017 Kia Cadenza. Who copied who?

  • avatar
    andyinatl

    This is seriously good looking car… Those seats are something.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    This is a very good looking car. I wouldn’t pay 7-series money for it, but I would pay 5 Series money for it. However it has to be bigger on the inside with more overall space than the prior model.

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    “Diesel and manual versions of the sedan will be offered, but it’s highly unlikely that those models make their way to the States”

    Too bad about Volvo giving-up on manuals. That 300+ HP 2 liter would be sweet with a manual.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    I just can’t get excited about a FWD sedan with a 4 cylinder.

  • avatar
    Mr. Orange

    Because it will only be offered with a 4 cylinder my knee jerk reaction is to say pass. But since I really do like Volvos I may be interested in the plug in variant.

    Times like this have me missing the V8 S80.

  • avatar
    tylanner

    I like how handsome and yet ‘not German’ it is.

    The long, bullnose hood is in line with current trends, which I am okay with. Not as pronounced as the 3-series and a bit flatter even than the 5-series.

    I think the clean and lean side profile is a good, distinctive trait for the new Volvos.

    • 0 avatar
      kosmo

      Not sure about the length, but the “bull nose” look is probably mostly due to pedestrian impact standards.

      The XC60 changed in this regard between the 13 and 14 models.

      The “non-bull nose” 13 version looks a bit sleeker, but both are acceptable.

      Especially if you use the new Maxima as your styling base line!

  • avatar
    kmars2009

    Beautiful…and we BETTER get the wagon too! Volvo buyers expect one and the V60 is not much of a wagon…practically speaking. Too small in back for cargo and dogs.
    Volvo seems to be on the right track, regardless of who’s funding them. If only SAAB had followed this path…unfortunately, GM first ruined, and then killed them.
    I look forward to this S90 and V90 coming to market, and helping th resurgence of Volvo.

    • 0 avatar
      hf_auto

      Yes, the V90 will be shown at the Geneva show in March. It’s supposed to be coming to the US as well. Giggity!

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      If they due offer a wagon, I’ll definitely buy one. It will probably be used, which really won’t help Volvo, but I’ll buy one.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      They still sell the XC70, you know.

      • 0 avatar
        kmars2009

        As a current XC70 owner…I like the car well enough. However, it’s design is now considered old. Also, from what I have read over the past few months…the V90 will be replacing the V70 and XC70. The V90 will also have similar powertrains to the new XC90…Meaning, it will ne more fuel efficient. I also like the idea the V90 will be larger than the old V70 and XC70. More room for my dogs, without the SUV height to jump in and out, truly appeals to me. So make mine a white one, with parchment leather…and I’m sold.
        PS. If it’s available in Cross Country…even better!

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    This looks amazing, well done Volvo. Quite refreshing.

  • avatar
    CincyDavid

    I LOVE it…this is a beautiful car. Say what you will about Chinese ownership, but it sure looks like Volvo is having a resurgence.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      “Say what you will about Chinese ownership”

      For one thing, it’s better than Ford or GM ownership.

      Cadillac and Lincoln should be sold to Chinese companies so they can build world-class cars again.

      • 0 avatar
        threeer

        still wouldn’t buy a Volvo given it’s ownership, but that’s just me. Most Americans won’t care. Heck, GM is already trotting out cars assembled in Asia with a high percentage content of Chinese parts (Trax/Encore/Spark, anybody?) never mind the (potentially) forthcoming Buick actually assembled in China. Glad my tax dollars bailed them out.

        I do have to say that Volvo does make some seriously nice thrones though!

      • 0 avatar
        ponchoman49

        Your delusional if you think Chinese make world-class anything! I have yet to come across anything that was made in China that has lasted for more than a few years without failing, having some sort of problem or being thrown in the garbage and that is including clothes, shoes, appliances, radios, pots and pans, furniture and so many other items.

        • 0 avatar
          BlueEr03

          IPhones are made in China. A lot of people seem to enjoy those and they don’t end up in the trash. Volvos are made in Sweden

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            @BlueEro03

            How much does an Iphone cost?
            How much does a Volvo cost?

            See the difference? Not all Volvos are made in Sweden.

            Think, fact check, then post. :)

          • 0 avatar
            BlueEr03

            @coreydl, How much more abuse does that phone need to endure, and at much much smaller tolerances for error. Plus, as you mentioned, a much lower cost target. If the Chinese can do that, they can make a car.

            But as already mentioned, the Volvo you are buying in the US isn’t coming from China, it is coming from Sweden, or at least Europe.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            @BlueEro

            http://www.autoblog.com/2015/05/28/volvo-s60-china-america-report/

            Seriously, please read this. Let me know when you have, then you can give up the ghost of Sweden/Euro-only Volvos. It’s simply not true.

            And no, just because you can make me a $350 phone that lasts <2 years and can be “abused” with fingertips and keys, does not entitle you to make a $50,000+ car which must/should last 10 or more (really 15-20) and drive at 130mph.

        • 0 avatar
          George B

          ponchoman49, I worked closely with engineers for the huge Taiwanese contract manufacturer Foxconn that has factories in China. The quality of their manufacturing was about equal to the Canadian/US CM they replaced, but Foxconn was 2/3 the price. The biggest problem was the time zone difference. I saw fewer manufacturing problems with Foxconn in China than Flextronics in the US or Samsung manufacturing in South Korea.

        • 0 avatar
          Sigivald

          Volvos are still *made* in Sweden.

          The *holding company* that owns them is Chinese, but that means almost nothing.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            New S60 is to be produced in China!

          • 0 avatar
            Sigivald

            (I mean, no, not all of them are made in Sweden.

            Some are made in Belgium.

            Thailand makes some cars – not for the US market.

            China makes some Volvos for the *Chinese* market – and in theory some S6 0 “inscriptions” are going to be sent to the US.

            In practice, buy a Volvo in the US and it comes from Sweden, still – I can’t find anything suggesting we even get cars from the Ghent factory.)

          • 0 avatar
            tremorcontrol

            Audis are made in China. BMWs are made in China. Mercedes-Benz vehicles are made in China. GM builds cars in China.

            One Volvo made in China (the extended wheelbase S60) is slated to be sold here and all of a sudden every Volvo is made there? “New S60 to be produced in China” makes for a vague, deceptive statement.

            Some people’s heads are going to explode when the first South Carolina-made Volvo rolls off the assembly line.

        • 0 avatar
          tremorcontrol

          How are the recalls and lawsuits on American-made cars coming? Not sure if we should trust anyone to build quality products given the shoddiness recently from US brands.

          There are tons of low-quality, low-cost Chinese-made products out there for sure (many of them spec’d, designed, and sold by American companies for what that’s worth. The beancounters and PMs at those companies need to do a better job.).

          The Macbook Pro I’m writing this on is a solid piece of hardware, though. Seems logical that that level of quality will come to other China-made products.

          If you expect all Chinese quality to persist as low-grade, you’re not really familiar with how improvement over time works. South Korean cars were terrible. Now Hyundai has a legitimate shot with a Genesis luxury line. Things change over time.

        • 0 avatar
          Tostik

          Let’s see–how about the new XC90? Engines made in Skovda, Sweden, most body parts made in Floby, Sweden, Haldex AWD made in Sweden, many parts made in other European countries, and transmissions made in Japan by Aisin, which makes Toyota/Lexus transmissions. Assembled in Gothenburg, Sweden. And did I say developed by Swedish engineers in Sweden?

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    That is one gorgeous Buick Park Avenue that Volvo has built, it even has the “million dollar grin.”

    Having said that, I’d take one (CPO – let someone else take the depreciation hit.)

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      “(CPO – let someone else take the depreciation hit.)”

      You almost had me there!

      Sad to say, I’m now in the same boat – I’ve now turned into a true TTAC-er!

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Looks nice but it appears too much length was placed up front and not enough in the rear passenger compartment. Its a FWD sedan, the whole point was interior space utilization. My beef with the P3 S80 is simply its not very big inside.

  • avatar
    tremorcontrol

    The wagon version V90 is going to be where it’s at. They BETTER bring it here.

    I think this looks good but too much “looks like” something else. The seats do look incredible. My first (split second) impression of the tail lights was more refined Dodge Charger (take that as you want).

    The front end looks good. There are some angles remind me variously of Passat, Malibu, Genesis, and Q70.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    It looks pretty good, though:

    -Is anybody else getting strong Lincoln vibes from the interior? With the decoration on the vents, I’m just seeing old Lincoln! Not complaining.

    -From side view in white, there are too many cut and panel lines and it looks a mess. So this will be one to avoid in white.

    -It will be overpriced as new, and will depreciate faster than other options, ESPECIALLY given the wacky as you please drive train options. This is one of those best bought used…

    —IF you can find one with all the options you want, but since Volvo packages them all individually (to jack prices higher) good luck with that.

    +++And, if they prove reliable, which is always a huge question in my mind for Volvo post 1994.

    Signed,
    Previous S80 shopper

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      “Is anybody else getting strong Lincoln vibes from the interior?”

      Yes, but this is fitting given how the previous S90 had a somewhat Mercury front end to it.

      I hope these S90s proove sturdier than the previous model, which was basically a 960 with 850 guts tossed in.

  • avatar

    This Volvo is a beautiful machine inside and out. The car has a certain “something” about it that is very distinctive. The interior looks very plush, but still retrained. I dig it: clearly a lot of thought went into the details, and the car as a whole.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Also note – NO key slot. If your key battery is dead or the remote breaks, you will not be accessing the interior of your car.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Such fail.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      There has to be some sort of way to get in. Maybe you have to pop that door handle fascia off? Why would they do that?

      I guess all the batteries will last the 3 year lease period.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I look forward to that conversation via Volvo Customer Care.

        “My remote isn’t working, it’s snowing, and I need to get home.”

        “Just remove the trim from the door handle, and…”

        “What?! Take apart my S90?!”

        But I seriously doubt there’s a lock cylinder behind there. I think it’s just another short-sighted design decision from Volvo.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          This person has a bigger problem. Here is who is going to be on the other line of that call.

          https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e7/The_Swedish_Chef.jpg

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          The battery in my GTIs key fob liked to die. Because VW. They replaced it under warranty and the second one died prematurely too. Quality product.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’m on my third (newer) GM clicker since 2010, meanwhile the Saturn’s key fob (older 90s style) is 12 and I believe still on its original battery. Konsistency & Kwality from our friends at RenCen.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I had to replace the MkT’s fob battery this year. 6 years isn’t so bad for a battery in a fob of a car with remote start.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Is the VW battery a special thing, or only dealer replaceable?

            I had to do a new battery in my GS, the M, and also the Deville remote. All of them were super cheap, pack of five sort of thing on Amazon for $3.

            My boss needed a CR1616 for his dead 2011 Accord remote, and I brought him my remaining four today. The GS took the same one.

            Original 93 remote still works fine, by the way! Takes two batteries.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            It’s a CR2025 coin battery. They will sell you one at the dealership for $9. Otherwise, CVS sells a pack of two for a few bucks.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I have some of those too. I collect CR battery packs!

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      There’s always a way to get in. The 2016 XC90 uses these same door handles. When you pull all the way back on the driver’s door handle, the key slot becomes visible and you can use the included key blade to unlock the door.

      Here’s an illustration from the 2016 XC90 manual:
      http://s24.postimg.org/kybiynyp1/xc90.jpg

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        See. There is the answer.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I can’t view that at work – but it sounds like you’d have to hold the handle out, then use the other hand to unlock?

        Easy to do while on the phone!

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          Something like that.

        • 0 avatar
          George B

          Not easy, but acceptable considering how infrequently you have to use the feature. What’s more annoying is how manually unlocking the door is going to trigger the alarm.

          Ran into a keyless entry problem with my Honda Accord while on vacation in Florida. When you drive to the beach, where do you put your key fob? I put mine in a zip-lock plastic bag, but would have preferred an old-fashioned key that wouldn’t be damaged if it was exposed to sea water for a short time.

          • 0 avatar
            Chicago Dude

            George B, the XC90 comes with 3 keys. 2 are the fancy leather-covered works of art and the 3rd is a small waterproof no-button key that you can put on a lanyard and would likely mistake for a USB stick if you didn’t know what it really was.

      • 0 avatar
        VenomV12

        The problem is if you are locked out you won’t be able to get to your manual to find out that’s how you get in. Now one would presume your car salesman would show you how to do this when you take delivery of your car but we all know half of those clowns don’t even know about half of the features in the cars they sell. So there will be lots of angry calls to the dealership or frantic searches on your cellphone trying to figure out how to get into your car. Also even if you get in, how do you start it if the key fob is dead?

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I should -think- there’s a slot on the interior somewhere that you can insert the keyfob and use it that way. I don’t think I’ve seen a smart key car without a fob slot somewhere on dash.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            That’s true. But a lot of manufacturers are doing away with the slot altogether. Instead, they have a sensor, typically on the steering column, where an ignition switch would otherwise be located, and usually with some kind of icon to designate it. When you touch the smart key to that area, the sensor can authenticate said key by making direct contact and will allow you to turn on or start the car, even if the key’s battery is dead.

            My Golf SportWagen works this way. Ditto for the 2016 X5 loaner I just turned in. They both have sensors on the right side of the steering column. My 2011 X5, OTOH, has a visible slot beside the start button where the key would go if the battery died (as do most of the other Volvos). And our 2012 Sonata has a slot underneath the armrest where you’d stick the smart key.

            Here’s an example of the sensor: http://images.auction123.com/daff90cf-aec0-4e99-88ca-8aab5244a946/WBA3A5C52EF605072/24.jpg?web001lnw

        • 0 avatar
          Sigivald

          “Lots” as in “once the first time the battery fails in the fob”, with the exception of everyone curious enough to look it up before that.

          (Which sadly, might not be many people, but…)

      • 0 avatar
        heavy handle

        On top of that, you need to ignore the “remote battery low” warning for a month or more.

        I don’t see this as a problem. If you have enough brains to get a driver’s license, and make enough money for payments on a Volvo, you can figure this out. The few people who can’t should not be driving.

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      This is a disastrous trend these idiot car manufacturers are taking with several recently introduced new models. The comical Tesla door handle fiasco that effectively locked out CR from there much ballyhooed top scoring sedan having to be taken away on a flatbed is another strong case in point.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      Bet you a dollar it’s just hidden, like on the XC70, and possibly just glossed over for the show reveal.

    • 0 avatar
      Funky

      The S60 Inscription (made in China) is already available at USA dealers. It has been around for about a couple of months. I wonder how many have been sold?

    • 0 avatar
      Funky

      My above post was intended for a different thread, sorry. My post intended for this thread: I had an issue like this with my new S60 (2014). The battery went dead due to a software (for which there was a recall) issue. My neighbors had a good time poking fun at me since they saw me trying to jump start my brand new Volvo. I was sort of shocked that absolutely nothing on the vehicle worked without the battery.

  • avatar
    geee

    I hope no one was anxiously waiting for this. It looks like someone’s nightmare : a Chrysler 300 from the rear, a Mustang from the side, some soft of bizarre bulbous Karl Mauldin nose up front that I can’t understand, and a seriously overripe cheesey design on the inside – Im not sure if it is Lincoln, but it’s not right. Yikes.
    edit : OK, yes, the seats are nice, but the steering wheel? Brutal. But the vents literally kill the interior and ruin any of the pluses. It’s not Lincoln, it’s Taurus. Nothing should ever evoke that styling disaster.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    That twincharged engine sounds like a freaking nightmare out of warranty. It’s like the exact opposite of what the fabled Volvo “red block” 4 cylinder engines stood for. Definitely not a million kilometer service life, that’s for sure.

    • 0 avatar
      andyinatl

      Volvos have used turbocharging on their engines since 80s, with stellar reliability record. You can fault the Volvo for 2000-2003 automatic transmission issues, but they are not known for turbo/engine issues.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        V8 Yamaha issues
        Trim issues
        Transmission
        Paint
        Electrical

        All regulars on the “what’s wrong with my Volvo” list from 1993+.

        • 0 avatar
          Jacob

          V8 Yamaha was naturally aspirated, and was a Yamaha designed, Yamaha-built product. The Volvo V8 Yamaha was not the first Yamaha V8 with reliability issues. The previous Yamaha engine used in a Ford car was the 3.4L Yamaha V8 in 96-99 Ford Taurus SHO, and it was known for catastrophic failures before 100K miles mark.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Well we’re talking about a turbo-supercharged engine. The tight packaging, high heat and incredibly high cylinder pressures and corresponding stress on other major components is what worries me. I agree, the older T5 engines seem to be straightforward, sturdy units.

        Then again, Volvo had serious oil consumption issues in the 3.2L naturally aspirated inline 6 (with gear driven valvetrain!), an understressed engine would would assume would be straightforward and reliable as the sun. Perhaps Volvo performs best “under pressure” :p

        • 0 avatar
          Tostik

          The T5 is an excellent engine, with great durability and reliability, and is made in Sweden at the Volvo engine foundry. The 3.2 was made at the Ford foundry in Wales, and was Volvo’s most problematic engine. The Volvo-made 5-cyl engines have been Volvo’s best engines over the last 20 yrs–even better than the Yamaha-made V8.

        • 0 avatar
          heavy handle

          Not sure about “tight packaging.” Look at that hood line. Volvo left a lot of free space under the hood in order to meet pedestrian impact regulations.

          The cylinder pressures aren’t that impressive. Saab was getting close to those numbers 10 years ago, without direct injection, or variable valve timing, or a host of newer tech (or significant development budgets). Those engines last forever.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            I’m not talking about the engine within the bay so much as all of the charge piping, supercharger and turbocharger that envelope the engine. Working on it would be a nightmare, and I know firsthand what heat does to any sort of rubber pieces or fittings (vacuum lines, etc) that are near a red hot turbocharger. Throw in the high pressure fuel pump for the direction injection and its high pressure lines and fittings, along with the possibility of having to crack this thing open to clean up gunked up intake valves (common on turbo DI vehicles with high crankcase pressures), seems like a disaster waiting to befall anyone foolish enough to hang onto this thing past the CPO warranty.

    • 0 avatar
      onyxtape

      That’s what’s keeping me from signing for a XC90 right now. It has everything we want. Though our current plan is to pick one up off-lease in 2-3 years and live with our current vehicles a little while longer. That ought to give it enough time to identify tell-tale signs if the engine is a total time-bomb.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        2-3 years is also long enough to see if the buttons will keep their finish. Something the past XC90 was not great at.

      • 0 avatar
        Tostik

        If I may paraphrase an automotive reviewer on turbocharging, “Gone are the days when unreliable blowers would destroy weak engines”, and Volvo knows how to strengthen an engine to bare the rigors of turbocharging. They’ve been doing it successfully for long time.

    • 0 avatar
      Funky

      Currently I have about 35k miles on my 2015 V60 (which has the new turbo charged four cylinder engine). This vehicle is driven about 25k to 35k miles per year; therefore it will likely be out of warranty within the next year or so. I intend to drive it far beyond the warrantied number of miles. I will keep you posted. So far the vehicle has needed only routine maintenance including any needed recalls. The four cylinder engine sounds like it should (this type of engine, apparently, rattles like the dickens…a phenomenon of which, I think, TTAC readers are aware); and it is running (or, rather, rattling strong) strong at 35k miles.

      • 0 avatar
        onyxtape

        That’s good to hear from actual owners. Though I understand this engine is also supercharged on top of it all, so that adds multiple points of failure for an otherwise reliable powerplant.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    All in all, this S90 is not quite as svelte as its XC90 counterpart—especially from the sides—but it’s lovely, and a real improvement over the outgoing S80. Volvo’s decision to do engines no larger than four-cylinders has allowed the company to continue using transversely-mounted engines, yet give the cars the smaller front overhang of a longitude-engined configuration.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Haven’t I seen you somewhere before? Looks like the love child of a current Kia with the interior of a Lincoln with a bit of Buick thrown in for good measure. I wonder if it comes with toxic lead paint as an option?

  • avatar
    CincyDavid

    I am struck by something…the pushbutton start switch is in the center console, behind the shifter…like an old SAAB

  • avatar
    wmba

    Compared to anything recent from Lexus or Infiniti, this looks great.

  • avatar
    PriusV16

    Outside looks too generic. As others have already said, this might as well carry a Hyundai badge. It’s not ugly, it just doesn’t look distinctively Volvo.

    Interior is very nice, though.

    Volvo seats are the best you can get in any car because they’ve partnered with some orthopedic specialists of some large Swedish hospital (Goteborg General or something) since the 1970s.

  • avatar
    Alfisti

    Volvo are releasing some nice product but honestly, where’s the money coming from? What i mean is, how much luxury money is out there because their prices are very, very high. They have clearly decided to continue taking on the Germans head on and other than the XC90 have failed miserably at this strategy.

    • 0 avatar
      Tostik

      I think it would be accurate to say that the new XC90 is the first vehicle that is taking the Germans head on. The S90 is the second, with more all-new models to come in the next couple of years. And, as you implied, the new XC90 is turning into a stunning success, taking on the Germans.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    As much as I loathe Volvos 850-S70 line, those cars did have nicer upright proportions compared to most other FWD sedans of their time, or even now.

    This new S90 isnt that bad styling-wise, but I cant say I like the generic BMW-Accord-Alfa Romeo-Lexus-Kia-Mazda-Pontiac Grand Prix shape of it.

  • avatar
    VenomV12

    Nice car with crappy engines. They have done beautiful work on the inside and out. Enjoy the discoloration and staining on that white interior down the road though.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Agree. While I like the idea of pure white leather, it’s not really sustainable in a car you actually use. BMW is doing that optionally now on the 6GC, I believe.

  • avatar
    honda_lawn_art

    Nice! Gotta bit of ’54 Kaiser goin’ on there.

  • avatar
    pb35

    I purchased a 2007 XC90 V8 Sport new. This year has been especially bad with out of warranty repairs. It caused me to add up all of my invoices for repairs and service over the last 8 years. Total is $17,422. Not sure I will be buying another Volvo and a first year Volvo? haha

    This car is ok but they have an uphill battle going with a 4 cyl. lineup.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Hummer: Jeez, I can’t imagine paying that much for 1 vehicle, $1,900 is what one could expect to pay for about 3-4...
  • geozinger: Fnck. I’ve lost lots of cars to the tinworm. I had a 97 Cavalier that I ran up to 265000 miles. The...
  • jh26036: Who is paying $55k for a CTR? Plenty are going before the $35k sticker.
  • JimZ: Since that’s not going to happen, why should I waste any time on your nonsensical what-if?
  • JimZ: Funny, Jim Hackett said basically the same thing yesterday and people were flinging crap left and right.

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States