By on December 10, 2015

titleloan

Many people rely on title loans when money is tight, regardless of their infamous predatory nature and high interest rates. However, getting that loan is much like playing Russian Roulette — and with similar odds. According to a recent PEW study, one out of every nine title loans results in a repossession, with the titled vehicle eventually heading to auction. 

Recently, I received a notice that a large title loan vendor was to auction off over 500 vehicles. My curiosity got the better of me. Armed with the auction run list and a VIN history tool, I decided to take a look at what ends up at these auctions and how they get there.

Pulling up the auction run list showed a total of 549 vehicles available for sale. Most of the vehicles were older, had higher mileage or a combination of both. There were only nine vehicles wearing less than 100,000 miles, making up two percent of the total vehicles available on the run list. The 150,000+ mile group was the largest by far and contained 358 vehicles, accounting for 65 percent of the vehicles in the auction. There were also 110 vehicles that were listed as exempt or mileage unknown. These vehicles were exempt either because they were over 10 years old or had an odometer that was not accessible.

odometer

All of the vehicles are listed with fairly low “buy it now” prices that allow qualified purchasers to purchase the vehicles before the auction begins. Title loan companies are able to set such low prices since the amount those companies have invested in each title is only a fraction of the actual market value. Most title loans average around $1,000 and the amount loaned is usually less than 25 percent of the value of the vehicle used as collateral, according to the PEW study. If a vehicle is repossessed, the title loan companies will set a price that will cover the principal of the loan — and possibly some of the lost interest if the market allows it — in order to move the metal quickly. The annual interest rates on these loans can be as high as 300 percent and loans can go as low as $100, so there are vehicles listed for as low as $200 plus auction fees.

1995 Chevrolet Blazer

One vehicle, a 1995 Chevrolet Blazer, currently shows 271,285 miles. Pulling up its history, we see it shows up at auction in December 2011 with 199,683 miles, then it’s sold with a lien attached in February 2013. Since it had almost 200,000 miles at the time, it is highly unlikely any traditional lending institution would have written a loan for it, meaning this loan was almost certainly processed by a subprime lender. The February sale comes during one of the bigger months for subprime and “Buy Here Pay Here” dealers as many potential customers are receiving tax returns that can give them enough money for a down payment on a new-to-them car.

1995 Chevrolet Blazer

The Blazer’s owner was immediately in the hole since they were likely taking out a loan with an annual percentage rate of 30 percent for a vehicle that was only worth its weight in scrap. We see three more liens reported on the vehicle with the last one hitting in October of this year. The vehicle’s owner could have taken out multiple title loans or refinanced his loan, the last one being too expensive to cover. Since the vehicle was not worth more than $300 or $400, they would have only been able to get a loan for $150 or so, which would have cost them double or triple the original amount once interest was added. The owner may have been in a tight situation or the car could have broken down, making default a more affordable proposition. Due to the mileage and condition, it’s next stop for this Blazer is likely a salvage yard.

The majority of the vehicles on the list follow a similar pattern: high-mileage domestics between 10- to 20-years old with cosmetic damage. However, there are a few exceptions, like this 2002 Mercedes Benz S500 that shows a last reported mileage figure of 87,000 in September of this year.

2002 Mercedes-Benz S500

It started its life as a lease in the community of Woodbury, NY in 2001, like many other luxury sedans. A year later, it was turned in and auctioned off. The next owner kept it for two years and sold it once the 36,000 mile factory warranty was up. The third owner kept it for three years, but lost it when it was first repossessed in late 2007 with 68,354 miles. The car bounced around Brooklyn for the next few years before finally ending up in Newport News, VA where its last owner took out a title loan against it in September of this year. It now sits with a failed air suspension and a $1,000 preliminary bid, destined for a “Buy Here Pay Here” lot — and quite possibly a third repossession.

ram

The youngest member in the bunch is a 2013 Dodge Ram 1500 with a V-6 engine and only 39,380 on the clock. It’s listed with a clear Texas title and a $13,000 “buy it now” price. This may seem like a great deal, but its history tells a different tale.

2013 Ram 1500

The truck was sold new in early 2013 and its owner only had it for only a year before it was wrecked and deemed a total loss at 12,200 miles in February 2014. It was rebuilt and registered in June of that year and went on to serve its second owner. It had its second accident in July of this year, but was able to pass the Texas safety inspection in August. The lien from the title loan company was reported in September and the truck was repossessed soon after. The pictures show a slightly misaligned rear bumper. Other than that, the truck looks clean and will likely end up on a dealer lot.

2006 Ford Five Hundred

Sorting by the highest mileage gives us an unexpected example: a 2006 Ford Five Hundred that has achieved 412,983 miles. It’s first significant event after purchase is a severe accident with left rear impact in 2010. The original owner fixed it up and drove it all the way to 296,893 miles in February 2013, at which time it was picked up by a second owner. That purchase shows a lien reported. At almost 300,000 miles, it has to be a subprime loan like our Blazer example above. The history is fairly quiet after that point with standard renewals until the recent repossession. Although the Five Hundred has proven resilient to this point, it almost certain to end up at a salvage yard due to current mileage.

Most of the other cars I checked on the run list followed a similar path where they spent a few years in the mainstream market before ending up at a subprime dealer. Some of them experience accidents that should leave them with a branded title, but there are loopholes that allow the title to be washed. Others live a long life with their first owners before reaching the subprime market. The second and third owners of these vehicles are usually underwater as soon as they buy the vehicle and the title loans just put them further into debt.

[Image credits: Top – Paul Sableman/Flickr/CC BY 2.0; Odometer – The Car Spy/Flickr/CC BY 2.0; Cars – Insurance Auto Auctions, Inc.]

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103 Comments on “These Are the Long, Rough Roads Traveled by Title Loan Cars...”


  • avatar
    healthy skeptic

    I guess 99.9% of all cars to roll off the assembly line (and aren’t totaled in a crash) are destined for sad and lonely golden years, even before they meet the Crusher. And the high-end models seem no less immune.

    • 0 avatar

      The higher end models are the ones most often seen in bankruptcies (not a scientific sample), or otherwise fall into disrepair sooner than low- to mid-range models. The luxury car companies have to cut something from the production budget, and automakers focused on higher performance with luxury appointments often cut the electronics budget. When those electrical systems (or peculiar suspension systems) wear out, most people can’t afford the cost of repairs. Also, many people who lease high end automobiles do not perform any preventative maintenance. That creates a ticking time bomb of expensive repairs down the road.

      • 0 avatar
        SaulTigh

        Not a lot of maintenance needed on a new car in the first three years or so, other than oil changes. My lease includes all maintenance and the dealer was very clear that I was required to bring the car in every 10,000 or on the calendar year, whichever came first.

        • 0 avatar

          If you are a leaseholder on a car, you are not expected to do a lot of maintenance on the vehicle. Why? Auto manufacturers spent a lot of money developing fluids and bearings that are designed to last the lifetime of a standard lease, but anything beyond that is a crapshoot.

          Allow me to give you a brief illustration: One of the attorneys here recently visited a Mercedes dealership. The dealership experiences was impressive, and one of the senior technicians spoke with him about the vehicle. The tech advised him that if he was purchasing the vehicle, rather than leashing it, he should service the vehicle more frequently than suggested for leased vehicles. This included more frequent oil changes, coolant servicing, and regular differential fluid changes. It makes sense. If manufacturers are primarily worried about the average lease period, they are going to put more resources into making the car trouble free for that period. Naturally, this decreases the amount of time worrying about the car’s longer term reliability. Given the amount of technology in higher end vehicles, it is easy to see that used luxury cars aren’t the bargain that the price seems to reflect. The longer the consumer waits to perform preventative maintenance, the higher they can expect the repair bill to be. In the end, these repairs are cost-prohibitive for many consumers.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “this 2002 Mercedes Benz S500”

    At least it doesn’t need $4,000 in suspension repair! Also IMO that was the worst S-Class generation in history.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      Since all 4 struts are empty, you would probably get away with a compressor, relay, fuse and valve block. Around $500-600 in parts and you will probably be good to go. There is also a repair kit for the front struts if those are leaking.

      • 0 avatar
        Exfordtech

        Compressors typically fail due to overheating caused by excessive run time in filling a leaking suspension system.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Spoken by someone who knows Town Cars!

        • 0 avatar
          VolandoBajo

          Which is why, while I can see the pollution control and mileage advantages of turbos, the fact that turbos throw off more heat is, or should be, a cause for concern for consumers.

          My guess is that a lot of the new Corvettes’ “heat soak” problem is due to the amount of thermal energy released by extreme compression in the turbo.

          A lot of Panther owners who have experienced air suspension failures replace it with a standard coil and shocks solution. There are several aftermarket options that seem to work well for people.

          Don’t know if they make a kit like that for the M-B’s though.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Ford tech nailed it. On MPVs like my old one, first you’d start to get a bit of but sag when the car sat overnight, the system would top up when you started the car and you were on your way. It’d progress to the point that the compressor would be kicking on to level the car out when you were sitting in traffic. Finally the poor thing would just be running all the time and burn out. I switched over to stiffer, taller steel springs and replaced the $800 a pop factory air shocks with less-weight bearing Monroes ($75 for a pair), and plumbed them into the factory lines and pump. Works great 6 years later, no leaks!

        • 0 avatar
          MBella

          Yeah, it is, but the valve block is usually the cause of the leak on these cars, especially if the rear is completely empty. These cars have one valve block near the compressor, and no valves at the struts like a Ford.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    “Other than that, the truck looks clean and will likely end up on a dealer lot.”

    Hopefully the dealer will fix the tailgate latch first.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “Sorting by the highest mileage gives us an unexpected example: a 2006 Ford Five Hundred that has achieved 412,983 miles.”

    Most impressive.

    Duratec V6 3.0

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Duratec_V6_engine#RFF

    Aisin 6spd auto

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AWTF-80_SC

    I know this wasn’t AWD as those were CVT *shudders*.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Unlike the Cyclone, you’ll be happy to know that the water pump of the 3.0L Duratec does not reside in the V6 valley.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        See, you knew what I was thinking.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          There are other irritating things about the 3.0L Duratec. However, the engine had been around for 10 years by the time that car was built. They aren’t as easy to work on as the Vulcans, but the Duratec is plenty robust.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Until its installed in a Mazda 6.

          • 0 avatar
            dolorean

            I thought the Mazda 6 had the 2.5L Duratec?

            I had one in my MY98 Contour SVT that was damn near bulletproof. Near 200HP was more than enough to motivate it and the gas mileage was better.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        This is certainly good news. That and the much roomier interior with better glass area, and more handsome styling (IMO) makes the original Five Hundred a much more appealing vehicle to me than the current Taurus. Shame the newest one is now almost 9 years old!

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I wish Ford would have continued with the more open and comfortable styling of the Five Hundred.

        • 0 avatar
          davefromcalgary

          gtem! No changing avatars! What is with you people!

          • 0 avatar
            VolandoBajo

            @davefromcalgary Are you the famous Dave of the auto farm? Don’t worry, if so, I am one of your fans. Just curious…seems like you might be.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Huh? No changes here Dave, It’ll always be my muddy 4Runner!

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I never saw yours change. If I had, I’d say something!

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            @gtem, I saw a silver new Colorado by your name on my phone… Maybe I was going crazy?

            @volando I dont know “famous Dave of the auto farm” sorry to disappoint.

            I’m just a pedantic nerdy car loving engineer from the Canadian prairie.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            No sir, no Colorados with laughably low chins here! Where I’ve taken that bone stock 4Runner of mine without incident (okay, a few dings on the front skid plate), not only would the Colorado have lost its lower front chin spoiler, but the entire front bumper.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            gtem, I’m not a big offroader, the most offroad my future truck will see will be rough logging roads to some of the more secluded Rocky mountain campsites.

            That said, I am totally on your side regarding truck chins. When the Canyon’s lower bumper hanger is closer to the ground than the Verano, thats absolute BS. Even the Acadia, I have to be MORE careful where I park than the Verano. Freaking ridiculous.

    • 0 avatar
      greaseyknight

      Agreed, you would think that something with 400k on it would be Japanese. I’m guessing that both owners drove for a living. 42k miles a year is alot!

      My question is who buys a 300k mile car on payments and then keeps racking up the miles at a similar rate?

      • 0 avatar
        sproc

        I can’t think of many non-employment related reasons to drive that much. How could a job that requires that much time on the road, fuel and certainly a minimal amount of maintenance be worth it if you’re still forced to take a title loan? Must be a particularly sad, crazy story.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        I would expect something with 400K on it to be Swedish.

      • 0 avatar
        matador

        This.

        I drive 35k per year (I’m in Wyoming, so my commute is long). I know that a car with those miles must be cheap, but I’d hold out for something else cheap. Out here, the Chevrolet dealer had a 1999 LeSabre with about 110k for $2999. That’ll last a lot longer than this will.

        Still, over 400k miles- that was a very good car- at least to the first owner.

    • 0 avatar
      SaulTigh

      I had dreams of taking my ’08 MKZ to that kind of mileage. Two things worked against me: I live close to my job, and alas, it was the 3.5L Cyclone with the internal water pump.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    Nice to see that a Five Hundred can really go the distance, I assume this is a 6 speed auto and not a CVT model? The 3 liter Duratec is no powerhouse in that heavy of a car but it sure seems to hold up well! The space saver rear tire permanently in place until the sad end is typical, this car would look 100% at home in my neighborhood, although a bit more body damage would make it even more fitting.

    Likewise the Blazer, lives up to the classic GM idiom of running poorly longer than other cars run at all. No doubt that it stinks of raw gas going down the road (malfunctioning poppet valves on fuel injection ‘spider’), and makes a creaking racket over bumps as the worn out idler arm and control arm bushings make themselves heard. No rust on it either which is impressive, assuming that the author is in a Northern locale.

  • avatar

    Now we know the last stop for most vehicles before they end up as “Junkyard Finds”.

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    Good gawd, I’ve probably passed that Benz on the road driving to work at some point. Newport News has almost as many title loan stores as 7-11’s, and I’m not even exaggerating.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Lots of sailors, I’m guessing.

      • 0 avatar
        strafer

        No, the locals call it Bad News for a reason.

        • 0 avatar
          VolandoBajo

          But a lot of sailors, too, in addition to the local color of the area.

          (Watch closely what I did there. My fingers never left my hand.)

          • 0 avatar
            CarnotCycle

            I have family in USMC and have spent a lot of time on the big installations (Pendleton, Lejeune). The dealership inventories at those places reflect the local market of young men making decent money with no expenses, from every ethnographic take on macho present in the nation collected in one place.

            Endless over-the-top Camaros, Eclipses, WRX’es, etc. Trucks never have stock suspension – either they’re slammed inch off the ground or ride on 36-inch mudders. The rides are traded in either because the old owner is deploying, getting based somewhere else, or just found out he’s going to be a daddy and needs more appropriate/cheaper wheels.

  • avatar
    ant

    This is a fascinating post. Absolutely ripe for editorializing into the political realm, but unpicked in that regard.

    What car is that first instrument panel photo? I find its simple symmetry to be pleasing to the eye.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    Everyone should have to visit a pathology lab. Yeesh!

  • avatar
    ClutchCarGo

    I wonder how liens affect your ability to use one of these cars? Can the lien holder come after it?

  • avatar
    Steven Lang

    I operated and owned an auto auction that specialized in title pawns.

    https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/01/hammer-time-the-black-pawn/

    One of the more interesting chapters of my life.

    https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2010/07/hammer-time-title-pawn-pro/
    https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2010/08/hammer-time-title-pawn-cons/

    That part of my life has traveled a bit.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/classified/automotive/sc-cons-0226-autocover-repossession-20150220-story.html

    • 0 avatar
      Land Ark

      On the way to my mother’s and sister’s houses I pass by an ADESA location and I’ve never really been clear on what they do. I went to their site and it’s still not totally clear what they do. It almost seems like they run the entire middle between the title holder and the buyer of the auctioned vehicle. Do I have that about right?

  • avatar
    John

    I’ll bet good money every single one of the 549 owners of those vehicles would have been better off today if they’d bought a used Corolla.

    • 0 avatar
      matador

      Mr (or Mrs) Ford Five hundred owner did pretty well- over 100k miles on a car that had to be very cheap to purchase.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      I’m thinking they’d have been better off with the best private sale running vehicle in their area that they could purchase with whatever cash they could scrounge up at the time.

      • 0 avatar
        matador

        Probably true. I wonder how much maintenance was done to that car in those last 100k miles. But, if you don’t have much money, your options can be limited. If you can’t wrench, a 1991 Bravada isn’t your car.

        Of course, being poor taught me how to wrench! Necessity….

    • 0 avatar
      Xeranar

      at what price? The problem is that these people are already in a cycle where they’re underemployed most likely, suffering through an economic desert, and the title loan helps them in a pinch when they get reduced hours or injured….

      I was actually surprised we got this far before somebody made a snooty ‘I’m better than you’ kind of remark. Most of the title loan vendors aren’t picking on foolish people, they’re picking on desperate people who want to live and be and that is what they’re forced to do. The Mercedes is the possible lone exception in this group but even that has some arguable question marks over it’s head.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        When I hear “title loan” its in the same facepalm vein as “I dropped out of school” or “I knocked up this girl” or more recently “yeah we haven’t paid the property taxes in like two years”.

        In general I recognize the impotence of the concept of pawn in a local economy but how much usury is too much?

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          “I got a stereo on layaway at Wal-Mart.”
          “My wheels is rented.”
          “Got a big 64″ TV RTO.”
          “Need to go get a pop an’ some Camels.”

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          You should get some cards with the Captain Picard facepalm printed on them. You can hand them out when such a situation arises. Get ones with the Picard and Riker double facepalm for extraordinary situations.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Funny you should mention Picard. There is a brilliant gentleman in YT who edits TNG and blends them with the other ST shows and new audio to create a series akin to the Mirror Universe where Picard is the greatest villain in recorded history. I am big fan of his:

            youtube.com/watch?v=eZkxa6PP3B8&list=PLyeOqz0Vgsa4JvFqk3uJ5j13rsOxB77kx

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      And that would be, why exactly? Not all of these cars were pawned because they broke down. And its not like every corolla ever built has never broken down. I see late 90s and up Corolla/Prizims for cheap all the time with “needs engine” or “needs [automatic) trans” just like any other car.

      I dont even get that statement, its just silly if you think about it. Are you trying to say that every aspect of one’s life is improved because they own an ugly, noisy and exciting-as-plain-white-rice car? That magicly they’d be better off financially so they wouldnt require the services of a title loan place? Suddenly, because they bought a Toyota instead of what they did buy, life just goes smoothly without any bumps or cash shortages? Because Toyota’s NEVER need alternators, belts, tires, brakes, radiator, hoses, etc, so you can just buy a used one with its hood welded shut and never do anything to it.

      Oh, because they otherwise had to spend $12,000 a week repairing their terrible non-corolla cars, that is where their good fortune will come from! Lol are you kidding me?!

      Toyotaphiles amaze me. It isnt enough that they buy their car with their head firmly planted in their rear (rarely cross shopping or doing any research whatsoever, explains how Toyota managed to sell SOME Venzas and Tumdras), it isnt even enough that they drive around with their head in a similar position (cutting people off, parking in the left lane doing 5 mph below the speed limit, blocking other drivers any chance they get, pulling out in front of fast moving cars and then waddling along at 15 mph, failing to signal, driving with high beams on all the time because a $7 light bulb will break them). They STILL have to walk around so smug and arrogant, as though they and only they know some devine automotive secret that the rest of us are too stupid to get, and their arguments towards that end tend to be from the same head-up-rear position as everything else.

      My brother the idiot loves “payday stores” (and has done title loans frequently in the past until financing his current car when the last one was repoed). Guess he probably drives some typical American clunker, huh? Nahh, a Toyota Prius that he owes about 30% more than its worth (and 130% more than itll be worth when the Hybrid battery fails).

      But me, the dummy who drives a Ford to which he has a clear title to, has never in my life taken a title pawn or payday loan out. Wouldnt touch em with a 20′ pole.

      Disclaimer: Im not saying ALL Toyota drivers fit the above statements, but many upon many do. There are idiots in every make/model out there.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        You might benefit from taking a deep breath and counting to ten before posting.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        You seem to understand the concept of value vs cost, which is lost on I’d estimate 2/3rds of the populace. While your comments on Toyotas needing typical maintenance are accurate, because of resale cost their value is much lower than that if say, the clean D186 or DN101 Taurus (which costs must less and offers similar value when found in average condition).

    • 0 avatar
      seth1065

      John,
      I do not know about that it seems a bunch were in accidents and I would take my chance in most of these cars over a Corolla and doing 42k a year in said Corolla would be like a jail sentence.

  • avatar
    MWolf

    I know people who have taken out title loans, it usually ends up being a situation rife with desperation and short on time. Very predatory, indeed. Something I’d have no interest in doing, as losing a vehicle is no good option.

    I’ve suffered through bad credit, sub prime loans, $400 cars, and still never ended up doing THAT. Now my credit is better, and I just might refinance for a better interest rate. But I wouldn’t finance a single damn one of the cars up there. The Benz needs suspension work (not a small bill on that car), and everything else is so used up or wrecked so often that I’d fear it wouldn’t last the term of the loan, or some safety issue would come to light that would make me stuck with it.

    • 0 avatar
      matador

      Since these are dealer auctions, I’d have to wonder who the heck would buy most of these. It’s got to be tough to try to sell someone on a repossessed Ford 500 with over 400k miles. I don’t have Manheim data, but I’m sure there has to be better “Cheap BHPH fodder” car options for a dealer!

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    I’d buy that Mercedes 500 for as much as $4,000 if the motor was in good to very good condition, and just take the motor out if I had to.

    I know someone who ruined their motor (out of warranty) on a similar year S500 and the dealership they purchased the car from, new, quoted them just under $30,000 for a new motor + installation + 1 year warranty.

    This, on a vehicle that was already 5 years old, had over 60,000 miles on it, and was probably then worth MAYBE $36,000.

    They ended up finding a specialty motor shop that installed a rebuilt motor for around $12,000 IIRC.

  • avatar
    nrd515

    A friend of mine seems to have the ability to pick the good ones at the auctions, and avoid the lemon tree. His daily driver is an old “melty” F150 4×4, bare bones, in a blah sort of silver, AM/FM radio, A/C and that’s about it. it had 110K on it when he bought it, and it now has over 250K on it, with a water pump, a battery, a couple of belts, and a new stereo (the original one died at about the 10 year old mark) all he’s put into it. His previous gem was an old 1986? MB 300 in Black Cherry. It’s still around, his sister bought it from him and still drives it on no salt days. It’s in amazing shape, and has been as trouble free as an almost 30 year old car can be. Before that one, he had a first year Olds Bravada in an awful gold that was great until his wife wrecked it when she fell asleep coming home from her mother’s one night. She’s killed a lot of cars since they got married 30 years ago.

  • avatar
    Brett Woods

    That was a juicy good article to read. Gotta love an auction for mystery and history. VIN history tool! Awesome man. Passed many of those title loan places when I lived in a rough part of Phoenix a couple years. Always wondered what the deal was and what cars would get loans. Now I know.

  • avatar
    VolandoBajo

    @davefromcalgary thanks for the info. FYI, there used to be a Dave from Canada with a large farm where people did wierd things with older vehicles, and which he posted on Youtube.

    He had pissed off an ex-wife and/or a couple of ex-GF’s, and apparently he had once taken some naked baby bottom pictures of his son while he was changing diapers, plus he had some underaged guys hanging out at his farm, and he was accused of something like exposing himself because he peed on the side of a tree in front of an underage boy, or something like that.

    And a small clique of women started a petition against his making money on Youtube, and eventually got him banned.

    He seemed like a nice enough guy, though I don’t know the details of what he did or didn’t actually do that was supposed to be so wrong. But his videos were some really cool experiments in home-engineering of weird rides.

    And given the interest in autos, your name, your being a Canadian also, I thought you might have been him. I used to watch his videos a few years ago, but he has been of my radar since then.

    • 0 avatar
      Steven Lang

      That guy is scheduled to spend time in jail… again.

      It’s sad that a guy with such amazing talents can be destroyed by such nasty urges and perversions.

      • 0 avatar
        VolandoBajo

        What did he get convicted of? Any links?

        In the case of the first charges, it seemed like he might have run afoul of a warped application of Canadian child protection laws.

        That said, did he get tripped up with a real crime, or was it some more attempts at proving he is a ‘prevert’ using a strict definition that seems to outlaw even pictures of you own child when young, unclothed but in a non-sexual context.

        Though I personally banned any naked on a bearskin rug pictures of my son, so he wouldn’t have them haunting him as he grew older.

    • 0 avatar
      davefromcalgary

      wow, never heard of the guy… he doesn’t sound like someone I would chose to associate with either.

  • avatar
    fincar1

    Hey Bozi, Pew, oddly enough, is a name and not an acronym. If you’re rich enough you can set up foundations and trusts that carry your own name no matter how weird it is.

    Thanks for the informative article, which confirmed some suspicions I had.

  • avatar
    laserwizard

    Nice slam against these loan companies.

    The problem here is that the companies are not predatory – they don’t chase down people and force them to do jack.

    Once you are an ADULT, you are RESPONSIBLE for your stupidity and lack of judgment. No one forces you to go this route. Perhaps if you had lived below your means and actually saved money, you’d have a bit of cash to fall back on!

    I feel no sorrow for idiots who lose their cars and end up paying through the nose for their mistakes.

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