By on December 9, 2015

2015 Ford F-150

In November 2015, for the first time since March, Ford’s F-Series outsold the combined efforts of General Motors’ full-size truck twins in the United States.

November’s results won’t change the fact that 2015 will go down as the first year since 2009 that GM’s Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra will outsell their chief rival on a calendar year basis. Through the first eleven months of 2015, GM has sold 734,253 full-size pickup trucks, 39,110 more than the F-Series’ 695,143-unit total.

But November did mark the continuation of a turnaround for the F-Series, which struggled for much of 2015 in terms of volume because of low F-150 supply. Through the first-half of 2015, F-Series sales were down by more than 2 percent in a booming truck market. F-Series volume then increased in each of the last five months, rising by an average of eight percent over the course of the July-November period.

Indeed, November was the F-Series’ highlight from the second half, as total auto industry volume increased by just 1 percent and overall pickup truck volume grew by just 3 percent. F-Series sales jumped 10 percent to 65,192 units, the fifth consecutive 60,000+ month for the best-selling vehicle line in America.

With one month remaining on the calendar, F-Series sales are up 2 percent. The trucks, which account for three out of every ten Ford Motor Company U.S. sales, are on pace to rise to a nine-year U.S. volume high.

Meanwhile, at General Motors, the Silverado’s 5-percent improvement wasn’t strong enough to cancel out the Sierra’s 27-percent drop. The duo combined for a 6 percent, year-over-year loss.

2016 Chevrolet Colorado

Total GM pickup truck volume grew 2 percent, however, as the Colorado and Canyon midsize trucks that were just getting off the ground at this time a year ago combined for 8,466 November 2015 sales. The duo’s market share in the midsize category, 31 percent, was obviously far stronger than last November’s 14-percent achievement, but it was down from 32 percent in October, 37 percent in September, and 32 percent in August.

Colorado volume slipped to a ten-month low of 6,230 sales, well below its new-generation high-water mark of 8,881 sales in May. The Canyon’s 2,236-unit November result was similarly the lowest total since January.

2016 Toyota Tacoma blue

This highlights the dominance of the newly launched Toyota Tacoma, which accounted for half of all small/midsize pickup truck sales in America in November 2015. GM doesn’t build nearly as many Colorados and Canyons in a given month as Toyota sells Tacomas, but with interest in the GM twins expected to rise with the arrival of a four-cylinder diesel powerplant, commercial van production may be moved away from Wentzville, Missouri to free up production capacity for the Colorado and Canyon. For Toyota’s part, it plans to turn up the wick on Tacoma production as well.

Non-full-size pickup trucks aren’t attracting the kind of attention they did just a decade ago, but the favourable trend line points in their direction. In 2006, more than 20 percent of U.S. pickup truck buyers chose something other than a full-size truck. Just two years ago, in November 2013, that figure had fallen to just 11 percent. Last month, small/midsize pickup truck market share rose to nearly 14 percent as full-size truck volume grew just one percent.

imothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

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70 Comments on “Ford F-Series Turnaround Picks Up Speed, Ford Beats GM Twins In November 2015...”


  • avatar
    mikeg216

    In before the Australian, ford staying ahead of the curve again and yet still not selling to fleets yet and sales are beating gm.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      And with gas prices slated to go even lower for longer, now is indeed the best time ever to buy that pickup truck for the fence-sitters.

      Money is still cheap to borrow. Better get in before the Fed hikes the rates. Lenders are sure to beat the Fed to it sooner rather than later.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Now is the time for the used EV or Hybrid of your dreams as eventually things will get messed up again. Just today i read Iraq wants to terminate its defense agreement with Washington in favor of Moscow as a replacement. This would leave only the Saudis, Qataris, Emiratis, Bahrainians, and Kuwaitis as the only petro-states under DC’s thumb. Sounds like a lot but output from Qatar, UAE, and Bahrain isn’t all that much. Iraq had the mother load of under utilized fields.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          We get about 4% of our imported oil from Iraq. As long as Exxon, Shell, Lukoil, BP, etc are in Iraq, it doesn’t matter who has the defense agreement.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          28, I’d be awfully cautious about buying a USED EV or Hybrid. Just like I would be awfully cautious about buying a used CVT vehicle.

          I would advocate buying new. Or leasing, for some.

          Putin and Moscow are exhibiting the leadership and strength that these Arab & Persian nation-states need and are looking for.

          America’s influence has waned to the point where we are inconsequential and reduced solely to a consumer of products.

          Hell, Bashir Al-Assad said in English during a news interview, “Nobody takes America or Europe seriously.” So that leaves only Putin and Moscow to turn to because China is having its own internal problems, like the US.

          But this is the way that the majority of Americans wanted it. This is what the majority voted for. Not once, but twice.

          Gotta respect that what the majority wanted. Not the way I woulda gone, but I respect their wishes, and just work around it.

          So I can live with that. The future belongs to the youth of America. Let them decide how and what they want it to be. And let them pay for it too. I already did what I wanted to do with my life.

          Most people my age are not affected by what the young will bring upon themselves.

          If people my age haven’t made it by now, you know like having enough money to live comfortably for the rest of their lives, then they chose badly.

          There ain’t no do-overs in life. You gotta get it right, the first time.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Don’t be cautious about buying a used Toyota or Ford hybrid. They will be reliable for a long time. Their powertrains are some of the most reliable powertrains that either manufacturer makes.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Some of the orphaned stuff sure, but I wouldn’t hesitate at a used Prius in the right condition for the right money. I’d have to do some research but Volt and Leaf sound like decent propositions for the right money in the right condition. The battery pack cost and its availability are the major variables in those two models.

            “Hell, Bashir Al-Assad said in English during a news interview, “Nobody takes America or Europe seriously.” So that leaves only Putin and Moscow to turn to because China is having its own internal problems, like the US.”

            I’m inclined to agree with Al-Assad. Sixteen years of Bush/Obama has wrecked the nation.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            bbal, you are right, as usual, but only if the previous owner has taken care of it. And most of the time the buyer won’t know that.

            When a person buys a Certified Pre-owned jewel, the only thing certified is that it is pre-owned. Unless there is a remaining factory warranty repair costs go to the buyer.

            Been there. Done that. And at a time when I could ill afford it. Don’t ever want to do that again.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Prius, Prius V, Prius C, C-Max, Escape Hybrid, Fusion Hybrid, MKZ Hybrid, Camry Hybrid, and Volt are all excellent used buys.

            As HDC said, as with all used cars, make sure it’s in good shape.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            No Honda Hybrids used though. Scary…

        • 0 avatar
          Sigivald

          Doesn’t matter.

          Because if they don’t sell the oil their state collapses.

          So they *have to* sell oil.

          Which is why OPEC is dead as a cartel, especially combined with increased non-OPEC production.

          Even *Russia* can’t “not sell oil”, for the same reason.

          (And to expand on what bball said, remember that it doesn’t matter “which team” they sell oil to, very much.

          Because oil is a worldwide market, and it’s basically interchangeable [not completely, but that’s nitpicking].

          If Iraq “sells all its oil to China”, say, that just means China buys less from whoever it’s buying from now, and we buy *that* instead.

          It’s a global *commodity* – “changing sides” doesn’t even have a meaning when selling oil.

      • 0 avatar
        George B

        Highdesertcat, car buyers remember the pain of $4/gallon gasoline. I’d guess that most people buying a full size pickup appreciate the current low price of gasoline, but expect it to go back up to $3/gallon or higher during the life of the truck. I was happy to pay only $1.729/gallon yesterday, but wouldn’t be shocked to pay twice as much in a couple years.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          George B, it is a certainty that gas prices will rise.

          Oil producing states like New Mexico are dead broke because of low oil prices/revenue and illegal immigrants sucking us dry.

          Oil and gas prices were artificially kept high for decades so governments and municipalities could swindle the consumers. It was all about the revenue.

          But until the price of fuel rises, you still have that dream vehicle you always wanted, and you can always trade it off at some future point.

          That’s what people did every time gas went over $4/gal. And that’s what they’ll do again.

          And don’t forget what many people did in the past with their vehicles they could no longer afford. They walked away from it. Ditto houses. Ditto boats, etc.

          A circle that goes ’round and ’round.

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            “Oil and gas prices were artificially kept high for decades so governments and municipalities could swindle the consumers.”

            I thought gas taxes were per-gallon, not a percentage of sale price like other sales and use taxes.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            HH, States derive revenue from any and all mining (oil, gas, coal, minerals, ore) and the depressed price for crude is killing many oil-producing states.

            Per gallon fuel taxes (gas, diesel, heating oil, kerosene, jet fuel and the like) goes to the Feds, supposedly for the Highway and infrastructure projects.

            Like the Social Security “Lockbox”, how well did that work out? Nothing but Congressional IOUs to show for all those tax dollars.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        True. But I’ll stick with my car. It’s gotten to the point where I can fill up the Golf SportWagen for a little over $20′ worth of diesel and then drive it for a week and a half in mixed environments. The mileage shouldn’t decrease too badly when the car gets its TDI fix, but whatever.

        If I need a pickup truck, though, the new F-150 will probably be my first choice. My stepdad seems to be looking into one as it is.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Mikeg216,
      Yes, you got in front of me!

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I wonder what impacted GMC’s Sierra numbers? 26% is a rather large change in the trend, especially if no other vehicle was hit the same or similar.

    The F Series have sold well, remembering Ford has been offering some nice incentives to move the pieces aluminium. I still stand by my comment, the aluminium F-150 will need to be priced competitively with the other steel pickups to sell.

    The problem with the F Series numbers is the numbers include the SuperDutys. How many additional SuperDutys were sold? Can we state that the improvement is all due to the effect of the aluminium wonder trucks?

    The Colorado/Canyon numbers have been gyrating throughout the year. The Wentzville plant still punches out the vans. Maybe the time vehicles sit on the lots could help explain the Sierra’s woes and Colorado/Canyon fluctuation.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      >The problem with the F Series numbers is the numbers include the SuperDutys [sic].

      If GM combines their HD numbers with their half-tons, why is it a problem if Ford does it?

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Drzhivago138,
        Because the SuperDutys proportionally represent a larger chunk of the F Series than do the Silverado/Sierra with GMs trucks.

        Also, the way incentives are used to move the pickups. Just because the aluminium pickups have a specific incentive program doesn’t mean the SuperDutys have the same.

        The pickups really should be broken down into smaller and more logical groupings. This would make it easier to disseminate the data. The current system of lumping all into one only benefits the manufacturer and not the consumer.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          It doesn’t hurt the consumer. Most people buying trucks don’t give two craps about Ford, GM, or FCA breaking out HD trucks from the half tons.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            bball40dtw,
            I agree with you in relation to the numbers by the majority. Really does the consumer care if Toyota sell more Tacos than Tundras or even Corollas vs Camrys?

            But the people at Ford such as yourself care. These number are very important. It will indicate how well a particular model sells.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Well, plenty of people know the specific breakdown and how much Ford makes per truck.

          • 0 avatar
            TomHend

            Bball, You recently wrote that you rented a Taurus, how did you like it?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I like the Taurus/MKS as a used vehicle. The MKS is an especially good bargain right now. For between $20K and $25K, you can get a one year old MKS with a warranty that goes until 2020.

            The Taurus isn’t the most space efficient vehicle on the inside and it depreciates rather quickly. However, it is comfortable, drives nice on the freeway, is safe, has more than adequate power, and has a reliable engine/transmission combo. If my daughter were 16 instead of 3, the used car on the top of the list would be a D-platform Taurus. Heck, if I was buying a car for me right now, it would probably be a used MKS. Since I like my C-Max, I am waiting to buy a Continental, Fusion ST/MKZ 3.0TT, or Bronco.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Just be prepared to pay a bit for the water pump when it needs replaced. ;)

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Right.

            Hopefully that doesn’t happen. And if you buy a 2014 CPO MKS, they warranty will take care of it for another 5 years.

            If you want to go a cheaper route, just put into your bank account what you would have spent on a car with less depreciation. Rolling the dice will probably go in your favor.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Tom Hend,
            It’s odd you interjected and started to discuss and out of tune issue.

            Hmmm………..has me wondering, are you a Ford employee as well?

            So, what’s your views on the great FE advances made by Ford’s move to aluminium.

            How is 2016 Ford profits looking?

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @BigAl – Ford’s ratio of F150’s to HD’s is the SAME. It is basically 63-65% LD and the remainder HD. Even recently Ford said HD’s are roughly 1/3 of sales when they were talking about upgraded to their plants making HD’s.

          Unless you can post some proof to the contrary your “steel HD’s are saving Ford’s “F Series” sales bacon is just masculine bovine effluvia.

          • 0 avatar
            TomHend

            HA, no, not a Ford employee, there are some posters here that make well thought our comments and I respect their opinion, I am looking at a used Taurus /MKS, the space issue concerns me.

        • 0 avatar
          Sigivald

          “Because the SuperDutys proportionally represent a larger chunk of the F Series than do the Silverado/Sierra with GMs trucks.”

          Do they? By how much?

          (I do not mean this as a “prove it, liar!” – I mean “I seriously have no idea if this is so, or *how anyone knows*”.

          Do we have good numbers on this anywhere, from anyone?)

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Sigivald – I don’t have recent data but GM tends to be 20% HD and 80% LD. Ram is similar to Ford with roughly 65% LD and 35% HD.

            http://news.pickuptrucks.com/2011/01/the-ultimate-guide-to-us-pickup-truck-sales-in-2010.html

            http://news.pickuptrucks.com/2014/04/who-sold-the-most-pickups-in-2013.html

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      The F150 is typically around 60%-70% of total F-Series sales. Transaction prices were also up $3800 over November 2014. Much of that is due to reduced incentive spending.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        bball,
        That’s a huge variation. The variation is large enough to even have a drop in the aluminium F-150 and a subsequent increase in SuperDutys leaving an overall increase in the total F Series lineup.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          It is a huge variation. Especially because you are talking 60K+ units. Some publications have run with 70%. Others have run with 60%. But just like the whole Morgan Stanley analyst saying 90% of Ford’s profits were F-Series based, no one really has a hard answer. The most profitable plants for Ford this year have been Chicago, Flat Rock, Oakville, and Louisville. None of those make trucks.

          • 0 avatar
            SC5door

            I don’t see how Chicago is. What is their FTQ? Less than 50%?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I should have said, “The most profitable products for Ford, this year, have been made at Chicago (Explorer), Flat Rock (Mustang), Oakville (Edge/MKX), and Louisville (Escape/MKC).”

            LAP and OAP have been assembling cash in 2015. CAP is dragged down by the Taurus and MKS.

          • 0 avatar
            SC5door

            “LAP and OAP have been assembling cash in 2015. CAP is dragged down by the Taurus and MKS.”

            Have you seen on how many vehicles are on hold at one time at CAP? Take a walk out back and see all the 502’s sitting out there.

            Regardless of vehicle, FTQ is beyond awful. Thousands of cars on hold after the launch of the `16 502—I wouldn’t touch it with a ten foot pole.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I’m not saying Chicago is running smoothly. U502 has had a litany of issues since original launch. It’s still a profitable vehicle, but it probably could be an even bigger cash cow.

            I haven’t been to CAP in awhile, but I’m sure it’s similar to what Wayne looked like during the 2012 Focus roll out or what Flat Rock looked like when it was full of the MKZs and Fusions from Hermosillo.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      @BAFO – RL Polk does break down pickup sales by 1/2 tons vs 1/2 tons, based on registrations. The Silverado 1500 always spanks the F-150, but so what?

      McDonalds always spanks In-N-Out. Now where would you rather eat??

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    But, but, but, the GM twins are over priced, ugly, and have – PUSHRODS.

    Rabble! Rabble! Rabble!

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Right. People always have the same complaints. The market still buys them because they are really good products.

      The F150 doom and gloom people remind me of those that predicted failure for the most recent Silverado/Sierra.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        bball,
        I have yet to read of the doom and gloom regarding the F Series? Can you post links to these?

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          https://www.google.com/#q=f-series+sales+poor

          It was the same when GM redid their trucks and sales started slowly.

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            This.

            And there was plenty of B&B hand wringing that the Ford all aluminum truck was a mistake.

            Back in the Bertel days, TTAC predicted that GM would have finished selling the last of their GMT900 trucks about 6 months ago, and would be in near collapse due to channels stuffing of the old Silvy/Sierra into dealers. GM said it was to assure sufficient inventory was in place during the swap over.

            GM moved the old iron a good 18 months faster than the old EIC predicted here, and we know the rest of the story as GM units hit their stride.

            I suspect that in 2016 the truck industry will return back to normal.

            Ford on top

            GM twins in a strong second place

            RAM in third

            Toyota in fourth

            Nissan in a distant fifth

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          “I have yet to read of the doom and gloom regarding the F Series? Can you post links to these?”

          BUT you have no issues making doom and gloom comments about the aluminum F150 with almost every post of yours!

          Dude, post some proof.

          Ford like almost everyone else did not expect oil prices to crash.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        bball40dtw – GM was off to a slow start with the GMT K2XX trucks and at the time I assumed incorrectly that they were in trouble. GM did not report any start up issues but I did notice a slow dealer uptake of new trucks. That to me indicated that GM did have troubles with the change over. They just happened to be not as vocal as Ford.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      They’re all overpriced, actually.

      • 0 avatar
        johnny_5.0

        Once you take the usual $10K-$15K off MSRP they aren’t so bad. I was just looking at F-150 inventory at a local dealer the other day and they seemed to have an endless supply of XLT supercrews with the 2.7 for $28K-29K before haggling. There were also a bunch of XL supercrews optioned up like an XLT with the V8 for $29K. V8 FX4 Lariats for $36K. I actually think car pricing is more depressing the truck pricing right now.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Pushrods are one of the only reasons I would buy those models. Ford and Toyota have me covered if I want an OHC truck.

  • avatar
    balreadysaid

    Just traded my 13′ f150 eco slob for a 16’silvy ltz 1500. 7k more for a similar lariat! It needs a hand jobby option with warm hand control before I’ll even consider it! I liked my f150 but not enough to pay 7k more for less truck. 8 speed tranny with 5.3 is better than my tuned eco boost with custom built mpt tunes. I’m very happy with this new truck and won’t buy another Ford till they have a v8 that can get this incredibly good fuel mileage. I got 26mpg on back roads. Same trip in the f150 Is 16mpg. And I leased this for 400 while the dealer wrote me a 20k check. My truck had body damage that I got a 3k check for. Gm did good by me, and next time around I will try them first. Ford isn’t all that good anyway. The open rear end is no where near as good as the ram or GM posi. In tight city driving the posi years work way better pulling out into heavy traffic on Sandy road corners from a stop. The 8 speed also gets that 5.3 into the sweet spot quick, also keeps it there till you let off. GM has a winner in my book..

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I’d say that might be their only product which truly delivers/overdelivers as a new product (cue the neo-GM defenders). I used to add Corvette but they found a way to screw it up too (at least the top trim).

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “I got 26mpg on back roads. Same trip in the f150 Is 16mpg.”

      Don’t bitch about the Ford, if you had been driving a Tundra you would have got 12. Those roller cam push rod motors really suck don’t they. Why does GM keep putting them in trucks?

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        If find it all depends on how you drive them. The Ecoboost motors are sensitive to driver inputs. I know one guy who says his EB3.5 is hard on gas and another marvels at his 25 mpg highway. Both trucks are identical other than colour.
        My best (US MPG) with my 5.4 is 20.4 on the highway. That is going south to Vancouver via the Fraser Canyon. I have to behave to get that. My brotherinlaw has a Platinum with the 5.4 and is lucky to get 18 mpg(US)on the highway but being a Staff Sergeant he tends to get away with speeding ;)

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    Interesting info about sales of the new Colorado and Canyon from autonews.com:

    The numbers tell the tale:

    • The Canyon’s average transaction price of about $34,100 is tops in the midsize-pickup segment, data from Edmunds.com show. The Colorado’s is $31,800, higher than the segment-leading Toyota Tacoma’s $30,015, though that should rise after the Tacoma’s recent redesign.

    • The percentage of buyers from other brands — the conquest rate — is 56 percent for Canyon and nearly 50 percent for the Colorado, GM says. The Colorado’s top conquests are Tacoma and Ford F-150 buyers.

    • Around 40 percent of Colorados are rolling off dealership lots accessorized with bike racks and other gear, boosting dealer and GM profits, the company says.

    Perhaps the most important measure of success doesn’t show up in the Colorado’s numbers at all: Sales of the big brother Silverado are red hot, too, erasing concerns that the Colorado would simply siphon sales away from GM’s biggest money maker.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      GM’s not foolin’ anyone! The Colorado’s top pickup “conquest” is the Silverado. No other pickup even comes close.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        As someone who has no dog in this fight: What are your sources for that claim? Carlson Fan provided a source for his argument.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Is GM really a “source”??

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            I dunno, but it’s better than nothing. Provide your source and we’ll have to see which one is better.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            reuters.com/article/us-gm-pickups-idUSKBN0ND2EH20150422#UfPdBftZbOCMp4bY.97

            90% of Colorado/Canyon buyers traded in another GM. 25% of those were Silverados and Sierras.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            As Sister Mary Elephant would say: Thank-you.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Drzhivago138 – I do believe that initially most of the Colorado buyers were “internal” but over the year more of the buyers have come from “outside” GM ranks. Intuitively that makes sense since early adopters are more likely to be loyalists.

            I found this interesting:

            2015 Colorado*
            Average age of buyers 58
            Buyers under 35 10%
            College graduates 40%
            Median household income $83,318

            2012 Colorado
            Average age of buyers 63
            Buyers under 35 2.9%
            College graduates 30%
            Median household income $59,211

            This would indicate that the Colorado is NOT a lifestyle vehicle for the young and sporty but for aging boomers.

            This tends to coincide with what I’ve seen. Most of the small trucks I see are driven by young people with no children or little children or empty-nesters. That fits in to my own personal preferences. When I was single I had a small truck and a reg cab 3/4 ton. Married I went from extended cab small truck to crew cab large truck. I’ll stay full sized until I don’t need the space or capacity inside the cab or in the box.

            This link is where CarlsonFan is getting his information.(Wednesday, December 9, 2015)
            http://www.autonews.com/article/20151102/OEM/311029965/gms-told-ya-so-small-pickups

            DenverMike’s link was from earlier in the year Wed Apr 22, 2015.

            Basically, both are right but from different times of the year.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            Interesting Lou…perhaps they should wear Buick badges in light of that!

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    From the same article Denver Mike got his info:

    “Owners of full-size Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra trucks made up more than 16 percent of the consumers who switched into both smaller GM pickups, according to IHS data.”

    “GM officials said the IHS data fails to take into account new buyers and Canyon marketing manager Kenn Bakowski said more than half of all the sales of the new trucks are buyers new to the company”

  • avatar
    johnny_5.0

    I like that Blue Flame color on the F-150. If I had to buy one right now I’d probably want an LTZ Z71 Silverado with the 6.2. You get a great engine and a good 8 speed auto. Ford’s habit of separating powertrain upgrades from platform/exterior/interior refreshes can be maddening depending on when you are in the market. The 10 speed will be here soon. The 3.5EB is about to get a big boost (ha!) in output. Just like their inability to do so with the last two generations of Mustangs, it would be nice if they could make the stars align and update everything at once.

    • 0 avatar
      johnny_5.0

      After inspiring myself to look at local Silverado inventory with the 6.2, I noticed this at the bottom of the vehicle details for one dealer and it was funny in a sad way.

      “This vehicle is Guaranteed to be RECALL FREE”

      It’s on every single new vehicle they have in inventory.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      johnny_5.0 – I suspect that separating drivetrain upgrades from body/chassis upgrades is to reduce the number of issues that tend to occur with a whole new model. It also has the desired effect of making people more comfortable with a body/style change since the drivetrain is a carry over and vise versa.

      I really like the 2015 Silverado but I’m not a fan of the 2016 facelift. I was disappointed but not surprised to see Consumer Reports “Not Recommend” the Silverado due to too many durability issues.

      Blue Flame is a nice colour but from what I’ve seen, it shows up scratches too easily.

  • avatar
    laserwizard

    It is laughable when a website that says it speaks the truth about something turns around and is deceptive. Total Recall Motors sycophants like to play the fuzzy math game – first, they claim Brand X and GMC are totally different, but when they want to claim they beat Ford in sales, they add them up as if they were one pickup.

    TTAC has just done the fuzzy math – nice try, but you fool no one.

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  • Flipper35: Our Pacifica has all that tech, including putting nav prompts in between the speedometer and tachometer. I...

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