By on December 16, 2015

2015 Ford F-150

Ford will have a rear-wheel drive, hybrid F-150 truck by the end of the decade, Ford CEO Mark Fields told NPR on Tuesday.

“Well, we do have plans to have a rear-wheel drive hybrid truck but the end of the decade. So yes, we’re working on electrified F-series, and it’s really around a conventional hybrid,” Fields said during an interview.

The automaker announced earlier this month that it would invest $4.5 billion in electrification and will unveil a refreshed hybrid Fusion at the North American International Auto Show next month as part of that plan. The hybridized, full-size pickup will arrive by 2020, although the automaker doesn’t plan on total market domination for the truck — at least right now.

“Well, it’s a big challenge right now, obviously, because where the cost of a gallon of gas is, (buying a hybrid car is) not a very good financial decision by the consumer. But part of our job as a company and as an automotive manufacturer and now as a mobility company, is to think of what the world is going to look like five, 10 and even 15 years from now,” Fields told NPR.

The CEO said the market for hybrid cars is admittedly very small — about 2.5 percent of the total market, according to Fields.

Fields offered few details about the truck, other than to say it would be rear-wheel drive and would be a conventional hybrid. It’s unclear if the truck will go on sale, or be an engineering study for the automaker. A spokesman for Ford didn’t immediately comment on the announcement by Fields.

Toyota is widely considered to be working on a hybrid pickup to bring to market soon. The two automakers had an agreement to work together on hybrid technology that ultimately fell apart (Autoweek’s story about the sour relationship is here).

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79 Comments on “Ford CEO Mark Fields: Hybrid F-150 Will Be Here By 2020...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    This is actually pretty cool, despite my reservations/disagreements on Ford’s turbo programme.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Derek and I talked about this 2-3 years ago. Ford has been working on it for awhile.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        GM offered electrified pickup trucks some time ago, and they didn’t become a sensation. Most buyers avoided them like the plague.

        IIRC, the GM Hybrids had an electric motor as part of the transmission, and GMC even offered all-wheel steering on the Hybrid model. They bombed out. The whole concept bombed out and GM pulled them from the product line.

        • 0 avatar
          tresmonos

          As much as this bombed and as much as the two mode GMT900 two mode hybrid was panned, both were solid pieces of technology.

          Nothing prepares you for the lack of ambient powertrain sound when you are pulling a boat.

          I miss living in Detroit with my college friends.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Right. The Two-Mode was a good piece of kit. It ended up being too expensive while, at the same time, having a reduction in tow capability. Still a good design and tech.

            Detroit misses you too.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            bbal, do you think that the HEV F150 will be any less expensive?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            HDC-

            Yes, I would expect it to not be as expensive as the GM two mode system. Ford is not afriad to have lower hybrid trims and they will use economies of scale to keep prices down. We don’t know what engine they will pair with the system either. I wouldn’t expect a large V8 like GM used.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            bbal, I find your forecast very interesting but I really don’t know what the different variables will be, i.e. a four-motor set-up with one electric motor in each wheel-hub; or a single-motor set-up like that of GM, parallel with the transmission; or maybe even a dual-motor set-up, in series with the drive-shafts for the front and rear wheel differentials.

            Also, I’m not as optimistic as you are about pricing because I thought the Ecoboost V6 was overpriced by $10K IMO.

            To me it appears that Ford deliberately charged the extra money for the Ecoboost V6 upfront to offset possible repair and/or replacement costs anticipated during the factory warranty period.

            However, time will tell, and I will not be buying one. Although I am curious what other options Ford will offer for the die-hard ICE fans at that same time Ford will bring out a HEV F150.

            If the HEV F150 is the only thing offered in that class, I would forecast more people voting with their feet and buying an F250.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Ford charges what they do for the EB 3.5TT because it’s not a cheap engine to build, it’s the top dog engine, and people are happy to pay for it.

            Ford wouldn’t make the F150 Hybrid only. It would be an engine option like anything else. There is still an ICE Fusion. Ford will be adding nine or so Hybrid models over the next few years. The more they offer, the cheaper they can make the tech.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Yup.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Highdesertcat,
            I would even buy a XD Cummins diesel before a hybrid pickup.

            A friend of mine’s kid used to work for Toyota as a mechanic and he said the Prius was only good for around town.

            A guy owned a Prius and Camry and decided to drive the Prius from Newcastle to Sydney everday for work covering around 80 miles each was on the freeway. It was costing more to run the Prius on fuel than the Camry.

            I forsee this as an issue with pickups, I would think most would with full size pickups live in the suburbs or further out where distance is traveled.

            Even a VM diesel powered Ram would be better than this hybrid Ford pickup.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            There is a lady in my area who used her Prius to commute to her job at White Sands Missile Range. She thought she was happy with it.

            After about 4 years of this daily commute she traded off the Prius for a Corolla and saw her gas bill go down. Her commute included a climb up the Organ Pass at 7880 ft elevation and maybe the weight of the Prius vs the Corolla was the difference.

            That was her venture into Hybrids. She’s back to gas now and drives a 2014 Avalon Touring. Her husband, a retired State Cop drives a 2012 Tundra 5.7 4dr 4×4 Limited — a truck I aspire to when I trade off my 2011 Tundra 5.7 DoubleCab SR5.

    • 0 avatar
      M1EK

      “A friend of mine’s kid used to work for Toyota as a mechanic and he said the Prius was only good for around town.

      A guy owned a Prius and Camry and decided to drive the Prius from Newcastle to Sydney everday for work covering around 80 miles each was on the freeway. It was costing more to run the Prius on fuel than the Camry.”

      Typical FUD.

      Most people in the real world get better highway mileage in the Prius than they do city mileage in the Prius, and there is no universe where you get better mileage in the Camry, unless your Prius has completely flat tires or something.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Posts on how genius this is because Toyota and Ford are working on the projects in 3, 2, 1…

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Well it was a good idea when GM did it too. It was just a very expensive and complicated idea that didn’t translate into enough sales. Still, the GM hybrid trucks were good vehicles.

      Can I get a Sierra Hybrid with Quadrasteer?

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Ronnie wrote an article explaining the crux of the GM truck hybrid was an existing special fuel efficient but otherwise standard transmission, IIRC.

        g2g

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        BBall,
        The Hybrids were not exactly brilliant as far as towing went?

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          No, a 6100 lbs towing capacity wasn’t great. It’s fine for people towing 25′ boats or jet-skis though. Ford will have to make sure their hybrid F150 has better tow ratings than that, or it will need to be sold at a relatively small premium over the NA V6 with similar ratings.

        • 0 avatar
          Carlson Fan

          The Tahoe Hybrid had a reduced tow rating over the regular ‘Hoe due to the hybrid system but if I remember correctly it was still rated to tow 5700 lbs.

          When I was snowmobiling in the Black Hills, SD a few years back someone with a hybrid Escalade parked in the hotel lot was towing a tandem axle 28′ enclosed V-nose trailer.

          EDIT: OK bball I guess I was low w/5700 number. Over 3 ton is hardly anything to sneeze at. Still pretty respectable IMHO for a hybrid.

          My 25’ boat goes 7500 lbs+ easy so I considered the hybrid Tahoe in ’07 but after learning of the reduced towing capacity had to pass.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Early ones may have been 5700. The last model year could tow 6100.

            I should have said 20′ boat. Boats seem to gain weight big time when you get over 20′. My 19′ Four Winns only weighs 2500 lbs.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            Do you know anyone with a hybrid Tahoe or the like? I’d love to know what people are getting for fuel economy out of those things.

            Towing w/that transmission in the hybrid scared me as I generally keep my vehicles for a long time. I don’t even want to know what it would cost to rebuild one when the time came. Or who could even work on it.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The guy down the street had one. He just bought traded it in and bought a new Yukon XL for his wife. He said that he got 17 MPG with the hybrid, and gets 15 MPG with the 6.2L.

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            We hauled a 27′ boat with an engineering pre-production two mode Escalade. I’m sure we were close to that 6100 lb rating and it seemed robust, though I wasn’t in the driver’s seat.

            Edit: yeah the fuel efficiency really didn’t justify the product option, but I still reveled in the concept and execution. I was sad to see development stop. I can only hope it’s still going. A lot of the same team that developed the Volt was on that program. I don’t know what they’re up to these days.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I hauled my 19′ boat up north last year in a preproduction Transit 250 3.5TT. Escalade might be cooler, but I love that [email protected] van.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            “He said that he got 17 MPG with the hybrid, ”

            I would have expected better than that. Our standard ‘Hoe always shows right at 16.5 average on the DIC which means we get around 16 as it usually reads a 1/2 MPG optimistic. Many are reporting better fuel economy out of that 6.2 than the 5.3 in the SUVs.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Fuel economy could have been better with the two mode system. It was smooth, worked well, and did a good job with fuel economy in the city. On the freeway, GM’s V8s are better.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          RobertRyan,
          Battery power is not the best in commercial applications.

          As an example use your cordless drill and see how many 1/8″ hole you can drill for riveting. The put a 1/2″ masonary bit in and drill some holes.

          This would be no different than driving a vehicle empty then driving loaded.

          The battery doesn’t like to be loaded.

          When the battery dies in the ass after 30 miles do you then rely on the 15.6mpg EcoThirst? That’s unloaded.

          Plus the vehicle must carry around that extra weight for to power and generate energy for the hybrid.

          If hybrid was that good why aren’t HDTs using this technology already? The transport industry would adopt this prior to the average Joe/Jane who represent 75% of actual pickup SUV come car operators.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @BAFO – Around 40% of pickup buyers are official/certified “Fleet” buyers, at least for fullsize pickups. Clearly most don’t go to the “lifestyle” or “SUV with a Balcony™” crowd, as you like to think*.

            Point is hybrids would work for fleets and ‘work trucks’ that are put away at night and mostly do light jobs and mostly local. Think utilities. And infrastructure. Municipalities. Or Orkin.

            There was a time for wide use of light duty (but big) diesel vehicles. 1982.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            DenverMike-

            You know better than to respond to that trolling post.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            BAFO you obviously have no clue how a Hybrid vehicle works. The battery doesn’t “die” after 30 miles of use, it is recharged ever time you use the brakes, slow down or when it is most efficient to allow the ICE to generate more power than is currently needed to power the vehicle.

            That is why hybrids are the future as they recover and reuse energy that would otherwise be wasted when slowing down, coasting, ect.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “BAFO you obviously have no clue”

            It isn’t obvious to him. He’s truly that stupid.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            bball, Scoutdude, etc,
            I am not trolling.

            Aluminium along with diesel power has been adopted eons ago by the transport industry.

            When it comes to efficiency gains then the transport industry would adopt this.

            EV and hybrid power is quite limited in its successful application.

            Taxis in inner city regions do use hybrid and EV.

            But these vehicles don’t hardly work, plus their are tax incentives to use this tech.

            Really I do believe that using a hybrid pickup for load and tow applications is just a fantasy.

            It’s a waste of resources. Ford would be better off producing a small diesel F-150 for commercial applications.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Who ever said it was going to be used for towing and heavy load applications? It may, but it may not. Also, we have no idea what engine, transmission, or other hybrid components are going to be used. A hybrid F150 would most likely be cheaper than a diesel F150 as well.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            @BAFO gov’t incentives for purchasing hybrids went away some time ago. So the only incentives are meeting CAFE for Ford and for the buyer lower total cost of operation which this promises to be the best of any Pickup. Of course if Toyota does move forward it will be more of a contest. However Toyota doesn’t have the economy of scale in the full size pickup segment that Ford has so it makes less sense for them at this point.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Just because the body is aluminum, and a hybrid F150 and small truck Tacoma didn’t have a new grille, the Australian market Hilux wins often across challenging Chicken Tax terrain. Also, L200 isn’t like the EcoDiesel Ram, and sometimes it’s not a payload minus Duramax towing, and suburban Texas ranch owners. Denali.

    There, all done!

  • avatar
    LeMansteve

    The instant torque provided by an electric motor seems like a no-brainer for a truck application. I wonder why it has taken so long for the major manufacturers to develop one. Cost? Perception? Customer acceptance?

    It’s interesting that Fields specifically says it will be a RWD hybrid truck. Start simple, test the waters, learn your lessons, then develop a 4WD version later I suppose.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      I wouldn’t assume that “RWD” means that there will not be a 4WD version. Look at it more from the perspective that it’s a RWD truck platform. Ford will want to put this in other BOF RWD vehicles as well.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        I would assume that RWD means that when introduced the Hybrid will only be available in a RWD version. I do not think that means there won’t eventually be a 4wd Hybrid, just that I would expect that not to be available in the first model year. I can’t imagine that they are not setting up the transaxle to handle a transfer case from the get go. Ford offered the Escape Hybrid in FWD and AWD.

        The F series is really the only BOF vehicle left in the car and light truck segments. Though I certainly can see many of the components being used in the Transit.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    Maybe gas mileage would be better if it weren’t the size of a semi tractor.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      Bit of an exaggeration, slightly bigger tthan the Global Ranger. Still question why you would have a hybrid version

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Gas prices will have to go up. It may make sense for a fleet customer if the fuel economy is very good. Ford hybrid systems are long lasting, reliable, and have good reputations in the US. I can see Ford carving a niche out with a hybrid F150.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          Well at least for the short term WTI is going to likely test $30. I’m starting to be able to predict short term moves now. Last week I was seeing a very oversold pattern, and through it would go up – called the spike to the day. Took a big dump today and looking at the relative strength index we could test $30 by Christmas. I’d put my money on $31.

          Call a few more swings and I might start putting my money where my electrons are.

        • 0 avatar
          Carlson Fan

          “Gas prices will have to go up. It may make sense for a fleet customer if the fuel economy is very good.”

          Especially considering most fleet vehicles never leave town which is where a hybrid shines.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Right. It may be in a model where towing isn’t extremely necessary. If it’s a few thousand dollar premium over the entry level V6, it may be worth it for a business. When I had a fleet, it certainly would have been.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Any urban fleet might gain some benefit from a hybrid truck but for any fleet used in a rural setting it would be a waste of money and time.
            The sits 5 sleeps 2 night shift would save a ton of money with these trucks ;)

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Then start offering diesels for larger vehicles.

          As you can see with the Ram and Colorado diesel power is a cheaper option than EVs or hybrids.

          How much will the tab will the taxpayer be slugged with? When the world is ready for this technology then it will become viable.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Proof that the Ram and Colorado diesels are a cheaper option than the yet to be released F150 Hybrid?

            Based on Ford and Toyota’s other Hybrid offerings the reality is that the price premium for the Hybrid will certainly be lower than the diesels are in the Ram and Colorado. The MPG will be much better in the city and mixed driving. Finally the cost of maintenance and repairs will be much lower for a Ford/Toyota Hybrid than for any diesel. No DEF to buy and maintain, longer brake life, longer oil change intervals with less oil capacity. Longer transmission life. I’d expect the average battery pack life to top 200K or maybe more.

            If Ford can keep the results of MPG improvement in line with what they achieve with the Fusion I’d expect to see ratings of at least 32mpg city and 30 Hwy with a 31 combined. VS the Ram EcoDiesel at 20/28/23. Even if the improvement is only ~75% of that of the Fusion then it will still be somewhere around 30/28/29. So it will do way better than the diesels in everything but hwy MPG and meet or come very close to meeting them there.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Yes, Scoutdude.

            How much are these taxpayer funded vehicles without all of those handouts?

            They are still costing X amount per vehicle, irrespective of the how much the consumer pays.

            The handout money has to come from somewhere.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            BAFO, again where is your proof? There are no numbers for the yet to be released F150 Hybrid. However you can extrapolate based on the improvement that Ford (and Toyota) obtain from their Hybrid vehicles and the relative cost differences.

            You could also look at what VW achieves with their Hybrid Jetta vs the best gas or diesel versions. Since I know you are challenged I’ve complied the numbers below

            Hybrid 42/48/45
            1.8t AT 25/37/30
            Diesel At 31/45/36

            Now VW’s archetecture is different than what Ford and Toyota have traditionally used which is why the VW Hybrid does not have as big of an improvement in city MPG as is seen on the Ford and Toyotas. However even VW manages a 25% improvement on combined and a 33% improvement in city. Just another reason that diesel is on the way out. Because the reality is that most people don’t drive exclusively on the hwy.

            Now before you say that the diesel will produce better than the EPA estimates yes that HAS been the case with the VW diesel in the past. However we know now that they were able to keep those pre-emission control MPG numbers by cheating on emissions. The real world VW diesel numbers will go down.

            I do have a friend who bought a Jetta Hybrid about a year ago. He bought it because he was transferred by work and now had a ~40mi commute each way. His commute is heavily freeway driving and he has averaged between 49 and 50 mpg over his first year. Now maybe the Hybrid will get caught up in this mess too and it will get a MPG lowering change of software too.

            Either way the Hybrid had a lower up front cost and should have lower repair and maintenace cost though that is yet to be seen since VW doesn’t have a track record with Hybrids like say Ford or Toyota.

            Also where do you keep getting that this will somehow be subsidized. The F150 that they have announced so far will be a standard Hybrid so it will not qualify for a rebate like an EV or Plug in Hybrid. Locally there may be some incentives but because Hybrid tech is now mature the vast majority of those subsidies have went away.

            I won’t go as far to say the Hybrid F150 is a game changer but it will certainly be the best value if one is looking for a high fuel efficiency pickup, large or small.

            No I don’t think it will have range topping tow ratings but a lot of users don’t need and don’t currently buy the version of the truck with the max tow rating. The reality is that the EcoDiesel isn’t the range topper in Ram 1500 tow capacity either.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @BBall,
          Isuzu produced some Hybrid delivery vehicles for Australia, but fleets have pretty well shunned them. They sold both Hybrid and CNG, but have kept CNG for their light delivery trucks

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        RobertRyan,
        I don’t see the F-150 as the best platform for making a hybrid for commercial activities.

        If this is slated to the daily driver come SUV type of pickup person, then I would assume Ford is trying to improve the average mpg for the aluminium F-150s.

        The 3.2 diesel is by far the best option. It will tow well, provide the best FE for any aluminium F-150 and be cheaper than a hybrid or EV.

        Ford changed the original selling point of the advantages of aluminium from FE to load and tow when it realised the the aluminium F-150 only gained around 1mpg. Using the 2.7 EcoThirst as a comparison would be incorrect as well. I’m stating this prior to anyone putting out inaccurate 2.7 EcoThirst EPA figures.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @Big Al from Oz
          To me it is a Pickup version of a Toyota Prius, with limited load and towing capabilities, but great fuel economy

        • 0 avatar
          derekson

          Auto week claims they spotted an F150 prototype with a diesel. They think it’s the JLR 3.0L diesel V6 rather than the 3.2L Duratorq though:

          http://www.autoblog.com/2015/12/17/ford-f150-jaguar-land-rover-diesel-spy-shots/

  • avatar
    George B

    I could see the hybrid F-150 as a city work truck that makes lots of stops and hauls bulky, messy cargo, but isn’t used for towing. Animal control, water and sewer, parks department, etc. It doesn’t have to win bragging rights vs. Chevrolet and RAM to be a useful fleet vehicle plus it might qualify for “green” incentives in government contracts.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Some electrical companies already use Ford HEV F150 trucks in the field and have used them for many years.

      For them it makes sense because the electricity is free. The battery pack is carried inside the bed behind the cab and reduces bed space by about one-half..

      If they ever leave the immediate area adjacent to the power lines, they always have the regular gasoline engine to run on.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      George B,
      If they are to be working vehicles as you mentioned, then a Transit would be a far better vehicle to convert into a hybrid or EV.

      The main reason I can see for Ford doing this to the F-150 is to reduce the average FE per F-150, nothing else. It is a waste of resources and as I mentioned isn’t the best possible configuration for a commercial vehicle.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Hybrids have been proven as a great option for commercial vehicles, one only has to look at the results of using Prius and Escape Hybrids as Taxis. They stand up to the rigors of taxi use for 300K, 400K miles or more. Taxi use is tough on vehicles especially the transmission, the transmission is the heart of the Ford and Toyota systems that have proven to last those kind of miles. So yeah the F150 Hybrid should make a great commercial vehicle if it performs similarly, in both MPG improvement and durability to their previous hybrids.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @Scoutdude,
          I would not classify Taxi’s as Commercial vehicles, but. Prius, is a very fuel efficient Taxi for fleets.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            No, but if a fleet operator could translate what Scoutdude is describing into a truck, that can be purchased at a reasonable price, it could be a winner. When I had a small fleet (6-7 1/2 ton trucks, a step van, and a 1 ton truck), I could have used an F150 hybrid. The payload rating, which is a big number, would only be reduced by however much the hybrid system weighs.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @BBall,
            It is a US thing. Hybrids were supposed to be the ” big thing” for fleets here generally, but most found LPG or CNG more practical . Some Taxi companies, use Hybrids for general suburban use, but most use CNG/LPG

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Well it’s a good thing that the F150 Hybrid will be sold primarily in the US. There will be a diesel version too. CAFE man.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            I’d expect the payload reduction to be minimal. It should still have more payload than the 1/2 tons of 90’s.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Right, just the wright of the batteries and such. Since the payload ratings of the F150 are high anyway, it won’t matter much.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    I am a Ford/Lincoln guy. I havent owned one in about 10 years but I am a their guy. However Ford has done this before. Read somewhere about 5 years ago that Ford reviewed “stole” the software program for Ecoboost from a startup. Dont remember where I read it.
    I have said here before in these pages, about 10 years ago now I wrote to Ford with some ideas on how they could improve their engines. I didnt create any tech nor did I ask for money I just went to their site and explained to them that I thought that in order to get the best performance from their engines would be to have them. TT charged, 5 valves per cylinder, extrude hone process, direct injected for intake and outtake valves as well as losing 1000lbs from all trucks and SUVs as well as 700 from all car.

    A few weeks later I got an email telling me that they didnt owe me nothing and that I should not write on their boards anymore.

    I wrote them back stating that I didnt want anything and any idiot could have come up with my idea. I just loved your cars so much I just submitted what any Ford guy would. I am just some dude on a forum..thats it. I dont have an engineering degree and not connected to the car industry. I just love cars and wanted them to put in what I thought was the best tech at the time.

    I may buy a Flex or MKT in two years when I am ready to buy again but they make it hard when I hear stuff like this. its so Apple like..lol

  • avatar
    Luke42

    A hybrid F-150 with AWD and an electric power takeoff (“generator panel”) might just be enough to get me to put a pickup truck in the “heavy hauler” slot in my driveway. (I probably won’t use an F-150 as a DD, though.)

    I can see using it to tow and power a small/durable travel trailer in rustic places.

    I’m eagerly awaiting the chance to test drive a diesel Colorado, as well.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      In my area and much of the Southwest, the pickup truck in any powertrain configuration is already the DD of choice for many.

      It is for me, all 5.7L of it.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        Even though my last two new trucks were a GMC PU and a Chevy SUV I again have to give Ford credit for continuing to push new technologies in the FS truck market. Even if you don’t agree with everything they are doing at least they are leading versus sitting back watching where the ball lands. If I had been shopping for a 1/2 ton PU in 2004 versus a 3/4 ton, I probably would have went with a Ford.

        This post was supposed to be at the bottom of the page.

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      As an unintended feature, the Escape Hybrid has a 110V outlet and a mode where it can be used, for instance, to charge cordless tool batteries. Such as at a remote worksite without a generator. It just starts up the gas engine now and then to keep the 12V and hybrid batteries charged. If Ford put their mind to it, such a feature could be even better executed in a hybrid pickup. Whether or not this would be important to many people, it could create a publicity buzz.

      Where are btsr’s comments on this Ford pickup hybrid idea? Huh?

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        The 110v outlet is not an unintended feature, Ford definitely choose to use the availability of the HV battery’s voltage and inverter to offer it. They will almost certainly offer that in the F150 I can see them offering something along the lines of what they have offered in the Escape and Fusion standard and a higher amperage version for contractors and other users with the need for that extra power. Something that can power a pancake/hot dog compressor, a circular saw and charge a cordless tool battery at the same time. Heck just offer a built in compressor and a ~2gal tank. That way the PCM can control the compressor in conjunction with cycling the engine.

        Have a little panel on the front of the bed side where there are a a couple of outlets for power and air and the controls for the compressor.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    The hybrid F-150 will come standard with au naturale (i.e. unshaven) truck nutz attached to the hitch & a neckbeard air freshener.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      DeadWeight – if everyone were to stick to the “eco” theme with blue colouring then those “truck nutz” will be blue eco-nuts or maybe just call them “blue balls”.It works for Mercedes ;)

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    The Hybrid F150 will do alright assuming that the premium for the Hybrid power train is similar to that on the Fusion. Of course it needs to be available on a range of trims from fleet to top of the line.

    Many fleets will buy them like crazy. Many agencies have policies that require an ever increasing percentage of “AFV”s and/or give preference/mandate that an AFV is purchased if a suitable one is available. That is a big reason why the big 3 offer at least 1 FFV powertrain option in their 1/2 tons.

    It doesn’t need to have a super high towing capacity. Most of the typical fleet uses never tow a trailer. Many of those that do tow a trailer are usually pretty light. The typical uses for a trailer are a small landscaping trailer, the message board signs and things like that. If the use case is towing big loads then most agencies use a 3/4 or 1 ton.

    Give it a ~2000lb payload and a 5~6K and that will be good enough to win a significant number of customers.

    They do need to offer a “work truck” option package with a robust 120v outlet for powering tools, lights ect. For many govt fleet uses the fuel savings vs having a truck idling all day long will be significant.

    Ford hybrids have a good reputation among fleet users who have had good experience with Escape, Fusion and C-Max Hybrids.

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