By on November 20, 2015

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I come to bury the old Camaro, not to praise it.

In the past few years, I’ve had a chance to drive a variety of the more powerful and competent fifth-gens on and off track, including the mighty Z/28. None of them ever struck me as being more interesting or enjoyable than their Mustang or even Challenger equivalents. At best, the old Camaro was a lousy car that could really do the business on a racetrack. At worst… well, it’s what you see here.


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I needed to take a quick weekday trip to California recently and Hertz happened to be offering a “Chrysler 200 Convertible or similar” for the same price as an Impala. This seemed like a no-brainer — after all, the first thing Ohio hicks like myself want to do when we get to the best coast is to drop the top. Real California natives only use their convertible tops at night and in the rarest of circumstances. It’s the tourists that find the sight of an unclouded sun in November to be sooooo fascinating.

When I got to the airport, I saw that I’d been “upgraded” to a Camaro. This presented a few problems. The trunk in the Camaro convertible is absolutely miniscule, even with the top up. My single Samsonite suitcase was a tight fit and intruded well into the space that would be required should I want the full open-air experience. I also had difficulty getting my crutches into the backseat.

Oh well. At least I’d have the mighty GM V-6 shoving me along. Well, coupled to the automatic fitted to this rental car, the V-6 that is such a delight in the old FWD Impala feels wheezy and overburdened. True, if you shove the pedal to the kickdown it will take a breath, audibly wake up, and groan to the redline at a pace somewhere between “I-4 Camry” and “V-6 Camry”. There’s nothing sporty-feeling about the way the six goes about its business, however. And the self-reported 20.1 mpg on a 420-mile freeway haul wasn’t exactly outstanding, either. You can get that kind of freeway mileage from a Coyote-powered Mustang.

It’s possible to select the gear of your choice, of course, either by squeezing one of the wheel-mounted paddles or by shoving the shifter past “D” into “M”. (You’ll do that accidentally about half of the time, by the way, until you become completely used to the shifter’s idiosyncrasies.) The problem is the process feels more advisory than commanding; it’s not uncommon for the car to wait nearly a full second before agreeing to shift in your preferred direction. The shifts, when they do arrive, are long and languorous. This is not a Porsche PDK or even an old Tiptronic.

I’ve been told by people who should know that the stick-shift V-6 Camaro coupe is actually a pretty decent way to get around. Some of that has to be due to the absence of the lousy automatic transmission, but the incompetence of the Camaro platform as a convertible has to be the primary factor. My rental had just 11,000 California miles on it but it would shake the wheel in my hands on every major bump. On pavement whoops it wasn’t uncommon for the shock absorber at one of the four corners to simply bottom out, sending another nasty shudder through the entire frame of the car. This is all with the top up, mind you. The level of cowl shake in this particular example of the modern Camaro convertible wouldn’t be out of character for an old Fox Mustang droptop.

A quick run down a twisty two lane close to San Luis Obispo showed at least the brakes were up to the task of repeated hard slowdowns. The grip, too, was remarkable and progressive, as long as you weren’t working the suspension too hard. In that respect, this Camaro was like an old Grand Am GT: holds onto the road like hell until there’s a ripple in the pavement. Credit the ridiculous twenty-inch wheels for both of those qualities. Visually, they’re a great fit for the creased-and-folded full-size aesthetic that survived nearly untouched from the original show car. Dynamically, they’re a mess. Think of running an obstacle course while wearing ankle weights and you’ll get the idea.

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The interior, often criticized as the weakest part of the fifth-generation car, is not helped much by some contrast-color leatherette on the dashboard and seats. There are four gauges on the center console that are nearly invisible in most conditions and so far out of the driver’s line of vision that reading them will probably trigger a warning in the Mercedes-Benz “you’re falling asleep” monitor, were such a device to be fitted to a Camaro, which it will not be until the Federal Government makes it so. Not to worry; you can configure the center LCD in the dashboard to show you oil pressure or temperature, if you’re worried.

There’s also a lap-timer feature, which seems like a bit of cruelty in this rather inept, indifferently powered, cowl-shaking convertible. I didn’t use it. I did use the stereo, which is labeled “Boston” in the old font that should please vintage car-stereo enthusiasts but which sounded both muffled and distant regardless of source. On the positive side, the iPhone integration is outstanding, for you ladies who use an Apple phone — but no amount of fussing with the EQ could produce reasonable sound quality. It was slightly better when listening to FM radio, but how often are you doing that in 2015?

After a few days with this now-obsolete Camaro, I came to understand that its truest calling was, in fact, as a rental convertible. Chopping the top off this platform robs it of the dynamic merits that are really its only advantages over the Mustang and Challenger. It’s a neutering of sorts, to take the vicious Z/28 and cut it down to this lethargic barge. But as a way for two couples to tour California with the top down, it’s adequate. Just like a Chrysler 200 would have been.

There was just one little problem: the top wouldn’t go down. It reported a variety of issues, most of which seemed to be related to the fact that the astoundingly flimsy cargo cover in the trunk wasn’t properly attached. After twenty minutes of poking and fussing, I just let it go and decided to use it as a coupe. Which meant that I would have been better off with an Impala after all.

The new Camaro is already out in public. If you order a Camaro at your local dealer today, you’ll get the new model, not this lash-up. I haven’t driven that new Camaro yet, but I’m told it’s much, much better, particularly in the V-6 and convertible-top variants people actually buy. That’s a good thing, if the new Camaro is much better than this one. It needs to be.

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63 Comments on “2015 Camaro RS Convertible Rental Review – California Rental Barge...”


  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I especially like the steering wheel from the Cruze, and the awful baseball stitching which you must touch each time you shift that lazy automatic. The center stack gauges down there look like old thermostats.

    Really, I just hate this Camaro. I’d like a car with the dynamics and build quality of the Mustang, with the size and presence of the Challenger. But Ajla stories put me off FCA-built Dodge products.

    So I’d have a Mustang.

    • 0 avatar
      davefromcalgary

      Steering wheels are important but seemingly overlooked. The wheel in the current/new/nice Impala looks like an alien’s face, and the wheel in the just revealed Lacrosse looks like crap. I have other thoughts on the Lacrosse but It was too late to comment on the launch article.

      Its the one thing you always have your hands on, and its always in your field of vision. Put some effort into these things please, car makers.

      Edited to add, I’m actually quite ok with the wheel pictured above, which IS the same one in the Cruze and Verano. Its much better IMO than some of the new ones I just mentioned.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        I wonder if they have steering wheels from Ions left over someplace. Maybe they can put that on a Silverado for you Dave.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I just feel the Camaro is a “special” thing and can be quite expensive. The steering wheel from the Cruze/Verano isn’t an especially nice thing to touch.

        Moreso for me, because my hand rests when on the highway right where the lower spoke is on the Cruze. The sharp plastic edges and general feeling of that area made my hand feel nasty and dirty when I was driving around PA.

        • 0 avatar
          davefromcalgary

          The leather wrap on the Cruze and Verano is actually quite nice to the hand, I think. I’ll agree that the plastic quality might not be great, but the visual design, and rim are at least decent.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Thickness and size of wheel are good at least, I agree. The leather made my hand sweaty, I guess. I can blame that on either leather texture or poor AC, because I don’t normally have that problem on any car with a leather wheel – which is every car I drive!

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            The only other leather wrapped wheel I had was my 04 Mazda 6GT, and this one is far superior.

            Man, if I could combine that Mazda’s looks and utility (5 door hatch) with the Verano’s interior, isolation and powertrain (sans electrical issues), make it AWD, I’d be in car heaven.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      @Corey

      Mustang is on my shortlist of I’m actually spending money cars.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I think I might go C4 Corvette before Mustang, now that I think of it. Cause a car like that will never be my primary transport anyway.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          C4 Corvette? Who do you thin 28Cl is, Ron Jeremy?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            The C4 in certain colors with directionals is PURE CLASS.

            http://carphotos.cardomain.com/ride_images/1/2954/4701/7384850001_large.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I want Ted Nugent’s Callaway Corvette from Miami Vice.

            http://www.imcdb.org/i051669.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I showed a pic of a C4 Sport trim the other day which looked kinda like that, in all black.

            Then comes Dal and says “Oh I don’t likes that body kit on there.”

            It looks great!

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I do likes me a C4, but won’t DD one.

            I think MY12-15 Mustang GT is “where its at”, I’d have to look but a Corvette (C6) is probably more expensive.

          • 0 avatar
            MBella

            As I have stated a couple of times before, I think a C4 is the RWD Chevy bargain. You’re buying a G body for more money these days. I think a C4 LS project is in my future as soon as I have some room to keep it.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            My inner guy with chest hair and medallions is missing.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        If I only had $30K-$35K to spend the Ecoboost Mustang might have tempted me. I did like it, just not as much as I had hoped I would. Loved the engine, the new suspension is miraculous compared to the old, but it still feels like a boat and is too hard to see out of. Just too big outside for too small inside, and the inside just isn’t that nice. The sport seats were uncomfortable. But it is really good value for money and looks fantastic. With $40-50K to spend, the 2-series BMW is a nicer place to spend time, and much more reasonable in it’s dimensions inside and out.

        I had the exact same Camaro Convertible from Hertz in Orange County last Spring, and I felt exactly the same as Jack about it. Pretty terrible. BUT, he really should have figured out how to get the top down, because that really fixes a lot of the shortcomings. Top down on a beautiful day in San Diego, cruising with the ocean breeze in your face, you really don’t care about the dynamic shortcomings. And you can SEE OUT OF IT!

        I actually had a Challenger this week for my rental in NJ. What a BOAT! It felt like it was 50′ long and I was sitting in the bottom of a well. Back seat was useless, even for short passengers. Had the V6 and 8spd, so it went quite well once the motor got wound up, handled well but the ride was really unpleasantly firm. Steering was pretty lifeless. One of the few American cars that has that German “carved from a block of granite” feel on the road (thanks Mercedes). Was a weird spec. Super rental spec blah gray cloth interior with the saddest looking tiny touchscreen in a huge bezel in the dash. Electric seat bottom but manual backrest adjustment – blech. Lousy seats. But keyless entry and go with HID headlights. I didn’t hate it, but I didn’t love it either. White outside on shiny 18’s with fat tires, it certainly did look the business. I felt like the dude in Vanishing Point!

        • 0 avatar
          pragmatist

          The biggest problem with the Challenger is the 1970 model. Put them along side and the current model is fat ugly cousin, while the ’70 is automobile erotica. It could get a speeding ticket while parked.

          How could Dodge screw it up so badly.

          • 0 avatar
            nrd515

            You need to go back on your meds. Just kidding. IMHO, the Challenger is one thing that Dodge gets right, the Charger is, well, “OK”, but nothing great. Everytime I see a 2010-on Camaro, including the new one, I think, “How the hell could GM screw it up, AGAIN?”. The Mustang is ok from the side, but has a problem nose and especially a bad rear end. My Challenger is 5 years old at the end of the month, and it still gets daily positive comments, like last night, picking up some greasy fried fish, “Wow, I love your car!” from a 20ish girl. Earlier yesterday, I got a thumbs up from one older guy, and the cart kid at the grocery store said, “I love this car so much!”. About once a month, I get sucked into talking to someone about it at length. And I plan on buying another one in about a year and a half, so I’m sure it will continue.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            I always thought the best way to improve the Challenger was to put a premium interior and to run the entire car through a “scaling machine” to reduce it proportionally by about 20%. Still, most who buy it like all the extra room compared to its “pony car” rivals. Alas, the old platform it is built on does not allow for much wiggle room in changing dimensions. Same is true for the outgoing Camaro.

            Having spent quite a bit of seat time in a SS convertible, I will attest to the cowl shake. It is quite pronounced.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Typical General Motors/Guangzhou Motors sh!t. SSDD.

      Pre-bankruptcy, post-bankruptcy, yesterday, today, tomorrow…

      After the glossy autojournodinosaurus reviews and dry humping of the NEW 2016 Camaro, count on that POS to lose its luster quickly, too, when they begin disintegrating after the 6,000 mile mark.

      As for the current New Mustang, meh…it could’ve been so much less bloat, flotsam & jetsam, too.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      That’s not quite the same steering wheel that the Cruze uses. The airbag cover is similar or the same, but if you look, you can tell the rim and spokes are different. The Cruze and Sonic share a steering wheel. But this one is shared with the Malibu and Volt. The SS uses a stylized version of it, as do certain Buick models (pre-facelift Regal GS, Encore, Verano), whose airbag cover stretches all the way over the bottom spoke.

      Originally, the fifth-gen Camaro debuted with its own steering wheel (which has most recently been seen in Elio prototype vehicles), but they dropped it around MY2012 or so; I’m not sure why. The new sixth-gen has its own steering wheel again, though.

      As far as Chevy’s new corporate steering wheel, it can be seen on several of the latest models, such as the 2016 Malibu, 2016 Volt, 2016 Cruze. Buick’s version can be seen on the Envision.

  • avatar
    Easton

    Everybody will praise the new Camaro to death for a few years. Then on the dawn of the next generation it will be derided as complete crap and the same people who once sang its praise will claim they never liked it. Yeah, I’m familiar with this cycle.

    The reality is that most mainstream car makers would rather build appliances that they can build cheap and pawn off quickly. They don’t want to build seductive, sporty coupes and convertibles. When they eventually do, seemingly out of a sense of pressure or misplaced patriotism, they do the minimal effort possible. If you want to own a true sports car be prepared to shell out the big bucks for a BMW, Porsche, Ferrari or one of the few auto makers bred with that purpose in mind.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      To be fair to Jack, he never really liked the Camaro in the first place. I never found it to be a good car to do things like good to the grocery store, go to work, drive on the freeway, back up, see other vehicles on the road, or navigate intersections. The 6.2L is most beast and makes good noises though.

      • 0 avatar
        davefromcalgary

        This just in! Best part of nasty GM vehicle is engine! More at 11!

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I like to think that during Carmegeddon, Mullaly, Fields, Fairley and Ford Jr were looking through telescopes on the top of Glass House at various GM facilities, trying to figure out how they could take the GM Powertrain division during bankruptcy, and burn the rest to the ground. Fairley certainly wouldn’t mind setting the RenCen on fire.

      • 0 avatar
        VolandoBajo

        @bball40dtw wrote:

        “The 6.2L is most beast and makes good noises though.”

        Which would make it one of the most narrowly purpose built cars of all time.

        I am struggling to try to envision anyone who could convince themselves that those two purposes were sufficient to justify a space in their garage.

        Though in the category of faint praise is damning, that is a winning entry.

    • 0 avatar
      SomeGuy

      Agreed Easton. This type of end of cycle slamming gets tiring after awhile, especially from the BIG publications (C&D and MT, but not R&T as much). The 2016 Camaro is the car of the year for 2016, and by 2020 they will slam its poor interior, coarse V6, and tiny windows.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      I don’t think the mainstream press was ever overly enthusiastic about the 5th gen Camaro – I especially remember a few being especially underwhelmed that it didn’t drive as well as the Pontiac G8 it was related to.

      • 0 avatar
        nrd515

        I nearly bought a G8, I really liked it, but the GT was just too expensive, so I bought a Charger R/T instead. Three years later, I bought my Challenger. I really really hate the Camaro, a useless trunk, ugly, and the lack of headroom really bothers me.

    • 0 avatar

      You had me until you said BMW. Right. True sports car manufacturer.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    So in summary I’m not missing anything by driving a nearly 50 year old Mustang convertible when the urge strikes me.

    Good to know.

  • avatar
    Funky

    I’ve been there and I’ve done that (2014 SS RS with 6 speed short throw shifter…bought new) and I found the Camaro to be, in general, a disappointment. It looked good, and it attracted plenty of attention; but it was not as easy to live with as I intended. Since this is water over the dam, I won’t go into detail. I will simply say that your assessment of the previous generation Camaro is correct and that I feel bad for those (who like I was) who were duped by the hype to spend their hard earned money on the thing. I am not familiar with the new model; however, I would suggest some healthy skepticism before one makes a purchase.

  • avatar
    genuineleather

    Someone currently visiting my office in Northern California rented a convertible at 3x the cost of a midsize. And they’re from Portland; it’s not *that* much warmer here. And speaking from experience, there is only a very narrow temperature band in which most people want to drop the top: 65 is too cold, 85 too hot. And the wind ruins your hair in any season.

    These Camaros were all over Maui last month though; substantially fewer Mustangs and virtually no 200s left in service. The people who rent them must pack light.

    • 0 avatar
      DevilsRotary86

      It pleases me then that I was an oddity in that regard. When I had my Miata, the rule was: top if:

      Temperature was below 50’s and I was going to go on highway
      Or
      Temperature was below freezing and I was sticking to surface streets
      Or
      Temperature was somewhere above 100.

      Of course, living in Texas if I stuck to 85, I would have the top up from March until October. I think I almost never had that top up. I even Had to keep sun screen in the glove box.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        The top on my Spitfire only goes up for winter storage. Of course, I live in Maine, and I don’t actually fit in it with the top up! Nor can I really get in and out with the top up anymore, after 20 years of aging and spreading.

        When I had my Saab 900 convertible, I found that top down and A/C blasting was a perfectly reasonable thing on a hot day. I’ll always have at least one convertible in the fleet, though I will admit middle age has made me a lot less tolerant of the extremes than I was at 25.

        • 0 avatar
          DevilsRotary86

          “I found that top down and A/C blasting was a perfectly reasonable thing on a hot day.”

          Seconded. My ’06 Miata was smartly designed in that regard. The vents had an open mode in addition to the usual chest/feet settings. That’s what made it possible to drive with the top down so much. Hot day? Turn on the AC with it set to “open mode chest”. At a stop light it wasn’t bad. At speed it was great. The laminar flow off the windshield formed a nice bubble over the cabin. The AC felt awfully close to a normal fixed roof car.

    • 0 avatar
      Master Baiter

      “65 is too cold, 85 too hot”

      Yeah, it’s only between 65 and 85 in Northern California about 90% of the time.

    • 0 avatar
      VolandoBajo

      @geniuneleather wrote:

      “These Camaros were all over Maui last month though; …The people who rent them must pack light.”

      Or maybe there was a nudist convention in town?

  • avatar
    Matt Foley

    “I’ve been told by people who should know that the stick-shift V-6 Camaro coupe is actually a pretty decent way to get around.”

    It would be, except for the throttle overrun. I test-drove a 2014 last summer and could not get used to the way the revs hang between shifts. I’ve been spoiled by the instantaneous response of OBD-I cars with cable throttles.

    Other than that, it was a fine grand-touring car, especially for the asking price. Not a muscle car (no V8 rumble), not a sports car (3800 lbs!), but comfortable, quiet, fast, and a great-looking car in bright red (only the visually- or mentally-impaired would disagree).

    • 0 avatar
      Wheeljack

      Engine calibrators call that overrun sensation “dashpot effect” and its actually programmed in on purpose to protect an undersized catalyst, or a catalyst with a very light precious metal washcoat. Even vehicles with cable throttles can have this effect since there are other ways to control rate of engine deceleration such as the idle air control solenoid.

      When I worked for Ford, I had a V-6 Mystique with a 5-speed as a zone car. It had so much dashpot effect that it was impossible to drive smoothly, especially the 1-2 shift. In contrast, the SVT Contour had a bigger/better catalyst and was calibrated around that, so it was a delight to drive – press in the clutch and the revs drop like a stone.

      Years later, a buddy special ordered a 2005 Mustang GT with a manual trans. Another undriveable package with a cheap under spec’d catalyst and software to compensate. Fortunately for him, he knew a guy in powertrain calibration who put an engineering “test” calibration in the car that eliminated the issue. I’m sure if he had kept the car long term it would have ended up with an inert/plugged cat at some point.

  • avatar
    55_wrench

    So the Samsonite barely fit in the trunk, did it?

    Back in ’79 we were at a BBQ and the grill ran out of gas. The 5 gallon propane cylinder would NOT fit thru the trunk opening in my friend’s new Z-28.

    I see not much has improved in the intervening 40 years..C’mon, GM..look at the design language of the original Camaro and notice how the styling was understated and purposeful, and still looked clean..and you could see out of it too.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I tend to like barges and the Zeta Camaro sucks as a barge too. It just isn’t comfortable to drive.

    The only car equipped with the 3.6DI where the engine impressed me was in the last gen CTS (which is a car I still really like). Other than that it always seems underwhelming for its output.

  • avatar
    Menloguy

    Hertz’s “Chrysler 200 Convertible or similar” category baffles me, as Chrysler does not make the 200 convertible any longer; I haven’t seen any 200 convertibles on any rental car lot recently. The Mustang convertible is in its own separate rental category (IXAR). Another rental convertible staple was the Mitsubishi Eclipse Spyder but that’s been out of production, too. If Hertz did not upgrade you to the Camaro convertible, I wonder what kind of convertible you would have gotten.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    My views on the V6 Camaro convertible…I was generally even less kind that Jack.

    http://caps.fool.com/Blogs/584-maui-miles-in-a-lt1-camaro/1060394

  • avatar

    I had a rental camaro coupe and mustang (previousgen) last year, the mustang was easier to see out of and I would give it a slight edge on interior materials and design. But I found the driving to be remarkably similar and I would actually give my (I have no desire to go near a track ever I like “touring cars”) vote to the Camaro because it was a better highway cruiser where the mustang seemed a little twitchy and tiring to drive. But really for a guy who doesn’t spend much time with sporty cars I thought the camaro was better then reviews made it seem and the mustang slightly worse at least in V6 rental form.

    • 0 avatar
      WheelMcCoy

      Back in 2012 I rented a convertible in Florida and got a Camaro convertible. The top worked and I was easily amused: Top goes up. Top goes down. But with the top up, visibility was poor and I had to make a conscious effort to learn where the four corners were. The steering was also very heavy at parking lot speeds. And trunk space was indeed very small.

      Top down and cruising the boulevard, I got compliments and conversations. On the highway, the Camaro was faster than what I was used to, and when I unintentionally made cars disappear from my rear view mirror, I reminded myself to slow down.

      This summer, while in Orlando, I was lucky enough to rent a 2015 Convertible Mustang Eco-Boost GT. Unlike the Camaro, visibility was excellent and the car was very easy to place. Trunk space was practical. Steering was vague unless you put it in sport mode, and that’s where I kept it! It was a lot of fun. A Hyundai Genesis tried to beat me to an on ramp, but hey, I know how to use the paddles. The best ride in Orlando wasn’t at Disney. :)

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    How can Jesus cast a shadow? He’s supposed to be all radiant when he comes back.

    And why would he need a camera?

  • avatar
    rbg

    I’m sitting here in WI watching the first snow flakes of the season. My Boxster is snug as a bug in my heated pole barn. I drove it 2 weeks ago with the top down, heat blasting, fleece cap and gloves….and a big shit eating grin.
    It will not come out again until at least late March, I refuse to expose it to any salt residue. I’m so glad I bought it vs another Mustang or Camaro. The new Mustangs seem to have better build quality, but our 2004 was a rattling, clap trap with a very nice v-8 rumble. Other than trucks, I can’t get excited about much from U.S automakers.

  • avatar
    CincyDavid

    I had the misfortune of sitting in the back of a rental Camaro convertible last weekend…of course everybody wanted to take the convertible that the other couple rented, not the Cruze I rented, when we went out to dinner. The back seat is just about uninhabitable by adults…too narrow to even get seat belts on. Not a bit of leather back there, all rubbery-feeling vinyl/pleather. I think it would have been physically impossible to even get back there with the top up. We were in Florida, escaping Ohio weather, so the top down aspect was fine, but I wouldn’t own one of these on a bet. The sticky decklid was the best part…sounded like something was going to break every time the trunk was opened…

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    I think it’s time for a comparo of V6 ‘verts, Camaro vs Mustang, to see which one sucks the most.

  • avatar
    Parousia

    500 miles in a rental ‘Maro Coupe from Pittsburgh through the mountains of WVA, VA and NC. 28mpg at slightly above posted limits. The cloth seats were fine.
    The infotainment screen never turned on (probably a fuse… on a car with 18XXX miles?), leaving me to blindly hit the right and left arrow hard buttons guessing where I was on the XM dial (note to SXM: too many boom-boom-clack channels, not nearly enough classic vinyl). The sight lines are as bad as people say. To get your arm out the window as God intended, your elbow ends up all but spooning with your ear. There might be a 323hp party going on under the hood, but Torque declined the invitation. And, try as I might, the “information display” remained in French (although it reported everything in Miles, not Kilos).
    After 500 miles, the Camaro left me wondering: what’s the point? Even the base Mustang is better at pretending to be a sports car, and the Challenger is better at eating up miles. It’s not small. It can’t carry stuff. How important, really, is it that the toll booth dude tells me I have a “nice car”?

  • avatar
    dwford

    I don’t hold out too much hope for the new Camaro, after sitting in one yesterday at the local autoshow. For some reason Chevy was only able to bring one extremely base gray on gray V6 Camaro, and it did not look like any improvement at all over the old one. Meanwhile, The Ford display had the Fiesta ST, Focus ST and RS, a Mustang GT and a GT350.

  • avatar
    jthorner

    These retro muscle cars of today are not much better than the crappy cars they are imitating. People buy them because they want to feel like hormone soaked teenagers again. The original muscle cars didn’t turn or stop worn a damn. Ride around in a vintage 1965 Mustang again and be honest, it is not much of a car. Better by far than a 1965 VW, but still not much of a car. Then drive a properly tuned 1965 Jaguar and feel the difference. Too bad the Jag was not very reliable.

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  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber