By on November 18, 2015

IMG_3359 (1)

Square-jawed linebacker and sometimes-Alfa chief Reid Bigland took the covers off the 2016 Alfa Romeo Giulia QV for the first time in North America on Tuesday.

The car, which has been delayed about six months, will boast 505 horsepower and a price tag in the “$70,000 range” when it goes on sale next year. According to Bigland, the Giulia QV’s 7:39 lap around the Nurburgring is the quickest for any sedan.

For the reveal, Alfa brought out its big guns. A compendium of cars from the automaker’s heritage lined its outdoor tent, including a 2008 8C, 1967 GTV, 1970 Giulia 1300 Ti, et al. (Why no Milano, no 164, or you know, ones I can actually afford? — Aaron)

The highlights:

• 505 horsepower
• 443 pounds-feet of torque
• Six-speed manual or automatic
• 3-liter, twin-turbocharged V-6
• 3.8 sec. 0-60 mph
• 191 mph top speed
• 7:39 Nurburgring lap time, 13 seconds faster than 911 Turbo
• 50/50 weight distribution
• 8.8-inch wide infotainment system
• Carbon fiber accents
• Probably not the best climate controls for a luxury sport compact

Bigland also outlined the base Giulia, which cost in the “$40,000 range” when it goes on sale. An all-new 276-horsepower, direct-injection four cylinder engine will power that model from 0-60 mph in around 5.5 seconds.

The Giulia’s exhaust note — not as potent as the 1968 Alfa Romeo Tipo 33 Stradale — sounds impressive in person.

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83 Comments on “LA 2015: Is This The 2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia QV You’ve Been Waiting For? [Video]...”


  • avatar
    RideHeight

    So, Dodge with some oregano.

    Wait… 70K? Oregano and basil.

  • avatar
    ajla

    That is some aspirational pricing for an FCA product.

  • avatar
    cdotson

    So this 4cyl base model, will it have a rear weight bias or will front end components get heavier to maintain balance? Not only are you dropping from a V6 to a I4 but I’d imagine you’re also dropping the driven front wheels so that could be quite a bit of weight coming out of the front.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      Are you asking if the 4 and the 6 will use different spring rates?

      I can’t imagine that they wouldn’t. Even GM uses different springs for different engines.

      • 0 avatar
        cdotson

        No; I assume the springs would be different for different trim levels and especially engines.

        I’m asking what they will do (or not) to the center of mass for the base model car. A rear weight bias is not a good thing for safe, predictable handling of a road-going automobile. Going to a lighter front engine and removing driveline components from the front end will move the center of mass toward the rear. When you’re starting out front-heavy that’s fine. When you’re starting out with a 50/50 weight balance that’s not so good.

        • 0 avatar
          pragmatic

          Just because they say 50/50 does not mean it is. V6 is likely around 52/48 and the 4 will be 50/50. Even if the V6 is 50/50 I don’t see the turbo 4 going to more than 48/52 not a dangerous rear basis.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          Meh, my BMW wagon is 48:52 and it handles brilliantly. The 4cyl e91 wagons are even more rear biased. A couple points either way is insignificant.

        • 0 avatar
          derekson

          There are a lot of carbon fiber components on the QV version of the Giulia, so putting those back in aluminum or steel will add weight to the front (roof and hoof should both push the weight distribution forwards). And you’ll likely be losing that trick rear diff, which is a bit of weight out of the rear.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      The quadrifoglio version shown is rwd not awd. Also the weight difference between the 4 cyl and 6 cyl isn’t as substantial as you are thinking.

  • avatar
    Sloomis

    From the front it’s very distinctive and attractive. From any other angle it just says generic Eurocar. If I saw just the profile I would have said it was maybe some recent vintage BMW 3 series.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    High hopes that this car will feel like BMWs used to — simple, direct, focused on the driver.

    Fears that this car will have typical FCA build quality.

  • avatar
    tekdemon

    Uhh a 7:39 ring time is not even vaguely close to being 13 seconds faster than a 911 turbo. Unless you’re comparing it to a 911 turbo from 16 years ago. Where are you getting these crazy figures from?

    A 7:39 is actually 9 seconds slower than the new Carerra S let alone the current Turbo. It’s also slower than the last generation Careers S for that matter.

    Even the 997 Turbo managed to run the ring in 7:38. The QV running it in 7:39 is definitely impressive for a sedan but why are we cooking up claims that it’s faster than a 911 Turbo?

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    This is what Sergio is betting the FCA farm on?!?!

    /facepalm

  • avatar
    cwallace

    There’s a branch full of Infiniti G37s lurking in that family tree.

  • avatar
    energetik9

    I like it! Will look forward to some in depth reviews.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    For those assuming an obsolete FCA reliability stereotype, I pity you. I strongly recommend you drive one before you make any assumptions about it (and I don’t mean a ‘beat to death’ rental unit.)

    I’m honestly pleased by the fact that Italy finally has some automotive presence in the US again as many of my favorite cars of the past were Italian, whether they be Lambo, Ferrari, Fiat or whomever. The fact that they have survived despite their absence in the US market means a lot about who the companies really are. The fact that I now own a Fiat product myself (a real Fiat, not a Fiat Chrysler) when I, too, questioned its capabilities before test driving means it simply isn’t what too many people want to believe of it. I look for continued success from FCA.

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      Ha ha.. cartoon fox has little cozy coupe 500 for short little time and now is expert. Much funny, good for digestion!

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        What do you consider a, “short little time”, hmmm? How many miles is a, “short little time”?

        So far, “cartoon fox” happens to really like the base model Fiat 500 and hasn’t needed to take it into the shop for any purpose.

        • 0 avatar
          RideHeight

          Anything under 3 years is laughable for reliability testimonials. Re: Germans.

          Even hot glue and pop rivets could hold something together for as long as you’ve had that little booger.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            If one looks at JD Power Dependability Study which is based on 3 year old vehicles: Fiat products are the worst of the worst… read… at the very bottom of the list.

            That would be 273 problems per 100 vehicles i.e. 2.73 problems per vehicle.

            They are right at home with Chrysler at 173, Dodge at 192 and Jeep at 197.

            Vulpine owns a Jeep so if that is one’s personal benchmark then the Fiat line doesn’t look all that bad.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            Fiat’s chief rival for worst cars sold in the US is Land Rover. That’s pretty impressive company to keep, when you consider that most Land Rover products are among the more complex cars you can buy while Fiat has what may be the simplest cars of any brand. If you look their failure rate on a per component basis, Fiat may be twice as bad as Land Rover!

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            LOL, I love Fiat hating, because it’s easy and factual and backed up with data/reviews.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            CoreyDL – “Fiat hating” . No one ever likes being confronted with the harsh realities of well reality.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Reality for some is apparently not the same reality for others. Personal experience tells me that your reality is pure fantasy where it comes to Fiat’s reliability. Even my Jeep, supposedly one of the worst on the different lists, is damned reliable–though I acknowledge that it had two issues coming from Daimler’s screwing over Chrysler and using the cheapest parts they could find. I think the stupidest issue you could think of is to have the ratchet teeth break off of the hand brake handle and prevent the handbrake from ever fully releasing. One or two teeth may never be noticed, but when six or seven teeth are missing, the brake is always dragging. FIAT fixed it, not Daimler. They actually created a new part number because the old one was basically a pot-metal part.

            And Lou, while I won’t argue your experience, I would ask if your GC was a Daimler or an FCA. So far, my Fiat has not gone to the shop… ever. Outside of scheduled maintenance–i.e. oil change.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        Ive seen enough broken Darts, 200cs, and Cherokees to convince me the old FIAT phrase is still relevant.

        On the other hand, Korean cars, GMs, China Volvos, and uber unreliable German cars seem to be doing okay.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “I strongly recommend you drive one before you make any assumptions about it.”

      I bought one brand new. The reputation is not obsolete. However if you won the FCA quality lottery with your 500 and want to keep buying them, more power to you.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Wanna bet the reliability is based more on how you treat it than any ‘fault’ in the product itself? I’ll grant I don’t baby the thing, but I also don’t thrash it out to maximum revs all the time, either.

        • 0 avatar
          RideHeight

          What’s foxy about implying that a unanimously acknowledged smart guy here would ever white trash his brand new, hard-earned ride?

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            First you have to assume a lot with your statement, RH. By no means is he “unanimously acknowledged” of anything, smart or not. I’m the sort to give anyone a chance to prove themselves. And all I have to do is look out my back door to see people “white trashing” their hard-earned, brand new rides every day. My Jeep, built by Daimler, had more problems than this Fiat has offered so far. And Fiat is the one company who properly fixed an ongoing, six-year-old problem by actually finding the cause of the problem instead of constantly fixing the symptom and ignoring the cause.

          • 0 avatar
            RideHeight

            Hey, don’t feel slighted, mate… you’ve certainly earned your very own unanimous acknowledgement here, too!

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          Tolerance of less than “ideal” treatment, is a large part of what most people consider practical reliability. Baby it well enough, and even a snowflake can remain pristine for quite some time.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          I do not thrash my vehicle and the car is stock. My issues have been electrical and build/trim quality related and the vehicle is just now a year old so I’m not sure how mis-use could be an underlying cause here.

          The drivetrain and suspension have been fine save for an alignment issue around delivery.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          Vulpine “Wanna bet the reliability is based more on how you treat it than any ‘fault’ in the product itself?”

          We drive my wife’s Sienna no different than the Grand Caravan we had before it.

          The Sienna had had 3 minor repairs in 6 years. The GC was in the shop 3-4 times a year for minor and major stuff.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      FCA products I’ve driven within the past three years:

      3 Chargers
      4 Grand Caravans
      1 Journey
      2 300s
      2 200s (new generation)
      1 sad-sack last-year Liberty
      1 Compass

      Of those, only the 300s did NOT have some kind of glaring build quality issue. Between that and the reliability statistics… yeah, FCA has to prove itself a bit.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        How many of those were brand new? How many of those were NOT rentals? Considering the number of different vehicles you name, I find it highly unlikely you’ve owned even a fraction of that list. My Jeep and my Fiat are not the first Chrysler products I’ve owned and while even my first Dodge had an interesting quirk–the 318 c.i.d. engine always blew off the top quart of oil–I also managed to achieve 25mpg on a 2,000 mile road trip while exceeding the national speed limit at the time. No, I don’t baby them, but I also don’t “white trash” them as one here has suggested.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          All rentals except for one friend’s Grand Caravan; I rent plenty of other cars and rarely see flaws as glaring as Chrysler’s, except sometimes with Nissan interiors (obvious flashing, loose parts). For comparison it’s been some time since I had a GM or Ford rental with a serious quality problem.

          I also forgot one Ram 1500 with a uConnect system that insisted on turning on the radio every time I started the truck.

          I think I have ample reason to distrust Chrysler build quality, whether or not you got the best 500 ever built.

  • avatar
    Menloguy

    Does one really need 505 horsepower? Most people probably won’t be able to handle that much power in everyday driving. I wish Alfa brings their more down to earth cars like the Giulietta with a 1.4 engine which I think would have a more wider appeal.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Im too busy looking at the vinatage Alfas , to notice theyve parked a Honda Accord amist them.

  • avatar
    jmo

    Can someone explain all the Alfa hate among the B&B? You’d think enthusiasts would be enthusiastic about additional automotive options.

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      I can only explain myself. I’m a turd and this is my idea of a good time :-D

      Plus, I’m on vacay and the yard work’s all done!

    • 0 avatar
      wolfinator

      Because it’s a dumb idea? The US already has a surplus of car brands. Most experts agree someone’s going to have to bite it in the near future (leading contenders include Mitsubishi and Volvo).

      So, in an overcrowded market with far too many mid-range brands (Volvo, Acura, Lincoln, etc are all barely hanging on), FCA wants to add ANOTHER one.

      And it’s a brand with either zero equity or negative equity among people who remember the last time Alfas were stateside.

      Finally, FCA is blatantly eating it’s seed corn for this idea. They’re taking the healthy profits that Jeep and Ram are making, and plowing them into this ill-conceived adventure. Like the last 2 corporations before them, they’re harvesting the warm corpse of Jeep/Chrysler for cash while deliberately under-investing in the R&D and production improvements that will be needed in 4 years.

      One nice little recession will once again bring the house down. And what – we’ll bail out Chrysler a THIRD time?

      That’s why people are down on this idea. It’s dumb six ways to Sunday.

      • 0 avatar
        RideHeight

        COTD

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I agree there are too many brands, but between the fact Mitsubishi will now import new models from Japan, the fact Volvo Cars is building a US factory, and the fact Acura IS USDM Honda/Lincoln IS Ford for more margin I think we will continue to see them. The one I’d like to see removed is KIA since its simply a superfluous Hyundai but recognize due to the ownership structure this is unlikely to happen. I’m not against Mazda per se, but this is another brand which we could lose and not much would change but I doubt anything will happen to it. If anything you will see MOAR brands as Chinese owned marques come Stateside.

      • 0 avatar
        jmo

        “The US already has a surplus of car brands.”

        I very strongly disagree. We have too few brands offering cars that are way too similar.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I agree everything is similar but its not because of a “brand”, more because of engineering and business reasons. GM had five divisions for most of its previous existence which more or less sold the same car with changes across all brands. Sergio seems to want to do something similar with the major difference being all of the brands are under one roof as opposed to separate channels and dealer networks (which is smart). However adding a new marque doesn’t guarantee success or even much volume. Many have said Scion has not been a success for Toyota and have called for its culling some time ago. Does Toyota need Scion? I tend to think not. Would it make sense to Honda to create a tweener brand in between itself and Acura? I’m not thinking it would work. I see what Sergio and perhaps yourself are going for but I don’t think its going to be a success. In the case of Alfa, its at least something very different than what the other Chryco marques offer so there is little to no overlap. If existing brands just spun up marques above and below themselves it would simply be an exercise of marketing which I think only goes so far. Alan Mulally killed Mercury and wanted to kill Lincoln because he felt they were superfluous brands in the portfolio. More brands doesn’t seem always to equal more sales.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

            No overlap? But 90% of the B&B think its a rebadged Charger and the rest think its a rebadged Dart. Cant get much more overlap than that.

            Wait, scratch “overlap” out of that last line, insert “ignorant” instead.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          I agree with you JMO. The US is a bland desert when it comes to cars. Of course, most here would be happy if the only choices were a panther, Camry, corolla, and the cuv equivalents, plus a truck or two.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        The benefits of investing in giorgio don’t end with Giulia or Alfa itself.

    • 0 avatar
      Mr. Orange

      They are nothing more than a whole much of EINO’s. They say they are disgusted with the shift in the car market to SUVs/CUVs from sedans/wagons. But when we get a brand who attempts to make some of what they supposedly want, they get treated to the same as the guy who walks by the monkey cage after the monkey got done digesting its last meal.

      Alfa is bringing us a true sports sedan, and we are getting all that stinky stuff being thrown at it. I for one can’t wait until I’m able to lease one of these.

      • 0 avatar
        MBella

        I agree, and am also very interested in this car. Although we’ll both probably wait until there is a ridiculous pile of cash on the hood. Not exactly what’s required to make this thing a success.

  • avatar
    omer333

    Somewhere, my old Dart is at auction. My hopes of having a reliable Chrysler product were dashed with that car.

    Sadly, the new Alfas fall into that category.

    It’s a good looking car, but I shall not have one darken my driveway.

  • avatar
    stuki

    I wonder which tuba is the quickest around Nurburgring ….. Or, if that is really the task people buy tubas and sedans for.

  • avatar
    redliner

    I wanted an Alfa 159. Instead I got this. If you cover the grill with your thumb, it looks like a refreshed Chrysler 200.

  • avatar
    Mullholland

    It seems I’m a big fan of green leather jumpsuits.

  • avatar
    Rod Panhard

    I think that matrix of front grilles, both really and textured plastic, is a bit much. Especially the textured plastic ones. Good luck Alfa-Romeo. You’re going to need it.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Those are the cruise control buttons from a Cruze.

    How could this be faster than a Panamera Turbo or an Aston Rapide?

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    All this car needs is two tone paint, maybe pink over black, some nice, red and green plaid seat covers, and a matte green painted metal dash.


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