By on November 23, 2015

00 - 1987 Saab 900 in Colorado junkyard - photo by Murilee Martin

About five years ago, the Saab 900 was a relatively common sight in American self-service wrecking yards, but now examples of this Saab 99 descendant are getting rare.

Here’s a non-turbo 900S that I spotted not long ago in a Denver yard.
03 - 1987 Saab 900 in Colorado junkyard - photo by Murilee Martin

Almost 200,000 miles, but this Swedish steel will go to The Crusher just 1,390 miles short of that milestone. A weekend road trip from Denver to Des Moines and back would have done the trick.

05 - 1987 Saab 900 in Colorado junkyard - photo by Murilee Martin

The interior has some sun-bleaching, but looks good for a 28-year-old car.

13 - 1987 Saab 900 in Colorado junkyard - photo by Murilee Martin

The naturally aspirated 16-valve four-cylinder engine in this car made 125 horsepower, which was pretty good for an engine based on the Triumph Slant-4, of TR7 fame.

07 - 1987 Saab 900 in Colorado junkyard - photo by Murilee Martin

Of course, Saab had made many improvements to the engine design since the British Leyland days.

02 - 1987 Saab 900 in Colorado junkyard - photo by Murilee Martin

How many of us have been burned by a junkyard radio that needs an unobtainable security code to function?

15 - 1987 Saab 900 in Colorado junkyard - photo by Murilee Martin

Not rusty, not smashed. Maybe this car developed some expensive mechanical problem (i.e., any mechanical problem) that wasn’t worth fixing, or maybe it was a trade-in that no dealer could sell.

Here’s the complete Saab lineup for 1987 or 1988, including the Viggen airplane (which went out of production a few years later).

Does Geely make jets? HELL NO.

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69 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1987 Saab 900S...”


  • avatar
    dolorean

    What a great find. Damn shame to see it not being loved by some Boulder neo-hippie as it should be.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Something about those older Saabs appealed to me. I suppose largely because they had that unique style that didn’t look like anything else on the road. Sadly, in more recent years, they lost their identity and now they’re gone. I wonder if anyone misses Saab?

    I no longer do.

    The same “disease” that bit Saab is also happening to Subaru as well. Subarus used to have their own quirky style, and now it’s not easy picking them out from the crowd. Hope they don’t wind up in the same leaky, sinking boat.

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      “The same “disease” that bit Saab is also happening to Subaru as well.”

      We should all get to retract one comment per day even after the edit time is up.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Yeah, must concur RE: invalid Subaru opinion.

      They aren’t quirky anymore, but they also can’t build them fast enough. The runaway success is nowhere near leaky or sinking, and has little in common with the sorry state of Saab for 30 years before execution.

      • 0 avatar
        April S

        I sorta miss my 1976 GF 2-door hardtop (a true hardtop-no pillar between the door and the back seat glass) .

        Or the 1993 Loyale I had. It was quirky just because all the squareness of it.

        The 76 was 15 years old and the 93 was six when I bought them. Both were old lady cars. Garage kept with super low miles and in great shape.

        The 76 was taken out by a kid driver who pulled out in front of me. The 93 by one of my co-workers punching a hole in the oil pan with a screwdriver. I made it about a mile when it went boom.

        Anyway, I really enjoyed them. Plus the cute but weird styling.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        Imo Subaru quit being “quirky” ages ago once they made the Legacy and canned the SVX. Styling was never a strong point for them.

        Its worked out pretty well so far for them.

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      I was referring to styling only, not inferring Subaru’s quality was going down.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Zackman I think Subaru is safe. They’ve cultivated a unique “brand” of “Love,” hauling dogs, people passing their old cars onto kids (dooming them to deal with head gasket repairs??), doing outdoors stuff, the environment, etc. Smart marketing for sure, whether or not we ‘car guys’ buy into it. And they are more or less alone in the niche of building non-truck based crossovers that retain a large amount of rough-road ability. The Outback’s nearest competitors are the XC70 and Audi Allroad, both massively more expensive, and more expensive to maintain as they get older even when factoring the Subaru’s known weak spots.

        Consider me one of the people benefiting from Subaru going more mainstream. I’m actually in the process of final price shopping for an Outback Premium. It’s finally large enough, comfortable enough, quiet enough, and efficient enough for me to seriously consider. The features and interior material quality you get for about $27k is stupendous. “2.5i Premium” trim gets you heated seats, heated wiper blades, a roof rack with retractable crossbars, and all the usual stuff (snazzy infotainment, alloy wheels, foglights, etc). The cloth on the seats is very pleasant, and especially on the door cards. Everything is well padded and well laid out. Coming off the 05-09 generation and the 10-14, the 15+ cars are in a different league. A crucial factor is also what they’ve done with the seats. The Forester still has small undersized seats, but the latest Outback FINALLY has seats fit for people of American/European statures. Will I have to deal with some repairs that I would not have to in a Honda CRV or Rav4? Sure, but the total package outweighs those concerns even for me, the long-time Subaru CV boot/wheel bearing/headgasket critic.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          The current downsized allroad is -entirely- and ridiculously too expensive.

          • 0 avatar
            Sigivald

            Seriously.

            If it was at A3 or even A4 prices it’d be compelling, but *starting* at $42k?

            Unless one demands that specific smaller size, Jesus – just buy an Outback already; the top-end 3.6R will smoke the Allroad and is really, really nice inside.

            Or if you demand a European luxury wagon, get a Volvo, for about the same price – and larger, if it’s an XC70.

            (I love the Allroad; I test drove one before I got my XC70 and really liked it.

            But it’s not a good *value*, and it was too small for my personal needs.)

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            They shrunk it a class size, but kept the pricing the same as it was for the A6 allroad.

            In 2005 (final MY), the A6 allroad was $40,250 for the 2.7T, or $47,250 for a loaded up 4.2!

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          That Outback roof rack really is pretty appealing. Too bad the uplevel engine option is ho-hum (although extremely reliable). Just budget CV boot replacements every 50,000 miles into the equation and you won’t have nasty surprises.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Yeah, I use the one on my 4Runner with some regularity (okay maybe 3 times a year) for canoe hauling duty, I appreciate that the cross bars are a) included in the base car, not as an extra accessory for $200+ and b) that they fold into the rails when not in use.

            I found the 2.5i+CVT to be perfectly satisfactory for my style of driving, which trends towards pretty laid back. Another thing I really liked was how good the turning radius was considering the car’s size. I wonder if the longitudinal engine layout has something to do with this, and whether this is another potential cause for increased boot wear. I know that the primary cause is exhaust manifold heat cooking the rubber. We’ll see about oil consumption, as long as it doesn’t cause cat or O2 sensor failure long term I’m okay with keeping an eye on oil level.

        • 0 avatar

          CV joints were improved around 2009 so you should be safe now, and of course the engine was redesigned in 2011.

          Im a big fan of the 2005-2009 Legacy / Outback. Much nicer interior, just the right size, and massively fast with the turbo.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            “Much nicer interior” I assume this is in comparison with the ’10-’14, the 2015+ blows it out of the water by a wide margin IMO.

        • 0 avatar
          Dave M.

          The head gasket issue was pretty much put to rest with a redesigned head and block in ’06.

          My dealer keeps taunting me that my ’13 Limited is worth $22500. I NEVER replace a car after 2-3 years but I’m mighty tempted – the new one has a few features not available when I got mine (BSD). I do like the quirky, goofy aardvark front end on mine though.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Denver

      In Fiddler on the Roof, there is a scene where Tevye is told by his socialist son in law that money is a disease, whereupon Tevye replies “may God smite me with this disease and may I NEVER recover.”

  • avatar
    rcx141

    What a shame, that car looks in great shape. I can’t believe a dealer could not sell it (even through auction), maybe someone passed away or it has a bad mechanical fault. I love that “cliff face” dash – reminiscent of 80s Vauxhall dashes (UK)

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I’m thinking something small and made of relative unobtanium broke on this one. The engine bay is very clean and free of dirt/oil/leaves. The hoses are in great shape (surprising, as I see one there dated 1988), and the interior is clean. Look how tidy down by the pedals! Someone cared for this car for a very long time, until a last-straw moment.

    Perhaps a hard to access fuel pump/relay or something?

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      Perhaps a stretched timing chain did it in, a semi-common malady on high mileage B202 (multi-valve) Saab engines. Apparently the chain replacement is an engine-out job, and a stretched chain that isn’t replaced in time can lead to bent valves or worse, as it 16 valve motor is an interference design.

      I really love these cars, they used to be all over the place in Ithaca (along with 240/740/940 Volvos). I love the very functional hatchback body that can fit enormous amounts of cargo, and that massive greenhouse. Excellent in the snow as well, from what I’ve heard. Unfortunately in central NY these 900 series cars turned out to be nowhere as corrosion resistant as post-’86 Volvos.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      The transmission/diff died, guaranteed. That is that A #1 mechanical killer of Saab 900s, both manual and automatic. Good rebuilds are getting expensive and hard to come by. And since the engine is bolted to the top of it, it’s a VERY expensive job in labor to have done,as whole thing has to come out. The top of the tranny is the oil pan in these cars.

      One this clean would probably have gotten fixed here in Maine though. Around here it is a race between the transmission and rust as to which kills these cars first. The later cars got an improved transmission, and they were always pretty good as far as rust, but they are OLD cars now, with the newest being 21.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Even a worn out clutch could have been the last straw, perhaps weeks after one of the other common catastrophic failures occurred.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          A clutch on a non-turbo 900 is <1hr of labor for someone who has done it before, and a couple hundred in parts. Highly unlikely.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            Not everyone is a do it yourselfer, and I’ve seen $2,000 quoted for Saab 900 clutch replacement. The steps are available online, and you’re not helping your strained credibility by claiming anyone short of an NHRA Top Fuel crew can do it in less than an hour.

          • 0 avatar
            bill h.

            I’d never consider doing the clutch on an classic 900 myself, but the one time I did have it done by a shop it wasn’t anywhere near $2k. However, that figure is entirely credible for the GM 900s and the 1st gen 9-3s. With that car, changing out the clutch also requires transmission and subframe removal and replacement.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            I have seen the clutch done in a classic 900S in less than an hour with my own eyes. There is very little to it, assuming you have the couple of Saab tools needed. It’s right up top front and center, nothing needs to come out but the cover over it. One of the few advantages to Saab’s oddball engine placement. $2K would be for a NG900 where the transmission has to be dropped from the car.

            Turbo classic 900s need more time due to the turbo plumbing having to come out. I have done one of those personally in ~2hrs. A little slow since it was my first time.

            How many C900s have you owned, exactly? I’m at three.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            Here is the procedure for a 1984 Saab 900:

            http://www.wikihow.com/Change-a-Saab-900-Clutch

            If you do that in an hour, how many steps do you skip? Did your car still have an HVAC system when you were done? Engine cooling?

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Those instructions are for a turbo. On a N/A car when you open the hood the clutch housing is right there in front of you. He also did not have the correct tools – threaded rod?? Uh, no.

            All you need to protect the radiator is a piece of cardboard, there is zero need to move it.

            Reading comprehension for the win! Or you know, you could actually keep your opinions to yourself for things you have no actual experience with.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    Heh… Top Gunnar and Executive Eric each taking their Saabs out of the hangar! Such great ads the Swedes did back then.

    How do you beat that Looming Bird Of Prey schtick?
    Ya don’t.

  • avatar
    jkk6

    -I believe this card held a Guinness World Records for top speed on a mass produced car at the time.
    -$2k to fix AC compressor due to it being placed behind engine or something requiring an engine drop.
    -Father says this car was the worst POS he has ever owned, as it allowed him to become a master technician. In turn training a non-intentional shade tree mechanic(me) by holding a flashlight in the parking lot and frequent Strauss Auto visits.

    Yes this car is indeed special.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      The 900 didn’t hold any top speed records, but Saab used three 1987 9000 Turbos to set endurance records over a twenty day period. In terms of mere top speed, there were plenty of mass produced cars faster than the fastest Saab 900. A decade later, Saab(GM) used a bunch of Opel-based 900s to reset the records of the Saab 9000 for endurance.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    These fall into the Volvo camp of “I don’t get the appeal”.. but like we’ve discussed, we all have our weird old car heart’s desires.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      Even as a Volvo guy I dont get Saabs, great interiors but awful electrics, and engine repairs are a a nightmare.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        As one who has owned a bunch of both Volvos and Saabs, I put it this way – I would rather OWN a Volvo, but I would rather DRIVE a Saab.

        In my experience, Volvo 240s have FAR worse electrical systems than Saab 900s. 900s are on par with 7/940s. Some jobs on a 900 are easier than other cars, some are harder. Easiest clutch in the world to change – 45 minutes on a non-turbo, for example. But the alternator is a beotch, as is just changing the drive belts. Suspension work on the front is a PITA due to the upper/lower A arm design. But on the other hand, they don’t drive like a tractor like the RWD Volvos do. And brilliant in snow.

      • 0 avatar
        BC

        I do think you’re a bit misguided about Saab engine repairs and electrics. I’ve had 3.

        – The 4 cylinder engine if treated right is fairly rock solid – sludge issues worked out, timing chain instead of belt, plenty of space around engine to do work if necessary.
        – The turbo on the later models is the rock solid Mitsubishi TD04.
        – The transmissions were aisin and again rock solid.
        – Electrics -depends what you mean. The ignition cassette can be gotten for less than $200 and my wife could put it in. They last at least 100k. I have not had issues with other electrics so cannot comment.

        The cars had shortcomings and didn’t do well head to head against BMW and mercedes when shopping new. But the used game is another story – the price points on these cars are insane. Tell me where you can get reliable transit, good gas mileage, the best leather seats I’ve ever sat in, amazing safety profile, readily accessible power (engine tuned for freeway passing and not R&T off the line numbers), and great all weather performance for less than $5k. Even with using a mechanic for the bulk of the work, my ownership costs are a fraction of what a reliable asian car would be.

        Granted, they aren’t for everyone, but I’ll keep buying low mileage Saabs as long as they are around. Parts are readily accessible, great online community for trouble shooting when problems do come up, and nothing else like them on the road.

        • 0 avatar
          Ryoku75

          So many words, yet I know not what Saab models youre talking about.

          At KR: I agree on the electrics, my late later 240 wagon had wires fraying at the hatch hinges, dead wiper motor and squirters, the 92 sedan had really wonky tailight issues.

          An older Saab would be a good toy once I have the resources. Iffy as a DD

          • 0 avatar
            bill h.

            Sounds to me like BC is talking about the next-gen 900 model, which then morphed into the 1st gen 9-3. Or perhaps conflating some other models into the mix? In any case, I have one of the last built of the original liftback 1st gen 9-3s that evolved from the 900 hatchbacks, made in Finland in late 2002 model year. It’s still my DD at 207+k miles.

          • 0 avatar
            Forty2

            I have a 1991 240 as a DD and I’m pretty familiar with the electrical issues. The tail lamps have a flimsy printed circuit “board” (more like tissue) that fry if you look at them sideways. I replaced them with crap repro parts that fried within a year, and sourced NOS units after that. No issues since. The only other electrical issue I have is a busted driver’s door window motor (original owner was a smoker I guess) and after I rewired the speakers the center stack lights don’t work anymore. Still trying to figure that one out.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Anything this old is iffy as a daily driver. When I daily drove 900s and 240s 10-15 years ago, I found very little in it between them for actual reliability. Both are quite reliable if maintained correctly, even at 200K+. Saabs cost more to maintain. They are often harder to fix, and the parts cost more in many cases. And they are more complex. The added cost was worth it, IMHO, as a 900, especially in turbo form is a heck of a lot more fun.

            Now that the cars are WELL over 20 years old, I have to think the Volvo has a huge advantage simply in that it is so much simpler. There is simply a lot less to go wrong with a 240. And even less with a 940, which fixes most of the stuff that does go wrong with 240s.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      Think of this as the Ikea-designed predecessor to your Buick (turbo power, decent long-distance runner, and finicky ownership), and it might just resonate?

  • avatar
    GermanReliabilityMyth

    I used to own an ’87 900S. I really enjoyed that car, even though it didn’t have the same build quality as my ’88 240GL. Handled really well and had an excellent greenhouse. I’m still not sure how they utilized the cargo space so well, but it was nothing short of impressive. Despite its quirks, I loved that car because I resuscitated it while learning how to troubleshoot cars. Even more, though, I really enjoyed just looking at it. It was a pleasure to behold, coming or going. It made me feel special to be inside of it, too.

    I’m not hamming it up when I say that it makes me choke up a little bit to see such a nice example thrown away and left to rot, likely for something trivial. My own 900 had about 192K on it and showed no indication of slowing down. This example probably has/had a good bit of life left in it.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    I’ve always thought the 900 was an incredibly ugly car, especially in convertible guise. Or school bus yellow. Or BOTH, as I saw once.

    But the 9000? Oh…be still, my beating heart.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    I’ve always enjoyed the quirky nature of SAABs. Though I’ve never put more than test drive miles on one, I’ve always thought they had excellent seats, almost as good as Volvo. As a pilot, the interior layout is indeed very cockpit like and I’ve always liked the “Night Panel” feature. I’m not buying the whole “Born from Jets’ tagline they used, but it’s a very functional panel, even if the materials are lacking.

    Near me, there’s an 00 or 01 9-5 in black with the deep dish alloys. Very handsome car , always has been in my opinion . It’s a V6 Turbo automatic and it’s been sitting for a while at a local garage. It appears to be in decent shape cosmetically for a 15 year old SAAB, only the usual fading of black plastic and the badges. Edmunds says $2000-ish is reasonable. I’ve started looking for a third car and I wouldn’t mind picking up an orphan for cheap.

  • avatar
    mfgreen40

    Was Saab the last car to set the windshield and rear glass in rubber rather than being glued in?

  • avatar
    VW16v

    I can smell the gas leak from the in cabin gas lines from here.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    These are neat cars with some of the better interiors Ive seen, but honestly, some cars just arent worth saving.

    GM Saabs mayve lost the “quirk”, but at least they will work! Well, until your low friction engine goes at 110k.

    I cant help but think Nissan stole the front end from Saab for their “legendary” 90s Maxima, of which I saw broken down yesterday.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      That’s a bit of a stretch. The Maxima front end is very derivative of the earlier 810. Gen 1 Max had a smaller and smoothed 810 front. Gen 2 Max had a smaller and more smoothed one still.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        I think the long flat hoods threw me off, youre right though, that Maxima was just a stylistic evolution of previous models.

        Now, howd they go from modest to the current deformed monster?

  • avatar
    e30gator

    I snagged a junkyard stereo for my old ’97 Volvo 850 once that required a security code I figured as long as I took down the VIN, maybe a dealer would be able to give me the code. Piece of cake.

    I live in Florida and it was 7 pm on a Friday, so I’d have to wait till Monday to try and convince someone locally…unacceptable. I figured I’d google a dealer on Pacific time (service dept at a Volvo dealer in Santa Barbara, CA). I called and explained that I was taking a trip and couldn’t make it into the dealer before I left. No problem, I was jamming to Led Zeppelin in no time. Just make sure you have the VIN. Also, have a good story.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    As a first time Volvo (used) owner, my impression of Swedish cars is they have strong fundamental engineering, are perfectly sized, with good packaging, but let down by an endless litany of annoying to fatal mechanical and electrical maladies. Minor issues on other cars seem to bring Swedish cars to their knees, yet they can run forever too, a paradox. Still, when my Volvo actually runs, it runs beautifully.

  • avatar
    bill h.

    Our first Saab was an ’88 900S, though a four door sedan. The nicer thing about the transition from ’87 to ’88 was that they switched to the braking setup then being used on the 9000s, with the parking brake moved to the rear wheels, and simpler front brake maintenance as a result. The engines were a little wheezy at 125hp and no turbo, but adequate with a 5-speed, and the lesser stress on the transmissions meant that rebuilds of the latter were not as likely. We kept ours for 17 years and it had 225k or so miles on it, and it was still running well when we sold it. Drove it everywhere, and it was a beast in just about any kind of winter weather.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Awwww I wasn’t here for this.

  • avatar

    I like old Saabs, so I took a chance on a 900S convertible that was in the non-running section of our local auction. Even though it ran.

    I found out why quickly. The crank pulley is also a giant rubber balancer. And the rubber had completely vanished. And it had overheated. And blown the head gasket.

    So I took a small loss and sold it as a project. Shame, I was hoping to enjoy it for a few weeks.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    I do consider buying a later 90’s-00’s 900 or 9-3 convertible for a weekend cruiser and having a FWD car for the occasional foul weather jaunt. From what I have read they are fairly reliable with the occasional electrical gremlin and head gasket. The 2.0-T ignition module is an easy fix and does have a timing chain which is obviously a plus.

    I always though Subaru aka Fuji heavy industries should have bought the remains of Saab. After all they did make the 9-2X aka WRX for a couple of years. A boxer powered 9-3 AWD would have made Erik Carlsson grin.

  • avatar
    kmars2009

    SAAB began it’s slow decline once GM took over in the 90’s. Switching everything to GM platforms and parts resulted in simply a restyled Malibu…with equal poor GM quality. Then when times got tough, GM killed them off. Probably a good thing. Who wanted to pay a premium price for a redone Malibu? Certainly not a premium car shopper!

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Sorry, but no. GM taught Saab how to properly and consistently build cars. There is just no comparison in initial and long-term quality between the 99/900 and the GM platform cars, the new cars are simply far, far better over the long haul. They are not as quirky and endearing, which put off the faithful, but they are much, much better cars overall. Without GM, Saab would have gone under 20 years earlier.

      That said, GM did ultimately kill Saab by starving them of development funds and making them price the cars too high (at MSRP) vis-à-vis the competition. The 9-5 was a very competitive car when it debuted in ’97, but by the time they replaced it in ’10 it was woefully out of date. The NG 9-3 in ’03 had an egregiously cheap interior that was not fixed until ’07, and lacked the expected hatch at debut. And it was also getting pretty stale by the time Saab died in ’11 with no replacement in sight. I have long said that my ’08 9-3SC was a joke at its MSRP of $36K, but a great car for the $22.5K I paid for it new in ’09. Probably should have been a $30K car where it would have been reasonably competitive. Trouble was that Saab could barely stay afloat selling them for $36K.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        Great analysis and very true – much to my dismay, GM extended Saab’s life for at least 10 years. You’re right though – in all their internal troubles GM did starve Saab of new product…until it was too late.

        I love my ’04 9-3 Aero convertible, but no way would I count on it as a daily driver. Parts and repairs are expensive with limited availability of parts and knowledgeable mechanics, but no worse than a typical European car.

        Here’s a great read….

        http://www.steadysaabin.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/Who-killed-Saab-Automobile.pdf

  • avatar
    kmars2009

    I would rather SAAB die with some dignity, than part of the GM junkpile. They almost killed Suzuki too, fortunately, after GM ruined their reputation and sales here…they chose to back out. Saving their lives. Anyway…RIP SAAB!

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