By on November 10, 2015

“WE GOT A CALL A FEW MINUTES AGO… SOMEBODY PUT A CHILD IN THE TRUNK.”

Uh-oh, Spaghetti-O’s!

When I first heard about this video a couple of days ago, I had what I’ll call the Typical Car Guy’s Reaction: Those stupid pigs. Why are they harassing a family with a Tesla? What percentage of criminal behavior in the country is perpetrated by people who own Teslas? Is it because the people in the video aren’t lily-white? Is it because the cops were bored? Because they wanted to exercise their authority on yet another hapless family of meek motorists?

Every anti-police cliche ran through my head. It didn’t help to actually watch the video and see the cop order the little kid back into the car like he was El Chapo or something.

But then I watched the dad walk around to the back and press the trunk release button and… the trunk opens… and the kid gets out. And under no circumstances is the man or woman on the street going to see that as anything but putting children in the trunk. The fact that they’re actually being put into rear-facing child seats of reasonable safety is besides the point. You’re putting them in there by opening a trunk/hatchback.

I’m betting that you wouldn’t get that call if the family had been driving a (nonexistent) Tesla station wagon. While most of America has forgotten the era of station wagons with rear-facing seats, we’ve all seen people get into a Toyota Land Cruiser or Land Rover Discovery through the back door. It’s also faster sometimes to have children pile into a Suburban or Tahoe through the cargo entrance.

The Model S, on the other hand, looks like a fastback sedan. It’s a pretty direct rip of the Jaguar XF, visually speaking. If you saw somebody putting kids in the trunk of an XF you’d probably call the cops assuming you didn’t just walk over and discuss it with the driver directly. So what makes the Tesla any different? You might personally know that it has rear-facing seats, but should every man, woman, and child in America have to know this? Should we all have to memorize certain weights and capacities? If you see somebody putting six adults in the back of an F-150, should you be required to do the math real quick and check total load against acceptable payload?

It is therefore reasonable to think that, until the Model S has the same kind of mindshare with the American public that the VW Beetle had in 1970, people will find it unusual or scary that children appear to be climbing in and out of the trunk of a sedan. And some of those people will care enough about the welfare of said children that they are going to call the police about it. You might not like that — you might not like the idea of other adults judging you for what you do with your kids — but it’s how America used to work all the time and it’s going to stick around in some sort of vestigial-tail situation until every bit of pre-Vietnam culture in this country is cauterized with the hot wire of media re-education.

The only reason this sort of thing isn’t happening more often is simple: Ninety-five percent of the time the Beings of Light who purchase Teslas are far too enlightened and post-modern to become involved with anything as disgusting and messy and hick-ish as the actual conception and parenting of children. They’re far more likely to have “fur babies” than they are to have real babies. The enclaves where Teslas dwell are only slightly less child-free than was London in “Children of Men” and the appearance of actual children in those walled gardens usually only evokes disgust from the latte-sipping knowledge engineers who have difficulty conceiving of an existence without the FitBit and the smartphone and the domestic servant.

Those of you who see the jump seats of Teslas as the identical solution for a four-child family are beneath the notice and contempt of people who consider bearing four children to be a crime against the Mother Earth Gaia and/or the environment. You’re like all the old people who bought a Scion xB because it had a high hip point and a seniors-friendly MSRP; the entire marketing department despairs at your existence and is willing to spend millions of dollars to deny it.

Should families with a normal (pre-1999) number of children consider a Tesla? Maybe, maybe not. I rather think they’d be safer in a Tesla than they would be a Lexus GX 460, both from a passive and active safety standpoint.

But there’s something to be said about not having an interaction with the police. Nothing good ever comes from being pulled over. The best thing that can happen is that you lose half an hour of your life and you’re exposed to oncoming traffic. The worst thing that can happen when you accidentally enrage a police officer… well, we all know what that is. Would you want to be shot down like a dog in front of your children, just because you had an electric car and a chip on your shoulder? It’s worth considering.

Or you can make the kids climb through the gap between the middle row and the rear seat. It’s uncomfortable, but it’s not fatal, right?

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127 Comments on “#BackLivesMatter – Riding In Tesla’s Rumble Seat Will Get You A Chat With The Cops...”


  • avatar
    henkdevries

    The worst thing that can happen when you accidentally enrage a police officer… well, we all know what that is. Would you want to be shot down like a dog in front of your children

    Even the thought of this, to me, is a serious issue.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Or, like that guy in Louisiana, your 6 year old child gets shot down in front of you.

      • 0 avatar
        RideHeight

        #WhiteLivesAin’tSh1t

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Those cops certainly had no problem mowing down a 6 year old white kid with autism.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Good Lord I had not heard about that one.

          • 0 avatar
            RideHeight

            Sorry, my Compliance Helmet has activated and I may comment no further on this issue.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            http://www.cnn.com/2015/11/09/us/louisiana-child-shooting/index.html

            Shot 18 rounds into a truck that had the 6 year old and his dad. No firearm was found in the truck.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Right, so both officers had pending excessive force cases against them, and both of them were allowed to work regular shifts dealing with the public anyway. Nothing wrong with that, clearly. Definitely they shouldn’t have been on suspension.

            I presume there hasn’t been a massive riot with fires and looting, or I would have certainly heard about it? If the child was a different color, there certainly would have been.

          • 0 avatar
            VenomV12

            @CoreyDL, before you went on your rant, did you actually do any research and see that those cops were not white? They are either black or Hispanic or mixed with both, but definitely not white so I am guessing if the child had been black which is what you meant to say, I don’t think it would have made a difference regarding these cops.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Yes, I meant if the child were black. I saw the officers race via the photo on CNN, but that part isn’t relevant to what I was saying.

            If the child were black, that part of the country would be on fire right now.

            Better?

          • 0 avatar
            VenomV12

            @CoreyDL, why exactly would black people riot over black cops killing a black child? Can you give me an example of when this has happened or where this precedent has been set?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Venom

            So essentially there is a color wheel for riots?

            Oh wait we didn’t line up all three guys, lets head home.

          • 0 avatar
            JCraig

            One difference is that these cops have already been charged with murder. If the cops were white and the kid black would they have moved that quickly to charge them?

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            Most of the police involved in the death of Freddie Gray were black. It didn’t help Baltimore. Most of the police involved in the death of Eric Garner were black. It didn’t stop de Blasio from inciting murders of officers. Only the dead civilian’s color matters.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            JCraig-

            Yes, because in this case they had the body camera footage. That footage is supposedly pretty [email protected]

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            @VenomV12

            Anyone and everyone is justified in protesting the police, after the police gun down a child through their own incompetence.

            Race issues aren’t a prerequisite for protesting the killing of a child, though they sure can turn up the volume.

            Bun, remember that the racial strife is the context, and the killing of a child (or whatever the outrage is) is the problem.

          • 0 avatar
            Detroit-Iron

            @Venom

            Literally half the cops indicted in Freddie Gray’s death are black.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      I really thought TTAC was above this kind of crap.

  • avatar

    I still get the whiff of viral marketing when I watch that video. Too many cameras.

    • 0 avatar
      VenomV12

      Yeah, something about this seemed off and a little staged. Every site from business to automotive has about 5 Tesla articles a day each, hard to believe that the cops don’t know about the rear jumpseat feature.

      • 0 avatar
        brett

        Nowadays, Most police cars now have high quality dash cams, plenty of people have HD home cameras. I have both. I also consider myself fairly knowledgeable about cars and didn’t realize that the Tesla’s had the rear jump seats.

      • 0 avatar
        Toy Maker

        It’s very possible.
        I read articles on Tesla , but most publication focuses on the electric this and that and the funky door handles, I don’t remember anything about jumpseats. Also because I don’t have children. And I cannot afford a Tesla.

        I even sat in a Tesla on two separate occasion, again all I remember was the funky door handles and the huge touchscreen.

        Even right now I am confused, so the tesla can seat 5 people plus 2 rear facing babies ? That can’t be it because then all the megazines will tout it as the first luxury full electric 7-seater or something.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      You mean you don’t run your cars with perfectly centered and focused dash cam and high quality front yard cam?

    • 0 avatar
      philadlj

      Agreed. The production values are a bit too polished. All it lacked was a bearded eunuch tossing people’s phones into a wood chipper.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    Nice job of squeezing a Cuddlekins and producing haterade.

    That last full paragraph is pathological.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Trunks don’t have windows.

    Maybe I’m being unreasonable here but I expect the general population to understand the difference between someone being stuffed into a trunk mafia-style and sitting upright in a hatchback/wagon.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Right? The Model S is a hatchback.

    • 0 avatar
      VolandoBajo

      I know of a case where a young child crawled into a hatchback in a rental car and then into his car seat, and the nursery worker who knew the parent and child, no less, reported it as maltreatment of the child.

      After a couple of weeks of hell, the case was finally closed and the child was left with the father. But it was very nerve-wracking because the state could have taken the child away at any time, just on the basis of an allegation of abuse.

  • avatar
    jmo

    Can we dial down the forced snark?

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      There’s two settings with JB: 11 and 0. 0 would be a verbatim reposting.

    • 0 avatar

      It was written by Jack Baruth. Does he force that snarkiness, or is it natural? The latter, I think.
      In fact, I suspect he tones down what he’s really thinking. I get that because I have to do it myself…and it ain’t easy.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      When Jack’s not fenced in, and is allowed to unleash his stream of consciousness full bore, SNARK included, he’s in his purest & best form, like a cheetah hitting its stride while hunting the impala.

      See his brilliant essays on anything Hublot, Porsche, Lincoln or Cadillac, as just some examples of Jack WOT.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        p.s. – It doesn’t matter if one agrees with all, merely some or none of Jack’s opinions/rants/philosophical/epistemological points in any given one of his better essays; he provokes critical thinking and has an uncanny ability to tap into current Zeitgeist.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Occasionally when I see a S and I’m with someone non-car-ish, I’ll point it out and also mention that it has a rear facing seat option for two kiddies in back. Nobody I’ve told has ever been aware of the option.

    But honestly Model S owners usually park in a garage or have a large gated drive where such conspicuous action as putting kids in the trunk is not visible to street plebs.

  • avatar
    SomeGuy

    I do agree that interactions with the police are almost never positive. Being pulled over is never a good experience. My biggest rant to my wife is why are cops worried about speeders, they should be more focused on poor driving behavior (hogging left lane, no turn signals, passing on the right, etc.). Or, better yet, they should be in the poor side of my and Bark M.’s town and keeping the peace.

    But that wouldn’t generate revenue now would it?

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Been pulled over four times in life (all four speeding) and got two tickets. Two times I was a young person in a nice car and I think the officer decided to punish me. One time the officer told me “You look thinner than the weight on your license. And you should slow down!” and let me go, and one time the officer said “We aren’t giving out tickets tonight, but slow down a bit!” and laughed. That last time I was in a Terraza though, so maybe felt sorry for me.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Only four? You’re doing good. My record may have helped convince me to stop buying performance cars. Let’s see…

        – 1992, 75/55, totally deserved it
        – 1992, 42/30, bull$h!t ticket on a wide neighborhood arterial in sunny weather
        – 1994, 67/55, bull$h!t ticket picked out of a line of traffic all moving at the same speed because I was a young kid
        – 1994, given a warning for cutting off a pedestrian in a crosswalk, totally deserved a ticket
        – 1996, 35/30, four-lane neighborhood arterial, bull$h!t warning
        – 1999, 51/40, given a warning, really pulled over not for speeding but because local cops didn’t like people using their back road as a shortcut. Cop dropped the ticket when I said I’d use the main road
        – 2000, allegedly 71/55, mistaken identity, beat it in court
        – 2008, ran a well-hidden stop sign at 5 mph at night, got a ticket
        – 2014, 89/80, empty Idaho freeway, bull$h!t ticket

    • 0 avatar
      don1967

      “Being pulled over is never a good experience”

      Well, duh. You were expecting a reward?

      The anti-cop vitriol at TTAC and many other places is getting unreal. By all means hold the bad ones accountable for their actions. But let the rest of them do their jobs, because someday that panicky 9-11 call just might be you.

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        >> “Being pulled over is never a good experience”
        >
        > Well, duh. You were expecting a reward?

        Remember that, for most adults, this is our only interaction with law enforcement.

        This is when and where we decide if police are all about public safety, or are thugs or bridge trolls.

        Police have lost the confidence of huge parts of the American populace, and these interactions are a large part of the reason why.

        There’s lots of ways to do it differently and better. When writing traffic tickets is you primary public outreach program, you’re not going to be popular.

        • 0 avatar
          don1967

          At what part of the video were the police acting as “thugs”? They investigated a reported child abduction in a very calm and efficient manner, and when the mistake was realized they couldn’t have been more congenial.

          As for those other situations when the police aren’t so warm ‘n fuzzy, we must understand that law enforcement necessitates a certain degree of “sport psychology”… of establishing dominance in dangerous situations including traffic stops. Show me a cop with a Care Bear personality and I’ll show you a guy with a short future.

  • avatar
    Matt Foley

    9/11 and the War on Terra have transformed the dumber among us into See Something, Say Something busybodies.

    “Why don’t you mind your own business?
    Mind your own business!
    ‘Cause if you mind your business, then you won’t be minding mine.” – Hank Williams Sr.

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      And what if someone really is stuffing a little kid into the trunk of a car? Think it doesn’t happen?

      Take a little time to read up on human trafficking. And be more observant at major airports for the adult variety.

      What do you imagine the overloading of our law enforcement systems and our border with a huge narco-empire are going to result in, safer times for the vulnerable?

      • 0 avatar
        fvfvsix

        Out here in the Sonoran desert, the signs of human trafficking are many and very obvious. None of them involve anyone being stuffed into a trunk at a grocery store – and the cops around here don’t really seem to be interested in confronting the most egregious everyday examples. It seems they’d much rather pull me over for “calling attention to myself” (and yes, that actually was an excuse I got for pulling me over while I was driving to an airport to board an international flight.. funny, the TSA didn’t think I was calling attention to myself).

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    Why did they ask for ID when it was already settled that it was mistake?

    • 0 avatar
      Ojala

      Most Police Officers on Patrol are required to document stops for racial profiling reports. Some places require an id to be entered, some require a form filled out, and some just want a couple boxes checked on the patrol car’s computer.

    • 0 avatar
      OhioBobcat

      They’re required to ask for your ID to see if you have any outstanding warrants for your arrest.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Paper work. Plus maybe they had warrants or restraining orders, the officer has to “run them” to be sure. Pretty standard procedure.

      The Tesla is odd with that optional, rear facing backseat, so I can understand the confusion.

  • avatar
    Frank Galvin

    Mom. “Did you follow us?” Officer, “No, we waited here at the house, got the license plate, we were wondering.”

    Well that’s just great. Report of a child being placed in the trunk of a car (assuming no knowledge of the jump seat), so we’ll just wait and see if they come back to the house, hopefully.

    Is it me, or is that not the response I want to see from the police with a report like that? Obviously, we don’t have the call to 911, but whose to say that it wasn’t a carjacking, kidnapping, parental kidnapping, gta, etc. We’ll just wait at the house and see what happens? Weak.

    • 0 avatar
      SlowMyke

      I’d bet officers on the road were made aware to look out for the vehicle while two others went to the residence to cover their bases. Looks like the strategy paid off. This is pretty much what I’d want to happen in the given situation.

  • avatar
    Kendahl

    The cops get a call that someone appeared to put a child into the trunk of a car. They show up to check it out. On arrival, their attitude is neutral. They haven’t dismissed the call as frivolous but neither are they on a mission to arrest the parents for child abuse. As soon as they see the rear-facing seats, they readily acknowledge that there isn’t a problem. As CYA for them and their department, they have to document how they handled the call. That’s why they wanted the father’s ID.

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      Good on ya.

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      Why didn’t they check the mother’s ID, too? She could have outstanding arrest warrants, and she may have been the one who put the child in the back in the first place.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        The mother wasn’t driving.

        There was reasonable suspicion for the traffic stop. A traffic stop allows the police to check the driver’s license and to question briefly.

        To a car buff who knows that there are seats in the trunk, this is a bit silly, but it appears from this to be a legal stop. An arrest would obviously have been inappropriate, but that as we can see, that didn’t happen.

  • avatar
    SlowMyke

    My few take aways from the video/ this article:

    1- As people have pointed, fewer police interactions are generally better than more. In my experience, police are generally upstanding, hard-working individuals who get a bad rap from media, a few extremely bad apples, and a general mistrust of authority figures. That said, they are still just people and are susceptible to all the downfalls us civilian-types are. You can’t get shot by the authorities if they aren’t there.

    2- Who called the cops? Neighbors? Someone in a parking lot? Did they get the plates quickly? The cops rolled up like they knew where they were going. If it were neighbors, that’s pretty sad they either didn’t understand their neighbor’s car or couldn’t go ask.
    EDIT: better listening provides that answer, someone gave a plate number and the cops were waiting at the house.

    3- People pointing out the possibility of wannabe viral BS. That didn’t initially occur to me due to the fact police were involved, but the cameras and sound were all very well executed. I suppose that’s it’s very possible. However, there are some pretty high quality surveillance systems out there and pointing a camera at a $100k car seems logical.

    4- That was possibly the least threatening interaction between unsuspecting motorists and police I’ve seen. The cops didn’t have their hands at their guns, they didn’t shout “get back in the car” or anything like that. They let the driver approach and open the hatch and they all laughed immediately when they realized what happened. The one officer did his due diligence and they were on their way. I think this could be a public awareness video for cops to show they aren’t all assholes.

    5- Immediately thinking “pigs” when hearing about this video is idiotic. Unless you heard that cops pulled the car over under their own volition, what else would you expect a cop to do when they get a call of kids being put in a trunk. If thinking of cops as pigs is a normal car enthusiast reaction, then normal car enthusiasts suck. There are crappy interactions with cops for sure, but the vast majority of negative cop-car enthusiast videos I see are because the car guy is acting like a dipshit.

    • 0 avatar
      Toad

      SlowMyke, bonus points for the most reasonable post of the day.

      FWIW, I have some sympathy for the police, especially in a situation like this. The get a call about kids in a car trunk and really have no idea what they are going to be dealing with. Could be benign, could be a kidnapping, and everything could unravel very quickly.

      We forget that virtually every interaction the police have with the public involves somebody who they suspect is breaking the law or somebody who is a victim of a lawbreaker. It is all bad news, all day, every day. That has to get old.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        “SlowMyke, bonus points for the most reasonable post of the day.”

        Agreed!

        I have no problem with the officer telling the child to get back into the car when they first pulled up. That’s called taking control of the situation and I’m quite certain he was following the training given to him. It was done for both the childs and his own safety. When you don’t know what you walking into you have to handle the situation accordingly.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Notice the father was pretty relaxed during the whole thing..takes out the wallet, flips over the license, and “standing legs-crossed” from that point on. I wouldn’t be as chill in that situation; in fact, in a warning incident several years ago (marked lane violation going into a middle turn lane around the line of cars turning right into the Middle School near my home to drop off their kiddos), I was stuttering and stammering so much that the cop said to me “[y]ou don’t have much interaction with the police, do you?!” (It’s either a 10-minute wait on the worst mornings, or a couple minutes with an occasional well-timed drive-around; my mistake was being the last of a few cars in who had done the same thing. Now, if necessary, I make sure to be the meat in the sandwich!)

      Smart woman, I’ll say!

  • avatar
    PeterKK

    I’m 31 with 3 kids, already. Bucking that trend! Probably I’ll never be able to afford a Tesla, haha. But I’d love to. Especially with optional seats in the back. SO COOL!

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Tres chic to hate cops.

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      I just had an epiphany moment regarding Baruth’s incessant and escalating cop hate:

      He’s aware that he’ll soon be incapable of interesting them at any level of any kind of surveillance. So much defiance, so little time.

      Like the other epiphany moment I had the other week about concept cars *having* to be grotesque, this makes me feel better.

  • avatar
    ckb

    Jack, your wordsmithing flows like a waterfall bubbling over conjunctive boulders and suffix stones allowing adverbial rainbows to shine through the antecedent mist before crashing down into a prepositional pool of…libertarian paranoia.

    Back to the topic, I wonder if this incident is better or worse than a news report I saw a while back where they had someone pretend to be passed out in a car with the alarm going off and videotaped every single person just walk by.

    Anyway, keep up the good work!

  • avatar
    05lgt

    Until the law enforcement agencies learn to police their own and institute effective use of force policies and training, no one in their right mind wants to interact with them. That’s the underlying issue. This time, and most times, went well. That’s not the safety standard I (or seemingly Jack) strive for; not being killed “most times”. If my child or someone else’s is drunk/drugged/mentally ill and presenting a danger to themselves or others, calling the police is far from a no brainer. Their quickness to resort to lethal force to ensure their own safety and or control of the “situation” makes that a very dangerous decision. There’s room and need for improvement, I have very little interest in paying for the service we now have.

  • avatar
    Wheatridger

    Generalize all you want, JB, about the childless Eco-Jihadists driving those Teslas. Opinion inflation makes better clickbait, I suppose. But the only Tesla I see regularly drops off its owner’s offspring at my daughter’s high school. If you asked the owner, he might say that e drives electric BECAUSE he has kids who will have to live with whatever world we pass down to them.

    But I wouldn’t know– I don’t drive electric, I am a parent and an environmentalist and I can’t afford a Tesla, so I’m on the outside looking in. As are you and I am so done with judging people by the cars they drive. Except for those coal rollers, sociopaths all!

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Right because there’s no sociopathy in environmentalism and Earth worship.

      Check your privilege, prole.

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      ” If you asked the owner, he might say that e drives electric BECAUSE he has kids who will have to live with whatever world we pass down to them.”

      If/when I ever buy a Tesla, the answer I will give on why I drive it will be “have you seen how fast this thing is off the line?!?!”

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        Of course, I always drag out the time when I had my doors blown off by a rampaging Prius on I-75 with cruise on MY personal Vmax of 82mph!

        Not to mention the smattering of those you see with “Nobama” and NRA bumper stickers.

        Thirdly, I’ve ridden in one, and it’s cool tech, though a bit chintzy. It’d be interesting to see what one could do to clean up the handling and performance with TRD bits (if they exist) and slightly wider profile tires with low rolling resistance would do.

        Last, as a Honda Accord fanboi, if the next generation loses the V6 for turbos, but uses their next-generation hybrid stuff without compromises like a matchbox-sized trunk, it’d be on my short list!

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    The video provides another proof that Pigs are just out of control. This Pig should have bowed out when the girl came out of the jump seats. But no, he saw a flat hat that was just a bit skewed on the driver’s head. The Pig just had to see some sort of a document. There was absolutely no reason to ask for a document. That’s where the Cop is displayed as a PIG.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      He asks for the ID because he has to write a report. The person he asked could have refused.

      • 0 avatar
        05lgt

        Oh man. Have you seen the videos of how it goes when you refuse to surrender your legal rights to LEO’s during roadside stops? Saying “No, you do not have my permission to search my car based on my alleged failure to signal for a lane change.” really sets some LEO’s off in a bad direction. When their training is all about how to skirt the limits to their legal authority instead of how to respect the law of the land while enforcing it, the tall daisies that don’t submit take real risks.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Well. In this case, it’s in his driveway, in his upscale neighborhood, and he has cameras running. I would tell my family to go inside and then ask the officers to leave in the nicest way possible. They found out pretty quickly that his kids weren’t in danger. Now they have no business on his property and should move along.

    • 0 avatar
      Domestic Hearse

      SOP. A) write the report, as stated, B) make sure that he is indeed who he claims to be, C) check for outstanding tickets, fines, warrants.

      Stumpaster, if you see PIG in this video, I predict that should you have any interactions with an LEO, it’s going to go bad for you. Please relax and be calm and understand the police are doing their jobs.

      • 0 avatar
        Stumpaster

        But he did not go to the car to run the name through the computer. Why would the cop need to check the driver ID, tickets and warrants when there was no basis for stopping the car in the first place? Is there a reason to believe a red 100K car is driven by a delinquent? The cop just did it to see the driver’s reaction, because you just never know why the hat is a bit crooked. He also now established a record for this driver in the police database. Why? As a matter of fact, the cops did not stop the car but instead followed it to the residence, which is another stretch of their imagination. If they were concerned about the kid’s safety they should have stopped the car. And people wonder why the cops are out of control – because people like you let them. I would tell the cop he had to leave my property that he was trespassing on. And also ask him to pay for my lawn services after he decided not to use paved pathways.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          “Am I being detained, occifer?”

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          He did it because he’s following protocol and his training. I would have politely asked him to leave, and left it at that.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Case law would support the cop in this case.

            There was reasonable suspicion for the stop, so a brief license check would be permissible even after the purpose for the initial stop has already been resolved. An extended fishing expedition wouldn’t be allowed but brief follow-up checks are acceptable.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Yes, but once the cop sees that the kids aren’t in danger, he should have a nice chuckle about the whole thing with the Tesla owner, and then move along. I know why he asked for ID. That’s what they do, but, “Have a nice day, sir,” and getting back in the squad car should be the right answer.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            If the cop didn’t do the check and it turned out that the guy was a wanted ax murderer, then the cop would be punished for his failure to follow up.

            His bosses would prefer that he did it. In this case, the cop is going to be badmouthed by someone, and he has reason to be more concerned about the folks who conduct his employment valuations.

            If we don’t like this, then Congress will have to pass a law that unwinds the court’s decisions that allow for this sort of stop. Blame the elected officials for this one, not the police.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I’m not mad at the cop. He’s doing his job. It is what it is.

  • avatar
    TW5

    It’s a tough situation. The reason we believe it is impossible to have anything good happen during an encounter with cops is because we are rarely or never the victims of crime. If society is peaceful, the cops are doing their job.

    However, I understand the main issue. The bias for the accuser is frustrating. Police are eager to believe the accusations of impropriety because they see so much crime, but they are hesitant to believe the accused. The bias of law enforcement is reinforced by bad administrative procedures, like gathering information from an innocent accused to prove that the cops followed-up the accusation.

    Police officers have been dehumanized. They can’t follow their own instincts. They aren’t really supposed to look the other way when the letter of the law doesn’t account for extenuating circumstances. The administrative handlers are the problem.

    Administrators set the rules of engagement. Rampant expansion of victimless crimes and for-profit prison systems. They also create “police accountability” rules that are actually means of surveilling the general public. For instance, how many cops do you think have been prosecuted with dash cam footage? How many citizens? Body cameras are the next great surveillance initiative.

    The devil is hiding behind the curtain, not walking a beat or driving a patrol.

  • avatar
    Whittaker

    If Jack wanted to hate on cops why would he post a video showing them acting decently when there are plenty out there showing the opposite?

    Probable less the 10% of cops grievously abuse their authority.
    The problem is that maybe 50% of cops will look the other way or lie to protect their brothers in blue.

    That is changing thanks to dash-cams, body-cams and smart phones, and to a certain extent, people marching in the streets.
    That is a good thing.

    I have no problem telling people to avoid cops. And if that’s not possible, remain calm and don’t tell them anything except your name, address and D.O.B.

    Am I a “cop-hater” or a “bad-cop-hater”?

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    I don’t think I’ve ever seen a back seat passenger in a Tesla, and I live somewhere with a relatively high concentration of the cars. If anyone were serious about hauling a big family in a Tesla Model S, they’re not going to have any place to put their stuff. CUVs and minivans rule for good reasons.

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      “If anyone were serious about hauling a big family in a Tesla Model S, they’re not going to have any place to put their stuff. CUVs and minivans rule for good reasons.”

      You can’t think of any situation where one might want occasional 6th and 7th seats, say for short trips with little luggage?

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        If anyone were serious about hauling a big family in a Tesla Model S, they’re not going to have any place to put their stuff. You could give your two kids’ friends a ride with the extra seats, but you’d be a fool if you bought one to haul your four kids.

        • 0 avatar
          S2k Chris

          Yeah, so? That doesn’t make the seats stupid. What are you arguing against here?

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          No it would not be foolish to buy order the jump seats for your Tesla because you have 4 kids. There are lots of times when people go places without taking a bunch of stuff with them. So having the jump seats means you can take the Tesla out to dinner, the movies ect and leave the CUV/SUV or minivan at home. The reality is that if a person has a family and a Tesla they almost certainly have another vehicle too.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      There’s a cargo area under the hood.

      It’s a lot bigger in the RWD versions of the car. The AWD versions trade cargo space for speed.

      Opening the hood of a Tesla is a about like opening the hood of any other car. You wouldn’t want to keep your laptop bag up there, because opening and closing the hood takes longer and is much clunkier than operating any of the other doors on the vehicle.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    “Those Stupid Pigs”

    What a disgusting statement. Shame on you Baruth. Shame on the editors of what is supposed to be car site. I hope you never have to live in a world where the good cops decide they have had enough and leave you to fend for yourself. Try this, Google “cop saves life / lives” any day of the week. Go on, just try it.

    • 0 avatar
      Stumpaster

      They are, they are saving lives. That’s why we need to help them weed out these pigs so as to keep the herd upstanding.

      • 0 avatar
        kcflyer

        The officers being referred to in this seem reasonable and professional. As are most that I have ever met. Please don’t include me in your “we need to help them” statement. Because when you and Jack lump all the good cops in with the bad and label them Pigs you and I have nothing in common. Drop the “Pig” moniker and we can talk.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      You weren’t here when this was The Truth About Cops. It was pretty bad.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I agree it was unfortunate. Let me say this, I do not believe the police system and constitutional protections were designed for this environment of economic, racial, and familiar problems. Period. Police officers all over the country are overwhelmed with orders, statutes, procedures, and politics they were not faced with as recently as sixty years ago. Period. Fedgov responds by arming LEOs to the teeth because it cannot simply fix the situation. Police officers are just people at the end of the day, some are corrupt, and some will f*ck up but we *hope* the overwhelming majority put the best foot forward. I think it was Pch who pointed out some time ago the legal system cannot handle the caseload it is given and thus prosecutors must seek plea deals of lesser sentences as opposed to trying everyone. Below is a source which reflects this, 97% of federal and 94% of state criminal cases end in a plea bargain. If the legal system the police serve isn’t designed to/able to work effectively then how can the police system be?

        I wish I had a good answer to fix all of this, but I don’t. Outright shoot rioters? Now we have a Kent State redux. Calm everything down and then disappear troublemakers? Now we have a Stalinist state. Create a better economic situation? Aside from abandoning a debt based economic system, what can they do? Raise rates and blow up the system? Cut spending so the sh*tbags riot more about their EBT/SSDI being cut? Cut SS/MC and watch the boomers freak out? There is no good solution.

        “But in two decisions on Wednesday, the Supreme Court tacitly acknowledged that it has been enforcing an image of the system that is very different from the real, workaday world inhabited by prosecutors and defense lawyers across the country.

        In that world, 97 percent of federal cases and 94 percent of state cases end in plea bargains, with defendants pleading guilty in exchange for a lesser sentence. Courtroom trials, the stuff of television dramas, almost never take place.”

        http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/23/us/stronger-hand-for-judges-after-rulings-on-plea-deals.html?_r=0

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          Another reason that many cases are plead out is because prosecutors want high conviction rates. That’s bound to happen when we use the wrong criteria to judge job performance.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Good point, and I’ll add police are judged by arrests rates. When everyone is playing for “points” as it were, when does it cease being a “justice” system?

  • avatar
    carrya1911

    It’s actually extremely rare for a traffic interaction with the police to end up in gunplay. Most people who are stopped don’t act like idiots, and most police officers doing the stopping don’t act like idiots. End result being that very few people die or suffer injury in these interactions.

    It’s amazing how effective not being an idiot is in preventing bad outcomes.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      With that said…

      It is even MORE rare for people to be killed by police when they aren’t interacting with police.

      There are a zillion pitbulls in this country that have never bitten a child’s face off. You can bet that I won’t ever trust a pitbull near my kid regardless.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Pitbull, $hit, I don’t even want the Goldendoodle across the street near my kid.

        I also don’t let her go over to people’s houses that have firearms that are not locked up (yes, I ask this). It’s not that I think people shouldn’t have guns. It has more to do with me not wanting my daughter to be at a house that has guns in it, possibly unsupervised, with someone that doesn’t practice proper firearm safety.

      • 0 avatar
        hybridkiller

        “There are a zillion pitbulls in this country that have never bitten a child’s face off. You can bet that I won’t ever trust a pitbull near my kid regardless.”

        Yep, nothing flawed about that analogy. So you won’t be calling 911 if, God forbid, your kid is ever the victim of a crime, right?

  • avatar
    Chan

    I am of the camp of no harm no foul in being asked to show some ID. It helps the police verify that I am who I claim I am and who the complainant claimed me to be, and they can close their paperwork.

    What if I really were kidnapping children, and I had stolen the parents’ car? That would have been prevented if things happened the way it did here. This Tesla interaction seemed perfectly executed and with minimal tension.

    This whole ID thing reminds me of student protesters in Hong Kong who were asked to present ID due to a noise complaint (they refused). As the police retreated, a sergeant was visibly PO’d and ranted at a student for filming him, calling it rude. The student responded, “is being rude illegal?” to loud cheers from his friends. The whole interaction disgusted me, from what the students did to what the police couldn’t do.

    The police are being boxed in by public intimidation (lack of respect) on one side and rigid procedures on the other.

  • avatar
    wmba

    Better safe than sorry is my take on average citizens being concerned enough to phone the fuzz. At least they are aware. As you say, why should I know that the Tesla has a rear-facing third seat? Enough dogs left in cars in the summer with only the tongue hanging out of slightly dropped windows to prove that many owners are about as bright as an acid-dipped penny.

    Kudos for the Jag XF syling reference; I agree.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    Where’s my tin foil hat ? .

    -Nate

  • avatar
    eamiller

    “The only reason this sort of thing isn’t happening more often is simple: Ninety-five percent of the time the Beings of Light who purchase Teslas are far too enlightened and post-modern to become involved with anything as disgusting and messy and hick-ish as the actual conception and parenting of children. They’re far more likely to have “fur babies” than they are to have real babies.”

    How about climbing off that child bearing high horse of yours Jack? Your implication that choosing not to have children somehow makes you an elitist (whether or not you own a Tesla) is completely disgusting. You can take your derogatory implications elsewhere. I find it interesting that you choose to bring this into the discussion, when your house is decidedly built out of glass (how many divorces do you have under your belt again Jack?).

    While there may be some elitists out there who look down on having children, I doubt there are enough to support your broad brush. I love kids, but there are about a dozen reasons I have chosen not to have them. That decision it not born out of elitism, it’s just a choice (neither good nor bad). I have many friends in the same boat. I’m a responsible enough of an adult to know that I don’t want to raise them at this point in my life.

    How about you stick to cars, eh?

  • avatar
    Seanathin

    Title: unrelated click bait. Check.

    “”My first reaction….” Extreme. Hopefully just for the sensationalism?

    Remainder or article: mundane.

    I really hoped after your initial action you would see the fault in your in your thought process and this would be a journey in self-discovery. Instead you cling to your onlyperspective: angry person behind a keyboard.

    Then I guess your hashtag works as people quickly jump into discussions about shooting innocent people. What?

  • avatar
    JDM_CU4

    I guess none of you have family in Law enforcement and what they really go through daily. Cops over blacks anyway.

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