By on October 8, 2015

 

used car. shutterstock user cleanfotos

TTAC Commentator NotAPreppie writes:

Hey Sajeev … or Sanjeev … I’m not feeling picky,

Am I insane for considering buying the same Mazda RX-8 twice? Alternate title: A car so nice I want to buy it twice. (Thanks for that – SM)

Backstory: Three years ago, I sold my daily driver and autocross car (2005 Mazda RX-8 Sport) to a car club buddy when living and going to school near downtown Chicago meant that it sat in a parking garage for months on end (physical chemistry was intense). I graduated and got a job a year ago and bought a new autocross toy: a 1995 Miata, now with 70k miles.

The Miata has turned out to be something of a mongrel. Anywhere fluids can leak, they have. Not having a garage to wrench on the car myself, it’s nickel-and-diming me to death. Also, I’ve discovered that while it’s a Great Car™ during the 60 seconds of an average autocross run, it’s pretty awful to live with day to day. Maybe if I didn’t live in a major metropolitan area, I’d see the appeal of a soft top. To add insult to injury, I think it aggravates my sciatica.

Fast forward to last weekend: I ran into my old ‘8 and her current owner at an autocross event (I swear I did a triple-take when I walked past her on the grid). The owner was making noises about selling it. He’d tried last November, lowering the price to $6,500 before giving up and deciding to hang onto it. It’s got 48,000 miles and is still on the original engine (which shows none of the usual symptoms of low compression, compression check will be requested) and is in exactly the same condition as when it left my hands (actually in better shape, mechanically speaking).

So… am I insane for wanting to buy my ‘8 back?

Sajeev answers:

Yes you are insane. That said, who cares?

There’s something very touching about getting back the car you once owned. You are a different dude, what with your new life outside of school. And you obviously love it — you’re a Mazda nut, you’ll enjoy having it back. That said…

The second-generation RX-8 is so, so much better from a long-term ownership perspective. The R3 version is a better track car, even if the ride is punishing. Don’t take my word for it, take Jonny Lieberman’s word back when he was a (relative) nobody here at TTAC.  Even though I like the front end of the original Mazda RX-8 better, you owe it to yourself to consider a later model.

[Image: Shutterstock user cleanfotos]

Send your queries to [email protected]com. Spare no details and ask for a speedy resolution if you’re in a hurry…but be realistic, and use your make/model specific forums instead of TTAC for more timely advice.

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74 Comments on “Piston Slap: A Car So Nice I Wanna Buy It Twice!...”


  • avatar
    energetik9

    The Miata and RX-8 are both great cars, although personally I’d favor the RX-7 over a Miata. I shopped an RX-7 and 8 at different times. The only thing that really kept me away from that car was engine longevity.

    Would I shop for the exact car I owned. Never. Would I try and look for a newer version? Yes.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I get the emotional connection to a thing you once owned. But on something mass-produced like a car, you’re right in looking for newer/better.

      There’s a reason you didn’t try and hang onto it harder the first time, and I wonder if that reason is still there (perhaps in different form), just clouded by emotional feels.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        I owned my Audi 5000 twice. The second time was 6-8 years after I had donated it to a car charity. For some stupid reason, someone paid actual money to get it running, drove it for 50K!!!!! additional miles, and then left it abandoned on I-94 near Detroit Metro Airport. So it was towed, and I got a letter about it, because somehow it was still titled in my name. I got the car back, drove it for a bit, then sold it for $1000.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Oh I remember that story! It makes so little sense how it stayed in your name all that time. Presumably if the charity didn’t change the title, someone had to register it with your name!

          Unless they put a false plate on it and never got caught or something.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I still have no idea how it happened. I mean, I went to the Secretary of State (DMV name in MI) and checked, and it was still titled in my name. I still have the original plate in my garage. It was fun for a few months, but I didn’t daily drive it. Maybe I was only meant to spare it from the crusher a little bit longer.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Lol, Secretary of State sounds so serious.

            As I recall my 5000 was pretty okay to drive. Rode nice and smooth, not wallowy. It was quite slow though, especially with the AC on. And the steering was heavy. The 2.8L 90S which replaced it felt much more lively. And didn’t have the lifter clatter and occasional blue smoke.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Mine was an excellent drive. I think we talked about this before, but when I bought a 2006 Jetta, I found the interior to be shockingly similar to my 1986 Audi. It also had a 5-cylinder engine.

            http://paddocktalk.com/news/html/modules/ew_filemanager/06images/ptalk/06/auto/vw/Jetta%20No%202.jpg

            http://www.curbsideclassic.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/tumblr_m7jk99eiGC1roi5yvo1_1280.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            What is sick is the fact we all owned C3 Audis (although mine was a ’90 100). I miss mine.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            We all miss ours apparently. And that makes us all a little bit crazy.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Just a bit?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Aww I miss mine too. First car memories. I still remember exactly how the velour smelled, and how that steering wheel cover felt. Mine did not have heated seats or AWD, and it was an auto. I don’t think I realized at the time that S meant “Super basic.”

            But it was a 1-owner, and the guy had the original spec sheet from it. He had paid $23,000 in late 86, and had it delivered to his home. There was a line on the sheet that said “crate delivery” IIRC.

            PS. After I sold it to a kid who was replacing his gold 4000 with it, my mom saw it at a gas station couple weeks later, wrecked at the front.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Oh and I’m recalling too the following problems with me Audi:

            -Vacuum locks don’t work on all doors, sometimes.
            -Climate control unit turns off, requires jiggling wires under dash, sometimes.
            -Door handle triggers break off in hand.
            -Disc brakes freeze down in cold weather, nice smoky drive to school.
            -Random acceleration forward on cold start upon putting it into D.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I never had those problems. What ended up happening with mine is I let it sit an entire winter after the battery died bc I didn’t feel like jumping it in 12 degree weather. i think the gas got bad or the fuel pump ceased to work properly because I could never get it to start again. I wanted to fix it but my guy does Volvo and pretty much told me it wasn’t worth working on (esp since it had not been legally inspected for years, lick ’em and stick ’em was great)

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Since I was looking at 5000 pics, of course, and this came up I’ll throw it here.

            http://cartype.com/pics/91/full/mitsubishi_debonair_amg.jpg

            Would drive. Erry day.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            [email protected] door handle triggers! Mine would get stuck and make it so I could not close a door. I always had a few extra fuses around, because I knew one was going to blow eventually.

            My car was a turbo, so it had an Idle Stabilization Valve. F that ISV.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Haha, oh and I also had rather unstable idle, and wobbly gauges. The needles wobbled to and fro as you accelerated.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Stop making me want another 5000.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Ok, I’ll quit. Don’t look at these.

            https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/Audi-5000-towing.jpg

            https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/Audi-5000-pair.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            You guys aren’t crazy – just masochists.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Corey

            Mine looked identical to the one on the left except mine was not a Quattro.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Yeah, teen Corey didn’t go after any manual-only Quattro nonsense. I was the -only- student in the high school to have an Audi, also. #goodfeels

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Did teen Corey also have hotline?

            youtube.com/watch?v=hqJ5gKZNkuY

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I’m so unfamiliar with Simpsons, I’ll have to listen this evening to get that reference at all! :(

  • avatar
    geozinger

    Back in 1986, I bought a brand new Mercury Capri 5.0L Sport Coupe (equivalent to the Mustang GT), it was the reward for finishing college and landing a pretty decent job. I really enjoyed that car for the three years before my first child came along, like so many others, once children entered the scene I gave up on the hot rods.

    Fast forward 20 years, and I came across a car for sale similar to the one I owned and it was in good condition. I took the car for a test drive and the memories came flooding back. The power, the handling, the braking. All of which were nothing like what I remembered.

    Cars had come a long way in 20 years and even my V6 Malibu that I had at the time could have easily smoked that Capri in terms of braking and handling. Acceleration was a wash, though.

    Like Tom Wolfe said: You can never go home again. I thanked the man for his time but declined to buy the car. I’ve never regretted it.

    I agree with Sajeev, look at a newer car just to be sure you’re not missing anything…

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      Sajeev and geozinger are right. But at the same time, others have expressed regret when later they see their old ride trashed out and/or sitting in a scrap yard.

      Since you know each other so well, I would ask if I could borrow it say for a weekend “just for old times sake.” Take it out over the weekend, and like geozinger said, see if the car really is like you remember it; and whether “that old feeling” is really still there.

      Then fill it back it up; wash it or do something else nice to it in return for his kindness, and give it back; then sleep on it and the next morning decide if you still think it is a good idea. That way, you both had a moment to go back in time; and can also objectively decide it buying it back is a good idea. You can also confirm that way if it really is in as a good a shape as it appears; maybe have it checked out by an mechanic while you have it if you really think you are going to pull the trigger.

      If you decide not to buy it back, you can at least remind yourself later that you did look seriously into it; and decided it really wasn’t a good idea after all.

      As much as we like to think we are creatures of logic; we are still very emotional about our cars and other things at heart. And personally, I think there is nothing wrong with that, so long as we keep things in perspective.

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      That’s because your Capri was an American turd. Same thing happened to me with a Third Gen F-body. Had fond memories of the one I owned 15 years before so bought another. It was rough, coarse, and not fun. It was also embarrassing to drive. I sold it in less than a year.

      I think the ‘8 may offer him a better experience as it’s a much better car.

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        sarcasm Ah yes, the myth of the Japanese übercar. Everything Japanese carmakers release are better. /sarcasm

        These are two different cars, with different missions. FWIW, for the time I owned my Capri it was bulletproof. Outside of regular maintenance and one minor recall, zero issues.

        I think jhefner may have a good idea there. Maybe this guy *can* go back home, at least he can see if he can. If he can’t, no worries.

        EDIT: I see that he did repurchase the car. Good for him.

  • avatar
    e30gator

    The newer RX-8 is probably the better car, but if nostalgia is what you’re looking for, you won’t find it there. I can only wish that I had an opportunity to be reunited with some of my lost loves from times past.

    As for the newer car, a ’15 Regal is probably better in every way than a 1972 Skylark 350/4, but I wouldn’t give owning the latter a second thought.

  • avatar
    jfranci3

    For $6k, this is like seeing your ex at the bar at the end of the night. Sure, do it, but in due time you’ll want to look at other options. There probably isn’t a better $6k out there for you.

    Since you’re young, Maybe drive a FoST or FiST is worth a drive and payments as they are do-it-all hatches with more power

  • avatar
    notapreppie

    Wow, I totally forgot I submitted this until I got Sajeev’s e-mail a few days ago.

    I ended up buying it and I’m loving every second I drive it.

    It was a long and drawn out process because the gearbox was going out and I stipulated that it had to be replaced. I help the seller replace it with a junkyard pull that turned out to not have a 6th gear. Returned a few weeks later and put in a brand new Series II RX-8 gearbox in (Thank you MazdaSpeed Motorsports Development!). So, now I know all the intimate details of how to swap the gearbox in one of these. It’s actually not a tough job; the second swap only took us 2 hours.

    The compression is borderline by the numbers but it doesn’t have any low-compression symptoms so I’m going to drive it ’till it finally does (premix, premix, premix). Depending on my garage situation, I’m going to look into swapping in a Ford Cyclone V6 and autocross the car in Street Modified class. Just have to figure out if the Mustang and CX-9 blocks have the same numbers stamped on them. If so, I can use a 3.7L Mustang V6 engine and transmission.

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      Well sonofagun! Somebody did make it back home… Congrats.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      The blocks are the same. All of the Ford/Mazda Cyclone blocks are made in Lima, OH. Many of the other parts on the 3.7L MZI (CX-9 engine) are specific to Mazda.

      When the 6 was built in Flat Rock, Ford would send Mazda the 3.7L block from Ohio to Hiroshima. Mazda would dress the engine there, and send it back to the US, for Mazda6 final assembly in Michigan.

      • 0 avatar
        notapreppie

        The rules for Street Modified only stipulate that the blocks have to be production units and badged the same as units used by the mfr.

        So long as both the Mustang and CX-9 blocks have the same part/model numbers stamped or printed on them, I’m golden.

        Everything else is unrestricted (cams, headers, intake, etc). Hence, if the blocks are marked the same, I can just pull a Mustang 3.7L engine and tranny from a wrecked car and shoehorn it into the ‘8.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Then you sir, should be good to go. Like you said, you might want to check directly with Ford/Mazda or pull numbers off wrecked examples. I know they are the same block, built in the same place, but I don’t know what’s printed on the block.

    • 0 avatar
      awagliar

      The heart wants what the heart wants. Best of luck with your new/old wheels.

    • 0 avatar
      bludragon

      Congrats!
      I have an S2 that I daily drive and track whenever I get the opportunity. For the money, I don’t think there is a better car out there for this dual purpose.

      Might I suggest you simply get a good rebuild when the time comes, and have the rotating assembly balanced when you do so. That will give you another 100k at least, and the next rebuild will be cheaper since the balancing is already done. I have just done this myself, and the result is that I am more in love with the car than ever.

      I get the engine swap idea, but the reality is there are likely to be a lot of unforeseen issues and expenses going down this path, and you will forever have to put up with losing some of the oem functionality.

      If you are capable of swapping the gearbox, you are capable of pulling the motor yourself (buy or rent a crane and get a friend to help for the lifting and lowering).

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      V8 Roadsters has a kit for the LFX (3.6L V6 in the Camaro & Cadillacs). It doesn’t look terribly complete, though.

  • avatar
    snakebit

    First, I’ve pretty well soured on RX-8s, and it might all be related to owners, and not the car. I spent about 18 months at a Mazda dealer, and we were towing them into our shop way out of proportion to how few we sold, almost always for no-start issues. I think the usual issue was fouled spark plugs due to only running the engine for a minute and them shutting down(maybe to move the car out of the drive so another car it blocks can pull out). Could very well be that Mazda corporate or Mazda user groups have since warned owners not to do this but run them longer. Truth be known, from day one seeing them at auto shows, I’ve not liked them, compared to the last version of RX-7, which I would purchase in a New York minute over the RX-8. So, that’s my RX-8 bias.

    I was also saddened to read of NotaPreppie’s experience with the Miata in Chicago. I drove one for a year in bad weather and good, and had tremendously good luck and much fun with it, i.e. no oil leaks, no weird electrical issues, no back pain problems from poor seating design. I would recommend the first and second generation Miatas to anyone seeking a well-designed, trouble-free open car. The trick, like any used car purchase, is to have your would-be purchase completely gone over by your favorite auto technician to determine what if anything it will need, and what it will cost to repair.

  • avatar
    VW16v

    Talk about using extra quarts of oil. Better keep a few in the trunk.

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    a hybrid/rotary?????

    My wife and I were following a beautiful red one the other day into
    our neighborhood. I told her I always wondered why they never considered this car as a hybrid/rotary.

    If they installed a smallish battery and allowed for the electric motors to do the initial torque…they would solve this car’s worst issue…no take off grunt.
    Plus they would help with the poor(ish) MPG.

    Dunno…seems like a smart move to me.

    Always lusted for one. A sports car with a decent rear seat.

  • avatar
    Fordson

    Is an 11-year-old RX-8 even worth $6,500? Much less one that has a bad transmission that you have to help (your time is worth $$) swap out twice, then spend much more $$ to replace with a new one, that has borderline compression, that has spent lots of time at either max decal, max accel or max g, with the tach residing between 5,500 and 9,000 rpm?

    I have my doubts that even a mint, unmolested 2005 RX-8 with 48,000 miles is worth $6,500, although with this class of car, it’s tough to say.

    But with this history, with a car that was arguably one of the most trouble-prone Japanese models of the modern era right out of the chute…no. Just no.

    Sorry.

    • 0 avatar
      notapreppie

      To each their own. A mint 2005 RX-8 with this low miles and with solid mechanicals would easily go for $6,500 to the right buyer. Even more to the right irrational buyer.

      I actually enjoyed swapping the transmissions. I mean, I wouldn’t want to do it for a living but I made a new friend in the process (we’re co-driving the car at an autocross this weekend) and I got to reconnect with my car.

      Also, it’s as much about long-term plans for the platform as it is about the emotional attachment. The RX-8 offers really good every day livability with very good autocross/track performance. The only weak point is the engine and I’m currently scheming with some guys from my car club to fix that.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        6,5 on the high end avg probably 4,5-5 for clean depending on model year.

        MY07 Mazda RX-8

        09/10/15 TAMPA Regular $3,900 70,882 Avg BLACK RG A Yes
        09/08/15 DALLAS Lease $2,900 76,035 Avg SILVER RG 6 No
        09/23/15 HRSNBURG Lease $4,300 90,477 Above BLACK RG 6 Yes
        09/23/15 CEN FLA Regular $2,900 95,433 Avg BLUE RG Yes

        MY06 Mazda RX-8

        09/16/15 NJ Lease $2,700 65,181 Avg RED RG A Yes
        09/23/15 NJ Regular $7,000 78,849 Above RED RG A No
        09/23/15 CALIFORN Regular $5,300 87,123 Above SILVER RG 6 Yes

        MY05 Mazda RX-8

        09/08/15 ORLANDO Regular $6,900 34,897 Above GRAY RG 6 No
        10/07/15 NEWORLNS Regular $3,500 48,350 Above BLACK RG A Yes
        10/01/15 NEVADA Regular $4,500 54,388 Above BLUE RG 6 Yes
        09/10/15 TX HOBBY Regular $3,000 63,371 Avg WHITE RG 6 Yes
        09/10/15 FRDKBURG Lease $3,500 66,460 Above BLACK RG A Yes
        09/23/15 NY Regular $3,100 72,930 Avg WHITE RG 6 Yes
        09/30/15 SAN DIEG Regular $2,100 81,203 Avg GRAY RG A Yes

      • 0 avatar
        Fordson

        “The only weak point is the engine…”

        Well, that’s kind of a big deal. And going by 28-Cars-Later’s search here it’s a fair conclusion that you paid too much for it.

        I hope the emotional attachment is worth it to you. I think that in any case in which we reconnect with an “ex” of any sort, we try to tell ourselves that the circumstances that led to the previous breakup no longer apply. And sometimes we’re even right about that.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Lowball the owner and do a swap to a good motor, issue fixed.

          What I would like to know is who is buying these things at auction with 60K+ miles when the motor is known to be a weak point? I can’t see the retail demand. There has to be maybe 12 guys in the country who would see it in their local paper or on Autotrader and say to themselves, I have to go look at that RX-8!

        • 0 avatar
          notapreppie

          “Well, that’s kind of a big deal.”
          Yes and no. It’s certainly not trivial but it’s a replaceable assembly. On the other hand, knowing that it’s a good platform to start from (no rust, no accidents, known history, well treated by friends from the same car club) is irreplaceable.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I had the chance to buy my A8 back, after the guy put 50,000 miles on it in about three years, and apparently never cleaned the driver’s seat again. But the BHPH-style lot was asking nearly what I had paid for it initially.

    Plus, I didn’t need more Audi in my life again.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      You don’t need that evil. The Infiniti is the way to go. I could use an M56 in my life.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        The MPGs are just so awful on that thing. It’s rated what, 13/18? Maybe improved if you get the 6-speed later one. They’re hard to find as well, as that engine option was $4000ish I believe.

        Funny story, when I told my parents my A8 was there at the dealer (on US 50), I happened to drive them to dinner further down on 50 that day, and told them I wanted to stop and look at it.

        So heading down the highway, I cut across the two lanes of opposite traffic to go in the little paved entry at the far end of the dealer…

        Except the lot had been reconfigured since I had last been in town, and the paved bit was no longer there, it’s now grass.

        My mom is in the front and goes “WOAH, UHH THERE’S NO ROAD HERE ANYMORE.”

        I said “Oh… well – fine!”

        *drives through grass anyway cutting into lot*

        She looked at me like I was a dang crazy. My dad just laughed.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      I missed the “didn’t” in your last sentence the first time I read it. I thought to myself: “Poor Corey’s gone off the deep end, but at least we’ll get some fun stories of Audi carnage.”

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Hey, if someone says to me “I’m gonna buy an old Audi, what do I avoid?”

        The 4.2 V8 doesn’t make that list! Just most other things. And the A8 would get a serious nod from me versus an A6 of the era or Allroad or TT. A4 would be easier to maintain as long as it wasn’t a T, I think. Maybe a 3.2.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          “Hey, if someone says to me “I’m gonna buy an old Audi, what do I avoid?””

          Avoid Audis produced after MY91 and stick with the 2.3L I5. The 2.8 introduced for MY92 is hit and miss.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Ha, pre 91 is a bit hard to find these days. They were all basket-cased by 1999!

            I didn’t have much issue with my 2.8. The cats went bad but that was under a recall. Other than that, it had a P0442 oxygen sensor issue, which was fixed with new ones. Then after that standard CEL vacuum leaks. But that’s any old VAG and not 2.8 related.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            They are out there, I bought mine in 2006.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            So, before C4C!

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Yes, apparently.

            Here’s one that is identical to mine.

            morgantown.craigslist.org/cto/5253570756.html

            Must. Resist.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            There’s something wrong with the trunk, and with the headrests in that shape it’s been parked outside lots. As well, the headlamps are messed up, and it looks like the hood isn’t closing properly.

            Paint looks good though! Mine was that same color too.

      • 0 avatar
        jhefner

        Man; that is such a good looking car. It looked totally awesome then, and it looks great now.

        I never had a chance to own one; just sat in one at a dealership and looked at them from afar. So, my opinion is not clouded by the experience of actually owning one. If I did not already own an older car, and one in great condition with a low price came up; I too would be tempted.

  • avatar
    Fred

    If you are really interested in keeping an older car long term, may I suggest a parts car? If storage is a problem, removing parts to save can save a lot of space.

    • 0 avatar
      notapreppie

      Fortunately, MazdaSpeed Motorsports Development has me well sorted on any parts short of a Renesis short block. For that I’d have to go retail remanufactured or 3rd party rebuild.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Fun story. I find the rotary too scary, but I can understand loving it just based on sound alone.

    I haven’t owned a car yet that I’d want to buy back if I found it again. The closest would be my ’04 TSX, but there are other old 6-speed Hondas I’d rather buy first. Maybe in a few years I’ll be pining for my G8 GXP, although I doubt it. I miss the ’88 Accord, but not the specific car I had, which had the crap carbureted engine and got rusted out after a couple New Hampshire winters in the care of my then-girlfriend.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Ive seen my old Volvo 240 sedan running about, same shape I sold it in for the most part.

    Then I brought my next 240, a cheap 700 buck wagon. Needed a ton if work at just 118k on its broken odometer. I was instantly reminded of my last cars cheap interior plastics, ancient road manners, flimsy exterior clips, weak engine skid plates. I was nice having a wagon, but nicer to have a profit when I sold it.

    Recalling my 92 Accord I looked into buying another, then remembered the super shady owners, not spacious interiors, shakey idle, rust rust and dents, awful brakes. I preferred a newer Civic I looked at but not the bare bones options.

    I ended up with a Volvo 740, it takes what made the 240 work and throws out the dumb bits. I wouldve gone 940 but people dont sell their Volvos willingly.

  • avatar
    Sigivald

    On another note, I kinda want a “Janseev” alter ego thing to start happening.

    Just, you know, because it’d be amusing.

  • avatar
    RHD

    It’s ALWAYS a mistake to hit the rewind button and get back together with an ex… especially if you have already gone thorough a divorce.

    No problem reuniting with a car, though. Back in college I bought and sold a Fiesta, and after the new owners had an accident, bought it back for a hundred bucks, drove it for a couple of years, then sold it for seventy five.

    Has anyone else here (voluntarily) repurchased a car that they had sold?

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    I swapped my ’84 Jetta GLI back and forth with my best friend for eons. We would each keep it for a couple years until we got bored and sold it to the other. Usually for a nominal sum. So I can totally see doing this, assuming you have a place to keep it and ideally something else as a daily driver.

    Though the thought of replacing the engine every 100K doesn’t really scare me that much, given that is ~20 years of driving for any one of my cars. :-)

  • avatar
    VolandoBajo

    If I could find another 88 Thunderbird with the 302 V8 and the AOD transmission, in metallic silver, moonroof, dark blue leather interior, and the aluminum billet wheels I had to lean on the dealer to swap in, I would buy it in a heartbeat. I got over a quarter of a million miles of fun out of that car in under a decade, before I had to sell it. Had to choose between supporting it, or supporting my then new wife and child.

    I made the right decision, but would love to have one back.

    Sometimes I fantasize that FoMoCo would have a giant 3D printer, where, for the price of the original, one could order up an exact replica of an earlier offering.

    I would buy another one of those Birds, just as it was the day I drove it off the dealer’s lot (minus the Eagle GT’s and plus the Sumitomos for half the price and twice the traction).

    That car even trumped the Mk II Jaguar I once owned. In fact, if I hadn’t been so in love with my then and now wife, I wouldn’t even have been in a position to have had to choose between her and the car. But she is one in a hundred million. When we had been dating for about six weeks, I found out that she had driven it when her hooptie died for the nth time, without telling me while I was on the road for a project I was doing.

    Any other woman, I would have figured I couldn’t trust her, and would have x’d her off…her, I just told her that if she had asked, I would have told her yes, but made sure she knew how to care for it.

    I realized I was already all in at that point. It had snuck up on me, but there was no turning back. I had been enjoying my new freedom for several years after my divorce, but I knew then that those days were behind me.

    Still, I loved that car then, and would love to have it back again. Even if it had a 100K +/- on it. But not enough to have remained a so-called “free born man of the USA” (a Wire reference for those who don’t know it.)

    But that was a tough day, when I had to let the most enjoyable car I had ever owned go. Especially since the early years of our marriage were good overall, but had their downs as well as their ups. But today, my only regret is that I didn’t make even more money than I did, so I could have swung both deals back in the mid-90’s.

    That configuration of the 88 Thunderbird deserves to be on a list of all time great Fords, along with the Model A (only for historical reasons), the T bucket (only because it made a good hotrod), the 32 Ford three window coupe, the 40 Ford, something from the 50’s and from the 60’s (you pick ’em), a few more modern ones, and I’m sure, the new GT350.

    If I had the kind of money Jay Leno has, I’d have all of them in my collection. But if not, I would still have that 88 Bird again, if, and it is a big IF, if you could “go home again”.

    And while I respect some of the authors who rave about the Miata being the answer to any question, in my mind, it is even the answer to “what is an under-powered, over-rated money pit?”, especially the first incarnations.

    But damn, no you have me jonesing for another Thunderbird…not a prudent use of my retirement time and money, but I would love to have it anyway. Unfortunately for me, my son’s auto taste runs more towards the high performance version of the Tesla. But if I was his age, mine probably would also. Still, that was one sweet matchup of comfort and roadworthiness in the Bird.

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