By on October 19, 2015

Merkur XR4Ti

A few months ago, I lamented how Blue Oval enthusiasts never got the “good stuff” from Europe. When all we saw here was powered by pushrod-laden V-8 lumps, the “sophisticates” to our East could buy high-revving, twin-cam fours in light, sturdy, rally-and-race proven sedans.

I was wrong. For a few short years, Merkur set up shop in Mercury dealers, trying to sell Americans a Cologne version of performance. However, most recall Merkur as “the car with the funny name and the funny wing.”

Well, today’s car doesn’t have the badass biplane spoiler of the early cars, but it’s still cool nonetheless. This 1988 Merkur XR4Ti needs a good bit of work to return it to perfection. The dash — like so many from the early days of plastics — is cracked in several places. The upholstery is frayed and loose in spots. The paint needs to be redone.

I’d argue, however, that this car needs little to make a wonderful track-day toy. A good set of shocks and better tires would be enough to let it run with contemporary BMWs.

Most basic parts should be reasonably available, considering how much the drivetrain is shared with the SVO Mustang. The car has plenty of racing pedigree in Europe, as well, so more speed should be available with the assistance of UPS or FedEx.

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76 Comments on “Crapwagon Outtake: 1988 Merkur XR4Ti...”


  • avatar
    Scallootch

    They really should’ve marketed this car as the Ford Capri over here. Were they still making the Mercury Capri when these came out?

    • 0 avatar

      Yes, Capri in Europe lasted until 1987. It’s actually a sport version of Ford Europe’s last rear-drive, mid-sized volume car, the Sierra, which replaced the ancient Cortina in 1982.

      • 0 avatar
        Scallootch

        All well and good, but I was speaking in terms of the North American market, where they clumsily tried the ‘Merkur’ deal.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

          I believe the cars wouldve done well as Mercurys. Replacing badge jobs with unique RWD sporty Euro (and/or Aussie) Fords I think wouldve done well. Instead of Tempo, Taurus and Crown Vic clones, they couldve given Mercury a unique identity beyond a lightbar and a different rear window.

      • 0 avatar
        joeaverage

        Even the name Sierra would have been an improvement over that XR4Ti. That didn’t even sound cool when i was 14. I recently saw one of these rolling around town. Still a neat looking car. Really stands out in today’s traffic.

    • 0 avatar
      Lightspeed

      I think the Capri was on the Fox platform at this time. But yes, would have been far better to transfer the Capri name to this car. Capri had some cred still as a sporty RWD car. “Merkur” was hilarious, and then GM Canada followed suit with their pathetic “Asuna” brand for bottom-feeder Daewoo and Isuzu cars.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      No, the Fox Capri went out in MY86 and the Aussie one did not come out until MY91 in North America.

      EDIT: I was wrong the Merkur originally came out for MY85, not MY87 as I had thought.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merkur_XR4Ti

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    I remember seeing those cars in passing while on the school bus (about the only way I could ever get out of Meredithville in 1988). They were so cool! I think the design has aged well, which doesn’t hold true for many things automotive from the 80s.

    • 0 avatar
      NoGoYo

      I feel like Ford was the only member of the Big 3 with an active interest in aerodynamic cars in the 1980s. The Mustang gained aero tweaks in 1987, the Thunderbird gained aero tweaks in 1987 and an all-new slippery body in 1989, the 1st gen American Escort had its own aero tweaks, and even the Grand Marquis and Crown Victoria were smoothed out a bit.

      About the only FoMoCo products in the US in the 1980s that didn’t have any smoothing tweaks were the trucks, the Aerostar, and the Town Car.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        I would argue that the little curve on the ’87 F-Series (http://i.imgur.com/OXCIPkR.jpg) was its only concession to aerodynamics. And yes, it was kinda there on the ’86, but the ’87 went one step further by having the hood go straight up instead of leaning forwards slightly. Similar on the ’88 Ranger.

      • 0 avatar
        Wheeljack

        T-Bird actually went “aero” with the ’83 redesign. It made quite a splash in NASCAR when driven by Awesome Bill from Dawsonville.

        The 1987 refresh was a further tweak to the aero formula gaining flush composite headlamps.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          And whatever the Fox based Lincoln Mark whatever 2-door was (that Sajeev loves so much) was the FIRST car in the US to have aero lights. Ford did the lobbying to legalize them here. And of course, the first Taurus was a work of art compared to what GM and Chrysler were turning out.

          Ford had it going on in the early 80s.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Continental Mark VII

          • 0 avatar
            mechaman

            Yeah, but if you are gonna name a car the XR4TI, why not come up with an ad campaign to capitalize on that? Side note, didn’t Roush have Ribbs and Bettenhausen driving these car in Trans-Am back in the day?

      • 0 avatar
        dolorean

        If I remember correctly, Ford went ‘aero’ not so much for style, but because they needed to meet new fuel economy regulations and didn’t have the funds to develop up new engine/transmissions. Instead of engineering their way out of it, they re-engineered what they had through a wind tunnel IOT ensure no aerodynamic loss saving a not unsignificant amount of fuel.

  • avatar
    motormouth

    I lived in the US for a number of years and being English, had a bit of a soft spot for cars I’d see on holiday back in the home country. I maxed out my credit cards to get one of these back in about 1988, a brownish color that had the ‘bad ass’ double wing and leather interior, largely based on the desire to drive the Sierra Cosworth look alike.

    I loved it for the three days I had it, until some dick ran into the back of it at high speed and totaled the car. Good thing the insurance paid out, as I probably couldn’t have kept up the payments on what I was making at the time. Always remember the XR4Ti name well, though.

  • avatar
    kosmo

    I had the big brother Scorpio, bought out of their employee lease program at 40% MSRP with 7k miles and 100k warranty when Ford pulled the plug on this experiment.

    A big-ish RWD (w/posi!) 5-door hatchback that was quiet as a tomb and handled great with a set of aftermarket Koni shocks all around.

    Not fast, but I still miss that car!

    • 0 avatar
      EquipmentJunkie

      My parents had two Scorpios. The first one was totaled by some jerk who drove into their lane and crashed into them head-on. They were very impressed at its performance in the crash and bought another. For their time, they were a good solid car that handled very well. That Cologne 2.9 V6 made nice noises, too!

      A good friend of mine bought one as well. He got tired of replacing switches and window regulators as parts got more scarce, so he eventually dumped it.

      I tried to buy one of the very few Scorpios with a 5-speed manual. One of 56 in the States, as I recall. The stupid Ford dealer who had it behaved like he didn’t want to sell it to me. (I was a 22-yr old college student.) I bought a VW GLI about a week later. I felt like hunting down that Ford salesman and letting him know that I really could buy the car and wasn’t just jerking his chain.

      Another friend of mine had an XR4ti. Great car, but a dumb name.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Wow – I had no idea ANY of them made it to the states with a stick! I really, really loved those cars in the day. By the time I could afford one they seemed to have all disappeared.

      • 0 avatar
        joeaverage

        The Scorpio MK I was in my opinion a much better looking car than the domestic Taurus. The Taurus was revolutionary but also kind of gimmicky looking to me.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheeljack

      The Scorpio built speed gradually like a freight train and was quite composed at speed. I’ve owned 2 of them and still have my second car, although I am at a bit of a crossroads about what to do with it.

    • 0 avatar
      joeaverage

      I still think the five door configuration is a great setup for a car. Can carry people or alot of stuff or – some of both.

  • avatar
    EAF

    My cousin purchased one of these brand new, it attracted a lot of attention during family reunions. Lol It was the first time I had ever seen or heard of a car that kept its fans running after being shut down & parked.

  • avatar
    turf3

    Hey guys, the early days of plastic dashes were not the 1980s. Padded dashboards were introduced in the early 60s. And new ones crack pretty enthusiastically as well, under an ongoing diet of UV.

    Now that we have airbags and seat belts on every conceivable surface, maybe some brave automaker would go back to the painted steel dashboard, since the rationale for the padded dash has disappeared (it was supposed to reduce injuries when an unbelted occupant struck it smartly with the forehead or face in an accident).

    • 0 avatar
      Xeranar

      Because we totally want sharp and extremely hard metal compartments to spring open to release an airbag? That’s just an impaling waiting to happen. I’ve not witnessed much UV dashboard deaths past the mid-90s vehicles because of the reformulation and a switch to harder plastics where the actual UV hits for the most part. My steering wheel’s thick plastic finally died where I grip after 8 years and I’m contemplating getting a new section put in. But my dash is still perfect. In many cases bringing in color coding only works in certain key situations (I believe the current Bug has it).

  • avatar
    turf3

    Nobody has mentioned that these cars, while cool looking, had a reliabilty reputation on the order of Fiat’s. Fiat’s reputation in the 1970s. Certainly scared me off at the time (instead, I got a Mazda 626 that ran 170k with no unscheduled repairs – and the original clutch).

    • 0 avatar
      pragmatic

      I owned one. Purchased used with 80,000 miles for $2000 used it until it had 280,000 miles and sold it for $250. Rusted (as does everything driven to ski slopes all winter in the northeast), had some problems but overall a good car that was hard to get parts form. Should have been sold as a Capri and at a slightly lower price with an intercooled engine. But with 200 hp (intercooled) rather than 175 hp (5-speed) it would have been faster than the Mustang and Ford could not have that.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheeljack

      One of the big issues was that the car was basically hand assembled by Karmann, so it had all of the issues that go along with hand-assembled cars that don’t cost hundreds of thousands of dollars and have layer after layer of quality inspections. People I know that had these reported finding improperly routed wiring, screws through wires, uneven assembly, etc. Add to that any known weaknesses that the basic cars had even when mass-produced at the Genk plant, and you have a recipe for issues.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    What were we missing from Ford of Europe in a bad way? I know they missed out on our SVO and Turbo chicken. But the Mustang GT was no slouch with just KONIs.

    • 0 avatar
      EquipmentJunkie

      I’d say that I missed the Cosworth RS200 Escort. It was legendary. Fortunately, I got to see one close up at a museum in Las Vegas.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        I think you would’ve missed out on the Coswrorth RS 200 even if they were imported. I know I would’ve. I meant cars a regular guy could buy and not extremely rare/expensive.

      • 0 avatar
        Wheeljack

        The Ford RS200 owed nothing to the Escort and was their entry into group B rally racing. It was a purpose built car which only borrowed a few bits from the Sierra such as the windshield and tail lights.

        They did produce a 4WD Escort RS Cosworth in the mid-1990’s that was truly glorious. I was behind a white M-plated one on the M39 service drive briefly when it came out of Ford World Headquarters and then proceeded to disappear into a speck as it merged onto northbound M39.

  • avatar
    callmeishmael

    XR4Ti sales suffered in part because of the cost of the car. The MSRP ($16,000) was more than half again as much as a Mustang GT ($9885, base price) and three fourths the price of a Corvette. That was a lot of money for a car that had no history in the US. It was also a four cylinder and many Americans then associated four cylinder engines with anemic econoboxes.

    Despite being offered during a decade when American iron was anything but inspiring, the XR4Ti was just too different, too expensive, and too “foreign,” to catch on at the time. A friend at work bought one and, though it was an excellent driver, the reaction was mostly, “Why did you buy that?”

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      And yet the BMW 3-series were even more expensive, less well equipped, MUCH slower, 4-cylinder until ’86, and sold like gangbusters, relatively speaking.

      The issue was the idiotic marketing, not the car or the price. Lincoln-Mercury dealers did not have the first clue what to do with these cars.

  • avatar
    threeer

    These just didn’t translate well here in America. Growing up in Germany, I saw these all over the place. Loved the Sierra. Somehow, so much of what was on the American roads at the time lacked the style that I was accustomed to (never mind the size…yes, everything is bigger in America!). Heck, even the Euro-spec Escort seemed crisper and better designed than the lump American Escorts were.

    Say…what ever happened to our favorite brown-spec Sierra that was brought back to the US and sometimes written about here on TTAC??

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Don’t forget who was a big cheerleader for the Merkur experiment: Bob Lutz.

    Bob never met a non-North American market car that he didn’t like. ;-)

  • avatar
    jdmcomp

    It was amazing to me to find out that the Aussies had a V-8 version and a 4 wheel drive version. Since the original car was front wheel drive, the front hubs on mine still had provision for the drive mechanism. Loved the car, fast when the turbo kicked in, slow without. It was not pretty but was a fun car to drive. Now, for me, a V8 4 wheel drive would be the mad max.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheeljack

      The original car was not FWD, it was RWD in base form. The front steering knuckles were designed to accommodate the 4WD system from the start. Scorpio used those same front knuckles and offered the same 4WD system available as an option in Europe.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I was totally in love with these back in the day. But it needs the biplane spoiler to be complete.

    A big downside is the turbo Mustang/Fairmont/Pinto 2.3 OHC engine, which was a thrasher.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      That was no measly Pinto/Fairmont 2.3. All forged internals and high nickel block. And lots more boost than any turbo car of its day. Way overbuilt for the job.

      Yes there was the normal turbo lag, but it *doubled* the output. Kinda worth waiting for.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    The problem with the XR4Ti was the T. European cars still had essentially no emissions controls, so they could make far more power with less engine. The Ford Sierra XR4i(no T) was powered by a Cologne V6 of approximately 150 hp. It was fairly smooth and dependable, and it made the car about as fast as Europeans could ask. They also had no safety or bumper rules worth mentioning in Europe, so the car gained hundreds of pounds when it was fitted with real bumpers and door beams. To restore the performance lost to weight gains and emissions controls, the nice little V6 was replaced with a vulgar 4 cylinder turbo engine. Gone was any claim to sophistication or hope of West German levels of durability. The price was right in the middle of established Euro yuppie mobiles too. Unfortunately, the interiors were cheap and cheerful, and aged like milk. One of the driving schools had a fleet of them fitted with 302s though, and those cars might be worth putting up with the rest.

    • 0 avatar
      Zykotec

      This is a pretty detailed and exact description of what went wrong I think.
      I’ve owned a bunch of Sierras, and though they are nice car, lightweight with decent handling, and very roomy, they are not luxury cars, and they were never ment to be. Even the v6 powered Xr4i which provided the body for the Ti, was not up to the standards of a base version of the Scorpio when it comes to comfort, noise levels and general build quality. And in Europe is was priced to reflect this. What eventually killed it over here was fwd cars, with better interior space and more predictable winter handling, and the fact that people started buying more expensive cars instead.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      If you’re referring to the 2.8 V6 of the time, yes that was a nice engine.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheeljack

      Weight and performance were certainly part of the issue, but the 2.9L V-6 was a decent engine in the Scorpio thanks to some aggressive gearing, and that car was considerably heavier than the XR4Ti. I think another part of the issue was that not only would the ancient OHV V-6 not provide “breakthrough” performance, but would be seen as kind of low tech in an era when OHC and turbochargers were seen as the “future” and more in line with some of the competition that used turbocharged or overhead cam engines (or both).

    • 0 avatar
      joeaverage

      What did they do to the doors that would add significant weight? I lived in Europe for a while and wrenched on those cars. the Americanized versions might have had an extra stamped piece of sheet metal in the door, little more. Maybe 2 lbs per door?

      Yes the American bumper requirements were a joke. Just look at the aircooled Beetles. Those USA spec bumpers were made like battering rams complete with collapsing struts. Same was done to other brands too. In Europe the Beetle had a lightweight stamped bumper and stamped brackets. Didn’t do much except protect against sloppy parking.

      Thanks but I;d rather just go with the European specs on my cars. This is after all supposed to be the “Land of the Free”.

  • avatar

    One of uncles purchased TWO Merkur Xr4Ti and restored them with parts shipped from Germany and Australia. Painted them.

    If TTAC would like, I can do reviews on both cars.

    If you look at my Youtube, I already have videos of them and his prized 1979 Capri which he turbocharged.

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    The car has a huge reputation in countries that took part in Group A racing (and rally to a degree).

    The Sierra Cosworth is probably worth close to USD$75k for a good example.

    Of course it probably means nothing to countries that did not get Group A. Also an amazing motor being a 2 liter 4 cyl DOHC 16v turbo that did 600hp in race trim.

    The car was only beaten by another legend, the Nissan Skyline R32 GTR which had even more of everything, drive wheels, cyl, capacity, turbos, steer axles… then both were beaten by the dissolution of Group A when it came to light that the cars cost between half a million and a million dollars each to prepare when that amount of money was a real amount of money (early 90’s).

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      I was under the impression what ended Group A racing was a series of fatal accidents involving Group A race cars; I think one of them was a Seirra Cosworth that got wrapped around a tree.

      They were definitely awesome to watch in action.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

    I test drove one (used at a Caddy dealer!) and LOVED it in high school. On the way home, some stupid woman ran a redlight and I couldnt avoid her (was in my mom’s 1997 Sable). So, despite nobody being hurt, the chances of me getting that car flew out the window.

    I would love to have one with a later Sierra front end (much better looking). Id like to use 3.0L Vulcan stroked to 3.3L with a supercharger (yes, everything to do all that is online). That would make it fly! The Sierra Saphire sedan had the best front end IMO, I would love to put that on a US market hatch.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      You LOOOOVE IT SOOOO MUCH because it is ‘Murican in name, brah!

      For you have the world’s finest collection of pristine Ford Pintos, and 2nd and 3rd generation Ford Tauri, brah!

  • avatar
    Rod Panhard

    As one of those individuals who was alive, adult, and working at an import car dealership in the mid 1980s, I can tell you why this car struggled in the marketplace. The magazines loved it, by the way.

    – Was it weird? No. The Saabs were weird. They were having their banner years in the U.S. during the same time.

    – Was it priced wrong? No. Saab 900s, Volvo 240s, BMW 3-series were all competitively priced with the XR4ti.

    – Was it the name? It certainly contributed, but was not the whole problem. Although it was supposed to be pronounced Mare-Coor…like the beer without an “S,” it really was a challenge for many.

    I still believe it was the “Captive Import Failure Syndrome.” Neither the Pantera nor the Capri were sold successfully at Mercury dealerships. Ford was not alone in this as Buick dealers struggled with Opel, Dodge and Plymouth dealers struggled with Mitsubishi products. Howabout Catera, the Cadillac that zooms?

    One might say GM showed modest success with their joint products, or maybe the Japanese product cafeteria sampling known as “Geo,” but I’m not so sure about that.

    • 0 avatar
      BDT

      This whole thing is wrong. All wrong. I’m totally disgusted by your post. The fact that you would type this out is an affront to all auto enthusiasts.

      The Catera is the Caddy that ZIGS!

      Who’s Lisa Catera?

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      I agree with Rod. Dropping big bucks on a Saab or BMW gave you enthusiast cred. Dropping big bucks on a Mercury sports coupe made you….a Cougar owner.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      @Rod – I’ll add the 78-80 Ford Fiesta to your list. It was an excellent, competitive car that got killed by cars like the Rabbit, and then the Ford Escort.

      • 0 avatar
        Rod Panhard

        You’re absolutely correct SCE to AUX. When the then future Mrs. Panhard and I started dating, she drove a Fiesta. My then roommate drove a fuel-injected Rabbit. I was frequently the “designated driver” and was familiar with both.

        The Fiesta was a little less expensive than the Rabbit. However, it’s bucket seats did not recline, and when pushed, the Fiesta exhibited torque steer.

        The Fiesta got replaced by the Americanized Escort. The Rabbit got replaced by the Americanized Rabbit. Both were terrible.

        • 0 avatar
          Wheeljack

          Fiesta Ghia and Sport models did have fully reclining seats with a similar thumbwheel like Volkswagen used. The base cars had the awful non-adjustable high back seats.

          I owned a ’78 Sport that I outfitted with a Ghia interior from a junked car. I modded the car with a bunch of XR2 suspension parts from Europe and added some engine performance upgrades as well, like a bigger Weber carb and a low-restriction exhaust.

          That little car was a hoot and embarrassed may larger/theoretically faster cars, at least for a gear or two, or when the road got curvy.

    • 0 avatar
      Syke

      No, the killer problem the XR4Ti had was the garden variety Lincoln/Mercury salesman. Walk into the dealership looking for a Merkur, and he’d happily try to steer you to a Cougar or a Grand Marquis. Assuming he even bothered to figure out what the Merkur was in the first place.

      • 0 avatar
        joeaverage

        There you go. I’ve witnessed that first hand with other brands. In my case I knew more about the car that I wanted to buy than the salesman and was much more enthusiastic about it than he was. He would have rather I bought whatever the lot cash-cow model was at the time.

  • avatar
    ShoogyBee

    How timely, I saw a silver Scorpio parked on the street on my way to work this morning. I didn’t get a close look at it, but it seems to be in pretty good shape and appears to be used as a daily driver. I see it parked there pretty regularly.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheeljack

      There’s still a few decent cars out there. A really nice white 1988 model just sold on ebay a few weeks ago for $3500. I was really tempted to buy it since I know all the strengths and weaknesses of the car and have wrenched on them extensively, but I just don’t have anywhere to put it.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    You have to wonder if someone atvFord didnt intentionally give Merkur a bizarre name, a name to keep it from competing with their Mustang. You already had to go Mustang for an intercooler.

    These had much nicer interiors than any Stang of that time, but thanks to their grille-less front ends the turbo engines like to overheat. This is unusual for me, but Id suggest a clever few scoupes before tracking one.

    Make sure get the manual, these cars are a bit clumsy with 3 -speed autos.

  • avatar
    Geekcarlover

    Didn’t they also have a version with a slightly larger engine and upgraded suspension and brakes? I believe it was available in Europe only.
    Maybe Merkur would have done slightly better with this, leather replacing some of the plastic, and selling it through Lincoln as an entry level BMW knockoff.

  • avatar
    kmars2009

    XR4ti was cool…but I liked the Merkur Scorpio better!

  • avatar
    wmba

    The real Ford Sierra Cosworth, on which this bag-o’-shite XR4Ti was based had a 204 hp, 2.0 litre Cosworth engine.

    Never so disappointed in my life as when the XR4Ti showed up with a rough, stumbling version of the old 2.3 litre SOHC engine from the Mustang SVO. An acquaintance of mine bought one and almost immediately regretted it.

    In the UK, the real version with the new Cosworth YB engine was first available as RWD, and later AWD. The versions with the great inert lump of Cologne V6 weren’t involved in any competition – they were for people to meander down country roads with all the understeer you could ask for.

  • avatar
    Spartan

    Love these cars. My parents owned one from 1987 to 1990. It was fun, but the window regulators went bad often and it had a thing for overheating. My parents traded it for a Honda Accord EX and never looked back. We were a growing family at the time so it made perfect sense to get out of the Merk.

    I also remember that funky manual operated sunroof, despite the car having power windows and locks.

  • avatar
    "scarey"

    Worst car I ever owned. I bought it new, less than a week into it, it wouldn’t start. Lincoln/Mercury dealer found RUST inside the starter. Took 15 trips to dealer to solve intermittent no start problem (faulty rear-end collision fuel shutoff device). Windows always went down, not always went back up. Lights dimmed noticeably (including headlights and dash lights) when A/C kicked in. Et cetera, et cetera, et cetera.

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