By on September 26, 2015

Booth Professionals At The 2014 Spring Fest of the LXs

Two more local unions rejected the proposed four-year contract deal between FCA US and the UAW Friday, adding to the growing opposition as voting continues.

Per The Detroit News, overwhelming majorities at Trenton Engine Complex in Trenton, Mich. and Toledo Machinery in Toledo, Ohio made their displeasure with the deal known by casting their votes against agreement. At Trenton, 80 percent of production workers and 71 percent of skilled trades voted down the contract, while 71.5 percent at Toledo felt the same, as reported by UAW Local 372 and Amalgamated Local 1435, respectively. The two plants join Dundee Engine, Sterling Stamping, and Kokomo Casting in rejecting the proposal.

Meanwhile, voting continues for Sterling Heights Assembly, Toledo Assembly Complex, Warren Truck Plant and Belvidere Assembly, all four accounting for over 16,000 of the 40,000 which would be affected by the proposal, which includes $3,000 ratification bonuses (down $500 from the previous bonuses in 2011); wage increases for both tiers; massive profit-sharing tied to FCA’s North American operations; a narrowed pay gap between entry and veteran employees; and $5.3 billion in plant investments.

The agreement, however, does not eliminate the two-tier wage system established in 2007 among the Detroit Three, nor does it cap the number of entry-level workers hired. Other issues noted by those voting against include a lack of focus on alternative work schedules, lack of information on a new union health care co-op, and the increase in wages being not enough.

Should the proposal be rejected, the UAW and FCA US could go back to negotiations, the union could vote to strike, or the union could turn its attentions to General Motors and Ford.

Photo credit: Dodge/Facebook

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24 Comments on “Two More Locals Reject Proposed UAW-FCA US Contract...”


  • avatar
    Rday

    Hopefully Sergio will stand up to these Mafia UAW and close some more plants and move more production to Mexico. He talks like a big man..let’s see if he has any balls.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      I like the idea of the ‘rank and file’ ousting the UAW for letting them down.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Rday, that’s what I’m hoping too. Mexico must be chompin’ at the bits with anticipation.

      Maybe there’s hope yet for Sergio to move more Fiatsler production out of UAW hands and elsewhere.

      The name of the game is to make a profit for the shareholders and you can’t do that with the UAW gnawing at the profits, while taking none of the risks.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    If pix of hot babes are now going to be a staple here may I please request some Mature BBW representation?

    Rday…meds.

  • avatar
    1998S90

    At least nobody photoshopped the smile on these to young ladies.

  • avatar
    dwford

    A $60k a year, 40 hour a week job with great benefits. Not sure what else the UAW is looking for..

    • 0 avatar
      fpeck

      Got some bad news for you its not a fourty hour work week I have been both salery and hourly and use to think as you did but the truth is you are now working 12 hour shifts most of it standing 6 to seven days a week I myself put in 96hrs in eight days and because of the alternative work schedule now in place your days off are on a Wednesday or Thursday try spending time with your family on that scheduled I only actually get one weekend off a month and some plants actually switch shifts when they come off there two day so now you only really have one day off because you have to sleep on your second day so you can go into work that night so I love when people make comments about the auto industry that have never worked in it also I now work in a machining department where I have to reprogram robots and do a little trigonometry at times and hey they even let us use computers a lot of people have no idea what it takes to work in a modern automotive plant as for all the jobs going to Mexico or China the auto companies better wake up not a lot of Mexicans buying 52000 dollar F 150s unless there working for the cartels

  • avatar
    RRocket

    Let me correct you: A $60k a year job that requires no special skill or education with great benefits.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Exactly, Good thing they don’t require a masters or doctorate before getting hired. But it does take serious money to assemble cars. Much below $60 and bennies, and you’re getting groups of pimpled/pierced face workers that were folding burritos the previous week. Is that who anybody wants their cars assembled by??

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Watch “How It’s Made: Corvette C7.” Compared to the people making all the other internal combustion sports cars on the show, the GM line workers are not exactly presentable or professional. Other cars are made by well groomed people in uniforms and smocks. UAW cars are made by people wearing what they fell asleep in last night.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        DenverMike, I used to drive only UAW-made cars until 2008, and I still remember how badly they were assembled. The UAW was making excellent money back then already. Better than most everybody else.

        After buying my wife that 2008 Highlander, made in Japan, I was in love, in lust, in heat with Toyota for their quality and reliability.

        I’m not ever going back to UAW-made stuff.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          @Highdesertcat – I’ve only had UAW F-series built before and after ’08, with 100% satisfaction on build quality. I can’t speak for other Fords though, and I’ve no doubt Toyota and Lexus built in Japan have to be among the best out there.

          Except my parents have only had Texas built Tacomas and Tundras in recent years, since ’02 with spotty to miserable satisfaction. The problem too is Toyota service people are the biggest A-holes this side of VW service people.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            I agree with Denver Mike about Toyota service for the most part. Toyota’s attitude is that they are the only ones who make reliable vehicles and that they are better than anyone else. In a competitive market a manufacturer cannot afford to have that attitude. Some Honda dealerships have that attitude as well. As for the quality of Ford cars and crossovers they have improved as have GM’s but the same is true for Hyundai and Kia. Toyota has become more like the old GM and hopefully they realize in a competitive market they need to lose some of the attitude.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          LOL, what they fell asleep in.

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      “A $60k a year job that requires no special skill or education with great benefits.”

      Whoa… deja vu all over again! Like it was the ’50s and what I call Sheer Dumb Luck Jobs were building our postwar middle-class. A reasonably healthy body, a work ethic and you’re good for 40 years of community building.

      Of course, the rest of the world is now denying those to us, bastards having clawed their way up from their rightful poverty, ignorance or war destruction, but the days of American dummies building the basis for their kids’ professional lives were sweet while they lasted.

      More than a few of the B&B got where they are today as direct beneficiaries of their forebears working such jobs.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    Nice headlights.
    .
    .

  • avatar
    fpeck

    So ridehigh obviously since were making banket assumptions judging by your avitar you must like four wheel drive trucks therefore I must assume you must also live in a trailor with a confederate flag flying high out front on a flag pole in the middle of texas somewhere ,one of my uneducated line workers as you put it has a masters degree and another is going for a degree in genetic engineering I myself also have a four year degree I will admit there are a few bad apples that make us all look bad but people have to keep in mind we have a mix of folks just like any other work environment the only reason we get so much publicity is the fact that the media tries at any chance they get to vilify any kind of organized labor you have to take into consideration who controls the media I will give you a clue they make a hell of a lot more than you or I and very much want to maintain that status so if you look back in history and want to return to the days of surftom or maybe the good old days just before the great depression when all the wealth in this country was cotrolled by a very few and take your child to work day was not just a way to show your child what you did for a living then watch what happens when all the unions are gone in this country , judging by your posts you either couldn’t pass the test to get into an automotive plant or you must be sitting on your ass all day in a cubical telling yourself all the while your the master of your universe or maybe your just one of those 1%ers.

  • avatar
    mikey

    fpeck..I don’t believe that was the point that Ride Height” was trying to make.

    Maybe I ,misunderstood , but I think he was pointing out , that with the passing of the well paid blue collar job. A “way of life” has changed

    I. like many of my friends and co workers, spent years in the blue collar world. I also put two kids through university. Today the opportunity for a limited educated parent to do such a thing is gone.

    I believe that was “Ride Heights” point.

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