By on August 17, 2015

You may have noticed that car dealers get bashed by the mainstream media on a regular basis.

There are a few good reasons for that.

We have what can be called an image problem. When folks think of a car dealer these days, they don’t think of a self-made man who started off with nothing but a love of cars and created a business that makes thousands of good folks happy.

What they think of is…

This…

And this…

And most definitely this.

Colorful crappy flags flying in the wind with neon green stickers on a car’s windshield that say “$500 DOWN! ONE OWNER! WHAT A DEAL!”

As a guy who has been remarketing used cars for about 16 years now, this phony baloney image has always pissed me off. Like a lot of guys who love cars and are lucky enough to make a living at it, I work my vital organs off to make sure that my business serves my customers and reflects my values.

Most of the successful dealers I know have spent years building their auto-related knowledge in this business. Trust me: It’s not easy at all.

Everything changes quick. Sometimes when a manufacturer has built a vehicle with quality issues, we get to be the guinea pigs hit with buying the new engine or transmission. This happens after the manufacturer is already aware of the problem and buries their legal head in the sand.

This type of shit always flows downhill when you’re a dealer. Guess who gets blamed for a Mazda CX-7 that has an engine design as defective as Andy Dick? The dealer who sells it — always. We get to find out from the customer six months later that the nice shiny car was really a rolling turd on the inside.

The manufacturer just gets to deny the claim.

There are countless other issues. Some of our members really are douchebags and they range from the guy hawking junk to the stupid and ignorant, to the dealers association who thinks that fighting Tesla serves anyone’s interest — including their own.

I have gone on record on a long list of media outlets, from Al Jazeera to Yahoo, telling our representatives to knock it off when it comes to Tesla. They have the right to sell their own product, and the manufacturers who are encouraging dealers to oppose Tesla (click and skip to 36:30 for the testimony from two GM attorneys) are essentially trying to operate as a legalized theft cartel.

There is also, unfortunately, a lot of PR hell you catch for operating a successful small business in a profession where the big guys get to stir the pot. When it comes time for someone, somewhere, to become the spokesmen for our business in a respectful manner, it’s rarely a working class guy like the one above. They’re too normal to fit that deformed mold of extreme tabloid spin.

It’s a shame because the successful in our business do more to help everyday folks, and the environment, by properly repairing and reconditioning millions of used vehicles.

We collectively achieve this. Every. Single. Year.

In the real world, you have to know more than just cars to become successful. In my case it was as an auto auctioneer, a remarketing manager, and much later operating an auto auction that sold thousands of cars. Some of us in the car business start out as body men, mechanics, or even enthusiasts like many of you who buy and sell one vehicle at a time.

We build businesses…and in the eyes of many, we’re the bad guys.

Do we get the publicity for our good works? Nope! Instead, we collectively wind up having our image hijacked by a variety of extremists and scum who couldn’t create a healthy image to save their asses from first base.

Don’t get me wrong. We do have a ton of good folks that get their moment in the sun. Go find a charity fundraising effort in any community and chances are you will find a dealer there along with plenty of other good-hearted business folks.

What I also find amazing is that some of our spokesmen are not actually dealers themselves. It’s like automotive journalists who don’t even own a car, or politicians who pretend to know everything from hemorrhoids to hurricanes. I frankly don’t blame any guy who asks for help and credits the guy who helped him figure it all out.

But that’s often the industry exception to what should be a golden rule.

The car business, like any other ‘used’ business that focuses on the needs of the general public, deals with a lot of weirdness when it comes to people and product. An ungodly amount of it. Contrary to the stereotypes, operating a successful dealership in the long run requires a lot of knowledge about cars and about managing issues that you mostly inherit from others.

That’s life. I know car dealers are far from alone when it comes to tackling the nasty ingredients that need to be removed from our PR recipe, so let me ask you two questions.

What folks in your line of business make you proud? And which ones do you wish could be pulled with a cane and whacked with a two by four? Feel free to share a story. I’m sure the car business is not the only business that has to deal with this reality.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

77 Comments on “Hammer Time: To My Fellow Dealers...”


  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Shopping used cars I’ll gladly trust a dealer over some of the private sellers I’ve had to deal with. On a test drive of a ’92 Accord, I had the “mechanic” owner lie to my face about a loud leak in the exhaust, said it’d pass safety with a broken mirror and trashed windshield.

    btw The Accord quit running at 149k, this guy did the minimum to fix it to flip it. This isn’t the first “mechanic owned” Accord I’ve seen, the other was a wagon with butchered wiring under the hood.

    The last dealer I visited had an ’86 Camry, pretty honest about its faults (rust and alignment aside) but I couldn’t knock the price down.

    Imo I dealers can be good and bad, its “flippers” that I avoid.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      This doesn’t make sense. You go to used car dealer and purchase no-one knows WHAT. Because dealer buys this car at the auction from no-one knows WHERE.
      I would prefer to go to private owner. Definitely. I would check car either way and disqualify the car, not the seller. Dealer has no idea about most cars they sell. They take a car for price X, wash it, may be change oil, and then price it at X+4000 and sell it.

      So, statements like, “trust a dealer” are just naive. The only thing you get from the dealer is that notorious 30-day warranty. And even then, most of the time it is an uphill fight.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    It’s the same everywhere, a few bad apples spoil the bunch. I work on the technical side of things with a bunch of largely non-technical sales relationship manager dudes. The majority of them are great to work with, do right by our customers, and generally make my life very pleasant indeed. A couple make me want to go postal on a fairly regular basis, and are more work than the rest of them put together when I have to deal with them.

    I think the ultimate example are the police. A tiny fraction of a fraction of a percent are anything but hard working guys and gals who just want to get home to their lives at the end of a shift, but the A-holes ruin the public image for all of them.

  • avatar
    ajla

    “Do we get the publicity for our good works? Nope!”

    Where’s my violin?

    I generally like your stuff and you seem like an honest enough guy and I’m sure you work hard, but I’ll be feeling bad for car dealers approximately never.

  • avatar
    OneAlpha

    Look out, Marshal Lucky! It’s High Prices!

    Fucking gold.

  • avatar
    bunkie

    I’ve found that the size of the American flag is a pretty good indicator. The larger the flag, the more likely that you will run into questionable practices. This applies to pundits and politicians,as well.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      LOL – my local Chrysler/Jeep/RAM store has a HUGE flag, streamers, balloons, the LOOK signs in the windshields, even a couple of those dancing inflatable whatsits. I have never set foot in the showroom, no idea how they are to deal with. Parts counter guys are great though.

    • 0 avatar
      SoCalMikester

      anyone who has the “christian fish” symbol on their sign or business cards.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Any religious symbol on a commercial business card is questionable (and no I have never encountered this personally). Although people really into the “fish” as it were don’t strike me as the kind who would screw me over.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        My aunt bought an old Avalon off a BHPH lot with a trailer because it had a Christian fish on it. “They must be good people.”

        I’m like “IT’S A STICKER.”

        Taking advantage of people with a religious “connection” is all too easy.

    • 0 avatar
      stevelovescars

      Ha, I had a similar thought. I never realized it, but I guess I have been following this formula in my mind for the past 20 years. The trustworthiness of the dealership is inversely proportional to the size of the flag, the number of blow up gorillas and a multiple of their references to Jesus.

      I also prefer to see dealers where the employees are easily identifiable by their branded casual shirts (polo or button down) rather than poorly fitted suits with polyester ties. It makes me think that the dealer expects people to stick around for a while if he/she is willing to invest in clothing for them. Also, unless it’s a top luxury brand, wearing suits and ties on hot days is uncomfortable, doesn’t support the brand, and is inconsistent with how most customers will be dressed.

    • 0 avatar
      VolandoBajo

      @bunkie sort of like my rule of thumb: a pharmacy that calls itself “Ethical Pharmacy” is probably compensating for something, as is a car dealer who calls his business “Honest John’s Used Cars”. Ditto for places called “Dependable Home Repair”, etc.

      But in part I think the rep for dishonesty comes about as a result of opportunity.

      A guy who I used to drink with quite often, and considered both a good friend and an honorable person, took the opportunity to dump an old Honda wagon on my then girlfriend (and now lifetime love of my life), knowing full well it needed a transmission overhaul.

      We ended up letting him repo it, and got out with our down payment. But he was found out when I dropped by his place of business, and started talking with his mechanic about the vehicle. His response? “I told him it needed a new transmission, that that one was going to go out before the car was paid off, for sure.” And he was right.

      End of a long friendship, beginning of a new phase in my life. Sad to lose the friend, but he showed his true colors, and it was time to cut him loose.

      Fortunately, the woman in question didn’t dump me as a result of having vouched for him, Fortunate, because it has been the one relationship in my life (regarding women) that has lasted well over a decade, and she became the mother of our son.

      It hurt, though, to see my former friend turn into such a weasel. But the gain more than made up for the loss.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    As a mid-sized mfr, my employer began outsourcing (a few years ago) some automated mfg work in order to remain price competitive and protect the real value-add US jobs. This limited-approach strategy seemed to be working well.

    But now that we’ve recently been bought by a Fortune 100 company, the outsourcing is systematic and widespread, because people, skills, and designs are treated as commodities. One of our project managers has people in 8 time zones on their project. A buyer essentially works two shifts so he can simultaneously support projects in the US and China. Other professionals are training their overseas replacements. Long-time suppliers have become alienated by 180-day payment terms, and the personal relationships we enjoyed with them count for nothing today.

    I’ve become embarrassed of my industry and its ivory-tower managers who manage their companies by spreadsheets. Much of the bad press is well-deserved, and the media needs to dig deeper than stock price to realize what’s going on.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I’m a lawyer — perhaps the one profession that gets a worse rap than used car sales.

    The image of our entire profession is tainted by news stories about judgments for money damages that come across as ridiculously high. Sometimes they are; usually, if you look into the details of each case, they’re actually reasonable. The irony is that in most cases it is not actually lawyers who are setting the damages amounts, but juries made up of regular people.

    Law is a service business. Most of us are here trying to make clients happy; if we don’t, they don’t pay us or hire us again. No one has figured out yet how to bill for legal services in a way that makes sense to everyone, and that’s part of the problem. Hourly billing sucks for client and lawyer alike, but the alternatives are even worse, except in certain specialized situations.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      What type of law if you don’t mind my asking?

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Tax and corporate, serving a specialized client base of nonprofit organizations and philanthropists.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Thanks for the reply, that does sound quite specialized.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          No wonder you got the LS, AND a Forester! LS for the big nonprofit days, and when you work for the philanthropists you can drive the Forester over.

          I know your game, buddy!

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Haha!

            The funny part is that I drive to work maybe once every two months.

            When I do, it’s the G8 (from here on out the LS, but I haven’t driven it to work yet). The car sits in the garage under our building so no one sees it. During the week the Forester serves as mommy-mobile.

            But most of my clients would think more of me if they saw the Forester. My boss just replaced her rusting, 240k mile ’02 Forester with a new ’15, and she fits right into our somewhat crunchy milieu.

          • 0 avatar
            Waftable Torque aka Daniel Ho

            The problem for lawyers, financial planners, and businessmen is that they’re caught between looking successful, but not too successful. People really do judge your competence in those professions based on what you wear and drive, yet if they think you make too much they think you overcharge. No win.

            That said, the LS is the perfect car for those above, for the above reasons.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I think lawyers get a bad rap from the ones you see portrayed on crap TV ads and in shows.

            Now, while the ones we have here mostly drive Lexii (one Mini and one Infiniti also), they’re nice people with level heads, and are pretty easy to talk to and get along with.

            Ours are all litigators and corporate attorneys.

            I’ve got my CLU but I’m not a financial planner!

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            What like our own hometown Yinzer, Dan Muessig?

            “I may have a law degree, but I think like a criminal”

            http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/jurisprudence/2014/03/daniel_muessig_video_the_man_behind_the_best_or_worst_lawyer_commercial.html

            or her?

            http://abovethelaw.com/2011/10/this-domineering-woman-apparently-cant-take-a-professional-spanking/

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Oh jeez. We have one here called “The Heavy Hitter” who fills his ads with baseball references.

            “I’ll knock it out of the park for you!”

          • 0 avatar
            MBella

            I think many of the issues with lawyers would be resolved if we implemented the so-called “English” rule. If I sue you and loose, I pay you’re legal bills. This would eliminate the frivolous lawsuits. There is nothing wrong with lawyers as a whole. They can be very necessary when having to deal with anything in the legal system.

    • 0 avatar
      SoCalMikester

      seems like every time i get some “class action settlement” thing in the mail, the money spent on postage is more than what i would receive.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      “Law is a service business. Most of us are here trying to make clients happy;”

      Most lawyers do about as well as could be expected by their clients. If you didn’t we’d find another one that did.

      A full half of those clients are only clients at all to protect themselves from the actions of another lawyer – who is, no doubt, making his own clients quite happy at the time. He’s the guy that we hate.

      Good people working in a terrible system.

    • 0 avatar
      totesrecall

      I’m also a member of America’s most reviled profession.

      I’ve had people tell me in earnest that all lawyers should be killed or that we should not be allowed to hold elected positions (God forbid a legislator actually knows the law).

      The funny thing is, 90% of what I do is relatively mundane paperwork.

      With regard to billing. We will do flat fee billing on simple items we have done a thousand times, but anything unique requires hourly billing. I find it’s best to be upfront with clients if you think something will require a great deal of work, rather than surprising them with an enormous bill down the road.

  • avatar
    wstarvingteacher

    Well Steve, I met my wife when she was selling me a truck. Ran a small BHPH lot. The truck was a loser but the gal makes me smile daily. Illegitimi non carborundum.

  • avatar
    PeterKK

    Maybe I just don’t know enough car dealers but I FEEL like most of the ones I have met were selling pure crap. I did find a guy like you who I’d buy nearly any car from, but I feel like you are a rare breed sir. Maybe that really is just a PR problem, though.

    It’s not like I myself am the super duper ultra wisdom car guy.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    DENIRO: Toyota, Lexus same thing; Japanese right? Let’s not forget Pearl Harbor.

  • avatar
    cwallace

    One of the best Simpsons lines ever… Homer goes into a dealership with a $15,000 in cash in his hand, and walks up to a car with “$12,000” written clearly on the windshield.

    “Does this car cost fifteen thousand dollars?”

    Guy in plaid sport coat walks over and leans against the windshield, saying “i-i-it does now!”

    “Woo hoo!”

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    The second video is one of the funniest things I have ever seen, I am almost crying from laughing so hard.

  • avatar
    Erikstrawn

    I can see two viewpoints on this, both of which are somewhat opposed, but both equally true.

    First, if your business has an image problem, the problem is not your image, but your practices. I’m thinking of a lot of Fortune 500 companies that get caught in a scandal and then spend tons of money trying to fix their “image”.

    Second, news stations are in the business of selling advertising, and if you watch the evening news, you’ll see all the major dealerships’ commercials, but you won’t see the little guys – they can’t afford it. So when the news has to “investigate” a scandal, it won’t ever be the big chain dealership, it will be a little guy.

  • avatar
    Crabspirits

    When I went to school to be an auto technician, it seemed like the industry was begging, PLEADING for trained persons to repair today’s complex vehicles! By the time I graduated, it was clear that all dealers wanted was a peon that could read a flowchart. The cheaper the peon, the better. This would usually cover the cost of parts mistaken thrown at a repair that were not covered under warranty. The “smart” guys were at chains and independent repair shops fighting each other for book time, or else stand around and not get paid.

    I happened to luck into discovering the turf equipment field where I can still turn wrenches, run my own operation, and not have to worry about so much of that bs.

    Who do I despise in my field? That list is long. The scarlet letter of the shady mechanic isn’t there anymore really, as people have come to appreciate the good ones. Almost every shop has at least one bad one, however. Be it by virtue of being inept, or to produce book time.

    Who do I look up to in my field? Anyone that has found a way to get out of it.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      Agreed. The funny thing is that they talk about how big the shortage of skilled techs is. Then they don’t want to pay. One of my older coworkers said that he made the most money in the late 80s. He said his flat rate hasn’t gone up more than a few dollars. The rate dealers charge has gone up 400% though since then. The flat rate times are also plummeting. You end up making less and less every year. It’s getting harder and harder for an honest guy to make it. The guys that make crazy high flat rate hours are the ones that sell brakes and other gravy jobs on every car that comes through the door. The independents seem to be a bit more fair when they divide the cheddar up. I am actually leaving my dealer at the end of the week, and will never go back.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    LOL 02 Deville at $21k. Wow. So long ago. Such overprice.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I almost bought an 02 in 2005 for 12 (40K), but then I was like Northstar is junk…

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        12 sounds a lot more reasonable than 21. Even though the one pictured IS a DTS, it doesn’t have the loaded-option night vision.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          This one was broughamtastic, pearl white with a black roof and an E&G grille. Looked just like this:

          http://thumbs2.ebaystatic.com/d/l225/m/mLu5s-8KAQ6QeSjY2ZuzsGw.jpg

          I think he paid 10ish for it. If it had been a Park Ave I’d still be driving it today…

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Oh lordy you and your E&G. I don’t fancy a landau on that model or the subsequent DTS. The last one it looked okay on was the 98ish model with the big egg crate grille.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The E&G allows me to roll with style and class.

  • avatar
    Jezza819

    My family ran a dealership from 1978-2012. I left in 2006. Single line, relatively small area about 70,000 total population. We tried to do things like when my father started the business. No added stickers, nothing added to the vehicle unless the customer wanted it, no DOC fees, none of that ridiculous advertising (we’ll pay off your trade regardless of how much you owe, or guaranteed $5000 minimum on any trade, etc.)

    But eventually we just got forced out of the market. The manufacturer forced us to do a very expensive upgrade in 2004 and we never recovered from that. Our overhead just shot up too high. Then the multi owned out of town franchises started moving and it all went downhill from there.

    As late as the early 90’s there were 8 dealerships in our town, all of them locally owned by individual families. Now there is only one left. One of these big out of town conglomerates runs almost all the business in that area. It’s either their way or the highway.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Sorry to hear.

    • 0 avatar
      brettc

      That really is too bad. It’s very hard to find a dealer these days that doesn’t do the whole “doc fee” BS. Sounds like your family tried to do it the right way for as long as possible so congratulations on managing that for as long as you did.

      • 0 avatar
        clkimmel

        The “doc fee” has found it’s way into real estate also. We recently signed with an agent to buy a property and told them no way are we paying a doc fee and they waived it.

    • 0 avatar

      My parents used to buy cars from a small Chrysler dealer – family owned since the 1920’s, showroom that held one car, my dad went to high school with one of the owners. Unfortunately, they got their franchise yanked in the Chrysler bankruptcy.

    • 0 avatar
      kvndoom

      That’s terrible to hear…. You know you could replace “dealership” with “farm” and account for the heartache much of rural America suffered during that same time period.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Very fortunate to have started a relationship with a family-run Honda dealer who also has several other lines in their group. The nice thing is they don’t play up the monopoly stuff, and keep their dealings as “small-town” as always, from sales, to parts, to service. (Most of their staff have been there for years, and some have come from other dealers, including a salesman who’s probably the longest-serving Honda salesman in my area, and who came from said stint all at another Honda dealership. As I’ve also related, many of the service techs have Hondas in various stages of “rice,” and the service manager has been a Honda fanatic for years, again coming from another Honda dealer in my area.)

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    The DOC fee is hilarious and pure profit. There’s a lady (it’s always a lady) who is probably making $15/hr to fill out paperwork, and it takes her 20 minutes. Therefore the DOC fee should be $5.

    Also, the dealer will tell you the DOC fee is “required by law”. Not in Nevada, Mister. The DOC fee is ALLOWED by law, not required.

  • avatar
    smartascii

    The reason that car dealers have a bad reputation is that they’ve been doing for a long time now what virtually every retail business has now adopted as a standard practice, and that is as follows:
    1) We do not care what you want or need. We care about you buying what we have.
    2) We do not want to pay the kind and quality of employees to staff our establishments that are knowledgeable about our products.
    3) We do not view your transaction as an opportunity to start a relationship that causes you to appreciate us and our product, so that you feel good about the money you just spent. Instead, we view your transaction as an opportunity to get you to spend more money than you originally planned, and if we make you mad, we don’t care.
    4) As regards 3) above, we’d really prefer it if we could find a way to trick you into spending money you don’t want to. We view this as our right.
    5) If you later determine that you regret your purchase, we believe that it was entirely your responsibility to have resisted our best efforts to wrest your cash away from you, and we have no intention of giving you any of your money back.
    6) What warranty? Didn’t you read the fine print?

    This kind of crap makes pretty much all retail purchases a competitive sport, and when perfectly nice individuals who sell things come across customers who treat them with suspicion and try to take advantage of them, just remember, we’re playing by the rules someone else created. I’m sorry it makes you feel bad, and I wish things were different, but it’s beyond my individual power to change.

    • 0 avatar
      319583076

      ^^^^^^That’s a pretty oily cop out, right there!

      • 0 avatar
        smartascii

        I’m not a dealer, and I don’t work for one. I don’t work in the car business, or in fact, the retail business at all. I am simply, as a consumer, saying that it’s pretty crappy out there, and while Steve’s right that several bad dealers ruin things for more honest ones, it’s the trend of the retail marketplace to crap all over their customers just as much as they can get away with it, and it’s not limited to car dealers (thought I’m pretty sure they invented most of the shenanigans).

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    That CNN reporter seem an airhead who’s only skills are to look accusing and scornful on cue.

    The Max Motors guy has internalized the Middle-American cant for gun ownership and is better prepared to deliver it than the reporter is to be detailed in her criticism.

    But neither got “owned”, they both seem dim but he’s more genuine. Who let this run as long as it did?

  • avatar
    PandaBear

    I think this is the norm when you are dealing with any business that has a huge amount of uncertainty. Sometimes you get high prices and lousy quality and sometimes you get huge bargains and high quality, but customers expect things to be the same every single time, with zero risk.

    The nature of any salesman is to minimize the risk in presentation, and when the expectation from the customer is zero risk, you have a receipt for the bad image problem.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      This is exactly it. There is a reason used cars depreciate. You are taking a risk. Don’t want the risk, buy new. I don’t understand how some people can expect a used car to be problem free. Of course there are some shady car lots out there that sell some absolute garbage.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    Just say no to used cars, maybe?

  • avatar

    I’m a part-time eBay seller, and every time I read an article about someone who got scammed on eBay, I cringe.

    I’ve also noticed that when I have a buyer who has a problem with something I sold, they usually send an initial email basically accusing me of trying to rip them off. Once I respond to them and take steps to make it right, their tone becomes much more pleasant. I think they have been conditioned to think that people are out to rip them off, when in reality anytime you are selling stuff you occasionally get something that’s dead out of the box or grab the wrong thing when packing.

  • avatar
    56BelAire

    At the moment I am going around and around with a swarmy appliance repair outfit. My pricey fridge needs a defrost heater repair and they wanted nearly $700.00. According to the mfg, it is a 30 to 60 minute job, parts are under $100.00……………….and they are rated as No.1 in our area by the local consumer reporter guy. lol

    As I recall from my youth in the 50’s and 60’s the old TV repair service guys were bandits as well.

  • avatar
    olddavid

    Good luck with changing the image, Steven. I am in my seventh decade and have wondered about this since our family became a franchisee in 1957. The only conclusion I have is that like politicians, “my dealer” is one of the good ones, while everyone else’s is a crook.

  • avatar
    tekdemon

    lol, a car dealership is literally the only business where they told us to “get the fuck out” after we didn’t think their price of over original MSRP on a used Toyota Matrix was a great deal. Actually, the irony of the Analyze That clip is that a lot of Japanese import dealerships are the ones that were started by mob associates.

  • avatar
    tekdemon

    lol, a car dealership is literally the only business ever where the manager actually told my mom to “get the f*** out” after she didn’t think their price of over original MSRP on a used Toyota Matrix was a great deal and tried to negotiate. Actually, the irony of the Analyze That clip is that a lot of Toyota dealerships were started by mob associates while DeNiro’s character is bashing Toyota.
    See: http://ladailymirror.com/2012/10/18/millennial-moment-hit-man-says-car-dealer-belongs-to-mafia/
    http://www.thesmokinggun.com/documents/crime/mafia-soldiers-support-bush-cheney (As in http://wardsauto.com/news-amp-analysis/staluppi-group-buy-mode)
    Maybe it’s an inside joke since DeNiro knows this guy.

    Oh and then there was the time a different Toyota dealership’s (located in a particularly mob heavy city) mobster wannabe repair shop employee tried to convince me that one of the creases in the design of the actual car was evidence of frame damage that would require “eight thousand dollars” of repairs. The most amazing part was that he managed to say this with a straight face. In reality this should have been about $250 of repairs to the bumper of an 8 year old Camry. Unbelievable.

    I don’t know if you can really expect great customer service reputations when the mob since the 70’s had pushed to expand into car dealerships especially on the east and west coasts (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Bonanno#Later_career_in_Arizona_and_California http://aboutthemafia.com/massachusetts-businessman-identified-as-made-man-in-new-england-mafia).

    Then even dealership managers who aren’t actually in the mob apparently decide they ought to pretend they are and literally hire criminals as the salespeople: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/crime/used-car-dealer-chris-orsaris-stole-7-million-finance-mob-fantasies-feds-article-1.163079

  • avatar
    IronEagle

    Oh l was laughing so hard l couldn’t breathe from that second video. It hurt but thanks for the laugh!

  • avatar
    DeWitt

    What a bunch of cry-baby bs. Used car dealers right here in Georgia were able to get a new title tax law passed that has been a huge boon to car dealers. The idea that most used car dealers are self-made men just trying to build a business and serve the customer is a big load of crap. A lot of these dealers are trust-fund baby’s playing with dad’s money and otherwise unemployable.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Art Vandelay: I don’t know of much that isn’t reliable for 3 years though (this is why certain cars I...
  • Art Vandelay: But I read on these very forums that GM never makes their new features available for retrofit into...
  • RHD: Having owned a Plymouth Colt Turbo hatchback, I can tell you that they are (were) terrific little cars –...
  • Inside Looking Out: That’s what Joe is for.
  • Inside Looking Out: Humans are outdated model nearing the end of service deadline. At some point no one will left...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber