By on August 13, 2015

03

The internet hivemind is a funny thing. Considering nearly everyone on the earth has an easy way to broadcast their opinions worldwide, one would think there would be a wide variety in those opinions. Often, though, through groupthink or whatever, a solid consensus emerges as an overwhelming favorite.

See bacon. Or cat videos. Or Bernie Sanders (I promise, that is the last political statement I’ll make on these pages).

Car enthusiasts, when asked for an ideal daily driver, respond similarly:

Brown, diesel, manual, all-wheel-drive wagon.

The iconoclasts (some call them hipsters) love the subrosa appeal of an earth tone, oil-burning longroof. We always want what we cannot have. Heck, look at the funky Citroen I posted on our forum the other day. A brown(ish), wagon(ish) French car that would get some serious street cred in Williamsburg bench racing circles.

For me, practicality is the nexus of the appeal of any wagon. All the load carrying capacity of an SUV — or more, considering Mark’s experience with the CX-3 — with nearly the economy and performance of a low-slung family sedan. Here’s a somewhat rare beast: a 2004 Mazda6 wagon, sporting both the 220 horsepower V6 and a five-speed manual. For six thousand dollars. I’d love to fly into Dulles with the family, pick this car up, and haul the kids westward through the Shenandoah Valley twisties. That roofline gives plenty of room for camping gear, or were one so inclined, a large dog or two.

I’ve been trying to convince my wife that her Trailblazer is due for replacement, especially considering the 12 mpg she reports in her daily commute with the thirsty SUV. A Mazda6 wagon — really, any wagon — would be a perfect alternative.

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77 Comments on “Crapwagon Outtake: 2004 Mazda6 Wagon...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Whenever I see a Mazda 6 wagon or a Mazda 6 hatchback of this generation I still turn my head and look. (First I look for the dual exhaust and chrome tips with V6 badges.) God I loved these.

    • 0 avatar

      Agreed. They really hit their stride in top-trim V6 form after the facelift in 2006. A lovely set of 18 inch rims were added, and they eliminated some of the unnecessary Pontiac-esque plastic “sport” trim that covered the otherwise lovely pre-facelift models.

    • 0 avatar
      Tosh

      And they came in some really punchy colors too!

      Now what’s this I hear about Bernie Sanders? He’s going to be our next President? That sounds good to me!

      FTR, I do not want mine AWD…

    • 0 avatar
      HerrKaLeun

      Don’t be fooled, my 4-cylinder hatch had the dual exhaust too. And it is all stainless steel…. the only Mazda that doesnt rust. After 8 years in WI it actually is exveptional underneath

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      You are right on…as usual, Mr PD.

      I still remember these coming out along with the Mazda3. I remember very clearly the impression they made on me…from front to back, even the rear lighting designs made me think they were special. Those multiple colored circular lights!

      I purchased the 3…but have always pined for the 6 wagon. I bought the 3 for a family member when I saw it used on a dealer lot…but they refused it…and I kept it. I was in full blast love with the Autumn Sunset Orange/Bronze color. Maybe it was because I told my brother about it in so low voice he never heard me…dunno.

      I searched the internet many, many times finding that awesome green wagon.

      Please, Mazda, I am begging you to bring us that beautiful 6 wagon the entire world has but we cannot.
      How truly awful it is we see those friggin Euro hags getting the 6 wagon while we cannot.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    I thought these were the bomb when they made them. My only critique was there was no 4 cylinder option….

  • avatar
    gottacook

    I’m surprised – I knew the wagon was available only with a V6 in the U.S., but I thought the automatic was mandatory.

  • avatar

    According to behavioral economists, the most effective way to get H. sapiens to do anything is to let them know that everyone else is doing it.

    That said, I LOVE that Citroen. Though not as much as I love a Peugeot 404 wagon. (My family of origin picked ours up in Paris 50 years ago possibly today, definitely this week, at the beginning of our year in that city.)

    But I get your desire to pick up that car.

    But forgive me Chris: those wonderful Shenandoah twisties are more south than west of Dulles.

    • 0 avatar

      Actually, I’d argue that a lot of wagon lovers (yes, I drive a wagon) are just being contrary and need to feel like they belong to a superior, elitist group. Many of them only hate CUVs and love wagons because they are the unpopular choice. I bet if you could cell enough of them that the Murano CrossCabriolet was the business, they’d eat it all up and sing its praises…but they wouldn’t buy it because they rarely put their money where their mouths are.

      It’s still a form of groupthink, but it’s more of a “Dare to be part of a different (smaller) crowd” sort of thing.

      • 0 avatar
        carlisimo

        All I know is, I’d buy a MT wagon to replace my Miata when our family expands. I won’t buy a crossover because I’d probably tip it over while autocrossing or taking an onramp. I could live with a sedan, but I’d rather have a hatch for IKEA and Home Depot runs.

        I’ll probably end up getting a 5-door hatchback and being disappointed that I can’t put longer things in it.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        @Kyree

        Don’t be silly. We drive wagons because wagons work. A non-truck that can still carry things. The appeal of sedans utterly baffles me, and a wagon on stilts is largely a wagon ruined.

        My rental du jour is a Chevy Equinox LTZ and it is one of the most unpleasant vehicles I have driven in ages. Manages to be stiff yet bouncy, you can’t see out of it, and it is weirdly cramped inside for the exterior dimensions. And slow and thirsty. And the turning circle of the Lusitania. Expensive, but the inside is made of crap. Why do people like these stupid things so much?

        • 0 avatar
          Dave M.

          Sitting up higher. Better sight lines (sometimes). Seating position more propped up. I find my Outback a great compromise between a regular wagon (say the Golf) and a crossover.

          • 0 avatar
            ldl20

            +1

            I sold my 06 GT Wagon (sadly, not manual but Dark Cherry color was sweet) in December of 2014 with only 65K miles to my local mechanic and bought a new Outback 2.5 limited. I have not regretted it at all. At 6’3″ the Outback has quite a bit more room, for not much more of a larger footprint. It is much easier to get in and out of, and as much as people lament it growing into an SUV, I, too think it’s a nice compromise between a wagon and SUV.

            Achilles heel: My transmission was showing signs of imploding…..and the brakes weren’t confidence inspiring.

          • 0 avatar
            Alfisti

            This, though the current model is too high i’d say but yeah with kids or older people the slightly raised wagon is near perfect.

            Agreed the big issue with SUV is that to have them turn corners they are set up SUPER stiff, so despite the huge sidewall on the tyres they ride terribly.

        • 0 avatar
          319583076

          “Why do people like these stupid things so much?”

          Styx was a popular rock band. There’s no accounting for taste in any human endeavor.

        • 0 avatar
          tjh8402

          @Krhodes and @Kyree – I’m with Krhodes1 100%. Had a wagon or at least a hatchback model been available, the Accord, Mazda 6, Civic, Fusion, Camry, Dart, and Corolla would all have been cars I considered before I bought my Fiat. I had driven most as rentals and enjoyed them, but I wanted the practicality of that third/fifth door without the sacrifice of fuel economy and handling that comes from jacking the car up on stilts.

    • 0 avatar
      Chris Tonn

      “But forgive me Chris: those wonderful Shenandoah twisties are more south than west of Dulles.”

      But, in general, I’d be headed west-ish toward Ohio. I get where you’re going…

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I did not know that these existed. A manual transmission as well, what a rare find. I bet this wagon has good acceleration with a 5 speed V-6.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      You couldn’t row your own with the 6-cylinder, automatic only – and the quality of the auto for this era was horrific.

      It was pretty darn fun to drive with row your own and the 4-banger, but you weren’t going to win many traffic light sprints.

      • 0 avatar
        DevilsRotary86

        Submitted for your consideration: One 2004 Mazda 6 V6 station wagon with a manual transmission

        http://www.autotrader.com/cars-for-sale/vehicledetails.xhtml?zip=75044&endYear=2016&vehicleStyleCodes=WAGON&modelCode1=MAZDA6&showcaseOwnerId=69568211&startYear=1981&makeCode1=MAZDA&engineCodes=6CLDR&engineCode=6CLDR&transmissionCode=MAN&transmissionCodes=MAN&searchRadius=0&mmt=%5BMAZDA%5BMAZDA6%5B%5D%5D%5B%5D%5D&listingId=396428520&Log=0

        Sorry for the long link; autotrader sucks sometimes. They were rare as hens teeth, but they existed.

      • 0 avatar
        azinck

        This is not accurate. I can attest that I owned a 2005 Mazda6 wagon with the 6-cylinder and a 5-speed. I owned it for about 3 years and eventually sold it due to it starting to rust and a pretty terrible engine design.

      • 0 avatar
        Lemmy-powered

        Nope. They exist. I’ve driven one.

    • 0 avatar
      davefromcalgary

      I had one for 3 years also, 04 V6 5MT Sport hatchback, it was slower than my 98 Grand Am 2.4L 5MT (verified side by side) and absolutely horrible on fuel.

      Great car let down under the hood big time.

      Oh and never mind that it burned half its oil in a 5k kms oil change interval

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Dave, you sure don’t seem to have very good luck with cars.

        • 0 avatar
          davefromcalgary

          Ha, not as bad as you might think. Only the two nearly new cars I bought were crap.

          87 S15, 2.5L 4MT – No options, bulletproof, rebuilt it with my dad as a first car.

          98 Grand Am 2.4L 5MT – Well over 300000 kms when I sold it to my buddy to buy the Mazda 6

          2004 Mazda 6 Sport GT 3.0L 5MT – What a looker, and so practical with the sedan hatch, solid feeling and good handling, but as I said, DOG of an engine.

          2000 Sunfire GT 2.4L 5MT – bought it to beat around in while trying to flog the Mazda, love the TwinCam/Quad 4 and the greenhouse was very airy!

          2003 Sonoma 4.3L 4AT – cool stepside, 2WD w/ G80, bulletproof and used it for landscaping, never let me down.

          2002 Alero 2.2L 5MT – Just a hair under 300,000 kms before a bad clutch job allowed the slave cylinder to die at -40.

          2014 Verano 2.0T 6MT – well, you know…

          • 0 avatar
            MBella

            When will we get our next Verano update?

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            MBella

            I posted this on Wednesday on the Buick Regal Article:

            “Update on the Verano!

            Went camping out of cell range on the weekend.

            CEL lit up Saturday morning! Pulled a code P0806 (Clutch Position Sensor Circuit)

            Luckily? it started and functioned normally Monday morning.

            Drove it to my chosen service dealer, they were instructed to replace the ECU by GM tech support.

            That is now the fourth CEL, for the same basic code, twice which caused a no start, with a different repair each time…in the last two months.

            There are now two “GM Customer Care Ambassadors” involved in my case (the one guy was sick for a week or something) and the silence from them is ABSOLUTELY deafening.”

            As of right now, the case has been escalated to their executive review team (thankfully), they are looking into it. I’m not hopeful, they seemed disinclined to consider a buy back, but it’s an improvement over phone tag with a customer rep.

  • avatar
    johnhowington

    Looks better then its dopey twin cousin the Taurus and grampus Sable.

    • 0 avatar
      xeenu

      Beware the rust proofing of older Mazdas is not up to scratch. For the new ones the jury is still out in my opinion.

      I like the looks of the current Mazda 6 estate a lot but nevertheless opted for a Skoda Superb Estate (no diesel, petrol, but manual and in a light brown colour they call amethyst which should be a sort of lilac but does not look lilacky at all).

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Do Miatas suffer from the rust that Mazdas are known for? I live in San Diego, so not much rusts here. Still, I see lots of beater, outdoor-parked old Miatas that don’t exhibit rust. Proteges have found a way to rust here though.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Miatas get rust at the rocker panels and A-pillars, but I see less rusty ones than other, none Ford-assembled, Mazdas. Maybe it’s because they don’t see the snow in snowy places?

          Proteges rust when the relative humidity is over 40%. You aren’t even safe in the desert southwest.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            The only rusty Miatas (I did live in the Midwest from the start of production until 2002) have been beaten within an inch of their lives.

            The beauty of the desert southwest is that many used Miatas are one owner cream-puffs purchased by guys who are 40 plus years old.

        • 0 avatar
          heavy handle

          Miatas get frame rust at the rear bulkhead. Not visible from above, but very aggressive.

        • 0 avatar
          TMA1

          I’ve never seen rust on 3rd-generation Miatas. Rust on older cars means it was neglected pretty badly.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          In Maine, Miatas rust just like every other Japanese car if they are driven through the winters. But many are not.

      • 0 avatar
        HerrKaLeun

        My 2007 “6” is pretty good with no rust.
        Miatas probably don’t rust because they are driven on nice weather…

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    This is a car I desperately wanted to love. Between the stupid way Mazda bundled the option packages at the time, the Soviet grade automatic transmission with the V6, the paint that was thinner than a Pontiac G8 (which I didn’t know was possible) and terrible crash test ratings, I just couldn’t.

    I looked at both the wagon and the 5-door, and enjoyed driving both, but research indicated it was a bad bet.

  • avatar
    mikehgl

    Still a good looking crapwagon now. Mazda nailed it with this generation 6 and have been on a roll since. Well, except for the smiley- looking front ends of a few years back. This 6 did have its drawbacks (owned an 06 sedan), most notably, road noise.

  • avatar
    Alfisti

    Over rated.

    Considered a 2008 model when i bought my Saab 9-3 wagon, there’s absolutely no comparing them. The Mazda handled better but that was it, different planets in terms of comfort, refinement and toys.

  • avatar
    AMC_MatadorX

    I too like Chris was really interested in one of these when I heard v6/manual was possible. My boss had one he got from a customer on trade. It was blue, with 112k, grey cloth. It ran….poorly. Had about 4-5 different CELs, we threw some 02 sensors at it, checked the forums for fixes, and I decided not to buy it. These have the ford V6, and as if that isn’t bad enough, due to the Mazda elements of the design in the 6, have a tendency of blowing up. The fix is to find a Ford engine and swap. Also the forward Cats fail due to a poor EGR design, which in turn takes out the rear cats, o2 sensors, etc=$$$.

    The 2005 V6 Manual wagon in question was later determined to be running poorly due to what was described as a communication issue between computer and ancillaries, the fix was a new $900 computer+ programing on a maintained simple Japanese car with low miles…. Even then no guarantee the engine wouldn’t fail later, or the several expensive catalytic convertors.

    The final straw for me was reading on a Mazda forum that the clutch pedal assy itself has a tendency to break off on the Mazda 6 manual. I mean come on.

    Run from these, diehards end up rebuilding most of the car to keep them going (check out the Mazda6 forums if you doubt this) Engine replacement is a main sticky.

    • 0 avatar
      Land Ark

      I was on the verge of buying one of these for my late step father to bash around in. It was ridiculously cheap and I couldn’t figure out why. When I looked at the Carfax it showed that it had failed emissions twice in a row. I forget if the ad said the CEL was on or not. But I went searching for common problems with these and stumbled upon the cat converter issue. Based on what I saw the cats were the reason these had a tendency to blow their motors. They seem to have a pre-cat which comes apart and then the shards get sucked back into the engine (much like the 2005-2006 Legacy GT motors).

      Needless to say, after reading about that and the possible fix I decided it wasn’t worth it. I absolutely love the look of this wagon and I cross shopped it before buying my Legacy.

      I am familiar with this area and the dealers in that neighborhood. I wouldn’t recommend making a trip out here just to visit that BHPH dealer whose name will probably be changed before you drive off the lot. Take a look at the satellite image, the huge building you see is about 12 different “dealers” with different names likely all run by the same group. Chances are if you drove up and asked about this car they wouldn’t know where it was and it may not even be on that lot.

      But if anyone is serious and wants me to go look at it, let me know.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        This was an occasional problem with the Taurus SHO (and one of the only things that could kill the engine). If it ran rich for any reason the cat’s innards would crack, and sandy material would be vacuumed back into the cylinders. Knowing about a problem like that definitely makes you feel like you’re on eggshells (although with that car something else was always actually broken anyway).

    • 0 avatar
      azinck

      Spot on. I owned one of these (2005 V6 manual) for 3 years. I bought it in 2010 and despite being very carefully maintained both by me and the previous (original) owner who was also an enthusiast it went through lots of oil (bad PCV design), I was constantly scared of the pre-cat problem, and the car never really ran 100% right (occasional misses) for reasons that we could never quite pinpoint. I was glad to get rid of it before it had anything really expensive go wrong.

    • 0 avatar
      Marko

      I remember seeing lots of first/second-generation Mazda6 for sale at suspiciously low prices three-four years ago. I guess owners were getting sick of the finicky sensors and the risk of expensive engine problems.

    • 0 avatar
      JimR

      ’03 Mazda V6 manual sport owner here. I have replaced the fatal flaws of these cars at great time and expense. Once you crest the mountain, they are more rewarding than their competitors. Sophisticated suspension, willing brakes, stirring sounds on cam, decent looks, quiet, and generally comfortable and decent daily driving accommodations. Think of this as the Alfa of the segment, for better or worse.

      At 145k miles, interior surfaces have been good, fabrics durable (other than headliner), paints shiny, etc. The factory shift knob is garbage and I replaced mine with a more conventional 5-speed knob from a later Mazda3.

      Not a used car for the weak-willed, though. A tight engine bay and complicated accessory mounting on the subframe makes clutch and exhaust replacements a real bear. The only real fix for engine self-destruction is EGR bypass and the headache of aftermarket headers. Some other small problems can trip up the uninitiated, as well.

      Don’t answer the siren call of the ’03-08 V6 Mazda6 without doing your homework.

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    Test drove a very similar car at the time. I remember being very disappointed with the interior (Japanese low rent, not much better than an 80s 626), the lack of real power, and the ride. It was way too soft and resonated at a weird stomach-churning frequency.

    Bought an off-lease 9-3 hatch instead (I preferred it to the then-current 9-3 sedan). It was massively better in all ways: interior, ride, power, even load capacity.

    Funny thing, at the time people were telling me how the Saab was unreliable, and I should get the Mazda “because Japanese.” Here we are in 2015 and the Saab still looks and drives like new, and I haven’t seen any ’04 Mazdas in a dog’s age. I’m sure Mazda outsold Saab 10 to 1 at the time, but you would never know it from counting the survivors.

  • avatar
    matt3319

    I had a 2004 Mazda6 S hatch 2.3L w/5 speed. In a dark gray color. Great car but a bit week in 5th. Bought it new with no options. Think it listed for around $22K. Traded my silver 2002 VW GTI.

  • avatar
    iganpo

    I test drove a used example of this car a few years ago. The interior did not wear well — Lots of gray plastic that was in fact black plastic with gray paint on top, evidenced by numerous chips at touch points. The drive train also lots left to be desired. You press the gas pedal, and the engine just drones without doing much to motivate the car.

  • avatar
    Marko

    Weren’t most of the (automatic) wagons dumped into rental fleets?

  • avatar
    3800FAN

    I test drove one of these with an automatic once. It was a blast to drive and one of the most fun/engaging cars I’ve driven. The current mazda6 WISHES it could handle like the first gen 6. Instead it drives like a mid 90s gm N body!

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Whenever I see a Mazda of this time period I just check the rear wheel wells for rust, 9 times out of 10 I’ll find bubbling rust back there.

    Well tuned cars but truly bottom-grade corrosion protection, and stupidly thin paint as others have noted.

    Oh, and be prepared for the frolics that come with CEL lights.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Engine problems, emissions system problems, rust. Great styling and everyone loves the way they drive. Sounds like a great car to lease before the problems set in. Meet the Japanese VW.

    Every time I glance over at one of these stopped next to me at a light, the storage bin lid atop the dashboard is busted.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    After reading these comments I will stick with Honda. I always liked Mazda but if there cars are this bad then I will skip them.

  • avatar
    readallover

    Well, I still have my 2004 mazda 6 sedan, auto (sue me, its a daily driver and I`ve got two kids). After 265,000 kms, 11 years the only non-maintenance money i have had to put into it were a pcv hose and a motor mount. And still no squeeks or groans – it is as tight as when I took delivery. I consider it the spitirutual successor to my 1990 Maxima. I`ll buy another one when (or if) this one finally dies.

  • avatar
    redav

    The iconoclasts also like what’s ugly, because what’s beautiful is popular, and iconoclasts’ purpose is to tear down what is popular.

    They like manuals and wagons specifically because they are unpopular. If wagons were as common as CUVs, they would be indifferent.

    Being an iconoclast and fighting the righteous fight is great if there’s a solid foundation for reformation. But that’s pretty rare. Most are iconoclast by trend of popularity. They go against the grain because they believe it’s the cool thing to do.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Thanks for this word. Iconoclast. Contrarian was not good enough.

      But yea iconoclasts are driven by contrarianism. Ironically, when they convene, they engage in the same groupthink they lambast everyone else for engaging in. It’s all very high school angsty.

  • avatar
    BobWellington

    I’m currently looking at selling my ’06 Explorer and getting one of these. Kind of hard to find, especially when you get crap dealers selling them who don’t include pictures in their online listings and won’t send me any pictures when I ask for them. I guess they don’t want my business.

    I test drove a 2006 a few months ago and it felt great. Nice interior, too. I was planning on getting it inspected the next weekend, but someone had bought it a day or two before.

  • avatar
    50merc

    “that is the last political statement I’ll make on these pages” Hallejuah! Partisan politics is the last thing we need on TTAC.

  • avatar
    blppt

    “I’ve been trying to convince my wife that her Trailblazer is due for replacement, especially considering the 12 mpg she reports in her daily commute with the thirsty SUV. A Mazda6 wagon — really, any wagon — would be a perfect alternative.”

    Beware though—those Ford 3.0 Duratecs were notoriously poor in the fuel economy realm. For example, the Fusion V6 used one, with a 6 speed automatic, and people were complaining of mpgs in the high teens.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      Not only are they poor on gas, not very powerful, but changing the sparkplugs is good fun as well:

      “You will have to remove the [upper] intake manifold to access the rear plugs. There are 6 gaskets beween the upper and lower IM’s. The TB and EGR each have gaskets between them and the IM as well.

      Start by removing the intake tube and the TB.

      There are a couple of wiring harnesses and coolant hoses connected to the TB. When you’re pulling off the lower coolant hose, be very careful. On my car, that hose leads to a plastic T-fitting which snaps very easily – it costs between $60 & $80 to replace”

      And thats just the first half!

  • avatar
    jthorner

    Don’t buy it. I test drove one of these back in 2006 (the last time I went new car shopping). I am highly biased towards station wagons and manual transmissions, but the deficiencies in that M6 wagon were too numerous even when new.

    1) Crappy plastic interior destined to wear badly.
    2) Under-developed engine … poor combination of power, economy and reliability.
    3) Low rent paint and assembly

    I’m glad I ended up buying an Acura TSX instead. I still have the TSX, and it is still a terrific car which does not in any way look or act its nine years and 140k miles age.

    If you want a manual transmission wagon, search for a later 2000s Volvo V70 with the five cylinder and manual transmission. They are rare, but do exist. Not perfect cars, but many times better than the Mazda 6 ever hoped to be.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    On my roughly mile long street of maybe 30 houses, there are three of these Mazda wagons. So I would never have known they were rare if I didn’t hang out here – a not uncommon car here in Portland Maine. The hatchback though – THAT one I rarely see.

  • avatar
    DweezilSFV

    Still one of the most beautiful vehicles out there. Even better looking than the sedan. I always do a double take when I see one. Disappointing to read about the problems though.

  • avatar
    TDIGuy

    I bought the sedan before the wagon and hatch were available. Should have waited, but it was a great car. Speaking in Canadian trim levels, I didn’t get the GT because I didn’t want the all black interior. Had a blue V6 GS with a 5 speed. Power was a bit lower than other V6s of the time, combined with a 1st gear ratio that was a bit too high, made for some poor 0-60 times, but handling was great. Dealt with the cheap looking nose by getting the optional sport grille from the GT.

    I should add the only reason I didn’t keep it when the lease ended was because the wife and I decided we could get by with one car and hers was paid for and an automatic.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    So you took my idea for Today’s Rare Ebay Find, lightly renamed it, and used it yourself on the forum. Cool.

  • avatar
    pb35

    I bought one of these new in 2005 when we moved to Texas from Manhattan. It was the same color as pictured, Squall Blue Pearl. V6, manual combo. The only option it had was the body-color sport grill and I basically named my price for it ($19,500). As a first-time homeowner, it came in very handy and was pretty fun to drive. However, the doors felt paper-thin and the clutch made a clicking noise that the dealer couldn’t fix so I dumped it after 2 years. Traded it for a new XC90 Sport that’s still in my garage.

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