By on August 31, 2015

2015-Subaru-WRX-STI-profile

After two consecutive years of growth, including record-setting U.S. sales achievements in 2014, what does the Subaru WRX do for an encore performance?

An all-time monthly record of 3,716 WRX/STI sales in July 2015 starts the second-half off strongly after a first-half in which sales of Subaru’s rally-inspired nameplate jumped ahead of last year’s sales pace by 14 percent.

When setting a brand-wide sales record in 2014, Subaru’s WRX/STI-specific record of 25,492 units accounted for 5 percent of the brand’s total U.S. sales volume.

Last month, however, the WRX/STI tandem produced more than 7 percent of all Subaru USA sales, up from 4 percent at this time last year thanks to an 85-percent year-over-year improvement.

Subaru WRX:STI pie chart TTAC

Subaru sales in July shot beyond 50,000 units for the first time since August of last year.

With massive increases through the first seven months of 2015, Subaru has already sold more WRX/STIs this year than in all of 2013, when sales were beginning to surge. Subaru is on track for significantly more than 30,000 WRX/STI sales in calendar year 2015.

Combined, Volkswagen’s Golf GTI and Golf R are on track for approximately 25,000 U.S. sales in 2015.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

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36 Comments on “Chart Of The Day: Subaru Sets Monthly U.S. WRX/STI Sales Record In July 2015...”


  • avatar

    A great alternative to the typical soul-less import econobox.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    It has to be said. Imagine how much more they could sell with the hatchback.

    Still hoping they put a bigger FA in the STI, and do the hatch body too. Gah doesn’t matter, I can’t get past that old looking interior. GTI all the way to the end of the warranty.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I see many of the prior version WRX hatch, and almost none of this current sedan one. Maybe they’ll bring it back if they decide to listen to their customer.

    • 0 avatar
      Elusivellama

      Truth right here. I’m not totally against sedans and coupes as a whole, but the hatchback just seems to work better for the STis. The profile has less of the boy racer look than the sedan with its huge wing. In terms of practicality and everyday useability, the hatchback wins because of the liftgate, the wider opening and the height of the loading lip. Hatchbacks also have a rear wiper for the window. That said, the sedan of this generation looks much, MUCH better than the previous. It is less bulbous in the front, and the overall profile matches much better with the wing – which still sticks out, but I believe that it looks like it belongs as opposed to the Pep-boys look of the previous gen.

      Still, if you told me to choose between a hatchback or the FA engine, I will pick the FA engine everytime. That EJ257 needs to go, it has far outworn its welcome. We need equal length headers (the Subaru rumble can disappear and I wouldn’t shed a tear….I want results, not ricer sound), twin scroll turbo, DI for better power, response, fuel economy, and just better everything else.

      If that is done, I’m lining up for an STi in a couple of years, which I’ll keep stock except for mods to the shifter / knob and maybe the engine mounts. I’m done with mods that break, or cause other things to break. Even ‘preventative’ mods like oil catch cans may cause stuff like excessive crankcase pressure, or maybe the hoses pop off, or the crap freezes in the lines / can, etc. Aftermarket claims to solve these problems, but it’s hard to beat the OEM at designing their own car. Been there, done that, just want a car that works great out of the box and is fully covered by warranty.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        People should be forced to recite your last four sentences verbatim, on tape, before signing up for car forums.

        I have to wade through so many threads of mods that objectively worsen the vehicle, sometimes for looks, sometimes for debatable functional reasons, to get any useful information.

        • 0 avatar
          Elusivellama

          I’m assuming this was in reply to my post (it’s impossible to tell if it’s in reply to anybody else, thanks to this awesome comment system).

          If we look at the premise of aftermarket ‘performance’ and boil it down to a single sentence, it will be something like this: “make money by selling parts which claim to outperform OEM parts without affecting reliability at all”. In some cases, this is true. In the majority of cases, this is usually not true. Think of what resources that OEMs have which are denied to aftermarket companies – teams of engineers, specialized testing facilities, millions in the R&D and testing budget, the ability to fly test mules to almost anywhere in the world to run them in real world conditions, etc.

          It is not easy for a small fab shop to outengineer the OEM, and design parts which work well in a very complex system, and will stand up to abuse in the real world through all 4 seasons. I had an aftermarket rear sway bar, and the brackets broke three times on me due to corrosion, the powdercoating was starting to flake off at the welds (the RSB was a 3 piece tig welded hollow design), and the exposed metal at the welds was beginning to rust. I swapped an OEM rear sway bar back in and NO problems whatsoever – the brackets were three times as thick and heavily coated with paint, and the bar itself was a solid piece of metal that had been bent into shape, also thickly coated with paint. I don’t care that it doesn’t perform as well as the aftermarket bar, it works well enough and doesn’t break on me every few months or so.

          That said, not all mods are crap. There are some things out there which CAN be upgraded from the OEM part, but these things tend to be parts which are not directly connected to more complex subsystems and which are simple to understand and reengineer / redesign at a higher cost than the OEM was willing to spend on, per unit. Still, people should think very carefully before slapping mods on their car, especially ANYTHING that affects the breathing of the engine (intake, downpipe, oil catch cans). I read somewhere that people should upgrade their driving skills first, then the suspension, then the wheels and tires. Anything else and they should just spring for something which is more powerful out of the box – modding something to get more ‘power’ out of it is just opening the gate to a host of problems waiting to bite you in the ass months or years down the road.

    • 0 avatar
      OneAlpha

      This is a good-looking sedan, but Subaru should be making this as a coupe, not a hatchback.

      I hate hatchbacks. As a type, they’re so ugly that their looks cancel out any increased utility they might have.

    • 0 avatar
      Advance_92

      ‘GTI all the way to the end of the warranty’
      Which is why I bought a WRX eleven years ago which has had one electrical glitch (this year) that wasn’t triggering the air conditioning. A contact behind the dash button needed to be cleaned. Mechanically? An axle dust boot’s the only non-wear item so far.

      • 0 avatar
        05lgt

        My 05 (lgt not wrx) had an AC glitch they first returned no problem/could not reproduce with 20 miles of “testing”. A switch of service writers and threatened switch of servicing dealerships got me a cleaned contact, replaced relay, and no charge. More than one Subaru dealership in a metro area = privilege.

  • avatar
    godomatic

    I went from a 2005 Forester to a 2015 WRX and I absolutely love it. I don’t mind not having a hatch (my wife has a new Forester). The WRX is fast, reasonably quiet, fast, fuel economy is better than I expected with the six-speed. Did I mention it’s fast?

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    So, does this mean that this one will avoid speculation it’ll be turned into a crossover and have it’s manual transmission axed?

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    I wonder what it says about the economy that increasing numbers of people are willing and able to afford a compact sedan that costs $28-38,000?

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      IMO, we have to consider these types of vehicles in a vacuum outside of other comparable options. The WRX/STI, VW GTI/R32, and Ford RS/ST models are all “special,” lower-production, and made for a very specific type of customer. Normal considerations of practicality, price, comfort, economy, appearance, etc. are thrown out the door.

      • 0 avatar
        eggsalad

        I’ll accept your premise. Allow me to rephrase.

        “I wonder what it says about the economy that increasing numbers of people are willing and able to afford a motor vehicle that costs $28-38,000?”

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Is that a high price though? People spend 28-38K on Accords all the time, and $60K+ on SUV items. Look how many Tahoes they sell every year.

        • 0 avatar
          deanst

          Given the fact that the average Ford buyer pays $33,000, I would say that the rising sales of this vehicle means nothing. The fact that pickup drivers are willing to pay 50 or 60k for a vehicle probably tells you much more…

      • 0 avatar
        Superdessucke

        Dealers are not offering good deals either, nor do they feel they have to. I tried to get one. No incentives and best price lower than MSRP but well over invoice. The residual value was excellent but Subaru has jacked the money factor so high that it’s cheaper to lease an Audi S3 than a WRX Premium.

        Hopefully this shows automakers there is a market for enthusiast vehicles if they build and advertise them.

    • 0 avatar
      Chan

      1. Pent-up demand for a niche car. In the case of the WRX and STI, the good styling doesn’t hurt either.

      2. Cars in general are becoming more expensive and financing has been loosened.

  • avatar
    Noble713

    Credit given where credit due, kudos to Subaru for continuing to produce a nice AWD rally-inspired sedan. I’d also like to send yet another “F**K YOU!!” to Mitsubishi for letting my beloved (and IMO, superior) Evo X wither and die. There’s obviously a market for this type of car.

  • avatar
    doublechili

    Maybe the WRX (especially) and STI are benefiting from a lack of competition. If you want an AWD sedan with MT and high performance, your options are extremely limited. The WRX has no real competition in its price range. The STI has limited competition (the Golf R is only available with DSG at this time, and the Evo is on the way out). I may be forgetting some car[s], but you get the general idea. And the toned-down styling of this model is attractive to many despite some early complaints about it being boring.

    • 0 avatar
      ganong

      I agree with the lack of competition part. I picked a base STI which at invoice is an insane value and there is nothing that has four doors that can give you same amount of fun. I did test drive the WRX and the FST. There was nothing else in the 35000 new range (new). I absolutely don’t mind the wing and its surprisingly spacious.

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      Manual Golf R’s have been hitting lots for about a month now.

      • 0 avatar
        doublechili

        Okay, so much for signing up for those email alerts for when the MT became available! I’m probably a year away from getting a car since my wife just got a new one. I’d probably still lean towards the STI now that you can get it with the wingless option. But thanks for the info.

      • 0 avatar
        ganong

        Sorry, didnot make it clear, end of April. There was one Golf R 100 miles away and the dealer was not ready to offer test drive. I am an older dude and do have a very cool and most secure job.

  • avatar
    Ion

    It’s easy the WRX comes in auto again. There’s no breakdown of WRX vs STI, but it’s a safe bet the automatic brings in more buyers.

  • avatar
    Jimal

    Osmosis. There are more people going into Subaru dealers than ever before, and they’re buying more Subarus than ever before. I’m sure some people who came in for a For a Forester or a XV Crosstec saw a WRX or an STI and decided on that instead.

  • avatar
    carlisimo

    I was sort of hoping it would struggle in the absence of a hatch. Would’ve been on my short list, but now it isn’t.

    • 0 avatar
      runs_on_h8raide

      Sedans outsold Hatch STis by quite a large margin at the two dealers I worked for. All this hatch love by people that never bought a Subaru STi hatch. Its hysterical. “but only if they offered a hatch, I’d have one in my driveway” ….yea ok.

  • avatar
    FlimFlamMan

    I don’t like how the WRX/STi design went more mainstream (IMHO), but I have to admit it was a smart move.. obviously.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    Subaru evidently realizes that as with yuppie lesbians, a certain dependable percentage of the car buying public will be adolescent males of all ages.

    Very practical of Subaru.

  • avatar
    DrGastro997

    I think America’s consumer diversity is helping Subaru’s sales on the WRX/STI line. It’s no longer just a “boy racer”. In Japan there are 40, 50, 60+ year old enthusiasts proudly driving the WRX/STI line, as well as Evolutions. The amount of Subi driving clubs in Japan is amazing. I went to one in Nagoya Japan and I was impressed by the diverse drivers/owners. I saw the very young to the quite old- all enthusiastic about their Subaru.

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