By on August 28, 2015

Ford-GT-1

If Ford wants to control sales of its extremely small production of Ford GT and vet its owners, it only needs to look at the Lexus playbook from 2010 to see how.

On Thursday, Ford’s Group Vice President for Global Product Development and Chief Technical Officer Raj Nair told a group of last-gen Ford GT owners that it would ask potential owners to submit an application through the automaker to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars for the supercar. Official pricing for the car hasn’t been announced, nor has the criteria for ownership been made public.

Ford said it would only make available 250 cars each year worldwide. There are more than 3,200 dealerships in America alone and more than 7,500 worldwide.

If all this sounds familiar (as in, 500 Lexus LF-A cars at $400,000 for thousands of Toyota dealers) you might be right.

In 2010, Autoblog detailed the extraordinary process that potential LF-A buyers had to go through to qualify to buy the car.

Included was a “lease” option with $60,000 in deposits required before getting the car, $297,000 due upon receipt of the car, and a $93,000 option to buy the car after the 24-month lease expired. The “lease” amount was $12,398.44 per month.

Ford hasn’t announced how much it will sell the Ford GT for, or how it would collect that money, but it appears that every part of the buying process for the supercar will be unique to the Ford GT alone.

In 2005, when the last generation of Ford GTs were sold in America, the first cars were going nearly $100,000 over the MSRP price, as chronicled by the defunct FordGTPrices.com. As production ramped up on that car in 2006, prices eventually normalized to MSRP, but as the former site’s administrator Paul Allen told us, the 4,000+ volume of the last generation car and the 250-per-year production of this car makes it a whole different animal.

In its bulletin to dealers, Ford said it would make available to dealership owners a separate number of cars — available by application as well — for them to buy. Those cars would still come from the 250 produced each year, but a Ford spokesman declined to say how many would be allocated to dealer owners.

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22 Comments on “Can Ford Control Ford GT Ownership Through Applications? Lexus Did...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    The only example of the previous generation of GT that made it all the way the Ford Dealer in Gallup NM was purchased by the family that owns said dealership.

  • avatar
    Syke

    Sounds like the dealers are being cut out of the process completely. Without cutting the dealers out of the process, of course. That would be illegal.

  • avatar
    Richard Chen

    Doesn’t Ferrari have a similar limitation, where you have to own a used one before being offered the opportunity to buy new one?

  • avatar

    LOL applications???

    Lexus of Rockville center had an LFA they couldn’t get rid of even if they humped my leg and paid me to take it.

    The LF-A was a LOSER even compared to the GT-R.

    Overengineering an exhaust system???

    That’s the STUPIDEST thing I’ve ever heard of.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “The “lease” amount was $12,398.44 per month.”

    Lawl, rich people problems.

    I like the styling on this new one (though not as much as gen 1 and that retro look), EXCEPT for the fact that the back of the thing looks like a cartoon dragon in a Nickelodeon cartoon.

    http://www.carzi.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/photo_4867_ford_gt_142406_original.jpg

  • avatar
    John

    The original Ford GT has appreciated massively. I imagine few of the new ones made will be driven – they’ll be bought by the very rich, and immediately placed in storage, in marked contrast to the Lexus, which was, and remains, a sales/resale dog.

    • 0 avatar

      I always wondered why Rich people bothered to buy stuff like this and then not drive them. It’s obvious now. Because they are appreciating assets, they are safer than being in the stock market – which is all government manipulation now.

      Same goes for expensive housing.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        “they are safer than being in the stock market – which is all government manipulation now”

        They kinda did that to themselves, not only the globabl meltdown but what is it now? 7 or 8 trillion dollars in 401Ks. That’s a lot of retirement accounts that could go tits up due to some careless speculation.

    • 0 avatar
      VenomV12

      It really hasn’t, like I have said before my neighbor bought a Ford GT when it first came out and had to bid against others to buy it and he paid somewhere in the neighborhood of $220,000 for his back then. Add in the associated costs of ownership and how much that money would have made invested elsewhere and the Ford GT was probably a bad investment to be honest if you looked at it in a purely financial point of view.

      If you take that same money and paid cash for a restaurant like Subway for example, you would put about $80,000 a year in your pocket, every year forever until you sold it, so over say 10 years you would have made about $800,000 plus you would still have the business valued at $220,000 or so. What do you think would have been the better investment?

  • avatar
    Higheriq

    And here is the official application:

    Question 1. Can you afford it?

    End of application.

  • avatar
    Ihatejalops

    Meh. Without a V8, it’s just a bleh car.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      I think that’s a valid point although this car will have a competition pedigree (well factory at least). Not that the prior Ford GT doesn’t have one, it holds the record for the standing mile and has some road racing under its belt, just no factory stuff.

      The Ford GT hasn’t done bad for itself as an asset but compared to the GT40 they are chump change. Look up original GT40 transaction prices I believe they are still in the millions.

      In any event we shall see how the V6 effects the status of the car as it sells and down the road.

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