By on July 27, 2015

Every year about three dozen children die after being accidentally left in hot cars. Babies fall asleep, parents get distracted, and tragedy results. Baby products maker Evenflo and retailer Walmart have worked together to produce a baby car seat that alerts the driver if the seat is occupied when the car’s ignition is turned off. 

The Evenflo Advanced Embrace with SensorSafe has a retail price of ~$150, similar to what you’d pay for many of the popular child seats available today. The seat has a wireless sensor in the chest clip that secures the two shoulder straps in place on the child. That sensor communicates with a device that plugs into the car’s on-board diagnostic (OBD) port, which interfaces with the car’s systems.

FOR BUSINESS -- WalMart Safe Sensor Baby Seat  CREDIT: Evenflo

While there are accessories and smartphone apps that accomplish the same task, this is the first child car seat with the technology built in. It took some work to come up with a unique alert, one that was easily distinguishable from existing tones used in vehicles or on phones. The seat is designed for children up to 30 inches tall and up to 35 lbs in weight.

infant clip

Because of Walmart’s involvement in the seat’s development, it will be exclusive to that retailer for a year. You can buy one right away on Walmart.com, or wait till mid August and buy it at one of their brick and mortar stores.

The new child seat is a good idea, but if I can digress slightly…

While, obviously, one should never leave a child (or a pet) in a hot (or cold), car, for what it’s worth, as a parent and grandparent I chafe at those absolutist nannies who say, “You should NEVER leave a child alone in a car.” Would they let a two year old run free in their house while they brought in the groceries? Providing the car is running and locked, the HVAC system is set to a safe temperature, and the car is in sight, I see no reason to wake a sleeping small child and unstrap them, just so I can run into the FedEx store and drop off a package. In that situation, it seems to me that the child would be no less safe then he would be sleeping alone in his crib at home, unsupervised for hours at a time.

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66 Comments on “To Prevent Hot Car Deaths, Evenflo & Walmart Introduce Child Seat that Reminds You a Baby’s on Board...”


  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    So it’s come to this…

    “Providing the car is running and locked, the HVAC system is set to a safe temperature, and the car is in sight, I see no reason to wake a sleeping small child and unstrap them, just so I can run into the FedEx store and drop off a package.”

    What FedEx location? Hopefully not 10/Greenfield. Every time I pick something up at that location, there is a “police situation” going on.

    • 0 avatar

      I’ve lived within 1/2 mile of 10/Greenfield for 35 years and the only police situation I can recall near that intersection was when I saw a bunch of Oak Park cops responding to what appeared to be an irate customer situation at the Comerica bank up the street.

      The cops more frequently are at the Bridgewater apartment complex off of Greenfield. Lots of Section 8 folks there. There are also a lot of runs to the Lincoln Towers apartment building just down the street from my house, but those are mostly medical emergencies – lots of seniors there.

      I have suggested to Oak Park officials that they look into setting up a satellite police station in north Oak Park. It would save on response time.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        It was minor things both times. One was an irate customer in the FedEx store. The other was a domestic dispute that could happen anywhere I suppose.

        You are right about North Oak Park. They should set up a satellite station up there. Greenfield between 11 mile and 696 is…interesting. There are always cop cars in the big parking lots there. Never seen anything happen, just surveillance. I’ll tell our Huntington Woods cops to help out, because they are just writing traffic citations on Coolidge Hwy or 11 Mile.

        • 0 avatar

          I hate Greenfield between 10 and 11. Too many traffic lights. Takes me less time to get from 14 to 11 than it does from 11 to 10 or vice versa.

          Don’t get me started on your lawbreaking Huntington Woods cops. They know damn well that it’s completely illegal the way they park in the left turn lane north of 10 Mile so they can hide from the people they really want to make the illegal right turn on red.

          Southfield cops park in the “Michigan turnarounds” on Greenfield and on Telegraph.

          MCL 257.603 is very clear that police may not illegally park for the purposes of traffic surveillance.

  • avatar
    EAF

    In addition to lowering emissions , on-board diagostics II aids in sharpening parenting skills. What’s next?

    Any parent dumb enough to forget their child in a hot car seat will be too dumb to operate said seat in the first place.

    • 0 avatar
      Toad

      I am capable of forgetting anything, anywhere that is not attached to my body or making noise. Could I forget my sleeping kid? I would like to think not, but…

      A very smart, well respected professional in my town swapped kid shuttle to day care duty duty with his wife, then forgot about it mid route and left the sleeping kid in the car seat all day during a minor heatwave. He found the kid when he walked out to his car at the end of the workday. The guy was on suicide watch for weeks.

      I’s spend a couple of extra bucks to make it more likely that didn’t happen. Those who profess to be perfect can save their money.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        I wouldn’t need to be on suicide watch, my wife would kill me.

        She would calmly walk into a gun store, purchase a hand gun with my credit card, come home, and shoot me in the head while I wasn’t looking.

        No one would feel bad for me, and most people would think that I deserved it.

        • 0 avatar
          ExPatBrit

          If she left that gun in the car unintended and something happened it would be considered just a “terrible accident” and the family “has suffered enough”.

          This has happened here locally, one guy was a cop who the city had to fight to not give him his job back.

          Meanwhile because of “zero tolerance” policies I have to schlep my two grandchildren simultaneously because I face draconian penalties if I lock them in the car for two minutes to drop a letter in the mail box.

          A two year old was killed by a car here 3 weeks ago because she suddenly ran into low speed thru traffic at a local mall . Trying to watch two youngsters is always fun, what with the complicated car seats and strollers you gotta have The next 5 years is going to be a challenge for this Grandpa.

          Maybe having more than two kids under ten should be illegal.

          • 0 avatar
            psarhjinian

            “Maybe having more than two kids under ten should be illegal.”

            I have four under ten, of which the bottom three are six, six and four. It turns your brain into cheese some days.

            Parents are often badly sleep-deprived, rushed and more than a little haggard. I’ve forgotten to buckle a kid when I’m dealing with three crankly kindergartners; I can see a quiet, napping infant getting missed.

            I’d certainly spend the extra money.

      • 0 avatar
        ihatetrees

        +1.
        I can understand being so focused on upcoming work / professional issues that I could forget a child in the car.

        The life changes and chaos that result from becoming a parent, especially the 1st time, are profound. Especially for well organized, professional couples that both work, kid chaos can be a challenge.

    • 0 avatar

      I suspect that parents that care enough about forgetting a kid in a car to buy the seat are probably not likely to forget about the kid in the first place.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        I’m not convinced forgetfulness/distractedness/absentmindedness is all that correlated with lack of caring.

        Unless it’s already included, vesion 2.0 of this, should also text a cellphone, reminding the owner that the buckle is closed, every 10 minutes unless the phone is Bluetooth paired with the car. To help prevent “went to drop of a package, but got distracted and ended up in Vegas” scenarios.

      • 0 avatar
        Toad

        I don’t think it has anything to do with caring. Some people are absent minded (all of us are at times), and it is easy to forget something when you step outside of a routine.

        Every day kids drown in pools, get backed over in driveways, eat chemicals under the sink, and even get forgotten in cars. Bad luck, bad timing, lack of caution, carelessness, and forgetfulness can combine with opportunity for deadly results.

      • 0 avatar
        clivesl

        Ronnie,

        I agree about the self-selection. I’ve always said that if you are worried about how good a parent you are, you are already a pretty good parent.

  • avatar

    This generation of “adults” is the worst that I have ever seen.
    They have absolutely no idea how to be parents because their parents before them in most cases were poor parents.
    There is no one training men in gender roles and there is no one training women in gender roles.
    Neither the men nor the women have any idea how to take care of children properly. Technology is no substitute for gender role training.

    These people don’t talk to the children, don’t discipline their children… They have no idea what’s going on with their children.

    Their idea of discipline is handing the kids some kind of electronic toy to keep them quiet.

    It takes more than absent mindedness to leave your baby in a hot car.

    That is a combination of stupidity, negligence, and apathy.

    Before Alex L Dykes reviews one of these chairs I want to get my hands on one and reprogram it to chastise the parent who leaves their child in the car:

    I want it to say:

    YOU STUPID MORON F’…YOU NEARLY KILLED ME…YOU DUMB F’

    Scream it loud while angrily flashing the lights and horn.

    I might also develop a lock for gun cabinets like that.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      I teach a “New Fathers” class and a “Soon to be Fathers” class that is sponsored by one of the major Detroit hospital systems. I wish hospitals would make it mandatory. Not because I get compensated (right now I am paid mileage to the hospital and Jimmy John’s for dinner), but because many men are completely unprepared for what’s about to happen and don’t know who to talk to.

      • 0 avatar

        Thank You for offering this course.

        My problem is, it’s their own fathers who should be teaching them to be fathers.

        We are in a national cycle of illegitimacy and lack of real men with “skills”. These “men” in most cases can’t produce or fix anything. They must rely on some low-wage illegal foreign worker to do their man job for them.

        In the old days, just about all the men were their own carpenters.

        And disciplinarians…

        Now the 25-35 year olds are sitting at home playing Call of Duty all day.

        Be right back. I’m gonna go MOW MY LAWN and TRIME MY HEDGES.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I don’t even pretend to be an expert. I’m just a dude with a kid that gets by. However, you are 100% right. My class is sometimes the first exposure soon to be dads have to fatherhood. That’s a problem.

          I encourage both men and women to take classes like that if they are offered. Gone are the days where the wife’s mother moves in once a baby is born and imparts all her child rearing wisdom.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            A few generations ago, fathers would just beat their kids. (That came naturally; no training required.) The good ol’ days.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            bball,
            You’re doing God’s work. Thank you.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Thank you VoGo.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “the wife’s mother moves in once a baby is born and imparts all her child rearing wisdom.”

            You’d be surprised, many people’s parents have health issues and will require some form of care at some point in the new future.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            28-

            I agree, but when my mom was a kid, her grandmother moved in with her parents and helped raise the kids. This doesn’t happen as often anymore (I would move out if my mother in law moved in right now). Like you said, older parents move after their grandkids have moved out.

      • 0 avatar
        an innocent man

        It’s great that you volunteer your time, but I’m dumbfounded such a thing is necessary. It’s actually not that hard to figure out how to be a half-decent parent. As my old First Sergeant liked to say, “It don’t take no GED to figure this sh1t out.”

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I benefited from going to a soon to be dad class and a couples birthing/early weeks parenting class. My wife also participated in a program where another mother called her weekly for the first few months. She’s the one that calls new mothers now. Postpartum depression, which my wife had, is tough.

          I probably would have been fine without the classes, but if new dads have questions, sometimes they don’t know where else to go.

        • 0 avatar
          ckb

          “but I’m dumbfounded such a thing is necessary. It’s actually not that hard to figure out how to be a half-decent parent. ”

          Perhaps but for some people, minor preparation for a life changing event they have zero experience with is part of being a half decent parent. Freakonomics (I think ) put it this way: “Reading all the baby books doesn’t make you a good parent, Wanting to read them does” (paraphrasing)

        • 0 avatar
          psarhjinian

          “It’s actually not that hard to figure out how to be a half-decent parent”

          You would be surprised, especially for people who:
          * Have no family support system and/or
          * Had crappy parents, themselves and/or
          * Aren’t very smart (or street-smart)

          There’s some very obvious things that it takes someone else to point out. A simple example is that almost everyone installs rear-facing seats wrong.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      So true. I got crap for “pushing” my kids. Math/counting drills when my son was a toddler in the baby backpack (it actually calmed him) and working with them on reading and writing at an early age. Now, there are several top schools talking with him about entering their Bio PhD programs. Funny thing is once I set the pace of learning they kept it up all on their own. Still, I got so much crap for “pushing” my kids. It’s almost like there’s a sort culture of failure. I was actually told by someone on the way to a social event that I should avoid talking about my kids because of the problems other people were having with their kids. Arghh.

      • 0 avatar

        I was visiting my son and three year old grandson. Aryeh was playing with the little Hot Wheels drag racing track I gave him for his birthday. I believe that you start teaching kids the second they’re born and you never stop. I got that from my late father.

        I asked Aryeh what colors one of the vehicles (a school bus) was, and he said yellow. Then I asked him to count them, but he’s not yet ready for counting, though he’s learning numbers.

        His dad said to me, “Abba, we’re concentrating on midos”.

        Midos/Midot is the Hebrew word for character traits.

        I said to Mo, “And how do you think he got a father that’s concentrating on midos? We also taught you how to count.”

    • 0 avatar
      Don Mynack

      “It takes more than absent mindedness to leave your baby in a hot car.

      That is a combination of stupidity, negligence, and apathy.”

      No it doesn’t. It takes diminished memory/awareness because of fatigue, the kind of fatigue that occurs because you have a newborn or young child who never sleeps, or has an altered sleeping schedule, for weeks on end.

      • 0 avatar
        Jimal

        Bull. Some parents are simply self-absorbed. Thankfully these tragedies are rare but they happen because of negligence or malfesence. I have a 5-year old daughter and a second kid on the way. The 5-year old is big enough to get out on her own, but when she was small if she was n the car she was Priority #1. Neither one of us ever got close to leaving her in the car. Not once.

    • 0 avatar
      ihatetrees

      @bigtruckseriesreview:

      You’re correct about the ‘types’ of parents today. They are lacking.

      However, you are wrong about more kids getting killed TODAY.

      Per capita, kids are safer today. Don’t believe the sensationalist media.

      Kid’s being left in cars has been going on for ages (and MAY be getting worse), but they’re a small number of overall accidental child deaths. Swimming pool deaths are much more numerous. But they don’t get the overwrought teeVee coverage because they lack an easily identifiable villain for the perp walk. (The teeVee media could report regularly on the danger with pools, but pool advertisers are an advertising staple.)

      As a child in the 1970’s, my dad (and everyone else’s dad) drove kids around without seatbelts — in the FRONT SEAT. Years ago, no one really talked about child predators (although we all knew they existed).

      Now, I don’t think the decrease in child death is a function of better parents. It’s a combination of less physical activity and better safety equipment (seat belts, smoke alarms*, swimming pool alarms). All the stats show the trendline for accidental child death declining.

      *When you see news of multiple deaths in a fire, it’s almost always the case that smoke alarms were illegally not present or disabled. And it’s becoming then media norm to not report this fact.

  • avatar
    mcs

    This could be easily modded to turn on the climate control – at least in EVs.

    I have left my dog in the car, but I can turn on and run the climate control with the car off. That’s the advantage of having an electrically run heat pump for climate control. Another important feature is that if the climate control were to shut off, the car texts and emails me.

  • avatar
    NotFast

    Been around the world and found
    That only stupid people are breeding

    (Thank you Harvey Danger)

  • avatar
    OneAlpha

    More evidence that my generation, and the generation that succeeded it, has no business being parents.

    The Onion said it best:

    Study: Uneducated Outbreeding Intelligentsia 2-To-1

    CHICAGO – In a report with dire implications for the intellectual future of America, a University of Chicago study revealed Monday that the nation’s uneducated are breeding twice as fast and twice as often as its educated.

    “The average member of the American underclass spawns at age 15, compared to age 30 for the average college-educated professional,” study leader Kenneth Stalls said. “America’s intellectual elite, as a result, are badly losing the genetic marathon, with two generations of dullards born for every one generation of cultured literates.”

    Added Stalls: “At this rate, by the year 2100 there will be five smart people on Earth, swallowed whole by more than 12 billion mouth-breathers incapable of understanding the binary exponentiation that swamped the Earth with their like.”

    High-school dropout Mandi Drucker, 16, said of the findings, “All I know is, we’re in love.”

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    So does this make the car ding every time you turn it of with your kid in the seat? That would be very annoying at first and would eventually disappear into the background and lose effectiveness.

    I would think they could make a buckle with bluetooth built in. So it turns off when you unbuckle but if you simply go out of range it sends an alarm to your phone.
    I’m sure something like this is already out there.

    I definitely sympathize with people who have gone through this. I will never have kids but as often as I leave the stuff I went to the store to get in my car when I get home I can see how easily it can happen. One change in routine means I forget something.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      I forget stuff and have made mistakes as a parent, but this is one of those you can’t make.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        When my kids were young enough for baby seats, I didn’t have a push button remote and would have to lock the door manually. When you do that, you have to look back into the car and I would have seen the kid. Just a theory but I wonder if some of the characteristics (minimal greenhouse, dark tinting, remote locking etc.) of modern cars contribute to the problem.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          +1!

        • 0 avatar
          UncleJunior

          My first car was a total base model mommymobile (1997 Dodge Caravan) with crank windows and manual locks, and during the four years that I drove it, I locked my keys in the car at least six times. Thank god there were no small children involved, but my scatterbrained ass needs either power locks, or to get much better at breaking into my own car…

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    How can you forget that lovely little girl (on the second photo) with that sweet grin on her face??

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      If she’s sleeping for the first time in weeks, and you haven’t been, it can happen.

      My first was born December 22nd. I forgot Christmas.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        It can’t happen though. It’s one of those things a parent cannot let happen. There is no excuse for it, none.

        • 0 avatar
          psarhjinian

          “It can’t happen though. It’s one of those things a parent cannot let happen. There is no excuse for it, none.”

          I don’t think any reasonably well-adjusted parent would let something like this happen through malice or laziness.

          But bad things can happen. I was in emerg with my stepson a couple years ago because, at a family outing in a conservation area, he bolted from his mother, wasn’t watching where he was going, and fell down a sinkhole into a cave. It was pure luck that he didn’t hit his head (worse than he did, at least) or fall onto rock instead of leafmould.

          The reason he was able to run for it it because we had three other kids in tow that day and we were outnumbered 2:1.

          There’s no excuse for intentionally leaving a kid in a car because you don’t know any better—people do that to pets, too—but I can quite clearly understand how a sleep-deprived and/or badly harried parent can make a mistake and the parents don’t need any more guilt shovelled onto them then they already have (the “suicide watch” above pretty much says it all).

          Kids drown, fall off things and get run over with distressing and, frankly, preventable regularity. It happens under the watch of parents and caregivers who love them more than life, but those people are only human.

          I don’t think I’d mind spending a few bucks on a smarter buckle.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I don’t mind spending $$$ on a smarter buckle either, and I understand bad things can happen to kids. However, of all the bad things that can happen to your kid, this is low hanging fruit. Things like leaving an infant in a hot car, in a bath tub, or on a high counter are things that cannot be done no matter how tired or exhausted.

        • 0 avatar
          carlisimo

          Well, it does. Why resist attempts to address the problem?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I’m not. It’s great that this is available for those who want it. I do think that the noise it makes will just become background noise to those who have the proclivity to roast their offspring. Let’s not pretend it can happen to everyone. It happens to unfit parents.

  • avatar
    See 7 up

    I have a newborn. You get really tired.
    You are an incompetent moron if you forget your kid in the car. Yeah I said it. Sometimes a spare is a spade. And this incompetence doesn’t just mean your stupid. I know book smart airhead that id label the same.

    That said, I support this product. Kids don’t have the luxury of choosing their parents. Hopefully this saves a few from them and they live long enough for their parents to get with it.

    Thus also makes me wonder how many cell phones are forgotten…let me guess, you “forget” your kid while talking on one.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      I agree. You, maybe once, forget to bring bottles to daycare. You don’t forget your kid in the car.

      • 0 avatar
        Toad

        And yet, people do. Combine that with enough time and a hot or cold enough day and a kid ends up dead. If 12 kids die from it every year that probably means hundreds of kids are forgotten in car seats annually but, because nobody is hurt (and how many people would admit they did it) there are no good statistics.

        Saying is does not or should not happen is pointless. A lot of things should not happen but do every day.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I completely understand that people have all kinds of stuff going on. There is so much stuff with kids you cannot control. One thing I can 100% control is not baking my child in my car.

          I am by no means a perfect parent, but I don’t want to hear the, “It can happen to you,” BS. It won’t happen to me.

  • avatar
    A09

    In my prior life I worked at an OEM that had supplier “technology demo events” twice a year, where numerous Tier 1’s would retrofit existing vehicles with new design/manufacturing/assembly advancements throughout the vehicle. They would showcase functional concepts on various subsystems to show the engineers and product planners what they are creating (for future potential sales) to the OEM’s.
    One particular innovation that I recall was a heartbeat monitor in a minivan using sensors concealed within the dome lights. Without attaching anything to the occupants, these sensors monitored the presence of heartbeats in every seating position. As long as a heartbeat was present the car doors would not lock. Additional flexibility was programmed to open the windows within 15 seconds of engine-off and having a heartbeat present.
    Every time I see a story related to hot-car incidents, I am reminded of this technology that I saw thirteen years ago. Perhaps the lawyers found a way to prevent this implementation.

  • avatar
    A09

    In my prior life I worked at an OEM that had supplier “technology demo events” twice a year, where numerous Tier 1’s would retrofit existing vehicles with new design/manufacturing/assembly advancements throughout the vehicle. They would showcase functional concepts on various subsystems to show the engineers and product planners what they are creating (for future potential sales) to the OEM’s.

    One particular innovation that I recall was a heartbeat monitor in a minivan using sensors concealed within the dome lights. Without attaching anything to the occupants, these sensors monitored the presence of heartbeats in every seating position. As long as a heartbeat was present the car doors would not lock. Additional flexibility was programmed to open the windows within 15 seconds of engine-off and having a heartbeat present.

    Every time I see a story related to hot-car incidents, I am reminded of this technology that I saw thirteen years ago. Perhaps the lawyers found a way to prevent this implementation.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Because I forget my children in the car all-the-time, yes I need this product.

  • avatar
    Sammy B

    Somebody linked to this story a while back on ttac and I think it merits reading: http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/magazine/fatal-distraction-forgetting-a-child-in-thebackseat-of-a-car-is-a-horrifying-mistake-is-it-a-crime/2014/06/16/8ae0fe3a-f580-11e3-a3a5-42be35962a52_story.html

    It’s possible to forget. Not because parents are complete idiots. Some parents are, don’t get me wrong. But this is far from a “any parent under 40 is a moron”. I’m in my 30s and have 3 kids ranging from 2-9. I’ve caught myself once or twice forgetting a little one was in the car with me. I was listening to music or thinking about a project/work/daydreaming. whatever. Then the kid makes a sound or something and I’m like “oh yah…I’m not alone here”. That’s a far cry from getting out of the car and walking away, but it’s still scary to be jarred back to reality.

    If you don’t like the product, don’t buy it. Seems simple enough, no?

  • avatar
    FAHRVERGNUGEN

    If I could just re-program the “Your door is a jar” module to sound like my ex saying “Hey @sshole, did you forget the kid??”, I’d make a million bucks.

    And not the kind in the Gaico commercial, neither.

  • avatar
    Waftable Torque aka Daniel Ho

    Children are so innocent. If we could enact laws to require every new parent to own one of these to protect their precious cargo, even if it cost hundreds of millions of dollars over the next 50 years, if we could prevent even the death of even one child, I know it would have been totally worth it.

    (/sarcasm)

    I think I gagged a few times just writing that.

  • avatar
    Sjalabais

    This is going to be one of the things used to ridicule the US, like “attention, your coffee is, indeed, hot”. Why on earth would you forget that you have a – presumably your – baby in the car? The kind of people that leave children alone in non-running cars on hot days will either not buy a beeping seat, or disable the beeping.

  • avatar
    TrenchFoot

    My kids are out of car seats now, otherwise I’d spend the extra nickle to buy one of these. I forget things sometimes, it happens. Backing up over kids happens often enough that the OEMs have to install backup cameras by 2018 so we should be over this kind of debate (especially when this is an optional spend, only applicable to people with newborns).

    But beyond the debate of whether you’re a model human that would never forget, I have a technical question:

    Why in their press release do they say it’ll work with all 2008 and newer vehicles? Did some regulation come into effect in MY 2008 that changed the OBDII data the receiver gets?

  • avatar
    Jimal

    So my options are to be reminded that my kid is in the car because I’m a self-absorbed jerk, or to save money on my car insurance because I’m a sucker. Decisions, decisions…

  • avatar
    BuzzDog

    It should never happen, but it does. If you think the product is idiotic or appalling, don’t buy it, just as I do with pre-tied neckties and “no iron” shirts.

    And keep in mind that there may be good, solid reasons it seems to happen more than it did 50 years ago, when I was an infant:

    1. We weren’t strapped into a comfortable device in the back seat, out of sight from our parents.
    2. Power locks and remote locking means you no longer look into the car (and possibly reach into the back seat) to lock it.
    3. Parents today have electronic distractions that our parents didn’t.
    4. Children of my generation simply weren’t taken out in public nearly as much as they are today.
    5. When things like this happened back then, the prevailing attitude was, “they suffered enough by losing a child.” No prosecution, no sensationalized stories on the evening news. So it happened; we just didn’t hear about it.

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