By on July 15, 2015

GT3 Damage

Much has changed since I last had the opportunity to humblebrag on TTAC. My good friend Derek has monetized the skills he developed and honed here into an actual, real-life job in the automotive industry, and I’ve gone from owning two Porsche 911s to owning zero cars — at least temporarily.

Keen readers will recall that I bought a Porsche 911 from the halcyon days of the mid-1990s just over 3 years ago. September will mark my 993’s 20th birthday, and when it was originally delivered on Halloween in 1995, I was trick-or-treating at the local bank with the rest of my first grade class. During my stewardship the car never failed to generate acute, intense emotional responses; I’ve loved, adored, and cursed the car at various times. For all those nostalgic reasons — as well as the pricing dynamics of the air-cooled Porsche market — I decided to hang on to my old car when I bought my 997.1 GT3 last year.

Recently, I wrote an advertisement for the car. I paid a high school kid to take some exceptional pictures. And then I listed it for sale. As I’d anticipated, the car generated plenty of interest including that of a very gracious, patient gentleman from Minnesota who ultimately bought the car. I won’t be so crass or callous as to tout my outsized returns on the “investment,” but suffice to say I bought the car for well under $30,000 and sold it for well north of $40,000, after three years and 23,000 miles. On the other side of the ledger there were some admittedly hefty maintenance bills, but the car proved a much better allocation of funds than the #normcore CamCordImas that the Best & Brightest typically espouse for #millenials purchasing their first car.

Meanwhile, I had a fun road trip planned for the GT3. Two, rather selfless, owners of the latest generation GT3 — the 991 GT3 in Porsche parlance — devoted countless hours of their time to plan a three-day drive through my native North Georgia, as well as the Smoky Mountains, that attracted nearly 40 new GT3s from across the eastern seaboard (and further afield). I left work a bit early on a Thursday to change out of a suit before heading to a kickoff BBQ cookout with other attendees.

Unfortunately, I didn’t make it.

I was driving on Peachtree Road, a major surface street with a 45 mph speed limit in my neighborhood, as I headed home. A teenaged driver traveling the opposite direction failed to yield and made a left turn immediately in front of me. Panic stop, ABS, fiendishly expensive Porsche Ceramic Composite Braking system, etc., did little to retard my progress. When the collision occurred I was probably going about 40 mph and airbags in both vehicles deployed. Mercifully, everyone involved was unharmed and the adverse party’s insurer accepted all liability.

Of course, I wanted the GT3 totaled rather than extensively repaired, but the insurance company saw things differently — for a time. The car had some frame damage and the entire interior would have to be replaced, courtesy of an unhappy marriage between 20 ounces of Venti Iced Caramel Macchiato and acres of Alcantara. Add that to new panels on the front end, new clear bra, new air bag, among other things and the decision became easier. Although I’d love to regale the readership with the sordid details of my negotiations with the adverse party’s carrier, I’ll refrain. The insurance company eventually totaled my GT3 and I received a healthy payout, reflective of the market appreciation that has transpired since I purchased mine last April.

So, with an intense distaste for Atlanta’s public transportation options and a reluctance to embrace fully the shared mobility lifestyle, I started shopping for another car.

To be continued …

David Walton grew up in the North Georgia mountains before moving to Virginia to study Economics, Classics and Natural Light at Washington and Lee University. Post graduation, he returned to his home state to work in the financial services industry in Atlanta. A lifelong automotive enthusiast, particular interests include (old) Porsches and sports car racing.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

113 Comments on “Ownership Update: The End of a Porsche...”


  • avatar
    Toad

    Teenage driver causes accident that totals out a Porsche; that will make for interesting insurance premiums for the next few years. I am guessing that the kid will be riding a bike or bus for a long time.

    At least nobody was hurt, the other driver actually had insurance, and you made a profit on the settlement. Most accidents don’t have that many happy outcomes.

    • 0 avatar
      David Walton

      I would estimate that the claim ended up being in the ~$150k range.

      Total loss on my GT3, certainly totaled the other car, and the other car nosed into a third car (minor damage).

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      “At least nobody was hurt, the other driver actually had insurance”

      Not just had insurance, had enough insurance. State minimum for property damage is typically 10 or 15K. Drop in the bucket against a real wreck.

      • 0 avatar
        David Walton

        I think state minimum is $25k in GA.

        I have substantial Un/Under-Insured Motorist coverage.

        I’ve mentioned in the past that I pay quite a bit for insurance, but I’m rather glad that I do given the potential alternatives.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Smart man. It’s bad news bears if you don’t have that coverage.

          • 0 avatar
            David Walton

            It’s not even particularly expensive, in my experience.

            I pay about $4k per year now to insure:

            1 Car ($500K/$1MM/$500K)
            Homeowners
            Umbrella

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            It’s not expensive. That’s why I can never figure out the reasons people don’t have proper coverages.

            $4K is cheap for what you are getting.

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            @bbal40dtw:

            Insurance is a bet against yourself, and it’s not free.

            It’s a good idea it many cases, though.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Oh no! Well at least everyone was ok. All the best.

  • avatar

    Sorry to hear about your loss. Hope your health is good, a lot of people have their back messed up for life from less. Having said that… dude, 20 ounces of iced coffee totaled your cars interior? I thought the point of polyester was that it was stain resistant. I am cheap, so I guess I will stick with black cloth. In your honor, I am going to dump 2 gallons of convenience store sweet tea in my car. I bet no one will be able to tell the difference, after I chase all the bees away.

    • 0 avatar
      David Walton

      Thanks.

      Fortunately my back is fine.

      The coffee sat and baked into my interior while the adverse party’s insurance company deliberated. It stained the leather dashboard, the carpets, and all of the Alcantara (ie, Suede) that it touched.

    • 0 avatar
      Cole Trickle

      Where does one find a cloth interior in a gt3 exactly?

      • 0 avatar
        David Walton

        In non-North American markets the bucket seats have traditionally been available in Perlon, which is flame-retardant black cloth.

        They have never been made available in North America, although the current – 991 – GT3 does have the lightweight buckets from the 918 spyder (although finished in leather).

  • avatar
    sirwired

    I repeat my plea: Would it kill TTAC writers to include references to the model year (instead of/in addition to Platform Codes) when discussing cars? (This practice is annoyingly common in any article about BMWs, Porches, and Mercedes.)

    The following sentence means little to somebody who is not a euro enthusiast: “I decided to hang on to my old car when I bought my 997.1 GT3 last year.” Okay, props for mentioning it’s a GT3 and elsewhere mentioning it’s a 911 (many times TTAC authors leave out any reference to the model name at all, and often even the brand), but “997.1” is not particularly meaningful; would it be that difficult to mention what year the car is? Yes, it’s just a Googling away, but it makes reading articles rather more difficult.

    (It has not escaped my attention that for whatever reason, articles here about Asian-brand cars (except for the Miata) always use the model name and year when referring to a car, never the platform code… I wonder why that is? And sometimes GM articles use the platform name, but never Ford or Chrysler cars.)

    • 0 avatar
      David Walton

      993 = 1996

      997.1 GT3 = 2007

      Sorry about that.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      It’s a bit elitist, but when at the country club or golf course, you don’t want to interrupt a conversation to ask what the heck’s an E46 or W124 others are referring to. They will know you’re an imposter and will escort you the hell out.

      • 0 avatar
        David Walton

        It is sort of a secret handshake I suppose.

        • 0 avatar
          qfrog

          Depends entirely on the folks you are communicating with.

          For some people that know cars the platform ID is a lot more relevant than what year the car is.

          I know what an E30 M3 is but I don’t know what year the E30 went on sale in the US or Germany. I know what a C5 Corvette is but I don’t know what years the C5 was on sale.

          If I’m talking to people at a road course it is a lot easier to say C5 or E30 because most of the folks at a track are going to be aware of those vehicles and due to their ubiquity probably know somebody with one.

          I know a tiny bit about Mercedes but I can easily google W124 and know everything I might need to know. I’m not offended by a Mercedes person saying W124 nor do I feel it is some sort of secret handshake for superiority of land, air, and sea.

          This isn’t elitism, it is common manufacturer specific terminology which places priority on the generation and platform rather than the year or color or trim level. It is the easiest way to refer to a particular vehicle and the more worldly a car person is the more of those IDs they tend to be aware of. Each of those IDs should be considered a mental file to which a person adds and associates information.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            No it’s elitism. Plain. Simple. The Exx BMWs, Wxxx Mercedes’ and Cx Corvettes are about all that’s referred to in *code* at black tie affairs, art exhibits, the opera, etc. But ask any random elite to please name a “Fox” platform car or name one “F-body” car, or “H1”, “Panther”, etc, and all you’ll get out of them is “Security!”.

          • 0 avatar
            Reino

            I agree with you.

            Also, I see a bit of irony in this whole discussion, as David went through the effort of explaining that his coffee was a ’20 ounce’ Venti…for all the non-Starbucks enthusiasts who don’t know our secret cup size language ;)

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            The only thing I ever get at Starbucks is a large black coffee.

            I guess I’m just a square and I’ll always be just a square.

      • 0 avatar
        facelvega

        In the current instance, it’s like Sirwired went to a golf course and then insisted that everyone there should stop mentioning handicaps and birdies and nine irons in front of him.

        • 0 avatar

          No, sirwired didn’t ask for anyone to stop using terminology, which is what your analogy suggests. He asked for there to be further explanation of it.

        • 0 avatar
          sirwired

          On Rennlist, Porsche chassis codes are entirely appropriate. On a site dedicated to “cars”, articles with unexplained chassis codes are unnecessarily obscure.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Some people like the inside baseball thing. It’s like knowing the secret handshake and being pleased that most other people don’t.

            On a car site like this that attracts a lot of generalists, I would refrain from using it exclusively. I’d also stay away from terms used out of context such as “B&B”, which most people would think of as a kind of hotel room, not as a reader of this website.

    • 0 avatar

      Thanks David Walton, for supplying the requested info. I hope you end up with an equally enjoyable car. And very nicely written.

      And for everyone else’s benefit, I strongly second sirwired on this.

      • 0 avatar
        David Walton

        Thank you.

        I’ll try to include a breakdown of chassis codes going forward.

        On the rare occasions that I come across them – typically a Mercedes – I feel guilty and google them since I’m inquisitive.

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      “Would it kill TTAC writers to include references to the model year (instead of/in addition to Platform Codes) when discussing cars?”

      Would it kill you to fire up the Google Machine and figure it out? Or memorize a couple codes? If you care enough about what model year Porsche is under discussion, why don’t you care enough to research it and/or learn it for yourself??

      • 0 avatar
        dartman

        …aybemay henay oesn’tday antway otay ebay anay oucheday agbay, ikelay anymay ermangay arcay ownernay’s….

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        It’s almost like a TTAC post might actually teach people things rather than assume they already know every Porsche model code!

        I’m with SirWired more than the “just Google it” camp; this is a front-page article, not a comment.

        Especially with the years – it’s not like they change chassis codes every year.

        (I know a lot of MB codes; I’m useless on BMW.

        Just type the year and model.)

        • 0 avatar
          MeJ

          I think I understand why people use the codes. It occurred to me when I was typing about my car (and I’m not the fastest on the keyboard), that it’s a lot easier to type ‘I own an E92’ than ‘I own a 2007 Bmw 328xi coupe’.
          Just my 2 cents…

          • 0 avatar
            Zykotec

            Yeah, it makes sense, but to throw in the engine size (if it’s a bmw,) or model year isn’t that much work.
            It was even better with my old CB7, since a CB5, CB6 or CB9 code include body style and engine size (ah, or those poor CB3 owners, thinking they have a nice car)

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Sajeev often refers to Ford platforms. The ones he typically refers to have names (Fox and Panther). I don’t think he talks platform code for his Mark VIII though. Maybe he throws down an MN12 or FN10, I don’t remember.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        FN10. How can you go to the FoMoCo board meetings and not know that?

        “A variant of this platform, known as the FN10 (Full-Sized North American Project #10), was used for the Lincoln Mark VIII from 1993 to 1998”

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_MN12_platform

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I know it’s FN10. MN12 is related though.

        • 0 avatar
          VolandoBajo

          Come on, @28-Cars, you know him far better than I do, yet I have already learned that he has an impeccable knowledge of details.

          It was immediately apparent to me that there was some overlap between the two, and that bball simply didn’t recall which nomenclature Sajeev used, and not that he didn’t understand their relationship.

          If I ever needed to know anything arcane or obscure relating to my Mercury, he is the first person I would humbly approach and ask for assistance, if I had been unsuccessful in all the normal avenues.

          I don’t know who he is IRL, but without trying to show off his knowledge I have seen repeated evidence that he is as sharp as a tack.

          It is the main reason I quickly deduced that you weren’t just pulling my leg as a newbie here when you told me he was on the board.

          Come to think of it, I do have one problem: bball, in the remote chance that you find out that somewhere within the vastness of F someone is getting rid of an OEM dual exhaust system for a 97 Grand Marquis, like for scrap, please let me know.

          I know the odds are small to non-existent, but as a retiree I can’t afford a four figure aftermarket stainless one, and am trying to figure out a way to get an OEM one without having to resort to pick and pull, as the nearest ones I can find are two or three states away.

          In the meantime, the GM (always Grand Marquis to me, never the other thing), and my 88 Thunderbird SC V8 are two of the nicest cars I have ever driven or owned. And I am strongly encouraging my new driver son to look into a Ford for his first car, because Ford. Actually, his first pickup, as he is starting a lawncare business, so towing and hauling are high on his list. But so is Ford reliability.

          I wish I could find a good book that had a detailed history of all things Ford…I’m sure it would be an interesting read. I have read many things about various times and projects, but never a beginning to end detailed look.

          Suggestions appreciated.

    • 0 avatar
      Zykotec

      It’s not just a German car thing, It’s a ‘brand-enthusiast’ thing.
      I’ve owned a Honda CB7 (2.2-liter Accord Sedan 90-93), and an RD8 (CR-V 4wd-2002-2006) , and even I get confused when people call their Civic an EK9 or ED9 or whatever.
      At least German chassis codes are mostly sequential…
      Even if I do recall many of the more ‘famous’ chassis code names (like BMW E30, and forementioned 997) I admit it would be helpful in an article like this that can be read by anyone, unlike in a forum discussion amongst other brand enthusiasts.

      • 0 avatar
        David Walton

        Point taken.

        I’ll make it abundantly clear going forward.

        • 0 avatar
          sirwired

          Speaking for myself (the OP) I appreciate you responding to my post. (FWIW, Jack responded to a similar post I made in response to his now-infamous “Privilege” article, where he used an old Mercedes code, and agreed that explaining codes would be a good thing in articles.)

      • 0 avatar
        qfrog

        Yeah, the Honda stuff is a bit odd like that. I like that Mazda has the good sense to go NA, NB, NC, ND. I’m not sure how Mazda went from SA22 to FC to FD for the RX7 but they did.

    • 0 avatar
      Toad

      Asking that information be clear and understandable to the majority of your readers is a reasonable request. The number of people who know or care about platform codes of any automaker is vanishingly small. Using platform numbers is a great way to self identify as a fanboi but to the other 95% of readers it is as annoying as listening to a teenager talk about obscure bands and then act exasperated when you don’t know what they are talking about.

      Unless you are writing for a very specific forum, writing should not require most readers to use Google to figure out basics like the model and year of the car. Not to fault David; an editor should have edited.

      • 0 avatar
        S2k Chris

        “Unless you are writing for a very specific forum, writing should not require most readers to use Google to figure out basics like the model and year of the car”

        But what is the cross section of people who A) CARE what the year of the model is and B) don’t know or don’t care enough to Google it?

        If someone tells me “man, you said AP1, and I desperately want to know what year that is, but not desperately enough to open another tab and type it in the Google…” it tells me they’re just intellectually lazy. I mean, come on. Either you care enough to educate yourself, or you don’t.

        • 0 avatar
          geozinger

          Normally, in other types of writing, one would mention ABC123 and then in parenthesis spell out (2015 Roadblaster Hyperbole XV Sport) or whatever the actual model/item/part is. From then on you would be free to assume that every mention of ABC123 would be the same thing. It’s really a matter of courtesy.

          Many times I’m reading these posts surreptitiously at work, I don’t really want to open yet *another* tab, Google it, and then read through the 44 possible explanations of what the fsck a ABC123 is. It has little to do with lazy, in my case, it has more to do with time.

        • 0 avatar
          Toad

          “But what is the cross section of people who A) CARE what the year of the model is and B) don’t know or don’t care enough to Google it?”

          Probably well over 90%.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      There IS a reason for it though – the Germans do not generally make clean, model year based transitions from one version to another. For example, BMW transitioned the 3-series sedan to the new F3X platform in 2012. But the wagon, coupe, and convertible remained on the e9X until the 2013 model year, with the coupe and convertible transitioning to the F3X 4-series. So if I tell you I have a “2012 328i” you don’t know which car I actually have. The platform codes are VERY descriptive. Also, quite often the US debut of a platform lags the European debut – we might be on one platform for a given model year while elsewhere the same model is a completely different car. Model year doesn’t necessarily tell you anything but how old the car is. US and Asian makes tend to be simpler, with model year telling you all you need to know.

      I do agree that including the model year is nice, but ultimately the code is more important. No reason not to do both though.

      • 0 avatar
        sirwired

        OP here… I vote for the “both” option. I’m not offended by the presence of platform codes, and being able to learn these things (without having to Google them) is not a bad thing.

    • 0 avatar
      SoCalMikester

      Youre forgetting about that sweet sweet panther love. and ive seen the challenger and charger referred to as the LX platforn. youtr pretty much correct though

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      My father in law in a BWW fan, and learning the model number and codes made him feel like he had special uncommon insider knowledge, back in the 80s and 90s.

      I’m just annoyed that I have to do an unnecessary Google search. It’s like dereferencing a pointer, assuming I care enough to take my phone out of my pocket to look it up.

      Different generations, and I guess that different things make you feel special.

    • 0 avatar
      S1L1SC

      I normally just provide both – I own a 1993 E32 BMW 740iL. easy.

  • avatar
    Nick 2012

    Glad you’re OK and the insurance company played ball.

    Get something like a Chevy SS 6MT – rare, subtle, and the resale values of its proxy, the Pontiac G8 GXP 6MT, are exceptionally strong.

    • 0 avatar
      David Walton

      The insurance company didn’t really have an option – I can’t elaborate unfortunately.

      I saw an SS last week actually, while I was eating lunch on a patio. Sounded nice, but I don’t need or want anything other than a two-door sports car at this point in my life.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      I hear another 911 calling your name.

      I drive a 997.2 C4S. If I was looking at anything else in the lightly used category, I would consider a Lotus, Alfa 4C, or a higher model Cayman/Boxster. I don’t see going from a GT3 to an SS as a like kind move. I think you would be very dissapointed.

      • 0 avatar
        Nick 2012

        Obviously the SS Suggestion was mostly in jest. My coworker drives a 2011 C4S cabriolet and she has let me drive it a few times. Dang fine car. I also convinced her to do an AutoX with it before she got new tires.

      • 0 avatar
        David Walton

        Stay tuned to find out what I got.

        I made a lot of calls to dealers, talked to some trusted friends with expertise in other marques, and did a test drive of an Audi R8 V10 manual…

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          I just hope you didn’t get a Ferrari 360, Skyline GTR, or Hummer H1.

          • 0 avatar
            David Walton

            LOL.

            Doug is a buddy of mine, but I have a normal day job, which is why:

            I am able to buy cars for me and me alone
            I write infrequently (busy, and I do this pro bono)

            The now-wrecked GT3 was the one he videoed, however

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    The 997 appreciated after you bought it? Is this because of the scarcity of manual transmissions in VAG’s current “Porsche” lineup?

    • 0 avatar
      David Walton

      Yes, 997 GT3s have appreciated pretty steeply since March of 2013, when the new 991 GT3 debuted at Geneva.

      I bought mine in April of 2014 and owned it for 13 months.

  • avatar
    Tinn-Can

    I’d like to see the look on that kid’s face after the wreck… It sucks to get in any kind of wreck. Hitting a very expensive car would compound that significantly I would think…

    • 0 avatar
      David Walton

      The kid was from an affluent background and seemed pretty nonplussed.

      Who knows what the parents had to say later. They arrived on the scene and initially assumed that I was at fault.

      • 0 avatar
        Toad

        Of course the parents of the little snowflake assumed you were at fault. My wife was hit by a teenage driver and when the kid’s mom showed up on the scene the first thing she did was tell her daughter “Don’t worry, we’ll get you another car.” Mom never did inquire about my wife or her health.

        This is probably a great argument for a dash camera.

        • 0 avatar
          Dave M.

          I was at a stop sign when a drunk driver hit the back of my car at 60 mph in her Benz. I stagger out of my car (unbeknownst to me I had fractured two lower vertebrae) to check on her when she gets out of her car and starts hitting my chest for “wrenching her Chauncy”.

          This was pre-DWI days and I had stopped in her well-to-do town for gas on my way home from college.

          Needless to say she didn’t get a ticket.

      • 0 avatar
        Shivatron

        I’m not trying to be obtuse, but genuinely curious: the colloquial “nonplussed” (ie. unfazed), or the formal “nonplussed” (surprised, confused)?

        (FWIW, someone once ran a stop sign in front of my 997.1 Turbo, causing similar damage. He was decidedly unfazed — so much so that I’m pretty sure he was stoned.)

    • 0 avatar
      Land Ark

      This is another fine example of why you should always carry way more than your state’s minimum liability coverage limits.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        I dont think anybody with a 911 GT3 is running around with minimum liability coverage.

        And there is definitely a clear breakeven point. If the difference between liability and comprehensive can pay off your car in like 5 years, it’s probably not worth getting, unless you can’t save money at all (in which case your only real insurance is prayer and luck)

        • 0 avatar
          David Walton

          I’m glad I didn’t have to use my insurance at all.

          If I were the parent of a teenaged rocket scientist driving in arguably the most high-end neighborhood in the Southeast (notwithstanding South Florida), I would have very, very, very high coverage limits.

          Yesterday I drove by the scene of the accident at about 6:30 PM and saw – in two miles of driving south of the intersection in which the collision took place:

          Bentley Mulsanne
          Rolls Royce Ghost
          Range Rover Autobiography
          Mercedes AMG GT S

          And countless other more subdued $100k+ cars.

          I’d hate to have a teenager impact any of those cars.

          • 0 avatar
            thornmark

            >>arguably the most high-end neighborhood in the Southeast (notwithstanding South Florida),<<

            You mean not including South Florida. I always thought GA was so inexpensive because of the climate.

        • 0 avatar
          Land Ark

          I was more referring to the rest of us who don’t drive $100k cars and, more importantly, again, liability coverage – not collision coverage. It doesn’t matter what David has for PD coverage in this instance, it matters that the kid who hit him had adequate coverage.

          Personally it would eat me up driving around in a car that expensive knowing how many people around me don’t have the coverage to pay for its replacement.

          • 0 avatar
            David Walton

            I am much more sensitive to this now.

            Last night I was driving to dinner with a friend of mine.

            Without revealing the forthcoming surprise, my new car – which has replaced both my 997.1 GT3 and 993 – was, frankly, very expensive. I’m in it for over double what I paid for the 997.1 GT3, and I haven’t paid the tax on it yet.

            So I’m understandably VERY cautious with it.

            Last night a guy driving a rough looking Charger made a left turn at a T-junction at the tail end of a yellow/orange turn signal and cut off a sizable junction of my lane as I slowed to a stop at the red light. He was going about 50 MPH in a posted 35 and nearly hit a brick wall after he made the turn. Hate to be judgmental, but I doubt he was in a position to replace the front end on my new car.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            “It doesn’t matter what David has for PD coverage in this instance, it matters that the kid who hit him had adequate coverage.”

            Well in his state. He also may want to have UM/UIM coverage to make up for someone driving a hooptie with state minimum coverage. If he lived in Michigan, he better have full coverage for that Porsche, because no-fault laws say his insurance is paying for it.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Carrera GT?

  • avatar
    energetik9

    From a fellow Porsche 911 owner, I am saddened for your loss.

    I agree with this statement wholeheartedly, “the car (model 993) never failed to generate acute, intense emotional responses”. I feel the same every day that I drive mine.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Glad you are alright.

    Don’t forget to fill out your Form 4684 and Schedule D.

  • avatar
    mitchw

    The US Treasury is eagerly awaiting its check for the sweet capital gains you received from the sale of the 993. And you may only lower the tax for improvements you made, not maintenance. Of course you kept all receipts. Ask me how I know.

    But I’ll ask the impolite question, Dave. Could you have done anything to have avoided the accident? I understand the insurance company agreed you were not at fault…Oh wait, don’t answer my question.

    • 0 avatar
      David Walton

      First Item:

      I kept all receipts from the 993.

      I owned the vehicle for 3+ years, so my gains are capital gains, not ordinary gains.

      I have enough CapEx to give me a modest tax liability ($1-2k maybe?), but I have enough other stuff going on that I’ll get a five figure refund, most likely.

      Second Item:

      I was nearly within the intersection when the kid turned in front of me. Immediately in front of me. There was a Honda Pilot to my left and a Subaru to my right. The Pilot was waiting to turn left, and the Subaru was turning right (ie, exactly where the teen was headed).

      Nothing that could’ve been done IMO.

  • avatar
    Zykotec

    Always sad to see a nice car die, no matter if it’s too expensive for me or not.
    Good to hear you were OK though. Had a driver loose control and almost hit my first CR-V head on 2 years ago, both cars were totalled even if I managed to turn a potential head-on into a small-overlap/strafing-hit instead.
    Now you can buy a 2nd gen ‘ED9’ CR-X (with a turbo’d Integra Type-R engine) for the insurance money and finally experience true driver involvement (according to the interwebz, and partially myself, although we ‘know’ the first MR2 was a much better sportscar)

  • avatar
    PandaBear

    The other driver’s insurance should be glad that there’s no injury involved. Injury claims can easily exceed even a 150k Porsche.

    • 0 avatar
      David Walton

      Oh easily.

      I was stunned that no one was hurt in the accident. My glasses weren’t even broken, and I didn’t get any of the aforementioned Venti Iced Caramel Macchiato on my suit, shirt, or tie. The sole of the loafer on my right foot had a litle bit of the imprint of the break pedal on it, so I had it resoled (that pair needed it anyway).

      There were two teens in the other car (both front row), and they both walked away. No broken (window) glass anywhere.

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        To me, it doesn’t look like much of a hit. There needs to be some passenger compartment deformation before I’m concerned about the occupants, and it’s nowhere near that bad.

        Speaking of imprints, I somehow had an imprint of my watch on my upper arm for a few months after I got hit! My brake pedal was not so kind though, moving with the firewall to snap my tibia during the process of folding the lower half under my seat. I’m sure I’d have been uninjured in that 60-ish MPH head-on if I’d been in something as modern as your poor GT3.

        Sorry for your loss!

        • 0 avatar
          David Walton

          My car handled it pretty well all things considered.

          But there’s some frame damage and every panel on the front end is bent; that adds up quickly. The front bumper cover alone is $7k, plus shipping, plus fitment, plus paint.

          If I’d have been in my former 993 I would have been in the hospital.

  • avatar
    BDT

    Bummer about the 911. Did they send it to the crusher, or is someone about to get a deal on a salvage title GT3?

  • avatar
    CincyDavid

    The good news is, you seem OK, and the money worked out OK.

    One of my kids was the 4th car in a 4 car collision near the University of Cincinnati recently…big enough wreck that EVERYONE in all the cars got transported, perhaps due to injury, perhaps due to watching too many ads from bodily injury attorneys on TV. Of the 4 drivers, 3 were licensed, one was not, and our car was the only one that was insured. Thank God she was not at fault, but how in hell did she get tangled up with 3 uninsured motorists in the same collision?!? Our uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage stepped in, so the money part is OK, but the irresponsibility of the other drivers astounds me. And we got out from under a lease on a 2013 Civic…the poor thing went to car heaven.

    • 0 avatar
      David Walton

      Ouch.

      As a rule, I tend to avoid locales in which the preponderance of other motorists don’t have insurance, but I wouldn’t expect that to be one such location.

      • 0 avatar
        mitchw

        It seems to me that I see people doing things in traffic nowadays which I’ve never seen before. Something is changing. It’s also why as the driver of a small silver coupe* I keep my head and tail lights on at all times. I noticed some years ago that I’m practically invisible to other drivers; maybe your boy didn’t see your car.

        *Don’t even think of being jealous

  • avatar
    mwebb

    Hey, I found your Porsche on the Copart Auction. http://www.copart.com/us/Lot/25657035?searchId=836672199

  • avatar
    JimC2

    Sooner or later, that dumb kid probably would have killed a motorcyclist with that maneuver (oblivious left turn into traffic). So maybe there’s a silver lining to this. It’s still a shame he had to kill your nice Porsche.

  • avatar
    AtomB

    This is G-d’s way of punishing you for having a 20-ounce Venti anything where it didn’t belong. Sorry about your loss, glad everyone is OK.

  • avatar
    manbridge

    Another Pcar guy weighing in with random comments.

    I like to cover my brake with left foot in “blind” intersection crossings. A flash of lights or even leaving brights on in daytime (old motorcycle tip). May not have helped here but maybe next time.

    Driving stoned isn’t enforced here (CO) at all. I’d expect more of this crap as society becomes more self medicated.

    Let’s bust the Alcantara myth right now. It’s plastic suede. Sells at fabric stores for about cheap a square foot. Porsche tax on it is diculous.

    Glad you are okay. Maybe rip the cup holders out of new whip…

    • 0 avatar
      David Walton

      I always keep my lights on and flash my highbeams at people who turn in front of me if I feel it’s warranted.

      In this case, the other side was a kid with very limited driving experience. Only so much you can do.

      There’s a Porsche tax on everything they sell, but I wouldn’t have been the one paying it in the event of repair. In that respect, I am thankful that it is so expensive.

      New whip has cupholders and even satellite radio!

  • avatar
    escapenguin

    I don’t mind your using platform codes.

    Sorry about your Porsche. Can’t wait to see what you picked up.

  • avatar
    Power6

    Surprised the commentariat has not taken you to task for having a drink in the car. As a SBUX gold card holder… Iced caramel macchiato really??

    Glad it worked out, my worst fear having owned a couple lesser special cars is that you fear an accident that doesn’t total it, the car is never the same again…

    BTW alcantara is not suede, its a cloth. So there is a GT3 with cloth interior, you had one!

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • gearhead77: It’s gotten really bad during the crossover era now. As much as I love hatches and wagons for...
  • gearhead77: I see a decent amount of influence here on the LX cars ( 300, Charger). More so on the first gen LX than...
  • Varezhka: Mitsubishi Motors is a place you normally end up when you fail out within the Mitsubishi conglomerate. You...
  • Lie2me: Well, there was that Trackhawk concept car that went down on the Titanic ;-)
  • -Nate: Thanx ! . I knew someone would know . -Nate

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber