By on July 20, 2015

2016-audi-tt-roadster-04

When the next Audi TT RS arrives in the U.S. in 2017 (and earlier elsewhere), it will be so advanced that you won’t even have the option of “shifting gears” in a “manual” fashion.

Isn’t it nice of Audi to make that decision for us? Decisions — like coordination — are pretty difficult, after all.

Car & Driver is reporting the TT RS won’t be available with a manual gearbox. At all. Anywhere. Instead, the sole cog-swapper will be of the DSG variety with seven forward ratios. That’s interesting considering the current car was a manual-only affair in the U.S. If you wanted an automatic, you were forced to step down to the lesser S model.

The new TT RS is expected to arrive with 400 horsepower, an improvement over the current car’s 360 horses, by way of another turbocharged, 2.5-liter five-cylinder engine.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

37 Comments on “Next-generation Audi TT RS Will Happily Relieve You of Shifting Duties...”


  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I would like the choice of stickshift but DSG in a car this quick is understandable in my opinion. IDK how VWAG stickshifts are but I would rather a DSG than a BAD stickshift as well. If it’s not Honda S2000 grade it could get replaced IMO.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      VW stickshifts are usually excellent. But I agree the DSG really makes sense in a car like this. And the combination of the turbo five and those belchy instant shifts sounds incredible. Sound is IMO the reason to buy this car.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    I really wish Chevrolet took the SS serious and gave it 2-3 engines. It truly renders half of European offerings obsolete, obviously this is a convertible, so doesn’t fully apply here.

  • avatar
    qfrog

    The TT is not a miata nor is it trying to be a miata. Sure it will be faster than a miata but it will still be a front wheel drive transverse/haldex kinda sorta all wheel drive but really front wheel drive working really hard not to make it quite so obvious that it isn’t a torsen based quattro system.

    Honestly this leaves the passenger behind the wheel a free hand/arm to do with whatever they please like text or take selfies.

  • avatar
    energetik9

    That’s dissapointing.

    I’d gladly take less power for the ability to shift. Even with paddles.

  • avatar

    Manual transmissions are DEAD.

    They just don’t know it yet.

    • 0 avatar
      fli317

      MT are not dead. Far from it. As long as there are enthusiast drivers, they will remain. DSGs are ok (if ok is all you want) but they do not offer the involvement (and skill) of driving a MT.

    • 0 avatar
      White Shadow

      I’ve been hearing that for at least ten years now….probably even more. Somehow, there are still lots of new cars available with manual transmissions. I purchased a new manual Audi 4 years ago and I’m getting ready to purchase another manual Audi in a few months. Just like the last one, I’ll have to order it and wait for it to be built since dealers don’t stock them. But hey, at least the are available still….far from dead.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      You’re likely right, but because of pervasive hybridization/electrification, not of anything resembling this DSG car.

  • avatar
    tylanner

    The DSG-equipped gen-1 TTRS was appreciably quicker than the traditional manual TTRS (previously, the only option for Americans). This is the right move for a magnificent car.

  • avatar
    ccd1

    Sticks are not about being faster, it’s about driver involvement. I own the previous version of this car and would not consider this car for a second because of DSG and the funky new dash. We are entering a time when great analogue cars will become classics and this is one of those cars.

    A short list would include the TT RS, several 997 Porsches, particularly the GT3/RS and the turbo, and the R8, particularly in V10 trim.

    • 0 avatar
      Kato

      Another nice car spoiled. ccd1, your car just started appreciating in value.

    • 0 avatar
      Jimal

      Sticks were all about being faster, until they weren’t anymore. Then it became about driver involvement.

      • 0 avatar
        michal1980

        And its really a usa male thing. Oh look I can push a pedal down, then move this arm lever over, and release the pedal, I’m so much more of a man then you because of that.

      • 0 avatar
        White Shadow

        True. When I first started driving in the mid-80s, a manual transmission car has several advantages: 1- cheaper to buy than an automatic. 2- Faster than an automatic. 3- Better MPG than an automatic. 4- More fun to drive than an automatic.

        So really, there was no question in my mind that I had to own/drive manual transmission cars. Today, a manual transmission car is often no cheaper to buy (a no-cost option most of the time), it’s often not faster than an automatic (this depends on the car in question and the “automatic” transmission it uses), and it’s normally less fuel efficient. But you know what? It’s still more fun than an automatic. And after all those years of driving manual transmission cars, that’s the only thing that really matters to me. I love the involvement of a manual transmission car and you can’t get that type of involvement with ANY other type of transmission. So I don’t care if it costs more to buy and to operate or if it’s not as fast….the only thing that truly matters is that it’s more fun to drive.

  • avatar
    JMII

    This makes me sad but the writing is on the wall. Every day it seems we lose another manual choice. And when the performance version of a car doesn’t have a third pedal that speaks volumes.

    My wife’s next car may be a TT and she has already stated she wants an auto because she is tired of fighting thru traffic with a manual. As long as paddle shifting is available she would be happy, I guess that is an OK compromise.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Manual transmissions are in the midst of a renaissance. I would argue that today there are more stickshift cars worth buying than there were 10, 20 years ago. Nobody misses stickshift Camrys or Malibus, and that’s about the only kind we are losing here. Often when we lose a stickshift car we gain another one. Case in point, TT is losing it, OK but you still have the GTI, and I think the Golf R and S3 are both getting stick in the US next year.

  • avatar
    sproc

    For better or worse, the transmission doesn’t surprise me. What does is the fact that it’s still got an inline 5. I would have totally expected it to have an even more bat-s#!ttier version of the EA888 putting out a little bit more than the Golf R400.

    • 0 avatar
      wmba

      When you make an engine like the new EA888 with a wire-rope crank with tiny bearings and only half-counterweighted, just to save about 7 lbs, perhaps the limit has been reached at 290PS.

      The five is the same basic engine with 25% more displacement due to the extra cylinder so doesn’t have to be tuned to within an inch of its life.

      In any case, they’ll be lucky to sell even a couple of thousand of these TT RS models. Expensive as all get out, and 99% of the people picking this wouldn’t have a manual in the first place, because they never did before.

      • 0 avatar
        ccd1

        Audi imported approximately 1000 of them total for MYs 2012-2013. Rumor has it that Audi will be moving the car more upmarket (ie raising the price substantially) for the new generation TT RS which will probably make it an even tougher sell in the US. Most auto reviewers will not help as they will likely trash the car for having most of its weight in the nose, its FWD bias and relatively numb steering. As is often the case, they will miss the point of this car as they rush to the track and evaluate the car solely in terms of its abilities on the track.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    No stick?? Then I’ll be keeping my Hyundai SCoupe *stick shift*!!!

    Good Day Sirs

  • avatar
    fli317

    I agree with DenverMike. If no stick is offered, and thats what you want, then either keep the MT you have or buy from a manufacturer willing to sell one. And there are plenty of MT cars out there that would be neat cars with a little refurbishing. Even high end cars are available this way, ie. Singer Porsches. If the big automakers can’t recognize this, they lose some business.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    It’s about the driving experience, not 0-60, so I’ll take the downgrade model or move on to something else with a stick. What do they think this is??

  • avatar
    tfdpny

    Is this some kind of sustained campaign by TTAC regarding manuals? I like a good manual as much as the next B&B, but I don’t think we need to have editorial everytime a new model comes out sans MT. That’s just going to get tiresome, along with all the J-nik style QOTDs lately. I don’t post much but I’ve read every post every day for the last 3.5 years.

    • 0 avatar
      hotdog453

      The save the manuals campaign, if you can even call it that, is pretty present across all of the car rags and online publications.

      It’s not that interesting of a car, short of the changes to the transmission. Car and Driver are commenting on the transmission lack of choice as well. It’s even more telling, given the older model was manual only in the top Model.

      We all know why they’re not offering it: automatics sell better, and these are private companies. But it’s still kinda sad and worth discussing.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      The whole “save the manuals” thing is a red herring anyway. There’s never been a time in history where there were so many great manual cars. BMW 2/ 3/4 / 6, Chevy Sonic/ Spark/ Cruze/ Camaro/ Corvette, Ford Fiesta/ Focus/ Mustang, Honda Fit/ Civic/ Accord, Infiniti Q60, all the important Porsches, WRX/STI/BRZ, all the good Mazdas, 370 freaking Z, the sports car bargain of the century, all the VW hatches/ sedans/ brown diesel wagons etc etc. If one can’t find a stickshift car they like in this market they aren’t looking…. theyve never been better.

      And like Kriendler said, manufacturers are in the business of selling cars to dealers….. dealers know people don’t buy stickshift on certain models, so they don’t make them. It’s very simple and not worth wasting emotional energy on, in the midst of all these great cars with sticks today.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Yes our boycott of auto-only sporty cars has to be laughable to the OEMs, but still, *hats off* to those that do stick-only top performance models. Those are limited-editions anyways (ZR1, GT500, Boss 302, etc), with fairly high demand and short sell-days (except for the ZR1).

  • avatar
    dantes_inferno

    And the dumbing down and wussification of the automobile continues…

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Russycle: I have an 08 xB and yeah, she does like her oil. Thought they sorted that out in later years, but maybe...
  • kcflyer: The infectious disease docs I’m hearing on tv and radio are all saying the same thing. Virus’...
  • akear: This is not a company. Case closed….. They did fool GM.
  • akear: This is not a company. Case closed….. They did fool GM.
  • SCE to AUX: Good write-up. It’s stunning to witness how Nissan led with the Leaf in 2011 but has done only one...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber