By on July 23, 2015

miata-10

Feel bad for the guy whose brand-new car gets smashed less than a mile away from the dealership? We do. Apparently, so does Mazda.

Jalopnik has a great story about a new 2016 Mazda Miata owner whose car met an all-too-soon end less than a mile away from the dealership. The ends were smashed, the driver and passenger were bruised (but luckily not seriously) and one of the first new Miatas fell victim to an F-150.

You’ll never guess what Mazda did next.

(They replaced the car, I hate it when people do that.)

According to the owner, who posted his tale on a forum, Mazda North America sent a new car on Monday to the unlucky owner. The man says he’ll receive his new car August 15.

According to the owner, his new car was so new (apparently minutes) that legal documentation hadn’t yet been submitted making the process of separating from his car relatively quick. Even still, it’s no easy feat for the dealer, insurance, at-fault driver and Mazda to replace a car.

Jason over at Jalopnik accurately pointed out that as the first Miata crashed in the wild, there’s a lot of useful information Mazda North America can glean from it.

But good on Mazda and the dealer for helping an enthusiast who is obviously excited about his new purchase enough to wait on a list and pick up his car the day it’s made available. In no way are they compelled to do that.

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37 Comments on “Mazda Replaces First Crashed MX-5 Miata for Unlucky Buyer...”


  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Compare & Contrast Mazda & General Motor’s Customer Service Responses:

    Today’s General Motors *Mark Of Excellence*, Chevrolet’s *Find New Roads, and It’s an Eminence Front/A Put On and A Well Tailored Scam at GMC (To Catch Fire On* is brought to you by the all new 2015 GMC Canyon; The All-New Canyon, if it spontaneously burns to a crispy shell, GM will blame you reflexively and deny warranty coverage:

    http://coloradofans.com/forums/145-2015-chevrolet-colorado-2015-gmc-canyon-photos-videos/250938-2015-canyon-caught-fire-photos-inside-8.html

    http://gfunktastic.kinja.com/how-not-to-treat-your-customers-gm-edition-1719671835/1719777305

    • 0 avatar
      beken

      I know what you mean.

      I have one GM car catch fire as it drove off the dealer lot after dealer replaced a “faulty” fuel injector and then they tried to bill me $2000 for the repair.

      In my last (and final) GM car I owned, the front wheel fell off while I was driving. The bolts holding the wheel literally sheered off. This was about a month after a recall was performed on the ABS system. GM got their lawyers together and said they didn’t do it and that I must have tampered with the car. The car was under warranty at the time. The most unreliable car (a Buick) I ever had in my life. Transport Canada said, though it was likely the bolts were faulty, I would be unable to prove in court that dealer was at fault.

    • 0 avatar
      EAF

      L.M.F.A.O! @ DW

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      This has to be about GM, huh, DW?

      I knew a chick once who had cold sores. She may have once visited Flint. Discuss.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Herpes (including the STD form) and other communicable diseases run rampant in GM Union towns, as prolific drug use (and drug dealing – it’s true) and casual sex is rampant in the plants and right on the assembly line.

        There are accounts of line workers doing lines of blow off of ready to install motors and bags of weed and other narcotics being hidden & distributed in new passenger vehicle compartments that are ready for the car haulers.

        • 0 avatar
          Compaq Deskpro

          Bravo.

          +1

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          I used to think you were like that one annoying kid on the playground, DW, always making up wild stories for attention. But a couple of nights ago I heard a piece on This American Life (rebroadcast from 2010) about how GM and Toyota’s NUMMI venture and how bad the Fremont plant was in the ’70s and early ’80s. It was essentially the same as what you just said. You might exaggerate, but there’s always at least some truth in what you say.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            I am not exaggerating in the least.

            The Feds & local law enforcement have raided many factories/assembly plants where UAW members were running narcotic distribution networks, where line workers AND management were involved in using, selling, packaging & shipping many forms of narcotics utilizing new vehicles, new vehicle truck haulers, parts/freight containers, etc.

            There have also been many incidents of shootings & stabbings in such facilities where the UAW operates – google these cases and you’ll see many of them where the feds did joint task force investigations and sweeps with local law enforcement to break up these networks.

          • 0 avatar
            tonycd

            Drz, this was much truer then. In David Halberstam’s twin history of Ford and Nissan, The Reckoning, he talks about the rampant disrepair of Chrysler’s Belvidere, IL plant — broken windows letting the winter gales blow right through, cars being assembled with no primer under the paint (I can attest to this, having owned one and seen the topcoat peel off its wheelwell lip like so many potato chips). All the American makers have cleaned up this act dramatically since then, because they had to.

            I frankly still don’t trust American car companies to be as well-built as their foreign-managed competition, but that has much more to do with GM and Chrysler management’s abusive treatment of their suppliers than with the final assembly that takes place at the carmaker’s plant. Check the recent survey of how US auto suppliers rated the carmakers they supply to see what I mean. It’s not the UAW that makes one daytime running light blow out at 1 year of age on every Suburban and Escalade ever made. It’s management’s decision to screw the component supplier with “One World”-style pricing squeezes, and the supplier’s quite rational decision to build the component down to the price rather than go out of business themselves.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            tony – it’s more recent than you make it out to be (given Chrysler employees toking up on lunch break last year, as caught on film by news crew last year, that pot was probably grown under the factory lights), as both Sterling Stamping (FCA0 and Pontiac Truck (GM) have had drug sweeps/busts in last 5 years or so.

            I would be shocked if IT WERE NOT STILL happening today.

    • 0 avatar
      InterstateNomad

      Great post DW. Sorry to hear Beken that sounds horrible.

  • avatar
    daniel g.

    Simply genious!!!

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    So this guy wants to go back out in traffic with another little cupcake car? We’ll see how his wife feels about that.

  • avatar
    brn

    Your existing insurance is required to cover a newly purchased vehicle, even if they don’t have the paperwork yet.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      I think it varies state by state. I have never had a dealer let me leave with a car before having it insured.

      • 0 avatar
        brn

        MBella, The lender (which can be the dealer) would require proof of insurance. They don’t know you have insurance, so they want to make sure you’re covered. If you give them cash, they don’t care if you’re covered. Only you do.

        • 0 avatar

          No, it’s not just to satisfy lender requirements when dealerships ask for insurance information. Many states have legislation passed that prevents dealerships from allowing individuals to take delivery of cars if they don’t have insurance…in order to cut down on uninsured driving. Even if you paid cash for a sub-$5K car, the dealer would need to see liability insurance at the least.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    This is disappointing. Mazda should be inspired by GM’s handling of the imploded low-mileage Corvette engine and do just the bare minimum.

    Maybe give him a ride back the dealership and allow him to use the phone. Along with a cup of coffee and a donut, that should be more than enough.

    • 0 avatar
      WheelMcCoy

      LOL.

      How can Mazda call themselves a corporation? Corporations are supposed to incentivize, monetize, and otherwise maximize profits for themselves and shareholders. Instead, they do this!?

      Heh, I’m a Mazda fan-boy, and now, even a bigger one.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        For the wholesale cost of a car, Mazda got itself a live fanboy who would share his story with the world and a bunch of free coverage.

        This was actually nice cheap PR, and more effective than a lot of advertising.

      • 0 avatar
        Brumus

        Um, WheelMcCoy…Mazda 3 rust problems and said corporation’s response thereto?

        • 0 avatar
          TMA1

          Mazda Canada Inc. announced today a new Unlimited Mileage Warranty, eliminating the distance limitations on their factory warranty coverage allowing owners to drive as much, or as far, as they want…

          The Unlimited Mileage Warranty becomes the new standard factory warranty on all Mazda vehicles starting with the 2015 model year… body sheet metal perforation for 7 years, unlimited mileage…

          The Unlimited Mileage Warranty will be retroactive to all customers who have already purchased a 2015 model year Mazda vehicle, and is fully transferable to subsequent owners.

          http://en.media.mazda.ca/2014-11-13-Mazda-Launches-Unlimited-Mileage-Warranty-in-Canada

          Five years, unlimited mileage in the USA.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    So I’m trying to figure out what happened. Did the dealer scrap the paperwork and say he was on a test drive?

    • 0 avatar

      I think the guy possibly put money down or financed it, then it got wrecked (but not totalled?), insurance would pay off the wrecked car, or Mazda would buy it back or something. But it sounds like Mazda GAVE him a replacement car, so F-150’s insurance would have paid off the wrecked car, now he has a car and no loan. But I didn’t RTFA yet.

      • 0 avatar
        Land Ark

        I highly doubt Mazda gave it away for free. I think it was more that they sent another Launch Series car.

        Perhaps they applied everything from the wrecked car (loan paperwork, etc.) to the new car and let insurance pay everything out.
        Thus:
        Buyer still owes agreed payment to dealer and has new undamaged car
        Dealer takes wrecked car back and gets credit for selling 2 cars
        F150 insurance pays dealer for wrecked car
        Buyer pays finance company as if nothing happened.

        I dunno, I just know I’m glad I am not the F150’s adjuster.

        • 0 avatar
          statikboy

          That would be all kinds of fraud. I’m sure the insurance company would be disagreeable.

          • 0 avatar
            Land Ark

            How is that fraud? The only thing the insurance company cares about it paying someone (the owner) for the value of the car. In this case the actual owner in the eyes of the DMV was the dealer since the paperwork never got filed with them.

            If all parties are in agreement as to who gets paid where’s the fraud? And who is being harmed?

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    The are pretty good. They service my CX9. The lobby sucks but the service is great.

  • avatar
    tbp0701

    Given the size difference between an F-150 and a Miata, I’m impressed there weren’t serious injuries. Anyway, the last time I went new car shopping, in 2012, I bought a Mazda. Now nearing 60K miles, the 3 has been great, and this story makes me a little bit happier I gave Mazda some money.

  • avatar
    Greg Locock

    “Jason over at Jalopnik accurately pointed out that as the first Miata crashed in the wild, there’s a lot of useful information Mazda North America can glean from it.”

    Such as? Crash results will be borderline useless as none of the important parameters are known. The Stuff We Make Up About Cars.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      It’s always nice to get real world verification (or not), that the testing you do in controlled conditions is relevant to real world scenarios. You can postulate all you want, but until the drunkards in gigatrucks are set loose en masse on your little roadster, all you’re doing is making (perhaps highly) educated guesses.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Now if only Mazda would sell a rust-repellent for older models.

  • avatar
    stuki

    How did the F150 fare? Bumper dent?

  • avatar
    Funky

    Good for Mazda. Maybe this will give them some extra publicity. Personally, after about 1 month and 2500 miles of family vacation trips in my new 2016 Mazda, I am still a fan (and this says a lot because I can usually find a lot to complain about). Mazda deserves some good recognition.

  • avatar
    "scarey"

    Good to hear that Mazda was so decent to everyone concerned. I may consider a Miata next time I am in the market.

  • avatar
    DrGastro997

    It’s refreshing to hear a very good story from the auto industry. The stories are soaked in nothing but bad news. Mazda deserves massive praise!

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