By on July 28, 2015

2016 Chevrolet Colorado 2.8L Duramax Turbo Diesel

When the 2016 Chevrolet Colorado and GMC Canyon start arriving at dealer lots this fall, they’ll be sporting more than an additional diesel option under the hood. Monroney stickers will be afflicted with much higher prices to the tune of $3,730 more than an equally equipped V-6 model.

However, you will get increased towing capability thanks to a standard towing package, improved fuel efficiency, and a diesel engine brake to minimize wear on brake components.

2016 GMC Canyon SLE

According to GM, the trucks will get their 181 horsepower and 369 lb-ft of torque from “the cleanest diesel truck engine ever produced” by the company. The cleanliness of the diesel mill is due in part to cooled exhaust gas recirculation, says the release. The GM midsize twins will also use diesel exhaust fluid for cleaner emissions. It is recommended the DEF be topped up with each oil change at around 7,500 miles depending on vehicle usage, said Otie McKinley, Chevrolet’s representative in change of Trucks and Colorado.

Towing capacity is best with 2WD models at 7,700 pounds, an increase of 700 pounds over the V-6 model. Adding 4WD brings the tow rating down to 7,600 pounds. Keeping your load in control is a smart exhaust brake based on a similar system used in Silverado and Sierra HD trucks.

The Colorado and Canyon are now available for order.

2016 Chevrolet Colorado 2.8L Duramax Turbo Diesel

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93 Comments on “Colorado, Canyon Diesels Pricy Propositions With $3,730 Premiums...”


  • avatar
    Clueless Economist

    How NOT to sell a lot of diesel-powered Colorado trucks:

    1) Charge $4k more for the diesel option
    2) Only offer it as an option on high content (overpriced) quad cabs.
    3) Disappointing MPG (I am assuming since GM hasn’t been very forthcoming about MPG)

    • 0 avatar
      segfault

      4) Teething issues with the new powertrain (I am also assuming since it’s the first year for the diesel engine).

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I was wondering about MPG, it should easily out-do the Ram diesel, at least 32-33 on the highway; and honestly for the inconvience of Urea, it should be all over 35-36.

      Hopefully they don’t give it another fruity Eco name.

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        you would think this close to sales it mileage be publicized somewhere.

      • 0 avatar
        derekson

        Is filling a urea tank every 10,000 miles really a significant inconvenience? It basically just adds another thing to do when you change the oil. Whoop dee do.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          Not really, but it gives anti-government types (read: my father) something else to whinge about.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          A user interface should be as simple as possible with minimal cost, therefore being required to buy a chemical to run an engine, where previous engines had no such requirement, does indeed inconvience everyone involved and create a step backwards.
          More so, it is another system that requires high tolerances to operate correctly, and therefore is an additional liability. I don’t know how this tank sits in the Colorado, but on the 3/4+ GMs, the tank is ripe to be ripped off the frame from its low ground clearence.

          And no, I did not just call filling a tank of DEF fluid complicated.

          • 0 avatar
            360joules

            Maybe the iron-bladder long distance driver types can buy the “catheter to urea tank” option. Two birds…

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            Does anyone sell non DEF diesel trucks in the US? Even new diesels stink, no matter what the Euros are (or were, the German industry “experts” have changed their tune now that they have already sold a diesel car to everyone who might want one. Now, the “right” thing to do is drive a gas powered “diesel” engine. Soon to be backed by legislation….) saying. So the fact that grandpa’s old hand started sootmaking appliance didn’t need urea, isn’t that relevant anymore.

            For anyone who tows “heavy” on a somewhat regular basis, but still wants a midsize for space, not cost, reasons, this sounds absolutely fantastic. A bloody exhaust brake on a Tacoma sized truck! For that market, mileage unloaded is lots less important than mileage when towing. And a small, 180hp diesel should easily double a 300hp gasser’s mpg in that role. Which is doubly-triply-quadruply important with the smaller tank/shorter range of a midsize.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Stuki,
            You would have to be the only person, who thinks they “stink” No person here as even mentioned a non existent issue. The other I have heard is they make a lot of noise, nothing there as well

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            @RobertRyan

            -40 (F and C meet there). Start your euro car to warm it up, then walk around back and spend a painful 15 minutes trying to fit your American sized stuff in the euro sized trunk. Which happens to be a hatch, hence open to the cabin. Then, get in cabin and tell me even new diesels don’t stink more than new gas engines……

            Ditto for staying in northern Swedede, getting up and into your car, and getting behind a new Diesel Volvo that just started up, and is gunning it to get somewhere, or just to heat up that big lump enough to heat the cabin, since he was too cheap to order a Webasto.

            Those are extreme situations, but the difference between that and a mild Aussie autumn day, is just one of degree. New diesels still stink more than new gassers, all else being equal. And some of us just have mopre sensitive noses than others. Perhaps from being told to occasionally shower when growing up, unlike some Crocodile Dundee in the bush somewhere… :)

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Stuki,
            I have had the “pleasure” of smelling Los Angeles smog and in comparison , there is no comparison. That greasy oily smell that pervades LA, is the winner in obnoxious smells. Nothing like that here

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Given how most Colorado/Canyon trucks sold today are already at the high trim rates (do an explore on AutoTrader and see the stickers on what is in inventory) and they can’t keep them on lots or build them fast enough – I see zero impact on tying them to the top trim – beyond GM has never seemed to be interested in selling a lot diesel anything that didn’t have HD attached to it – and even then – they had the 8.1 liter big block V8 as recently as a decade ago (early ’05 Avalanche 2500 was the last of the monster V8 IIRC)

      Personally, I’m disappointed in the price premium – but expected it. It won’t hurt – and buyers are showing they’re willing to pay a lot for the GM midsizers, despite the fact that with discounts a Silverado with close to the same option list can be had for near identical money.

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        wonder how the price penalty for the Ram diesel is effecting sales.
        I think they almost use it as a means of preventing to many sales of the dodge/jeep diesel.
        the German diesels are not penalized in price like the Dodge/Jeep/ Looking like GM is about to do the same.
        Perhaps it is simply because the availability is scan initially so they use the higher prices to hold down sales.

        • 0 avatar
          Wheeljack

          The german diesels (BMW, Audi, MB specifically) aren’t penalized in price as much because they make enough profit on their products to absorb the price premium, IMHO.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          TrailerTrash – IIRC Ram Ecodiesel sales have topped out at just under 10%. I would think that the biggest thing hurting Ram Ecodiesel sales is not the price but poor tow/haul specs.

          The Colorado/Canyon twins look like they will keep the same cargo ratings with a modest boost in towing.

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            Especially payload is hurting the Ecodiesel. The Ram is weak in that area to begin with, but equipped with the ecodiesel, the dealer is mandated to inform all buyers of a crew cab with the rambox and airsprings, that they need to go on a diet before taking delivery.

      • 0 avatar
        OldandSlow

        Here in Texas, the demographic group that buys pick up trucks choose mainly 4 door crew cabs, most of which are loaded to the third level of options. This segment has to be at least 75% of sales.

        A short bed regular cab truck with the base V6 is still under 30K – but the take rate is less than 5%. Consequently, the manufactures limit their numbers and the dealers don’t stock many of them. So, if you want one in any color besides white and black – be prepared to wait a bit for delivery.

        The demographic group that used to buy a short wheel base regular cab for personal use can no longer afford one at 25 to 30k new.

  • avatar
    Firestorm 500

    People will pay a lot to “save money”.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      They sure do, but I don’t think this is necessarily the best example. Diesels are simply superior vehicles for frequent mid to heavy towers versus gassers. And more and more of America are living in places where a fullsize diesel pickup just don’t fit very well. A midsize diesel amy not be a huge seller, but it is unique enough that there ought to be a market worth serving, at least as long as GM has that market to themselves.

      Of course, the exact same line of reasoning should support at least one of the makers offering a manual in a fullsize………

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Well diesel in my area is roughly the same price as regular unleaded but that of course is a historical anomaly. I wouldn’t mind having one for the ability to tow 7,000 lbs in a truck 75% of the size of a 1/2 ton.

    Honestly the nearly $4000 premium isn’t bad when you consider the standard towing package and exhaust brake.

    Although IIRC the diesel Cruze was cancelled so my cautious optimism might not be justified.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      The towing package is basically a transmission cooler that costs manufacturers $15 and should really be a standard feature, and maybe gears which are no more than $15 themselves. Or in Fords case the towing package means you get a frame thicker than the non-towings paper mâché. Really with a towing capacity of only 7,700lbs, the exhaust brake seems gimicky at best.

      It better get impressive MPGs.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        The standard Colorado doesn’t have a transmission cooler? Even my MkT comes with one of those.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          From past experience, I wouldn’t think so, I know on the GMT800 Tahoe and such you had to get the vin number to seperate the trucks with and without the cooler. I know I had one of the trucks with a cooler, and the transmission failed partly due to the temps getting too high from normal non-towing duties. I struggle to imagine how well transmissions in vehicles without transmission coolers last. Coincidently my 1st gen S10 has a trans cooler, not sure if that was part of the Z71 package or the towing package.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            Hey I’m basing that on what other manufactures charge for towing packages ($1000-2000) so including it in the cost of the diesel is a nice touch.

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        Obviously you have no clue what your talking about on this truck.

        The tow package on the Canyon and Colorado includes the hitch receiver, wire harness and the auto locking rear diff.

        Selecting the tow package also gets you a 16″ full sized spare tire, instead of the temporary spare.

        The transmission cooler is standard on the V-6 and it’s mounted in front of the radiator.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Thank you. I appreciate the info.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          The tow package on the Canyon and Colorado includes the hitch receiver, wire harness and the auto locking rear diff.

          Selecting the tow package also gets you a 16″ full sized spare tire, instead of the temporary spare.

          The transmission cooler is standard on the V-6 and it’s mounted in front of the radiator.

          ——

          We should have kept it that way
          (surprise) I figured the hitch and wiring would be standard on a truck, I didn’t even know it was possible to not get those. Auto-locking diff is (probably) the same G80 that’s been used since at least the 1980s (still) well known for exploding. The fact you can even get a temporary spare, is again, an embarrassing sign of cost cutting to no end.
          I’m glad however the V6 has a standard cooler, hopefully it doesn’t risk mixing with the coolant as so many other factory coolers do.

          • 0 avatar
            SC5door

            “I figured the hitch and wiring would be standard on a truck, I didn’t even know it was possible to not get those. ”

            Are you living under a rock? Even the full sized trucks do not come standard with a hitch and wiring assembly.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Perhaps so, I’ve never seen nor bought a truck or BOF SUV that didn’t have a factory hitch.

            Must be a thing in cities.

      • 0 avatar
        Lack Thereof

        I had to go to a webpage that hires real journalists to find out that the Colorado / Canyon tow package consists of:

        * Hitch receiver
        * Trailer brake controller w/ all wiring and 7-pin plug
        * Locking rear diff

        Pretty much the same as the tow packages most other manufacturers charge $2000 for.

    • 0 avatar
      Secret Hi5

      Why is diesel now cheaper than regular unleaded?

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        The Chinese construction industry can’t get government loans to build any more enough empty cities; and the Greeks are no longer allowed withdrawals large enough to afford fuel to soot up Athens in the German cars they bought with borrowed money they can’t afford to pay back. While Americans have taken all of Yellens free money and bought Hellcats. So the refineries are stuck with a diesel heavy mix of unsold fuel.

      • 0 avatar
        jhefner

        I think a more rational answer than Stuki’s is excess inventory caused partly by refining all that excess crude oil they had in storage into diesel (remember the “tank top” conversation earlier this year), partly by reduced demand caused by the slowdown in oil production, and by closer attention being paid to more fuel efficent driving and operation by the trucking companies. I rarely get blown away by trucks in the left hand lane anymore.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    They won’t let you have an AT in the base, ex-cab long box Colorado. Suck.

  • avatar
    Dan R

    Cynical gouging for the bragging (?) rights of having a diesel.

  • avatar
    Rday

    the reliability of these new epa tested diesels may kill them. with all the new pollution systems they will be an expensive proposition. the old mechanical diesels were spot on reliable but the new electronics will cancel out any mileage savings IMO>

    • 0 avatar
      OldandSlow

      Add the 6 speed transmission to the mix. It will have a torque converter that will be a bit more complex than the same transmission for the V6 Gasser. My question is how long will these units last, especially if you tow?

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    They talk about the EGR Cooler as if it’s a good thing. Good for the poor drivers stuck behind, but they’d be happier with a gas engine under your hood. Except anyone that’s owned a full-emissions diesel will wonder what the heck you were thinking with your midsize rattler. Enjoy all the hole_in_the_wall, shady gas stations with busted up bathrooms, poor choice of snack/beverages, waiting for an open pump while the dude you’re waiting on goes back in for change, lotto scratchers, scratches them, redeems the winners, scratches those, keeps on scratching until he zeros out, sees you’re still waiting/rattling and then REALLY takes his sweet A$$ time.

    • 0 avatar
      ClutchCarGo

      Not to mention flirting with the chubby lady at the cash register because no other female will acknowledge his presence. I even got inconvenienced the other day by a guy who was using 2 sides of the same pump to simultaneously fill diesel tanks in the back of his pickup.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        It’s frustration too when the only pumps being used, pump both diesel and gas, the rest of the station’s gas-only pumps deserted. They put the combo pumps closest to the entrance for easy in/out of buses or anything big/long/towing. Mostly I’m waiting on cars not even pumping diesel.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          Odd and funny at the same time.
          I’ve never had an issue fueling up at any fuel station and I’ve never seen anyone hogging the diesel pumps.
          If someone actually uses their truck for work and have multiple pieces of equipment then they will either have their own fuel supply delivered or fuel up at a commercial card-lock station.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            It’s not the big operators that hog the pumps. It’s mostly regular traffic and some medium operators. If you’re not seeing it, you’re not looking for it. Get back to me when you’re stuck driving a diesel pickup day in, day out. And when you’re dead tired, on the way home and just want to make as few stops as possible, with the least amount of hassle.

            .

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            DenverMike – I worked as a Paramedic for 20 years…….. I drove a lot of diesel trucks.
            Before that my dad owned a trucking business….. care to guess what engines were under those gold Bulldog’s?

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            I’m guessing they didn’t let you take the ambulance home at night. We’re talking diesel pickups replacing what ever Americans drive right now. The novelty will wear off before the new truck smell. The reality of the inconvenience will start to set in. Aside from urea, there’s all sorts of additives to condition the fuel and clean injectors. Especially as more cetane is pulled from diesel. Suddenly there’s much things to think about. They’ll miss how easy gasoline engines were and could be fueled absolutely everywhere.

            Getting beyond the glamour of “oil burning”, just like big rigs, it makes no kind of sense below an HD pickup. Laughable in a midsize pickup. Even then, the gas engine is starting to make way more sense, up to and including medium duty trucks.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            DenverMike – I’m familiar with the good and bad of various vehicles.
            Feeble attempt at discrediting my opinion since you figured I didn’t work with diesel powered units day in day out. As far as taking one home….. um….. like I said, my dad owned a trucking company. The only unit that left me on the side of the road was a gasser Dodge Tradesman Ambulance conversion.

            I doubt that the Colorado/Canyon diesel take rate will exceed that of Ram’s Ecodiesel take rate of 10%.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            I’m not talking about reliability, but don’t kid yourself. Your anecdotal was from the 90’s? It’s a whole different ballgame.

            The point is there’s a lot more things to think about when stuck with a diesel. Some, they’d never expect. And consumers that opt for diesels will feel just that. Stuck. And why didn’t anybody warn them. This is all I’m doing.

        • 0 avatar
          MrGrieves

          You’re exactly right. I love my Diesel vehicle (the highway cruising is awesome) but I can’t stand pulling up to a filthy, greasy, nasty pump and standing in a huge puddle of diesel fuel when it’s time to fill up. I keep a pair of work gloves in the truck just for filling time. Most of these guys who fill up their rigs at auto stations don’t give a hoot… they’re “on the clock” so they’re in no hurry to fill up and go. Once I lost my cool because a guy driving a Mack Dump Truck was parked at the only #2 pump and was inside having a bite to eat with his friends. I went inside and asked him politely to move it. He told me exactly where to go.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            You dudes must live in crappy neighbourhoods. I haven’t seen a fuel station matching those descriptions in decades. Maybe Canadians are just neater people ;)

          • 0 avatar
            hybridkiller

            Lou_BC –

            I live in the southeastern US and travel – a LOT – over a 6 state area. I don’t know what they’re talking about either…

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @McGrieves,
            Must be a U.S.thing, no difference to a unleaded, diesel or LPG dispenser or Bowser as we call them here.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Denver Mike-I doubt the Colorado has that bad of diesel engine since GM has been offering diesels in the global Colorado for years as Ford has been offering diesels in the global Ranger but then I am not a paid marketer for Ford Corporation to slander the reputation of a competitors product. An owner of an aluminum F-150 Limited with an Eco-Boost engine costing 65k would just as likely be subject to a shade tree mechanic with broken windows in their bathrooms once the truck is out of warranty as a diesel Colorado especially if they visit one of your garages. If this is what you think then this must be what is in your heart. If you think that everyone who buys a certain vehicle is going to be ripped off then this is what you would do. There are those that get taken advantage of but that is regardless of what they own and there are those that exploit others at any opportune moment.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      I’m not even saying it won’t be ultra reliable. Probably the most reliable among current diesel offerings. Except no way the best current diesel can be as reliable as the worst pre-emissions diesel. Emissions really $crewed the pooch.

      Nor am I saying the price isn’t a fair deal, as diesels go. I’m just giving someone like you that doesn’t quite know what he’s getting himself into, the heads up. It’s the thanks it get.

      Do what you want, but consider all angles and talk to current diesel owners you come across. And no good deed goes unpunished.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        I’m generally with you wrt diesels, except for the use case of fairly frequent mid to heavy towing. The HD diesels are so utterly over sized for what almost anyone realistically tows, that the benefits aren’t all that clear, but a 180hp diesel, in a truck with a small tank, will be a much less frustrating tow vehicle than a 300hp V6 gasser. Towing 7000lbs behind a Tacoma, you’d barely get out of one gas station before you have to start looking for the next one. And you’d be at redline, tapdancing on the brakes, on even the slightest downhill.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          stuki,
          I own a diesel midsizer.

          For moving heavy loads you don’t need a gas engine. You need an engine with plenty of torque in the correct rpm range.

          Some of these comments on this site shows how little some have with experience with all forms of motor vehicles.

          A V8 will tow quite well. But it will have pi$$ poor FE. A diesel will tow as well with far superior FE.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @ Big Al from OZ,
            Reading up on the new or preproduction Nissan NP300, the tiny 2.3 Diesel can tow the new 3500kg or 7,700lb standard but the bigger 2.5 Petrol has a 3,500lb towing capacity!! Looks like the Diesel is going to be a winner
            Small Petrol engine for a local runabout
            As regards the Baby Duramax, it has the same power and torque as the Euro V Global version, despite the differing pollution regulations used by the U.S. It would not be the same if Euro 6 had compliance was needed,a real nightmare for many manufacturers

  • avatar
    frozenman

    GM is poking a sleeping giant with this option and that is a good thing.

    • 0 avatar
      rudiger

      ^This. Anything that might conceivably motivate Toyota to get off their ass and make some significant improvements to the Tacoma is a good thing. As it stands now, with Toyota having essentially cornered the small pickup market, the only thing they do are superficial grille changes. Hell, they don’t even change or add new colors anymore.

  • avatar
    klossfam

    YIKES! And this is not a great midsize truck to begin with…Drive one, I have…Rough shifting 6 speed A/T, no rear seat room in the crew cab, not as quiet as the auto journos describe, etc. You are already in RAM EcoDiesel territory with this mark up…I drive a 2014 RAM 1500 5.7L and prior a Honda Ridgeline for 4+ years…Driven the Frontier, Taco and all the full sizers…The Colorado/Canyon is near the bottom of the list for pick ups period…that is before a $3,700+ diesel mark up…

    • 0 avatar
      wmba

      Autos.ca has twice reported in reviews that the V6 engine is ridiculously noisy, almost unbearable, while the usual reviews by captive magazines and websites say how quiet and refined it is.

      “The throttle response and gearing seem to certainly be “truck-like.” Even with the 3.6-litre engine in my tester the Colorado feels sluggish and sounds like it is having a hard time getting out of its own way. But really, the power is there, it’s just the noise intruding into the cabin is so violent you do not want to press the throttle any further for fear it will explode — V8 for me please.”

      http://www.autos.ca/car-test-drives/day-day-review-2015-chevrolet-colorado-4wd/

      Now, from this TTAC post above, it doesn’t mention whether this new diseasel is a gruff four clanger, or a V6 for your extra $4K. As for cooled EGR, well, holy cow, GM is finally catching up to the new norms.

      • 0 avatar
        Lack Thereof

        Can’t find it in this post, but if you go to other sites you will find that it’s a 4-cylinder with dual balance shafts, as well as a special vibration damper built into the torque converter.

  • avatar
    Robbie

    The so-called Pickup Truck is an accessory of the Homo Americaniensis Yokelensis. While other species of humanoids attract mates with wit, job, wealth, dress, intelligence, and physical attractiveness, Americaniensis Yokelensis reproduces solely based on the size of the Pickup Truck. The original point of the Pickup Truck – the moving of items – has long been forgotten and an estimated 99% of Pickup Trucks has never had any item in its back beyond groceries and grandma’s suitcase. Therefore, this mode of transportation has transcended practicality and is affectation only. Heavy government subsidizing has helped sustain this aberration in human evolution. Since the only point to a Pickup Truck is size, any type of sophistication, even a diesel engine, is completely beside the point and doomed to failure.

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    Well, the price premium for this diesel engine is a little more than half the price premium for the big diesels in the 3/4 tons. While the towing spec is impressive, one really needs to know the payload spec to evaluate it. Assume at least 10% of the towed weight is carried by the truck on the tongue: that’s, say 800 lbs. So, how much else can one carry in the way of people or cargo? The weakness of the RAM 1500 diesel is the relatively small payload, especially in the higher trim levels and crew cab (which most people want).

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      DC Bruce – The Colorado/Canyon is 1500 – 1800 lb for cargo capacity in the 4×4. A full bling crew 4×4 is around 1500lb and as you go to lighter configurations/options the cargo capacity climbs.

      7,600 lb max tow with a 4×4 means 760 lb on the truck pre-equalizer hitch. Any 1/2 ton needs an equalizer hitch over 5k and I’m assuming these will be the same. That counts for roughly 15% off the tongue meaning roughly 650lb on the truck.

      These trucks will put most Ram 1500 crewcabs to shame when it comes to cargo.

      I found the back of the crew Colorado/Canyon a bit cramped for my growing 13 yr old son who currently is all legs at 5’8″. That is about the only limiter for me when it comes to wanting to buy one.

    • 0 avatar
      NOPR

      They can put whatever tow rating they want on paper, but you’ll never convince me that towing with a 4000lb truck and 180hp is going to be a good idea or a pleasant experience. With so many euro 2.0L diesels making 180-220, why is this 2.8 so underpowered?

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        Climb the Grapevine on a 115 degree day at 11000 lbs combined weight, with a 220hp 2.0, and see how long those all those 220 hp are available to you……

        Light passenger cars can advertise huge hp from small, light engines, because they are advertising a “very” intermittent hp rating. Light duty pickup trucks are still advertised at way above genuinely continuous load ratings; but given how some buyers might just use them, they have to be a bit more conservative in their ratings than their car brethren.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @Stuki
          “Light duty pickup trucks are still advertised at way above genuinely continuous load ratings”
          Exactly, they really downrate those somwhat bloated ratings, here. They have to be inline with other ratings given to Commercial orientated vehicles
          i.e. A Silverado Diesel is rated at 9,900lb towing here, with an uprated version, 11,000lbs

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            @RobertRyan

            Do they allow for higher ratings when fifth wheel/gooseneck towing there? If not, they really ought to. The top end of the silly high ratings here, are not for bumper/hitch trailers. From what I’ve seen, Aussies seem to have a bizarre fascination for paying an absolute obscene amount of money for Landcruisers, then using those to tow monster trailers (filled to the brim with beer, of course) into the outback. Completely negating any off roading benefits the LC may have over a much cheaper, longer wheelbase and better for towing, pickup. While Americans who tow similar (truth to be told, even bigger) monsters, tend to opt for a fifth wheel. Just wondering if differences in the ratings regimen is partly to blame, rather than just different cultural stereotypes and prejudices.

            Perhaps because of the domestic, pickup heavy, lobby; In America, pickups have unusually high tow ratings, while anything without a bed, have low ones. With US towing allowances, the entire European Gypsy population would have to go on a year long starvation diet, unless they (and I suspect this is the point) went out and bought a good-ole-pickup truck, to tow their home built, 500lb plywood caravan around with.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Stuki,
            Fascinating topic. It is not bumper pulls when you are talking about 5ers and Gooseneck hitches but GCVWR.
            As you might have noticed , I have posted links to the IVECO Daily Cab Chassis, that has replaced F250’s here towing up to 32ft 5th Wheelers,with a small 3 litre diesel. They do tow 33-36ft units, but to keep up with Super Duty’s up hills ,, they need to be chemically supercharged, in this case using LPG. Improves fuel economy and dramatically performance.
            Unlike the Sprinter it has a full truck ladder chassis, compared to the Sprinter’s monocoque basis. The IVECO Daily 70c comes in with a 23,000lb GCVWR and a GVWR of 15,400lb
            Stuki some of US tow ratings are bizarre. Sedans cannot tow anything, but Europe has sedans towing 5,000lb trailers with no problems. The Sprinter is rated with a 7,500lb rating in the U.S., but elsewhere 4,400lb. U.S. Diesel Pickups are heavily down rated here, a Diesel Silverado gets a 9,900lb tow rating, you can upgrade with right hitch to 11,000lbs. Al lot less than in the U.S.
            Tow ratings are part of the PR war raged by companies to win the public over in NA

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        NOPR – 1 ton pickups used to routinely come with inline 6 gassers. I had a F250 with 195 hp V8. We have gotten spoiled by 380 hp V8’s. Why is towing 7,800 lb with a 4k Colorado any worse than towing 30k with an 8k Ram?
        In one case you have the Colorado with 195% of tare weight and with the Ram you have 375% of tare weight.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          “Why is towing 7,800 lb with a 4k Colorado any worse than towing 30k with an 8k Ram?”

          Then only reason I can think of, is that the madmen who decide to call Ram’s HD bluff, are more likely to restrain their stunts, to towing farm and construction equipment at low speeds, far from public roadways.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I don’t need or want a diesel myself but I do see where a diesel midsize truck would work for many. If someone is doing a lot of driving particularly long distance driving and they are towing as well then the additional amount extra for a diesel engine would be worth it. A diesel engine in a midsize truck is not new especially since much of the World drives diesel powered vehicles. As for the take rate of the diesel in the Colorado/Canyon Lou BC is probably correct in his 10% assessment. The diesel option for now is limited to the crew cab and to 2 trim levels which if diesel became more popular it would be easy for GM to include it in the extended cab. As for DEf this is available at Sam’s Club and most auto supply stores.

    As for the availability of diesel pumps they are everywhere where I live. Most of the fuel stations are self service with at least two or three rows of pumps with 4 sets of pumps in each row which include E-85 and diesel (diesel is usually on the end of each bank of pumps for easy access). The Kroger’s fuel stations at the Kroger Market Place stores have at least 8 diesel pumps. I don’t know exactly where you live in California Denver Mike but diesel is available almost everywhere in N KY and Cincinnati and most of the truck stops off the interstates have separate areas for big rigs to refuel and passenger vehicles with more than adequate number of diesel pumps for passenger vehicles. No shortage of places to get diesel and no shortage of diesel vehicles where I live.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      I’m not saying it’s not available. But most often you’re stuck with hole_in_the_wall stations instead of the name brand stations you’d rather use. So then you have to make a 2nd stop vs all_in_one.

      But you said it yourself. They put the diesel pumps where it’s easiest to access. So they’re usually the 1st pumps everyone goes to. Gas or diesel.

      All the inconveniences and high maintenance that goes along with diesel ownership are just something to consider before you buy. For most consumers, it’s like a cute puppy.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        My experience is that the hole-in-the-wall stations are the ones that don’t have a diesel pump.

        If you’re even considering a diesel truck or car, chances are pretty good you already know where and when to buy fuel for it. Waiting a few minutes for a pump is hardly the worst thing in the world.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          If it was just that, then yeah. But it’s just one more thing to consider. Eventually you’ll miss the simplicity and extreme reliability of gas engines and start to question your sanity. Owning a diesel will get old quick. If you don’t think so, have at.

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            Man, I thought I was a diesel hater……

            Do people really have as much trouble with the more realistically specced diesels in the new Euro Vans? I was under the impression that lots of people diesel “issues” and disappointments, stemmed from bro-driving around empty, with engines designed to tow 30,000lbs up Everest on a hot day. The highly advanced, very sensitive systems used to “clean up” diesel emissions, are all designed to operate most efficiently in a certain load range. Taking even a fat American kid 5 minutes to school on a winter morning, doesn’t really get there.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            They’ll get soot buildup on the EGR from lots of idling. Not a big deal, but just another visit to the shop. There just all sorts of new things to consider if you’re used to gas engines. I’m not saying it happens very often, but systems you didn’t even know existed, will leave you stranded. I used to love diesels, when I could work on them myself, of course before emissions.

  • avatar
    Johannes Dutch

    GM 2.8 Duramax = VM Motori A428 DOHC. Also used in the Jeep Wrangler, for example.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I predict this will be a seldom-selected (as it’s too expensive) option on these trucks. And since GM isn’t too invested here because they’re using a VM engine and slapping a new cover on it – it’s easy to drop.

    I’ll give it 3MY, then it’s gone. A rare option for later, and a little side note on Wikipedia how this model had a diesel engine at one point in time.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @bumpyii–Agree most places diesel fuel is readily available and if you want to buy from one of the majors or independents that is not a problem. As for one brand of diesel or gasoline being better that is a myth because they all come from the same refiners. The only difference in fuels are the additives that are added to the tanker before it leaves the refinery and if you buy regular gasoline then there will probably be no additional additives added. For the most part it is mid grade and premium gasoline that only get the additives put in their prospective compartments in the tankers and the additives mix in with the gasoline when the tanker is driven to its delivery destinations (it is called the splash method of adding the additives to the gasoline directly in the tanker and letting the additives mix with the fuel as the tanker is driven). Chevron adds their patented Tetron additive just after the tanker compartment is filled with gasoline. Each major brand has their own unique patented additive but they all are similar. Most of us don’t care what brand of fuel we buy as long as the underground storage tanks don’t leak or have too much condensation.

    @Denver Mike–I don’t have a need or desire for a diesel engine because I do more short distance driving and put few miles on a vehicle. If I were driving long distances and towing then a diesel truck would be a good investment. There is a purpose for diesels and both gasoline and diesels have their advantages and disadvantages. It is just like in lawn equipment a 4 cycle engine is better for some applications and a 2 cycle engine is better for others. On a gasoline powered weed wacker a 2 stroke engine is lighter and since most are used for edging and turned on their sides a gas/oil mixture assures that the engine will always get lubrication where a 4 cycle engine that is tilted will not get lubricated and will smoke and eventually wear out sooner.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    It should be obvious that if GM is offering a diesel option in only the crew cab with 2 trim levels that they want to gauge the demand for the diesel before expanding it to the extended cab or other trim levels. If there is not enough demand they will drop the diesel option but it is a little too soon to predict that 3MY it will be dropped. A little presumptuous to predict the diesel option will fail just before it is released. As for GM using a VM motor there is nothing that I have heard or read that says this is not a good motor. GM is not the only corporation to use another manufacturers engine, transmission, or other equipment. Ford used AC Delco air conditioners on their full sizes cars such as LTDs and Marquis in the mid-70s. I would not fault any manufacturer for using another brand of part other than their own.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Here’s where I argue that using a parts supplier is normal operating procedure, and different from using an entire engine.

      They almost all use Takata airbags, for example.

      But using engines from other manufacturers and labeling them as your own is -not- as common procedure.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Maybe so Corey but if you are going to buy a diesel powered truck shouldn’t you at least be interested enough to do some research. The information is out there on the internet and anyone who would blindly buy any vehicle without any research today should know better. I had a 1985 Mitsubishi Mighty Max with a 4 speed manual transmission made by Borgwarner which I did not learn until I needed a part. The same transmission was used in a Ford Ranger, Mazda truck, and some Toyotas and Nissans. I would think that a diesel engine made by another manufacturer would be covered under the vehicle manufacturer’s warranty. Most who will buy a diesel Colorado/Canyon will probably know who made the engine and if they don’t like this engine then they shouldn’t buy the truck.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I do know of one city in NJ that is replacing their Dakota’s with Colorado diesels.

    There will be a market for these.

    They can do the work of what many 1/2 ton pickups can do, but with far superior FE.

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