By on June 23, 2015

Uber At Igby's In Cincy Circa April 2014

Uber drivers and passengers alike are now banned from carrying their guns into town, thanks to a new policy.

While no explanation has been given about the new policy, the following was implemented after a recent incident in April, where an Uber driver stopped what would have been a mass shooting in Chicago, according to The Truth About Guns:

We seek to ensure that everyone using the Uber digital platform — both driver-partners and riders — feels safe and comfortable using the service. During a ride arranged through the Uber platform, Uber and its affiliates therefore prohibit possessing firearms of any kind in a vehicle. Any rider or driver found to have violated this prohibition may lose access to the Uber platform.

The stance — long since adopted by competing transportation network company Lyft — contrasts what a spokeswoman for the TNC said after the incident in Chicago, stating its drivers were only required to abide by local, state and federal laws on the matter of carrying guns in one’s glove compartment.

(Photo credit: Uber/Facebook)

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62 Comments on “Uber Bans Drivers, Passengers From Carrying Guns During Rides...”


  • avatar
    Luke42

    Meh.

    Won’t change anything, except their insurance rate.

    • 0 avatar
      RangerM

      Uber wouldn’t (ie. shouldn’t) expect such a policy to be followed. But, it does give them the deniability they might need (in the eyes of the jury) when things go wrong.

      And the beat goes on…….

  • avatar
    MrGreenMan

    Sounds like their lawyers got a little excited about the hypothetical. People will probably just ignore this.

  • avatar
    Joe K

    If it is concealed, just how is this supposed to be enforced. By the time the person get sin the car, and the driver realizes they have one, it is probably too late.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      Like most unenforcable rules, it’s a way to throw the book at people, after something goes horribly wrong.

      As in “your car was damaged in a traffic accident, but you were breaking the rule about carrying your gun while carrying that passenger, so sorry, we’re not obligated your insurance claim. Better luck next time.”

      • 0 avatar
        SaulTigh

        Exactly. Many businesses make it a policy to drug test every employee that files a workers comp claim for the exact same reason. That test is often under $50 and weeding out just a handful of claims makes it a money saving exercise.

        Even if the fact that you toke a joint on weekends has absolutely nothing to do with the coworker who dropped a box on your head.

  • avatar

    A criminal isn’t going to TELL the Uber driver he has a gun.

    A Law-abiding citizen with a gun just might save an Uber driver’s life.

    Common sense conservative values brought to you by Bigtruckseriesreview.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      “A Law-abiding citizen with a gun just might save an Uber driver’s life.”

      This “gun-toting hero” meme almost never has any basis in reality.

      • 0 avatar
        zerofoo

        Ahem,

        May I direct you to Mr. Farago’s Defensive Gun Use of the Day:

        http://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/category/defensivegunuseoftheday/

        Apparently defensive gun uses happen quite frequently. But hey, don’t let facts cloud your opinions.

        • 0 avatar
          psarhjinian

          Fascinating that Mr. Farago doesn’t publish a “Domestic Violence Abetted by a Gun”, “Suicide Abetted with a Gun” or “Accidental death by misuse of a Gun” list.

          Because those are longer lists.

          • 0 avatar
            zerofoo

            He kind of does here:

            http://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/category/irresponsible-gun-owner-of-the-day/

            Frankly, many irresponsible gun owners are cops.

            As far as suicides go – people wanting to kill themselves is not a gun problem, or a pill problem, or a jump off a bridge problem. It’s a mental health problem.

          • 0 avatar
            psarhjinian

            “As far as suicides go – people wanting to kill themselves is not a gun problem, or a pill problem, or a jump off a bridge problem. It’s a mental health problem.”

            And as soon as America has cradle-to-grave comprehensive social safety net, including treating substance abuse as a disease, having a living wage, pharmacare, eldercare, child care, preventative medicine and so forth, then, THEN, I will be okay with conservatives’ utter hypocrisy about guns.

            You cannot have an adult conversation about guns when you can’t deal with healthcare, poverty or education. As it stands, the same people who are okay with no gun control whatsoever are also totally fine with brutalizing addiction and petty crime, driving people into poverty and keeping them un-educated.

            So, pardon me if I have exactly zero sympathy for the gun-rights movement when they cry about responsible use of their toys but do nothing to move the needle.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          “But hey, don’t let facts cloud your opinions.”

          Don’t allow a basic understanding of statistics to interfere with your passion for confusing anecdotes with data.

          • 0 avatar
            zerofoo

            Reread the posts – slowly.

            No one made statistical claims. psarhjinian claims that a gun toting hero has “no basis in reality”.

            The links I provided show actual examples of “gun toting heros” in real life.

            By the way – I took statistics in college….I understand significance, confidence intervals, p values….etc

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “I took statistics in college”

            You must have skipped the lecture about odds.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        It’s so lacking in reality basis that a gun-toting Uber driver already averted a mass murder. Maybe you should read the story before spewing your ridiculous ideology.

      • 0 avatar
        thornmark

        >>This “gun-toting hero” meme almost never has any basis in reality.<<

        Not really. But you do have a point that the media rarely reports when guns have deterred crime. Stats show when people are allowed concealed carry, the frequency of criminal acts perpetuated w/ guns drop in that area. As guns have proliferated in the US over the last 20 years, murders committed w/ guns have dropped markedly.

        Apparently since 1950 all mass shootings in the US save two have occurred in "gun free" zones. Seems the mass murderers have actually scoped out such zones.

      • 0 avatar
        redliner

        “Gun-toting hero”

        You mean like Zimmerman? Thank god he was there to protect everyone from, um, uh, black people and their blackness. Yeah, that’s it. [sarc]

        I find it funny how in many states, you are not allowed to have a knife or a baseball bat within the drivers reach, because that’s an offensive weapon. What’s that? It’s a handgun loaded with hollow points and a high capacity magazine? Go right ahead sir, and excuse my intrusion.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Everyone needs a gun……….

      How could their possibly be ANY gun crime if EVERYONE has a gun?

      “Common sense conservative values brought to you by Bigtruckseriesreview.”, the NRA, firearm retailers and wholesalers near you.

      • 0 avatar
        thornmark

        >>How could their possibly be ANY gun crime if EVERYONE has a gun?<<

        That makes no sense. If killing someone is a crime it doesn't matter if the gun is legal, it's still a crime.

        Kitchen knives are legal, however killing someone w/ a kitchen knife is still a crime.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @thornmark – you are right…….. it makes no sense. That is why I made that post.

          It is no different than Nuclear MAD.

          If we have more nukes than them they won’t try to nuke us.

          Just substitute gun for nuke……

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            Yeah…MAD was obviously a terrible policy as evidenced by all of the nuclear exchanges between the US and the Soviet Union in the 20th century.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Big Al From ‘Murica –
            Nukes were a poor comparison to guns. I don’t like the thought of Mutually Assured Destruction with guns or bombs. That is more aptly the point I’m trying to make.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Yes, kitchen knives can kill. But consider this: would James Holmes have been able to wound 70 people and kill 12 of them in a matter of a couple of minutes with a kitchen knife?

          Guns exist on their own plane lethality-wise. They’re designed specifically to inflict harm or death on the people or animals they’re aimed at, and the more powerful they are, the more dire the consequences for misuse gets.

          So, yes, let’s have a conversation about why some weapons don’t require qualification to wield, but but let’s also keep it real, shall we?

          • 0 avatar
            rentonben

            I see the abolitionist types are clutching at their pearls

          • 0 avatar
            zerofoo

            Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols killed 168 people with fertilizer, diesel fuel and a truck.

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oklahoma_City_bombing

            Seems like there are much more efficient ways to kill people than shooting them with guns.

          • 0 avatar
            RazorTM

            A small group of people in China went on a massacre in March 2014 with only knives as weapons, killing 33 and injuring more than 140. But I’m sure that you’re happy that the victims were not allowed to have knives or guns to tip the scales in their favor. Better to be the better man and be murdered in cold blood than to go down fighting and taking out the bad guys with you, right?

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            It’s surprising that the armies of the world don’t save a fortune by using knives instead of guns. Apparently, they are equally effective.

          • 0 avatar
            psarhjinian

            “Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols killed 168 people with fertilizer, diesel fuel and a truck.”

            Yes, and interestingly we regulate and track those things with more rigour than we do guns, which were before and are now, used, en masse, to kill many, many, many more people.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      What kind of cockamamie scenario do you imagine where your big-sticked hero can save the poor Uber driver? Uber drivers are alone with their fares. People imagining the armed savior never stop to think that the criminal will almost always have the jump. That’s doubly true when it’s just the criminal and the driver in the car.

      The main effect of adding more guns to society is that more of the guns are diverted, lost, or stolen into criminal activity, the supply of illegal guns goes way up, and the price of illegal guns goes way down accordingly. This is why we have so much more gun crime, even though we don’t have any more total crime, than most other places with functional law enforcement. Yes, criminals don’t care whether guns are illegal, but they do care about cost and supply. It’s entirely possible that our freedom to carry is worth the extra violence (you be the judge), but people need to be honest about the cost of that freedom.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        This.

        We think of this in terms of a rights / no rights proposition, but we don’t think of the consequences of using that right. In the case of guns, with hundreds of millions of them floating around, and laughable restrictions on sale (you could literally sell one privately to a guy with a “Crips Forever” tattoo and the only question you’d have to ask him is whether he had the cash), the massive demand for guns just means more end up with the bad guys. And that drives more demand for guns. Who profits? We all know who. This is Don Draper-level marketing genius.

        What if people actually questioned whether they needed one? Notice that has nothing to with the exercise of their rights…just a common sense question.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        dal20402 – I was reading an article about gun defense. There needs to be a considerable amount of training and ongoing practice to be proficient at self defense against an armed assailant. That applies equally to police. SWAT/ERT exists for that very same reason.

        That applies to any complex skill.

        Lets send all pro-gun self defense types to Doctor’s who still have a licence but haven’t performed a prostate exam in 5 years and see how that works out for them!

        Perhaps they might enjoy it and voila, right wing homophobia might not be a problem any longer :)

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Here’s the problem:

      Where does a rider go in a taxi? The back seat. So if he wants to rob the driver, he’s going to take his gun and stick it right up against the back of the driver’s head and threaten to blow it off. So, even if the driver does have a gun, it might as well be a pack of Juicy Fruit for all the good it’ll do him.

      And, by the way…if some guy wanted to rob Uber, he’d have to hack in to the company computer, because the service is cashless, and all payments are done by smartphone app. I’d say the Juicy Fruit metaphor works for the robber too.

    • 0 avatar
      TomHend

      Love ya like a brother BTSR.

      I love that sign, My neighbor wants to ban all guns, his house is unarmed->

  • avatar
    twotone

    It will be interesting to see how this will play out here in our concealed carry states. Uber can’t control carrying a legal firearm in a vehicle they do not own. I’m sure the NRA lawyers are chomping at the bit on this one. If I was an Uber driver, I would definitely carry. Uber can not make rules that contradict federal or state laws. Here in Colorado, you do not need a concealed weapons permit to carry a handgun in your vehicle.
    What will they ban next? Joints?

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      “I’m sure the NRA lawyers are chomping at the bit on this one.”

      It will be interesting to see them try. Uber isn’t the government, and gun-owners aren’t a protected class, so they don’t really have a leg to stand on. I’d like to see Starbucks formalize their statements to this effect—and others follow suit—just to watch the NRA spit and sputter: much like eBay and Walmart no longer selling Confederate flags, sometimes society has to drag government kicking and screaming.

      This is the same logic that’s used to say that it’s legally okay to discriminate against homosexuals*, except it’s the other side of the spectrum.

      (* obligatory “that escalated quickly!”)

    • 0 avatar
      pbr

      Is there any jurisdiction where a business CANNOT ban weapons, concealed or otherwise, from their premises? (Honest question, I don’t know what the various states do/do-not allow.)

      • 0 avatar
        Mike N.

        It’s not Uber’s car. After all, they take the position that Uber drivers are contractors (interestingly enough, since contractors are generally supposed to bring their own tools and work unsupervised, etc., telling an Uber driver what he can and cannot have in the car that’s totally unrelated to the service provided is a factor that can be considered when deciding between employee or contractor).

        Like others said, it’s unenforceable. At least here in Texas, most they can do is ban you from using their service. Boo freakin’ hoo.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @pbr – my wife’s cousin lives in Texas and they said that there are restaurants in Dallas Texas where they live that do just that. They have “gun checks” instead of the old “coat and hat” check counter.

        • 0 avatar
          Mike N.

          I live in Texas, and I’ve never seen a “gun check” outside of a movie.

          I don’t know about anyone else, but I don’t want a stranger fingerbanging my gun. Aside from them damaging it, etc., what if they shot themselves or someone else accidentally, or what if it was stolen? No thanks.

          Also, the most dangerous part of carrying a gun is holstering or unholstering it, so I do that as little as possible.

          If I’m carrying and I’m legally barred from entering, I don’t enter (or, generally, do business) that establishment. Basically have stopped shopping at Whole Foods for that reason, I can overspend on groceries at Central Market. Otherwise, concealed is concealed.

          FYI, here in Texas, a sign prohibiting guns has to be in a certain form to have the force of law (a “30.06” sign, in reference to the particular section of the penal code, or a “51%” sign, in the case of establishments that get more than 51% of their revenue from booze).

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Twotone, why would you carry a gun if you were an Uber driver? I can’t see a whole lot of scenarios in which it’d do you much good, seeing as the riders – the ones most likely to rob or try to hurt you – are all behind you. I mean, are you going to tool around with one hand on the wheel and one hand brandishing a gun?

      I just don’t see the sense in it.

      (And joints are banned in cars, even though you wouldn’t know it…the car next to mine in the parking lot is routinely full of idiot kids hot-boxing, and then driving off…just splendid)

      • 0 avatar
        RazorTM

        “I can’t see a whole lot of scenarios in which it’d do you much good”

        So you can at least see some scenarios, then, right? Always better to have the gun when those scenarios arrive than to not have it.

        And who cares if YOU don’t see the sense in it? Just because you are blind doesn’t mean that everyone else is.

        I suppose you don’t have any fire extinguishers or smoke alarms in your house?

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    My goodness, I’m agreeing with Uber on something.

    Broken clock. Twice a day. Etc.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    This is definitely mostly a)PR to appease the gun-phobic and b)covering their butts, legally speaking. In future incidents, they can just say “well he wasn’t supposed to be carrying” and wipe their hands of any sort of liability.

    All in all a pretty business savvy move that ultimately changes nothing on the ground.

    • 0 avatar
      ihatetrees

      You win the interwebz today!

      Uber’s policy states that violators (drivers or riders) MAY face de-listing. In other words, Uber is NOT going to the mattresses on this.

      Even the most lunatic, statist, progressive Uber Driver wouldn’t risk a possible bad review, or social media blowback, or just being plain wrong by flagging CCW riders.

      CCW drivers face a tougher choice. They can ignore Uber (I would), but they then have to face Uber’s de-listing if the SHTF.

    • 0 avatar
      TomHend

      Exactly right.

  • avatar
    ajla

    What about mini crossbows or sai or balloons filled with hornets?

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      I wish I had thought of a balloon full of hornets, together with insect repellent on myself, when I drove a transit bus. The goal for a bus driver is always to get the miscreant OFF THE BUS. That would have worked brilliantly.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I’m predicting some blowback for the bad guy on the “deploying hornet-filled balloon in car” scenario…

      And has someone actually achieved this miracle of engineering? Impressive!

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    So is the Uber pilot now required to do a full TSA frisk on each passenger before boarding?

  • avatar
    DrGastro997

    The last time I rode in a taxi with a gun is when I was in the Philippines. As a physician that treats gastrointestinal trauma, I can say we have a damn serious problem with GSWs… Sickening

  • avatar
    ihatetrees

    I wonder if Uber has a carve out for cops, as both Drivers and Riders.

  • avatar
    Big Al From 'Murica

    So, let me see if I can sum this up…

    Uber Driver: I need Health care and basic employee benefits.

    Uber: Shutup…you are a contractor, not an employee and provide for yourself

    Uber Driver: OK, it is a dangerous world and I have a CCW so I’ll carry in my own vehicle.:

    Uber: Naa, we don’t allow employees to carry.

    Honestly, if I were a driver I’d ignore it since should I ever need the gun delisting seems to be the least of my worries.

  • avatar
    Kendahl

    Since I have needed a taxi once in more than 30 years, it won’t make any difference. With few exceptions, if a place objects to my being armed, I can find an alternative that is ok with it.

  • avatar
    madman2k

    I drive for them on the weekends. I don’t own a gun so it doesn’t really affect me – I thought about getting a thing of pepper spray though.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    That an armed Uber driver stopped a mass murder in April and gun control advocates are glad they’re being disarmed says everything you need to know about gun control advocates.

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