By on June 19, 2015

Julie HampYesterday, TTAC reported on the arrest in Japan of Toyota Chief Communications Officer Julie Hamp on drug smuggling charges. We have new information on what awaits Hamp now.

Through our anonymous source, Hamp’s alleged receipt of 57 Oxycodone pills — marked in a parcel dubbed “necklaces” — in the mail at Tokyo’s Narita Airport is a fairly common practice, where U.S. citizens in Japan take over housing from another foreigner, then use the previous occupant’s name to ship whatever drugs they desire. Japanese authorities routinely intercept the packages, which are then delivered as usual prior to a raid hours later.

The idea for allowing the delivery to go through as planned is if the package was delivered in error, the current occupant would either return it to the post office, or bring it to the nearest police station if thought to be suspicious. In most cases, the raid finds the package is already opened, and the drugs partially consumed.

Our source adds Hamp has a few things going for her as she navigates through Japan’s judicial system, including social status, reputation, and Toyota itself. The process of investigation, trial and verdict would take around 80 days to complete, with Hamp leaving the country almost immediately following a guilty plea, or upon serving 18 months in prison if she pleads innocent and is found guilty; there are no plea bargains under said system.

Speaking of Toyota, president Akio Toyoda apologized for the arrest during a press conference on the matter, Reuters reports:

To me, executives and staff who are my direct reports are like my children. It’s the responsibility of a parent to protect his children and, if a child causes problems, it’s also a parent’s responsibility to apologize.

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82 Comments on “Reputation, Status Keys To Judicial Fate For Toyota’s Julie Hamp...”


  • avatar
    John R

    “To me, executives and staff who are my direct reports are like my children. It’s the responsibility of a parent to protect his children and, if a child causes problems, it’s also a parent’s responsibility to apologize.”

    Awww…

    • 0 avatar
      nguyenvuminh

      What’s the matter John R? A CEO apologizing for the misdeed of a direct report is too mushy for you? Or do you prefer the CEO that washes his/her hands clean, while still getting his/her multi million bonus?

    • 0 avatar
      alexndr333

      Protect or apologize. Neither of these actions yield any consequences for the child. Now, I suspect the Japanese would not publicize how parents deal with child discipline, unlike the spread-it-across-the-globe habits of Americans. Nevertheless, Ms. Hamp is not a ‘child’ except in the words of Mr. Toyoda. What discipline will she face? Private shaming or quiet (but eventually public) dismissal?

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Only eighteen months? Well I supposed its better than the plea down to nothing and serve no time system of this dysfunctional country.

    • 0 avatar
      mike1dog

      Are you serious? This country puts non-violent offenders away more readily than any advanced country in the world. My cousin was arrested for the same thing, and between being unable to afford bail, and the actual sentence spent around two years in jail. Of course, you can’t ask her, as she died of a drug overdose within a year of getting out. Putting people in jail for being addicts is moronically stupid.

      • 0 avatar
        bikegoesbaa

        +1

        Nobody in the developed world puts non-violent drug offenders in prison with greater enthusiasm than the US.

        Whatever our problems are regarding drug usage, not being “tough on crime” is not one of them.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          Nobody in the developed world puts people in prison with greater enthusiasm than the US.

          There, fixed it for you.

          • 0 avatar

            PrincipalDan

            China/India has more than 4 times the US population and less than 1/10th the crime because THEY EXECUTE THEIR CRIMINALS REGULARLY.

            No recidivism rate!

          • 0 avatar
            beastpilot

            India last executed a person in 2013, and only 1 that year.

            They execute at a rate about 1/150th of the USA on average.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “China/India has more than 4 times the US population and less than 1/10th the “REPORTED” crime because THEY EXECUTE THEIR CRIMINALS REGULARLY.”

            there……. fixed it for you.

            BTW do those countries have the same access to private firearms as in the USA?

            No need to publically execute as many as them when we do it ourselves.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        My brother is a LEO and I’m here to tell you your sadly mistaken. *Bricks* of heroin are plead down as “personal use” because the “system” here isn’t willing to enforce the law of the land. I am truly sorry to hear your relative passed away as a result of drug abuse but unless someone initially shoved a needle in her arm against her will she chose her path. If we as a society want to rid ourselves of this drug epidemic we need to not only enforce the laws on the books, we need new laws calling for beheading drug traffickers and those who launder the money. One of the reasons the nation is going to hell in a handbasket is because if you steal $1,000 you are punished but if you steal $1,000,000,000 you not only are not punished, but praised.

      • 0 avatar
        RHD

        Unfortunately, the actual consequences of drug posession vary wildly from state to state. The offender’s prior record greatly affects the sentence for a felony conviction. Most drug offenders in prision aren’t there for simple posession, but sales, distribution, etc.
        Still, becoming an addict is entirely voluntary and supremely stupid. It’s tremendously inane to cry “victim” when the user happily stuck the needle in their own arm or pipe in their own mouth, knowing what a slippery slope they were putting themself down.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          “Still, becoming an addict is entirely voluntary and supremely stupid.”

          Most drugs are highly addictive even for those who do not have a predisposition.

          Experts in the field developed a rating system for addictiveness based on ease of getting hooked and difficulty getting substance free.

          100 Nicotine
          99 Ice
          Glass (Methamphetamine smoked)
          98 Crack
          93 Crystal Meth (Methamphetamine
          injected)
          85 Valium (Diazepam)
          83 Quaalude (Methaqualone)
          82 Seconal (Secobarbital)
          81 Alcohol
          80 Heroin
          78 Crank (Amphetamine taken nasally)
          72 Cocaine
          68 Caffeine
          57 PCP (Phencyclidine)
          21 Marijuana
          20 Ecstasy (MDMA)
          18 Psilocybin Mushrooms
          18 LSD
          18 Mescaline
          http://www.ukcia.org/research/misc/rel_addict.php

          The question becomes:
          Do we treat addicts as criminals or as patients?

          “For Profit” Prisons like the criminal side of the equation and due to the cost and difficulty of treating addiction the “For Profit” medical system also likes the criminal side of the equation.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Which way does the scale go, does 100 indicate most or least addictive?

          • 0 avatar
            RideHeight

            “18 Mescaline”

            Yay, gentle mescaline! It’s what I want in my euthanasia cocktail!

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            100 is most addictive

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Interesting the most addictive thing is perfectly legal in the US. Thx.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            28-Cars-Later – this tidbit is straight from the US’s Centre for Disease Control:

            “Smoking-related illness in the United States costs more than $300 billion each year, including: Nearly $170 billion for direct medical care for adults. More than $156 billion in lost productivity, including $5.6 billion in lost productivity due to secondhand smoke exposure.”

            Whereas the economic cost to society of speeding-related crashes is estimated by NHTSA to be $40.4 billion per year.

            Where should law enforcement focus it’s efforts?

            Thought I’d steer the discussion back to motor vehicles. (No pun intended)

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I call BS on that $40 billion figure in speeding related crashes. NHSTA figures show in 2013 there were 5,687,000 crashes of *all* types.

            40000000000/5678000=7044.73406129

            So the mean cost is $7,044 per crash for all crashes using the 40 billion figure (3/5ths were property related crashes only). But NHSTA thinks there is 40 billion lost in speeding related crashes alone?

            http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Pubs/812101.pdf

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            28-Cars-Later – “The total economic cost of crashes was estimated at $230.6 billion in 2000. Motor vehicle crashes cost society an estimated $7,300 per second. In 2000, the cost of speeding-related crashes was estimated to be $40.4 billion– $76,865 per minute or $1,281 per second.”

            I am not sure what they considered “speed related” other than estimated speed above posted limits.

            Total crash costs is much higher.

            http://www.derricklawfirm.com/library/cost-of-speedingrelated-crashes.cfm

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I think the only way E is less addictive than caffeine is because you don’t have the time to get addicted to it. You use it four times, your insides heat up and turn to beef jerky, and you die.

      • 0 avatar
        VolandoBajo

        @mike1dog My sincere sympathy for the loss of your cousin.

        I have heard and seen too many stories like this, having given up drinking years and years ago, and since, having sat in many rooms where stories like these abound.

        And the lack of understanding of the nature of addiction in our society, and the kneejerk way society seeks to solve the problem by locking it away, are barbaric. Some day society will look back to these times, and view them the same way we now view the chaining of mentally ill individuals as was done in, e.g., Bethlehem Asylum, a/k/a Bedlam.

        Treatment is far and away the most effective and humane response, and yet our electorate chooses to react as if all who are addicted are alien invaders, rather than mothers and fathers, sons and daughters, brothers and sisters, and so on.

        Some of the kindest and gentlest among us have been lost to us, because they could not find a way to cope with their demons without self-medicating, and society would not provide what they needed to find a way out.

        There is a way out, but it is kept a well-hidden, and seldom considered alternative to punishment of those who suffer from addictions.

        Perhaps in the lifetimes of some of us, we will see this madness change. But I do not think I will see it in my lifetime, as I have been waiting decades for the change to arrive, and instead, the insanity continues.

        A college friend spent two years in a Louisiana prison for two joints. Some people are serving life for little more, and with no violence involved. And for what, and for who?

        There are none so blind, as those that will not see…

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Fun fact.

      The United States has more people in jail, prison, house arrest, or on supervised parole than any other country in the world, either per capita or in real numbers.

      The real numbers statistic is pretty stunning when you consider the vast population of countries like China or India.

      We have criminalized stupidity in this country to the point that the average American, just going about their day-to-day lives, probably commits at least a misdemeanor on a daily basis – probably a felony of some sort under some stupid law about once a month. It is stunning what is a “crime” in the United States.

      We wail about crime and punishment in this country, and how the police are under attack. Then we begrudge police unions as helping thugs, call for police pensions to be gutted, even though the average street cop is physically and mentally spent as a human being after 20 to 25 years. We won’t give money to the courts to prosecute criminals (that takes judges and lawyers) and we sure don’t want to build prisons. So instead we hand over money to public traded companies, which incarcerate people for profit, and who put requirements in contracts to the states that use them to keep those private prisons full of fresh souls. That requires further legislation of stupidity and selective enforcement.

      Selective enforcement is easy. If you’re poor (regardless of race) you’re boned. If you’re middle class, with enough money to hire a real lawyer, you get a plea deal that will likely give you house arrest or a promise to be good after paying fines – because the money is more important. If you’re rich or connected, unless you’re incredibly stupid, you walk. It’s just that simple.

      Fun fact. Eighty-percent of all criminal cases in the United States end in plea deals. Why? Because if the system was forced by Constitutional standard to hear every case by a jury of ones peers, and within the Constitutional mandated time period in the 6th Amendment, our legal system would completely collapse. Not enough lawyers. Not enough judges. Not enough jail cells.

      It always amuses me when people point to countries with crime rates that are a fraction to the United States as examples of “broken” justice systems in the world – because they don’t give out strong sentences.

      For some strange reason – one does not think of Japan and massive crime problems, beyond the Crazy 88 in Kill Bill and Uma Thurman flattened them anyway.

      There is something deeply wrong with American society – and the answer is not easy to come to. It is clearly very complex. A continued march to a police state is no answer. We give the police MRAPS, they sell their armored vans at auction which then get used to shoot up police stations by nut cases. See, we NEED MRAPS! The bad guys now have armored vans! Fun little circle we’ve created.

      The problem won’t be fixed by longer jail sentences here – we already throw people into the system at a rate that no one in the world matches. Never mind the fact that statistically this country hasn’t been this safe since the 60s. The whole meme of, “someone is going to come into your house, kill you, rape your dog, ride your wife, and trim your hedges while you bleed out,” is largely a lie.

      But hey – we have a problem. I know – lets create more laws to lock up more people for even longer. We won’t give the courts anymore money to process them. We’ll take away the pensions and benefits from those union thug police officers. We won’t give any money to the penal system, instead we’ll out source it and let EBITDA and shareholder equity make the decisions on how many, who, when, and why.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Perfectly said.

        My $.02 is that there is no reason to jail anyone for a victimless crime, with drug possession and use offenses being the top of the list. It just doesn’t do any good, and causes an enormous amount of harm. Such a complete waste. And this from a guy who not only has never done any sort of illegal drug, never even had a drink of alcohol until he was 21.

        On the other hand, somebody like Tsarnaev, the idiot in Dallas, or the kid who killed those folks in the church a few days ago, I would cheerfully pull the switch myself. Lest anyone think I am a bleeding heart. I see no need to share the planet with someone who can commit mass murder. Mental health issues or no. But a successful exec who needs a little something to get through the day? Whatever. Should just be legal.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          Completely agree with krhodes1

          I’d flip a coin with you on who gets to pull the switch on Dylann Roof.

          Personally I think Tsarnaev should be kept alive in a deep dark hole, fed beer and bacon everyday where he can’t figure out where east is.

          I hope when he goes he discovers his virgins in heavens are all former Catholic priests – and they like boys…

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        well said.

      • 0 avatar
        notapreppie

        Part of the problem is the culture of fear. People are afraid of criminals the politicians know this. So, any time somebody tries some kind of criminal justice reform, they’re branded as “soft on crime”. Kills any kind of movement dead in the water.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Excellent post.

      • 0 avatar
        LectroByte

        Speaking of police, and Maserati’s, here you go:

        http://www.wrcbtv.com/story/29363595/autopsy-man-shot-in-maserati-by-police-was-shot-in-back

      • 0 avatar
        markf

        The last thing we need is more lawyers. 80% f cases end in plea deals because prosecutors (esp. at the FED level) overcharge suspects(because almost everything is a crime these days)so they are looking at unduly harsh sentences. Most suspects realize they don’t have a chance against a Gov. with unlimited resources and take the plea. And if you do reject the plea and win you end up broke,the process is the punishment…..

      • 0 avatar
        runs_on_h8raide

        American Prisons are BIG business. People, you should research how much stuff is made by prisoners and sold in this country. Our govt likes to throw out how there’s slave labor in other parts of the world, or extremely low wages…nothing lower than free through the prison slave system, but they don’t show you that on mainstream media. Can you imagine how cheap they could make a car for. Gangsta Motors…the new GM. Made in the USA…Blood “Red”, “White” CEOs and Crip “Blue” baby!!!

  • avatar

    I always think back to STAR TREK 6 when they convicted Kirk.
    While the crew (staff) is his responsibility, a conspiracy within the staff to commit felonies should NOT be laid on the head simply because they weren’t in on it.

    • 0 avatar
      Advance_92

      But as head they should be aware of their subordinates’ activities. It’s a different concept of leadership, loyalty and personal responsibility, Klingon or Japanese.

  • avatar
    shipping96

    A lot of reports out there of how common prescription medication abuse has become. People get hurt, get pain meds, get addicted. And many end of up finding that due to the inaccesibility of prescription drugs and their cost, they end up turning to heroin. Suburban moms, the new heroin customers. Crazy.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Naf_WiEb9Qs&index=1&list=PLBA06889EA057B4C0

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Opiods permanently alter brain chemistry and composition. A tin foiled hat critical thinker might argue these drugs are purposely over-prescribed in order to purposely create opioid (and later heroin) abusers.

      “These findings suggest that prescription opioid dependence is associated with structural and functional changes in brain regions implicated in the regulation of affect and impulse control, as well as in reward and motivational functions. These results may have important clinical implications for uncovering the effects of long-term prescription opioid use on brain structure and function.”

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2912691/

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Might explain my ex.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        28-Cars-Later – endorphin pathways are but one way that pain signals are transmitted. The central nervous system and gut are the only place with receptors.

        Overuse of any substance can result in changes to the nervous system. Prolonged chronic pain without opioid use results in nervous system remodeling.
        The study you cited states that chronic pain or opioid dependence “may produce partially overlapping brain changes”.

        I had a conversation once with a Pain Specialist and a Doctor with a PHD in neurobiology:
        People with depression or chronic pain have similar “wiring”.

        The whole “chicken or egg” part of the neurological debate IS this:

        Do opioids remodel the brain in addictive people or are people with certain neurobiological features more prone to addiction?

        We already see 10-15% of the populace develop a chronic pain syndrome post surgical procedure.

        That indicates that some are predisposed to chronic pain just like some are predisposed to addiction.

        The rate of addiction in acute pain settings i.e. post-op pain or acute pain is incredibly low.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Very interesting question, Lou_BC. If I had access to data on the subject i would try to draw a correlation between people with a previous history of chronic pain/depression who also later develop some kind of drug addiction.

        • 0 avatar
          clivesl

          Lou, You seem knowledgeable about pain management. What kind of research is there on the use Cannabis based pain meds? Wouldn’t those be less addictive than opioids?

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @clivesl – Cannabis for the treatment of pain, nausea, appetite etc. is a new and emerging field since it has been decriminalized and now legal for use in patients. That opens up the field of science for “above ground” research.

            One of the biggest problems I am currently seeing in the Medical Profession is the fact that most MD’s are conservative and still see cannabis/marijuana as a recreational drug with little medicinal efficacy. That is based on socio/political opinion as opposed to science.

            The Canadian Supreme Court just overturned law that restricted “medical” use to dry marijuana. Many preferred not to smoke it so this will help expand its use i.e. oils and foods.

            Scientists are isolating various active metabolites in cannabis. We all know about THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) but other active agents like CBD(cannabidiol) are being found to have differing effects.
            Nabilone is a prescription medication that mimics THC. It has been around for some time that was the only legal alternative to marijuana. There are those that say it works more like CBD than THC.

            I don’t have a problem with offering it to patients for use. It works in some people and not others but same can be said for opioids, antiemetics, neuroleptics, and antidepressants.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            clivesl – sorry, I guess I didn’t really answer your question directly.

            There doesn’t tend to be a high addiction rate when opioids are used in the context of pain. Chronic pain probably has a higher incidence of addiction.

            The table I posted was more about illicit or commonly abused drugs and narcotics. Marijuana does rate fairly low. I would suspect that most prescribed opioids are similar to heroin in activity.

            I do believe that Oxycodone (Percodan) is the most addictive.

      • 0 avatar
        notapreppie

        “These findings suggest” doesn’t mean an absolute causal link.

        I’m not saying you’re incorrect but your phrasing of it makes it sound like it’s a slam dunk when it’s really “these findings suggest”.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          notapreppie – cut and paste does not an expert make.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I’m quoting a source and provided a link to the source. If you want to go tit for tat with the source, or provided a contradicting one, by all means.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            28-Cars-Later – my apologies for the last comment. One does not always know what one does for a living outside of these boards.

            I do find it interesting that in the arena of pain management, one does not see a very high addiction rate especially with acute pain. The incidence is higher with chronic pain but that tends to be more due to a conditioned fear behavior i.e. fearful and weary of pain.

            One does see a large number of addicted individuals in chronic pain management more because they are fishing for sources of drug or are difficult to manage from a pain perspective due to endorphin pathways being rendered ineffective due to chronic abuse, neurological remodeling i.e. other pathways taking over pain transmission or “down regulation” systems becoming hyperactive. These factors can occur with chronic pain patients as well.

            Habituation is a different phenomenon. People will go into withdrawal symptoms but that is a physiological response to chronic use as opposed to a psychophysiological response i.e. one needs the substances emotionally as well as physically.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            As Mr. Spock would say, fascinating.

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    They are just protecting their sake industry.

    But seriously, why would an exec need oxy when you can just drive around in an Avalon and become just as sleepy.

    • 0 avatar

      Now THAT is the Quote of the day….

      “But seriously, why would an exec need oxy when you can just drive around in an Avalon and become just as sleepy.”

      It really is a brain chemistry thing. I’ve seen (and had OD and die) a few “heroin kid” clients…generally not bad folks, and the criminal behavior is to get money for the drugs…so you end up with shoplifting, credit card crime, or the infamous “steal grandma’s VCR”. There tend to be a LOT of offenses in a short period of time, and it isn’t “the system” screwing them. Heroin kids yes you and the Court to death yet do nothing they are supposed to….

      Had an ACL rebuilt. Bitch of an experience, and the pain meds made it bearable. Glad they exist-but the same dose that in the beginning made me drool on the couch watching daytime TV at the end did almost nothing. When I was able to gratefully go off them, three unpleasant days followed…flu plus hangover minus headache….

      Japan is well known for being tough on drugs and smuggling…only Saudi Arabia may be tighter.

  • avatar

    I hope there are some fellow TTACers from the Tamp Bay area. If so, you can verify the ravenous nature of the presciption pill problem that plagues Pasco and Hernando Counties. I worked in Pasco for about five years and my most entertaining stories of customer interaction typically always have pills at the root of them. In fact, our detailers used to move pills out of the back of the dealership until the Sheriffs came and busted them.

    Its quite hypocritical of any respectable governing body to come down so harshly on cigarettes and marijuana and give prescriptions painkillers and sedatives a free pass, nay, encourage their use and absue.

    For the record, I’ve never had someone scale the fence at my lot and steal 22″ chrome wheels for cigarette or weed money. But I have for pill money.

    • 0 avatar
      sproc

      That’s terrible, but thank you for providing the perspective. Just curious, other than having the employees arrested, was the business impacted by the detailers dealing out of the shop? Fines, seizures, license renewals, etc.?

  • avatar
    carguy

    Unless there is proof that she was selling these for profit, the only thing she is guilty of is being addicted to painkillers. What she needs more than anything is medical help to quit her addiction and get her life back in order.

  • avatar
    sckid213

    Um wtf is she wearing in that photo. It looks like something from the “Princess Mombi from Return to Oz” collection.

    Sorry couldn’t help myself.

    • 0 avatar
      brettc

      I thought it was a black puffy shirt because she wants to be a pirate. But maybe I’m wrong. Either way, I’m wondering if the oxy is calling the shots and telling her to wear that.

  • avatar
    tpepin

    She looks like the type be quite wild behind closed doors in a nonprofessional setting, I’m thinking those Oxy pills were actually meant for her…

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    Good thing Japanese automakers don’t whip disgraced executives anymore like they did in 1986’s Gung Ho, starring Michael Keaton and the Donger from Sixteen Candles.

  • avatar
    bikegoesbaa

    So, why are painkillers prescription-based at all?

    They’re not like antibiotics, where they become less effective for *you* if *I* overuse them.

    Just open it up, sell them OTC at Walgreens for 50 cents a pill, and save billions on enforcement and incarceration.

    I don’t care if somebody wants to spend the weekend (or month) in an opiate haze. People are doing that already now, but if it’s legal they won’t have to rob me or steal my catalytic converters in order to bankroll it.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      bikegoesbaa – opioids do become less effective if you overuse them.

      • 0 avatar
        bikegoesbaa

        Right, but only for the individual who is overusing them.

        Antibiotic-resistant diseases that impact everybody develop when somebody else misapplies them.

        The way opiods effect me is unchanged by the fact that the guy next door is eating them like candy. So why not let him?

        Make them legal for consenting adults, drop the prescription requirement, tax the users, punish those who drive while intoxicated. Just like alcohol.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          bikegoesbaa – well, that only applies if you happen to catch one of those antibiotic resistant organisms. Some of those microbes are only resistant to certain antibiotics.

          In many cases it is just irresponsible Physicians handing out prescriptions for opioids like candy. Your drug dealer becomes a dude in a lab coat with a high overhead office.

          The fact that the dude next door is eating opioids like candy does have an effect on you. Health care costs and decreased productivity effect us all.

    • 0 avatar
      JD23

      “but if it’s legal they won’t have to rob me or steal my catalytic converters in order to bankroll it.”

      If someone is broke and addicted to Oxy, you assert that he won’t rob you for drug money to buy legal Oxy? Do you expect the federal government to subsidize the cost for low income addicts?

      • 0 avatar
        bikegoesbaa

        I assert that he is less likely to be broke, because if his recreational drug of choice was legal he will be less likely to be branded a felon and lose his job.

        I further assert that if Oxy was legal and barely regulated it would cost much less, further reducing the need to commit actual crimes to acquire it. Generally people don’t resort to stickups to pay for their alcohol, because why bother when you can get a handle of Popov for ten bucks?

        I expect that government simply subsidizing the manufacture of Oxy and then giving it away free by the caseload would probably be cheaper overall and less damaging than the current strategy, which is about the worst option possible. This approach wouldn’t be my first choice, but I would’t oppose it either.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          bikegoesbaa – prescription opioids for the most part aren’t that expensive (at least in Canada). If it is prescribed for a legitimate reason it is covered by virtually every medical plan. Some require that you start out on something like morphine and if that isn’t effective then you rotate to different opioid. Same can be said for virtually any medication. Most plans will require starting out on a less expensive equivalent for any medication.

      • 0 avatar

        In my area, New York, most of the heroin is because it is way cheaper than the pills….so they go from eating oxy to shooting H, with all the attendant medical problems jabbing dirty/shared needles causes.

  • avatar
    wmba

    The explanation given makes no sense to me. Was the package addressed to Hemp or the previous owner of her house; why do Americans drive to the international airport to get their mail?

    Poor writing, because it’s the details that matter in a case like this.

    Toyota hasn’t abandoned her, so there must be some doubt as to what’s going on. It it was all cut and dried, they would have dropped her like a hot potato. As it stands, it’s just a load of confusion.

    • 0 avatar
      b534202

      Yeah, I keep reading from other sites also that she got the package at Narita, which is strange.
      Now this article says she’s using someone else’s name, even stranger.

    • 0 avatar
      Signal11

      It only takes a couple of minutes of reading the top few Japanese news article hits to clear this up.

      The Japanese news media is reporting that 1.) it was discovered at Narita and 2.) the package was addressed to Julie Hamp and 3.) Ms. Hamp’s residence is at a hotel.

  • avatar
    Pebble

    Hey, it’s Sheldon’s mom from Big Bang Theory!

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Jailing non-violent citizens for drug possession is idiotic on a galactic scale, but IT’S BIG BUSINESS JUST LIKE WAR.

    http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/21694-shocking-facts-about-americas-for-profit-prison-industry

    http://www.globalresearch.ca/war-the-racket-of-big-business-wall-street-and-the-bankers/5389212

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      DeadWeight – any war whether it be on drugs or weapons of mass destruction ends up benefiting some elite.

      They make billions and the poor SOB’s at the bottom end of society end up as cannon fodder or prison fodder.

      A CEO walks away with billions or causes billions in losses and nothing happens. A black dude lights a joint and ends up being someone’s bitch for the next 20 years.

      Put a few CEO’s in jail and GM executives might become more competent rather quickly.

    • 0 avatar
      ccode81

      Asian countries still remember first opium war in Sino, having idea of how bad drugs hurts the nation.

  • avatar
    mcs

    She probably had something to do with the Mirai program. That was probably the tip-off. One look at that car and you know serious drugs are involved somehow.

  • avatar
    Signal11

    The real irony of this situation is that this is a country whose economic gears would come to a grinding halt in short order without the social lubrication provided by alcohol. The consumption of alcohol is not optional, it is required, primarily because employees of large organizations are not socially allowed to speak their minds at the workplace. It is only during after hours team building (aka, heavy drinking) in which you are allowed to express your opinion in a meaningful way.

    BTW, females not invited (or sent home before the really sketchy stuff, aka mutual blackmail, gets started.

    • 0 avatar
      DrGastro997

      You’re right about the dynamics of the Japanese salary man and drinking. Business relationships, even with customers, are built based on eating, drinking, and entertaining (karaoke clubs, hostess clubs, etc.). This happens in just about every field of work. Funny how Nissan’s Ghosn eliminated executive’s monetary privileges that include expensive dinners and alcohol. He is said to take his executives to ramen shops instead of karaoke clubs.

      And the females better go home before heavy sexual harassment starts after stop number one = dinner.

      • 0 avatar
        Signal11

        With females of higher social position (department chairs, executives, etc) in the dining party, you go directly to a karaoke club for round 2. Then the party splits up. Which is why no one wants women along anyway.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    At first glance I thought her name was Julie Hemp, but after reading the article further I realized she was arrested for Oxycodone and not pot. Does she know Russ Limbaugh?

  • avatar
    JD23

    The real crime is that shirt.

  • avatar
    DrGastro997

    It’s highly doubtful she’ll ever be terminated. She’ll probably quit, if at all, because of the shame she brought to Toyota and Mr. Toyoda. Even that, being an employee of one company is usually for life. I wonder what happens next…

  • avatar
    John

    Here’s a news flash – reputation and status are key to anyone facing criminal charges anywhere in the world, and have been since before the time of Hammurabi.

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