By on June 18, 2015

2016 Kia Sorento SXL

Once one of the bests among the rests, Japanese automakers fell below average in the 2015 J.D. Power Initial Quality Study as the Koreans rise in quality.

While Porsche took the gold in initial quality for the third consecutive year, Kia took the silver in this year’s study, Detroit Free Press reports, marking the first time the brand has led all non-premium makes in the study; Hyundai held onto fourth behind Jaguar in 2015.

Meanwhile, Lexus tied with parent company Toyota for ninth with 104 problems per 100 units, with Infiniti finishing in fifth as the highest-ranked Japanese brand; it had placed 24th in 2014, five spots below the industry average of 116 problems per 100 units. Chevrolet took seventh as the highest-ranked U.S. mainstream brand, while Lincoln took eighth as the highest-ranked U.S. luxury brand.

According to J.D. Power U.S. automotive quality chief Renee Stephens, the shift in quality among the Koreans “was a historic shift” in the 29 years the study has been conducted:

For so long, Japanese brands have been viewed by many as the gold standard in vehicle quality. We’re seeing other brands, most notably Korean makes, really accelerating the rate of improvement. Leading companies are not only stepping up the pace of improvements on existing models, but are also working up front to launch vehicles with higher quality and more intuitive designs.

She adds the Koreans are where they are now due to their holistic approach in improving quality, from the assembly line, to design and the supply chain.

Technology remains the sticking point regarding initial quality, with the top problems being pairing smartphones to the vehicle’s infotainment system, and voice command. There, Stephens says Hyundai and Kia, as well as Chevrolet, benefitted from strong systems, while Ford has worked out the bugs, and Toyota’s system needed improvement:

Smartphones have set high consumer expectations of how well technology should work, and automakers are struggling to match that success in their new vehicles. However, we are seeing some (automakers) make important improvements along the way. What’s clear is that they can’t afford to wait for the next generation of models to launch before making important updates to these systems.

This year’s J.D. Initial Quality Study surveyed over 84,000 who bought or leased a new 2015 model, and covers 215 models and 139 plants.

Photo credit: Kia

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77 Comments on “Koreans Best Japan In 2015 JD Power Initial Quality Study...”


  • avatar
    210delray

    Bah, initial quality after just 90 days — means nothing! I keep my cars for a decade or more typically. (My ’98 Frontier with a manual is going on 17 years.) I don’t have a smartphone, so what is this “pairing” issue? Voice commands — like I give my wife?

    Now get off my lawn!

    • 0 avatar
      andyinatl

      Precisely what i was thinking. It’s not that hard to impress someone getting into new car with the soft touch surfaces, well padded armrests, etc. How does all that still look/feel after 5-6 years of southern 90+ degree heat in summer and 20-30 degree days in winter is another story. My 2003 Golf purchased new looked great and had ambiance of an Audi, but within couple of years, the buttons’ pain started peeling, as well as the soft-touch material that was on the door handles. A year later that soft touch material was looking like a mess. Japanese cars have a benefit of multiple decades of very good reputation for quality and reliability, and IQ study is not going to do squat to change that.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      JD Power IS A JOKE.

      I do not care that the qualifier here is “initial quality,” as even their long term reliability index lacks the credibility of Consumer Reports Reliability Index.

      A Hyundai or Kia product with higher quality than nearly any Japanese rival? Exceedingly rare.

      A Hyundai or Kia product with higher quality than nearly any GM or Ford product? Much more plausible, especially if we’re speaking of something along the lines of a Hyundai Genesis Sedan vs a Cadillac ATS, CTS or XTS, where the cost if 1/2, yet the quality, reliability and durability is 10x better.

      • 0 avatar
        carguy

        “Hyundai Genesis Sedan vs a Cadillac ATS, CTS or XTS, where the cost if 1/2, yet the quality, reliability and durability is 10x better”

        So you complain out JD Power’s numbers but feel free to spout your own made up reliability stats that are not backed by any evidence what so ever?

        • 0 avatar
          alexndr333

          Carguy: Our DW friend supports that which agrees with his world view (Cadillac bad) and dismisses all that which conflicts with it. It’s the sign of a simple mind.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Consumer Reports is far more credible than JD Powers, despite Pch101’s claims to the contrary (even though Pch was careful to not suggest that JD Powers had superior datum regarding long term reliability versus CR, because they don’t).

            JD Powers is essentially an industry lapdog, whoring itself out to manufacturers.

            No entity can rival CR’s exhaustive & comprehensive survey data (responses from over 1.1 million actual consumers per year, breaking down reliability over multiple categories from motor to cooling system to transmission, suspension, electronics and even body hardware/integrity, etc.) in terms of producing statistically reliable (repeatable) quality data regarding new & used vehicles.

            CR rates GM vehicles extremely poorly, with fewer than 33% of GM vehicles receiving even a “average reliability” rating, and 77% of GM vehicles receiving a “below average” or “well below average” reliability rating, as tracked over not just 90 days, but for as long as 7 years of a model’s life cycle.

            JD Powers initial quality survey is near worthless, and good for wiping one’s a$$ with whilst in the Cadillac Dealer’s filthy bathroom stall whilst getting their Crap-i-Lac ATS/CTS/XTS repaired in or out of warranty for the upteempth time.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            I’m pretty sure that you don’t know anything about JD Power or the flaws in CR’s methodology.

            CR is useful but it is compromised by some of the shortcuts that are taken in order to save money. JD Power does a better job of sampling, including its selection of who is included and not included in the survey.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          …“Hyundai Genesis Sedan vs a Cadillac ATS, CTS or XTS, where the cost if 1/2, yet the quality, reliability and durability is 10x better”

          So you complain out JD Power’s numbers but feel free to spout your own made up reliability stats that are not backed by any evidence what so ever?…

          Thank you and exactly. Here is data that supports his point, but the data is a joke. So I guess the opinion is a…

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            ‘s OK.

            We’ve all learned to correct for the fact that in DeadWeight Land the Genesis (and the Chrysler 300, for that matter) can be bought for the cost of a Prius, while all Cadillacs are actually loaded Vsports (but marked down five figures).

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Dal pans the Hyundai Genesis & Chrysler 300, both superior to anything GM slaps together, while his Pontiac G8 literally disintegrates around him with each additional mile driven (a b!tch he commonly pitches around these parts).

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I like the Genesis and 300 fine. I’ve even said more than once that if I lived in a place with nothing but wide straight roads I’d likely own a 300. You just tend to lowball their pricing (for the 300, in decently equipped form) and exaggerate their value.

            My G8 has interior build quality issues, like all pre-VF Holdens, but otherwise is doing fine. Not a hiccup from the powertrain, and the only repairs that have ever been needed have been for two minor electrical problems (defects in the CHMSL LED array and a failed TPMS receiver).

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            You talk out your a$$, Dal.

            I am going to rub it in your face from now on when you do.

            http://www.southfieldchryslerdodgejeepram.com/specials/new.htm

            Check out those NON-EMPLOYEE prices for Chrysler 300 LIMITEDS (rwd AND awd).

            If you challenge the veracity of my assertions, prepare to be impeached under cross examination.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            DW-

            Have you ever purchased anything from Southfield CJD? I work like a mile away most days and I am tempted to go over there and see if the lease deals are for real.

            If I can get a Chrysler 300 for $188/month with $0/down, sign me up.

          • 0 avatar

            I visit Southfield CDJ whenever I need one a CDJ model as the comparison car in one of my reviews.

            I cannot speak for the entire dealership, but Michael Williams is a genuinely nice, helpful guy. Ask for him if you go by, or just call (248-354-2950). He won’t BS you.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Yes.

            I nearly pulled the trigger on a 2012 JGC X Package (basically a limited) with a buyer’s order locked in for 31.6k plus TTL (MSRP was 38.xK). I decided against it at last minute.

            I helped someone lease a 2015 300S 2 1/2 months ago from there for $207/month sign & drive.

            I assisted brother-in-law buy a 2003 Jeep Liberty 4×4 from there new.

            I helped prob 4 other people get vehicles (lease or purchase) there in last decade.

            They are straight as long as you get deal lined & signed before going (as best as can be said of any dealer I’ve ever dealt with) and you don’t need non-conventional financing (i.e. aren’t subprime).

            The only caveat on those deals is a military $500 bonus which is in fine print, so tack that $500 on (though you quality).

            I had breakfast with son of largest Macomb county Chrysler/Dodge dealer last Wednesday in My. Clemens and the situation is such that nearly every automaker is blowing cars out at heavy discounts because manufacturers are trying to keep plant utilization up (GM is idling shifts at Orion Assembly due to slow Verano & Sonic sales and LGR due to slow ATS/CTS swellS.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Thanks MK.

            I’ve seen their ads for years, but never knew if they were BS or not.

            DW-

            Royal Oak Ford told me I could lease a Taurus SHO for $238/month for 24 months. The SHO has $8K on the hood for a lease.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Michael Williams is who I dealt with on that JGC deal (he even tagged the color I wanted from another dealer at that price).

            Southfield probably gets the most holdback cash from FCA of any dealer in the nation (at least in Michigan) because they do massive volume.

            Parkway is the new kid on M59 that will probably try to challenge Southfield (they started with 12 acres and already are expanding so they can stock more inventory).

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        As far as research methodology goes, JD Power is superior to Consumer Reports.

        • 0 avatar
          TrailerTrash

          This is true. CR does have some really poor data but GREAT media coverage. But again, not sure what the initial quality is good for. Not every new owner suffers as I d from Buyer Remorse…seeing a better car as I drive out from the dealer. If I had Leno’s money my garage would be double his.

          Then again, I see this after even a laptop purchase. Guess and OCD thing. I still scroll through newspapers trying to decide IF my last year purchase of a LG refrigerator was the best buy and can I have another new thing…anything!!!

          Plus this is kind of why I refuse to go to weddings. OK…great party. And do the new lovers fawn all over each other and kissy face every 3 seconds.
          Just call me after the 2rnd anniversary. Then we will see if the the lovey-dovey crap is still around once the couch farting and empty beers on the coffee table show up.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        Please, head to head, most Kias have higher grade interior material quality than Toyotas and the previous gen Camry was widely blasted in reviews for both chinzy interior materials and poor fit and finish (not close to the levels what the Camry had been known for).

        Also, Hyundai was ranked no.1 for 2 years in Germany by AutoBild for long term reliability, so it’s not it hasn’t happened before.

        Honda/Acura has started to slip since it is having teething problems with its new powertrains and other tech (the RLX, in particular, has had numerous issues) – which is why there have have been a no. of delays (prompted by Japanese recalls which have delayed US launch).

        Toyota, after basically using the same powertrains for about a decade, has just started to introduce new powertrains (finally joining the turbo club and the like), so it’ll be interesting to see how they fare.

        Of the Japanese Big 3, Nissan had fallen 1st since it introduced new powertrain components earliest (in particular, its CVT has been problematic) – but will likely be the 1st to start trending back up as they work out the kinks.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          I agree that the Koreans have improved interior fit/finish/material quality dramatically over the last decade, while the Japanese have taken steps backwards, on a relative basis (relative to where they once stood relative to the competition).

          However, I disagree that the Koreans, with a few exceptions (we’ll see how the new Sonata and new Genesis hold up over time) will be as trouble free/durable over the long term (i.e. 5 to 12 years) as the average Japanese vehicle (Toyota-Lexus, Honda-Acura, Mazda, mainly).

          I say this as someone who is NOT a fan of Acura or Lexus’s latest products (I criticize Acura as harshly as any brand), and who is NOT happy about Mazda moving production of the Mazda 3 and future products to Mexico (Mazda was tied for best non-premium quality and reliability with Subaru per CR, and I believe those results as accurate).

          • 0 avatar

            You do realize that CR’s brand rankings are based on the three most recent model years, and so only cover cars up to about 2.5 years of age, right? If you want a measure of long-term reliability, that’s not it.

            As much as I wish the situation were more complex, only Honda and Toyota consistently produce cars that remain reliable for well over six years.

    • 0 avatar
      Fred

      Every dealer I went to had some JD Power trophies to show off. It’s just bs.

      • 0 avatar
        MBella

        That’s all JD power is. They suckle money from automakers and dealers by taking money for special “training” they administer to improve scores. It has nothing to do with reality.

        • 0 avatar
          Brumus

          Dead Weight:

          I have a pile of old Consumer Reports lying around here at the cottage up in God’s country, also known as the Laurentians.

          Remind me again what year your allegedly reliable RX-X is?

          Kind regards

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            The “worst” Japanese or Korean vehicle is light years better than the “best” Garbage Motors vehicle in terms of reliability/durability.

            As Jack stated clearly and correctly in his review of the 2015 Hyundai Sonata, “…it doesn’t need to be said, but in this respect the Malibu isn’t even a competitor — which is perhaps why the press materials accidentally showed the previous-gen Malibu. Hyundai’s long past having to worry about fighting General Motors.”

            And check out those 6, long, arduous miles on the odometer before the LATEST Chevy Z06 suffered a catastrophic engine failure [email protected] MOTORS:

            http://www.gminsidenews.com/forums/f19/what-heck-going-another-z06-motor-blows-6-miles-211273/

            I guess a combination of shoddy engineering, shoddy QC, shoddy fabrication, shoddy motor casting, and 320 degree engine temperatures due to ENGINE COOLING FAIL will do that. LULZ!

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            Wow – so one updated performance engine failing is emblematic of all GM engines?

            As stated above, Acura has had numerous issues with the RLX.

            And when Honda previously had launched a new powertrain component – its now eponymous 6spd AT, it had a history of prematurely failing.

            Same thing with Toyota’s now venerable V6 – early on, there were teething problems until the kinks were worked out.

  • avatar
    rdclark

    What “quality” are they measuring? This survey annually blurs the distinction between “satisfaction” and “reliability.” Manufacturers do well in it when they give buyers what they want right this minute; those that focus on building bulletproof vehicles that may not be as polished do less well.

    The danger is that poor performance in this survey may influence a brand to focus more on shiny toys and less on solid, reliable design.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    Japan Inc ain’t what it used to be. Honda’s new DCT sucks, and its having the same problems with the ZF 9-speed as everyone else. The V6 Accord wasn’t even recommend by CR due to quality issues. Nissan has never been in the same league as the others, and while they have at least somewhat recovered from their horrendous quality levels from the early ’00s, that CVT has been doing them no favors. The ’13 Altima was one of the worst new car launches in terms of quality in recent memory, and the CVT was largely to blame, although there were other issues like seat heaters that didn’t work as well.

    I now await the double standard comments. Japanese brands do poorly in IQS = the study is flawed. German brands do poorly in IQS = typical German crap lol.

    One thing will always remain true though, don’t trust that Fiat.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    Tee hee… voice recognition and connectivity problems dominate the list of complaints.

    Oh, God, that’s serious!

  • avatar
    nguyenvuminh

    I’m inclined to agree with 210delray and andyinatl, the first couple of months doesn’t mean much. I buy and own my cars over the last 27 years and the Toyotas and Hondas really differentiate themselves from the rest. The Korean cars have improved drastically but I think there’s still a difference.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Every Korean car I’ve been in or touched has had some inherent cheapness to it. Something here or there which isn’t as solid as it should be, or is a little too small or a little too outdated.

      Even when you pull the door handle on the Equus, it feels cheap. Look at the seat embroidery that says EQUUS at the front, it’s very sloppy.

      It’s always something. The Cruze felt much better built than Forte or that other small Kia.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I did not think IQS really mattered until I bought an FCA product. Now I kind of get it.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    As a Kia partisan, I’d like to wave the flag, but the scores are so closely grouped – and the timescale is so short – that this metric doesn’t mean much to me.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Specifically, a 20% change moves a mfr from the top quartile to the bottom quartile. Hard to take this seriously.

      It is interesting, however, that for the most part the volume sellers are in the top half of the list, while lower volume mfrs are in the bottom half – with some notable exceptions, of course.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    “She adds the Koreans are where they are now due to their holistic approach in improving quality, from the assembly line, to design and the supply chain.”

    Yes, they copied kaizen. And in the process of catching up with Toyota and Honda in quality they’ve also done so in price. So it’s a model per model competition among four quality leaders in any segment they cover.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      And ask yourself how much H/K money you get back at resale time to your T/H money. I’d argue H/K is closer to Mazda depreciation.

      I can’t group Subaru anywhere there because they’re too regional, but hold their resale on Ebay especially well in any event (with a special ridic-resale nod to Forester.)

      • 0 avatar
        RideHeight

        Resale still reflects Hy/K’s crap history, true. But that will change.

        Personally, I can’t see myself *not* lumping for Japanese when it’s my money being committed (except for pickups). So I’m part of the problem.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Initial quality is meaningless because complaints that boil down to “I don’t know how to use it” are treated the same as actual defects. That successfully punishes carmakers for poor interface design, but doesn’t tell you anything about build quality.

    I’ll believe Jaguar belongs near the top only after they escape the bottom of the reliability rankings for a few years running.

  • avatar
    Russycle

    If you buy a new car every year or two, I suppose the JDPIQS is worth looking at to avoid extra trips to the dealer. If you’re a drive it til the wheels fall off type, it’s pretty meaningless.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    Initial quality and long term reliability are 2 completely different animals, I dare say when it comes to the latter, Toyota and Honda still rule, this is based on conversations I have with both mechanics and those who deal in used cars. My sister’s Journey went through the first 3yrs with zero problems, now that the warranty is over, problems are starting to arise.

  • avatar

    JD Power is the Donald Trump of automotive quality evaluators.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      Karesh needs better PR.

      • 0 avatar

        You mean you can’t simply put better information out there, and expect the world to beat a path to your door?

        The PR budgets of CR and JD Power are many times the size of TrueDelta’s entire budget. And they’re effective. Virtually everyone simply rewords whatever JD Power and CR say, without even a hint of a critique.

        This aside, it’d take a very good PR person to communicate things most people just don’t want to hear.

        Some people do have open, critical minds, and actually weigh and evaluate the evidence before reaching a conclusion. For them we’ll continue to do what we’ve been doing.

  • avatar
    64andahalf

    A question for the B&B…is there any amount of JDP saying “Hey, too bad you got a low score…hey ya know, we offer consulting services to help you improve your quality “?

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      Yeah, that’s how they get their money. Their consulting is also meaningless and vague advise. They send out their idiots to dealerships, where management tells them what they want to hear so they can get them out as quickly as possible. The only real things they come up with is stupid marketing talk like referring to customers as “guests” or calling appointments “reservations”. They also have similar “experts” for consulting directly with the manufacturers.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    I’d very seriously consider a Hyundai/Kia for my next car, supposedly they’ve finally sorted out suspension tuning on their latest vehicles. But I can’t stand how they package cars where it is impossible to buy a stick shift model with cruise control.

    The latest Accent was particularly attractive until I caught that nuance to their packaging.

  • avatar
    vanpressburg

    This J.D. Power Initial Quality Study is ridicules.
    Acura below average?
    Acura is one of the most reliable car maker on the market!
    Infinity -best Japanese car ?
    Q50 is the least reliable luxury car on the market!
    What is this study about? How to turn on the radio?

    • 0 avatar
      johnny_5.0

      Regardless of any other ranking, what I want to know is how Infiniti went from 24th to 5th in a single year. Did they even have a single heavily revised model in 2015? Did changing more models over to Q/QX badges improve the initial quality? Did they realize they had forgotten to do any quality control the year before? These dramatic shifts in a single year seem implausible.

  • avatar
    rocketrodeo

    Seems like very few commenters understand the concept of “initial quality.” Complaining that this metric doesn’t mean what you think it should is a rather invalid critique. Rest assured the automakers and every single dealer understand completely.

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      So, an “initial quality” ding actually means “whatever may have pissed-off a customer regardless of its nature”?

      So its not at all a commentary on the basic reliability and build quality of a car?

      I easily accept that specific industry jargon can be code words unknown or misleading to the uninitiated.

      • 0 avatar
        MBella

        Yes, that’s exactly what it means. Just about any unscheduled service visit counts.

        • 0 avatar

          There doesn’t have to be any service visit. In fact, this is the case with most of the reported problems. If someone reports that the voice recognition system has trouble understanding them, or that the Bluetooth wouldn’t pair with their phone, or that they had trouble using the nav, that counts as a problem–even if there is no fix for it.

          And that JD Power includes issues in a “quality rating” that the general public doesn’t think of when they hear a car is “below average in quality” is a strong critique, in my view. JD Power’s influence is based on people’s purchasing decisions being influenced by these ratings. If people knew what they were really measuring, that influence would be reduced.

          Similarly, if the average score were lower (better), that influence would also be reduced. JD Power has a financial interest in maximizing the number of things they count as a problem.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    @rocketrodeo

    So, an “initial quality” ding actually means “whatever may have p1ssed-off a customer regardless of its nature”?

    So it’s not at all a commentary on the basic reliability and build quality of a car?

    I easily accept that specific industry jargon can be code words unknown or misleading to the uninitiated.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      Much of the shift in IQS scores is related to technology issues, such as Bluetooth connectivity and the NAV/computer interface. I suspect that the traditional reliability leaders that have not done well with this will get their acts together and sort this out fairly quickly.

      • 0 avatar
        RideHeight

        As I thought, thanks.

        I would imagine that as the buyer’s age increases so does tolerance of any glitches in what are seen as undesired frills. So would understanding of and experience with cars in general that will look past gadgets to the true reliability and “initial quality” of a vehicle.

        But I can see where dealers and manufacturers would have great anxiety for the sort of petty disappointments felt by trendy youngsters as indicated by Power’s survey. Any tantrum is lost follow-up sales and incalculable bad-mouthing of the brand.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          There’s nothing wrong with expecting the technology to work well. After all, you’re paying for it, so it should work.

          That being said, automakers today have to deal with a whole new series of last mile problems — they don’t control the devices that their customers are using or the varying degrees of user competence that their customers have when using those technologies. The automakers may be taking some blame for problems that were the fault of the user and/or the device.

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        exactly. if i remember correctly, many of the ford complaints were about the electronics and ford touch.
        but isn’t this more to do with the inability of the customer to understand the technology? my dad would complain about the internet and his laptop quality and all he was really doing was complaining about his lack of knowledge and skill.

    • 0 avatar
      rocketrodeo

      @rideheight: build quality yes, reliability less so. Reliability in the first year shouldn’t be a concern with any car sold new these days. But squeaks and rattles, poorly closing doors, flaky or inconsistent infotainment systems, panel gaps — that’s the stuff that gets a manufacturer dinged. It’s nothing more or less than attention to detail. IMO initial quality speaks to the manufacturing process, and reliability speaks to the engineering process.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        Reliability isn’t as big of a problem (but some things, if they are going to fail, do so within 90 days), but aside from the whole ease of use/intuitiveness of infotainment systems, etc. – also takes into account things like rough shifting or improperly shifting transmissions as we have seen in Chrysler’s 9spd AT or the previous Mustang’s China sourced 6spd MT.

  • avatar
    jim brewer

    Well, I guess days 91- 365 are doozies for GM owners.

    Their 10k shows a year over year increase of roughly 20% a cool billion in warranty expenses. That’s not the ignition recall either, as best as I can tell. They dramatically cut their warranty. Take a hint.

    Note 13 on the 10k if you want to see for yourself.

    • 0 avatar
      sunridge place

      ‘As best as I can tell’

      Most revealing statement on that post. Apparently you can’t tell much.

      If you can’t understand that and think that 10k statement relates to the Powertrain warranty cuts that start with the 2016MY vehicles instead of recalls…then maybe you shouldn’t post your thoughts on stuff like this?

      • 0 avatar
        jim brewer

        Nope Sunridge. There it is on p.21. The recall campaign was 2.9 billion. The 20% $1 billion increase in warranty expenses was really a 20% increase in warranty expenses.

        Yes, it would account for a diminution of the power train warranty going into model year 2016. We high finance types call it “cutting your losses”.

  • avatar
    LectroByte

    One of my coworkers bought a top-of-the-line Sonata a year or three back, he likes it a lot, but the AC blows hot every spring, and he takes it back in and they “fix” it under warranty. I think it probably has a slow leak, they’ll probably tell him it needs a new $800 compressor after the bumper to bumper is up next year, assuming he keeps it that long. He’s pretty soured on the brand at this point.

  • avatar
    STRATOS

    I would not put too much weight on these initial quality reports.Most people getting familiarized with their new cars would not even notice if something is out of place or wrong until they owned the vehicle for a while.Low noise and a plush ride they interpret as high quality in a lot of these surveys.Not to discount Kia/Hyandai ratings.Do you ever notice all the stiff riding cars are at the bottom.

    • 0 avatar
      HotPotato

      Ha! A co-worker just demanded I take a ride with her in her new Nissan Rogue Classic. “There’s something wrong with it! It bounces and shudders!” So we go out in the car. Yep, something’s wrong all right: you bought a small, stiffly sprung CUV.

      Her previous car was a melting-marshmallow-era Hyundai Santa Fe, probably the softest-spring CUV ever offered, with original shocks: by the time she traded it, it rode and handled like a pillow.

      She took the Nissan back to the dealer. They fixed the problem by letting a bunch of air out of the tires.

  • avatar
    tekdemon

    What’s weird is that Porsche is on top of this study and then Consumer Reports also similarly says that Porsche reliability is very good. But then What Car in the UK is claiming they’re super unreliable: http://www.cnbc.com/id/102592730

    The data from consumer reports and JD power actually match up decently so I dunno what’s going on with this UK data.

    Edit: It seems that the UK rankings used some sort of cost to repair system that ranked companies a lot lower if repairs were expensive, not just by frequency. That explains a lot then lol.

  • avatar
    DrGastro997

    I get email requests from JDP asking me to complete surveys on quality, reliability, etc. Some of their questions are simply stupid so I delete them anyway. I think it’s obvious Koreans are trying but I think their lack of automotive heritage will always put them years behind Japanese engineering.

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  • Inside Looking Out: Exactly, like cable TV which I cut long time ago. And sound quality is worse that compact...

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