By on May 4, 2015

Mercedes-Benz G-Class (BR 463) 2015

As Mercedes-Benz rolls out its all-new 4.0-liter V8, engineers in Stuttgart have decided the bi-turbo mill will fit right at home in the aging Gelandewagen, a luxo-utility military-born vehicle that hasn’t seen a major update in 25 years.

The immediately recognizable box-on-wheels is due for a complete overhaul for 2017. In the meantime, Mercedes-Benz needs to keep their top-line SUV fresh to captivate the attention of celebrities and athletes and their conspicuous consumption. That’s not to say the updates are insignificant, however.

The new 4.0-liter bi-turbo V8 in the G550 is a variation of that found in the Mercedes-AMG GT and C63. In the G-Class, the V8 is good for 416 hp and 450 lb-ft of torque sent to all four wheels, compared to its 5.5L V8 predecessor with 382 hp and 391 lb-ft of twist.

Other G-Class models see bumps in power as well, including the 571 hp V8 powered G63 and 612 hp V12 motivated G65 – the latter coming to the U.S. for the first time. All V8 powered models are said to improve fuel economy thanks to a new start/stop system.

One model many would love to come to North America – the diesel V6 powered G350d – will continue to be forbidden fruit for those of us in the colonies.

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42 Comments on “2016 Mercedes-Benz G-Class – New Engine Candy, Same Old Boxy Wrapper...”


  • avatar
    ajla

    “All V8 powered models are said to improve fuel economy thanks to a new start/stop system.”

    Well thank God.

  • avatar
    Landcrusher

    How long is the warranty against rust? Longer than the lease I presume?

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I have never seen a rusty G-Wagen, so I don’t think it’s a concern.

      • 0 avatar
        Landcrusher

        Omg, it’s a plague here. Mostly it’s older ones, but sometimes you see some where the clear coat is still on parts, and rust is around the fenders! What type of climate are you in? I’m in Houston. It’s a coastal swamp.

        We had a thing with BMW 7s a while back where they were dying on the Gulf Coast.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Hmm. I’m in SW Ohio, where things like rust on Mazdas and old Hondas is very common.

          Not that I see -that- many G-Wagens, but when I do they’re pristine. Even the older ones.

      • 0 avatar
        hgrunt

        I’ve seen one. My ex’s father’s G500 had a patina underneath from being in NY for a couple years before he bought it. My ex’s mother’s G500 was a California car and the difference was striking.

    • 0 avatar
      TybeeJim

      These are military grade vehicles with luxury interiors. I owned one from 2002-05 and they won’t rust in your lifetime. In fact, the folks that hand-build these in Austria, put 50L of wax into the frame to prevent any inside rust from condensation. The sheet metal, while not bulletproof, is a mm or 2 thicker than any other production vehicle. All window glass is flat for a reason. If it is shattered for any reason, e.g., gunfire, it can be replaced with plywood or other material in the field. I think that it is the only 4-wd vehicle that comes STANDARD with 3 locking differentials. And it’s not nearly as big as folks think. It is tall and has excellent ground clearance, but it is smaller than a Ford Explorer for example. Also, it’s design is well over 25 years old, more like 36 years old since it was originally designed at the request of the Shah of Iran for his personal desert/mountain vehicle. That was prior to 1979! It is currently in use in some form by nearly every military in the world including the USMC who ordered 200 of them several years ago as I recall. Jest if you will, but it is still far more capable off-road than all but maybe a Jeep Rubicon which shares it’s trans/diff from the ill-fated Daimler/Chrysler matchup.

      • 0 avatar
        Landcrusher

        Sorry, buddy. You can stop believing the PR nonsense.

        They rust. They rust worse than jeeps. I don’t know how old you are, but it’s not old enough to know that rusty vehicles were almost all given rust proofing. And, they still rust.

        The worst example I used to see a lot was a grey market model, but now I see many examples of them with rust.

        I’ll start checking the year models on them, but the amount of rusty examples around here is not small.

        • 0 avatar
          TybeeJim

          Landcrusher, I suspect I’m far older than you at 72. I’ve owned, not leased, 37 different cars in my life, lived in the NE for 30 years, (Chicago, Detroit, NY, CT, PA). Yea, I had a Subaru that I bought new in ’75 that had no trunk floor by 1979, so I know rust. And sure, any metal will rust after time, but Gwagens are built to last longer than normal as are most military grade vehicles today. Worrying about one of these babies rusting before any lease runs out is nonsense. In that I owned one, I don’t “beleive the PR nonsense” as you state. But, obviously, you’ve never owned one and likely don’t have the wherewital to do so. Quality vehicles don’t rust if you give them a modicum of care, something you may not know about. You’re pseudonym implies you’re into Toyotas and the older ones, like snowbelt ‘barus are notorious for rusting. Stick to what you actually know.

          • 0 avatar
            Landcrusher

            TybeeJim,
            Gratz on winning the oldest contest. Sorry, but we are both old enough that you aren’t getting a pass on your rudeness or attempts to change the subject.

            You told me they won’t rust in my lifetime, but I see rusty ones almost every day. When did they start putting GL on them? Not that long ago IIRC. It’s not just the lower edges either as the rain gutter seems to be a problem area.

            These trucks were all made in my lifetime, and trying to change the bar to during a lease and with a modicum of care won’t fly. Read your own posts, and don’t expect me to be so stupid as to ignore what’s still there.

            I live in a really nice neighborhood where I commonly see dozens of six figure priced cars daily. My neighbor had an AMG version for about six months. Yes, I could stroke out a check for a new GL, or a dozen, but I can only do that because I don’t spend that much on cars. Partly, I don’t spend that much on cars because I spend too much on airplanes. They do cost a lot to operate and maintain, but traditionally, though not lately, they hold their value quite well. So, questioning my buying power is both rude, and ignorant.

            If you want to call me a liar, just do it. You might first want to check with some folks on the internet who have decided among their little online GL owners community that Carwell coating is a good idea if you plan to keep your GL past the warranty. Sorry if you are easy going, but my standard is that I shouldn’t see rust on a premium vehicle for well past a dozen years. This ain’t the seventies or eighties.

            We done yet?

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    How about a V8 that’s not small and miserable? With turbos, it’s putting down solid Eco Boost V6 power.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      And the next 3.5L EcoBoost V6 will stomp it’s face.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        And the next MB twin turbo V8 will stomp it’s face.

        There, I got you;)

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          The 4.0L biturbo is brand new and doing 510 HP and 480 lb-ft or torque in the AMG GT. I would expect the next Ford 3.5TT to eclipse the power the 4.0TT V8 puts out in the G-class when it’s dropped in the Raptor. I could also see it getting AMG GT level power if it was put into a Mustang. The Mercedes 4.0TT is a more premium engine though.

          Let’s just agree and say there needs to be a TT Coyote busting out 700 HP.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            I drove a 1946 Willys CJ-2A yesterday powered by a 60 hp Go Devil engine. It seemed like plenty for an off road vehicle.

          • 0 avatar
            AustinOski

            “It seemed like plenty for an off road vehicle.”

            But, most don’t (go off road).

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            My about 140 HP POS Bronco seemed like plenty to me when I used to take it off road. Your CJ was probably better off road too.

    • 0 avatar
      wmba

      “How about a V8 that’s not small and miserable? With turbos, it’s putting down solid Eco Boost V6 power.”

      Would any 3.5 ecoboost except one boosted out of its (note proper spelling bball and BAFO) mind have the balls to accelerate an AMG GTS to an 11.2 sec quarter mile at 127 mph? C/D June 2015.

      Small Mercedes V8 but hardly miserable and with 503 real horsepower. When an ecoboost 3.5 in a Taurus made for daily driving can manage that, maybe I’ll listen to you truck people.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Pardon my auto correct. I’m aware if the its it’s differences, but sometimes in my haste, I make a mistake.

        The current 3.5 ecoboost would do high 12s/low 13s in the Mustang. The 500 HP version that is coming, paired with the 10R transmission would have no issues getting into the high 11s.

  • avatar
    AustinOski

    “One model many would love to come to North America – the diesel V6 powered G350d – will continue to be forbidden fruit for those of us in the colonies.”

    Yes, because they’d sell like Camrys.

    So, “many” is…732 of the 3000 that will sell stateside this year?

    • 0 avatar

      I honestly think a smaller engine — whether it be diesel or gas — would do the G-Class a lot of good in the US. It’s working for Range Rover.

      • 0 avatar
        AustinOski

        I was about to reply, “Assuming that smaller engine was accompanied by a big drop in price.”

        If they are competing against the Range Rover, maybe they don’t need to. I just looked at the two dealers here in Austin. MB of Austin has a G550 for $114k. The Land Rover dealer down the street from me has 7 Range Rovers (not Sport) for sale from $96k to $142k.

        Choke! I’ll crawl back into my 2008 hole where these started at $77k.I didn’t realize how pricey they’d become. I think I’ll hand on to my 1985 Landcruiser with 100k on the clock. It’s value should intersect with an average 2008 Range Rover in the next year.

        The Sports are a paltry $75k to $99k, BTW. Are you thinking they’d do better if they dropped down into this range?

      • 0 avatar
        albert

        I was manager of a fleet of G-Wagons. All with the 2,9 liter diesel (95 hp when it´s cool enough for the fan not to kick in, otherwise 90 hp). Believe me the introduction of the 290 turbo was a leap forward.
        I remember driving a 6-cil 3,6 liter tuned version in a time when the 320 was the strongest. At last you had a chance to overtake.
        What I want to tell you: Mercedes does not need a smaller engine. People who buy a G already own several cars and don´t care much about price/costs.
        They want what they like and buy that. BTW, the same goes for RangeRover buyers.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    It’d be really cool to have the non-blinged-out diesel variant brought over, they’re the cat’s pajamas for expedition/overland type of offroading. BOF with solid axles front and rear, locking differentials front rear and center. Not sure what the business case would look like for that, but I do know there’s people that are into that expedition type scene with some obscenely deep pockets.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      They’d probably just spend on a Defender, or one of the old grey market imports which seem to be rather abundant on Ebay.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      The problem is it would be the current 642 diesel, which isn’t what you want for that type of use. Honestly, the twin turbo V8s are bastions of reliability compared to that junkpile engine. Only time will tell if the new 4 cylinder diesel will be any better. What I would really want is an olde G-Wagen from the 80s, with the indestructible 617.Engines that never die, and power things like generators after the vehicles they came in rot away.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        Is the 617 that old inline 5 fitted to many a 300D? Because yeah, that’s definitely an engine that never dies…not unless you stop maintaining it or convert it to frying oil badly.

        • 0 avatar
          Sigivald

          Yes.

          (I got mine with a broken oil return valve – God only knows how long that thing had had zero pressure at idle.

          Fixed that and then drove it for a decade and change, probably 100kmi.

          Loud, underpowered, messy, uneconomical.

          But built like tank engine.)

  • avatar
    Nick

    Dimwitted Toronto and area sheep are lining up already. How else can they get groceries home from Whole Foods?

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    LED eye-liner on that vehicle is just wrong. Jeremy must have moved on from smart cars to these.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    The G Wagen has been with us for many years or even decades.

    It’s amazing the life that MB had gotten from it. By now it must be nearly pure profit.

    MB’s 3 litre V6 diesel would be a very good engine for this. It has over 400lb of torque and it would do wonders for the G Wagen’s FE.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      It’s probably been pure profit since the late 80s or before.

      How many G460s did they sell to militaries?

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @bball40dtw,
        The militaries are using them in ever increasing numbers.

        We use them. The guys at work are divided about them. The guys that go out bush prefer the old LR 130s. But I think this is due to familiarity.

        The 6×6’es we have are awesome. They can carry 3 tons and are the size of a crew cab long bed full size.

        The use the V6 diesels that are down rated. This is to allow for the use of a greater range of diesel fuels.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al From 'Murica

          Well one thing we can agree on…The experience I have with these is positive. Course I wouldn’t roll one off the FOB. Horsepower and Torque take a serious backseat to the “How well does it take a blast underneath” test and these as with any non purpose designed flat bellied rig fail pretty miserably.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Was it Top Gear calling un-tardis like.. big on the outside small inside.

    I wonder what pops up in Jurassic World next month from MB.

  • avatar
    TybeeJim

    Landcrusher, why the appelation if you aren’t into such vehicles. Airplanes rot too as will cars, trucks without some care. I drove a ’68 Volvo 245S though 10 Connecticut winters without rust while the Subaru rotted. I drove an ’88 Isuzu Trooper for 6 years in PA before giving it to my son for his college car. It ran four more years without any rust, but the head gasket blew. I could go on but it doesn’t appear worthwhile. I will mention that living 15 years on an island only 500 ft. from saltwater hasn’t produced any rust on my 10 year old CLS 500 (an ’06 purchased in May ’05). My ’04 Ford Ranger never had any rust when I traded it in 2014. You obviously know it all. And yes I did say “in your lifetime” assuming you’re maybe 13, a conclusion reached since you apparently don’t understand hyperbole.

  • avatar
    Landcrusher

    I bought my Landcruiser when it was five years old and forty percent of sticker and loved it greatly. If you read my post again, you will realize your mistake. I don’t buy 80k plus automotive equivalents of yellow bananas. I sold my crusher at nearly the fifteen year mark and no rust. Total depreciation was about a 1500/year.

    Aircraft don’t rot nearly like cars do. The average GA plane in the fleet is over thirty years old. Mine has an aluminum skin on a steel frame and is pretty new being a ’95. My first plane depreciated only 15k from new to sold at four years old. Traditionally, before 2008, aircraft would lose up to 40% value in the first four or five years and then hold their value versus inflation

    Now you are confusing me with your points. My point is that GL’s rust too much and you are arguing with me because all your other cars haven’t rusted? Also, if I were only a kid, then it would be more likely that a GL would rust in my lifetime would it not?

    I was perfectly willing to accept that the really rusty GLs may be a local phenomena. It wouldn’t be a first (occasionally materials react to some pretty tiny traces of things the petro chemical guys let loose), but a little research showed me I wasn’t collecting strange data during my GL watching. Whatever process they use isn’t all that grand.

    Lastly, calling me a know it all or questioning my motives is not getting you anywhere with me. I’ve been pushing back for decades on people with real reputations and much more credible arguments than you have shown here. It’s amazing how often I find out years later they have accepted my position or at least seriously altered their own. (Of course, I take a lot of at bats, so my average may not be all that great!) Telling me I am making up what I am seeing just won’t fly.

  • avatar
    TybeeJim

    My point, simply put early on, is that Gwagens (WTF is a GL?) are no more susceptible to rust that any other vehicle and you views don’t disprove that. And further, I noted that the vehicle in hand assembly in Austria, includes putting 50L of wax inside the frame to further prevent rust. In that you never owned one as I have and I have had apparently considerable more car experience than you, Landcrusher, I think my opinion would carry much more weight with anyone knowledgeable about automobiles. As for aircraft, my son, a USAF Major flies in planes older than you or your aircraft, but they have been rebuilt many times over. I’ve tour the major aircraft rebuild facility in KC and seen first hand how much rebuild work goes on. I don’t think your limited observation would sway anyone from purchasing a Gwagen if they chose to do so. Of course the USMC buying 200 or them was I suppose a stupid decision in your opinion. What do the marines know? I’m not trying to “get anywhere with you”. I just dislike “trolls” posting BS.

    • 0 avatar
      Landcrusher

      Calling me a troll for failing to read your mind? Or are you just unable to admit mistakes?

      “These are military grade vehicles with luxury interiors. I owned one from 2002-05 and they won’t rust in your lifetime.”

      You wrote this several hours after I posted that rusty GL’s are a plague here.

      Who is the troll?

      And, once again, you go off on some weird tangent trying to attack my credibility. Please ask the Major the difference between GA aircraft and military ones. I doubt they rust much, but I don’t really know. My applicable military experience was being the motor officer for a battery. We had nearly fifty trucks, all military grade, all with rust except for the very newest, the hummers. But hey, keep making unfounded assumptions, they haven’t killed you yet.

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