By on April 21, 2015

04-2015-ford-mustang-1The Ford Mustang outsold the whole Lincoln brand by a 1.5-to-1 count in March. U.S. Mustang volume has, not surprisingly, risen sharply since the age of the sixth-generation model began.

March’s tally, however, was particularly notable, not just because of the way in which Mustang volume made Lincoln’s abysmal total appear even worse (Lincoln sales slid 3%, year-over-year, to just 8695 units) but because the Mustang outsold the Chevrolet Camaro and Dodge Challenger, combined.

That won’t become a long-term trend. General Motors is already gradually leaking details of its next Camaro. The Challenger, meanwhile, is selling better than ever. Sales have only increased on an annual basis since Dodge brought the nameplate back in 2008.

Nevertheless, the Mustang’s March total of 12,663 U.S. sales was, according to Ford, the “best performance in eight years.”

More precisely, Mustang volume hasn’t been this healthy on a monthly basis since June 2007.

Car
March
2015
March
2014
%
Change
3 mos.
2015
3 mos.
2014
%
Change
Ford Mustang
12,663 9,305 36.1% 29,811 19,596 52.1%
Dodge Challenger
6,110 4,882 25.2% 15,957 11,034 44.6%
Chevrolet Camaro
5,956 8,624 -30.9% 17,320 19,568 -11.5%
Total
24,729
22,811 8.4% 63,088 50,198 25.7%

Remember the summer of oh-seven? Yeah, Bush was president, Craig Biggio was still playing baseball, and you were singing all the words to Umbrella in a rented Caliber. More importantly, the Camaro hadn’t returned from its lengthy hiatus, and the Challenger was still months away from being available for order.

In that era, 12,781 Mustang sales wasn’t all that impressive. Ford averaged nearly 14,000 monthly Mustang sales in the United States the year before.

But in 2015, when the overall passenger car market isn’t quite as large and in decline, when competitors of various types are attempting to steal sales, when most other Ford cars posting decreased volume, the Mustang’s surge to 12,663 March sales is rather impressive.

The Mustang was America’s 18th-best-selling car in March 2015 and finished the month just 68 sales back of the 17th-ranked Kia Soul. Besting vehicles like the Subaru Outback and Volkswagen Jetta, the Mustang accounted for 17% of Ford brand car sales, significantly more than the Taurus, Taurus Police Interceptor, Fiesta, and C-Max combined.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Challenger year-to-date figures updated, intiially published with Charger Q1 figures.

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86 Comments on “U.S. Ford Mustang Sales Boom In March 2015: Mustang Outsells Lincoln; Outsells Camaro And Challenger Combined...”


  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    But it is so ugly and overweight. LOL

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Does Ford break it down by engine? V6%/turbo 4%/V8%

    I’m just curious because whenever an automaker does something a little different (first offering of a turbo 4 in the Mustang since 1986) I’d like to know how the market is receiving it.

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      I’d be more than happy to share it if Ford supplied it. Alas.

      EcoBoost makes up about 39% of current inventory, which is about twice as much as the V6, leaving 42% for V8s.

    • 0 avatar

      I’d consider the F150 as a similar market. Not for the truck market, but for the “I drive an F150 because Merica” market. When the 3.5 first came out people were scared and said how foolish Ford was. Now it’s their best selling motor in the F150, and the new 2.7 will be a huge hit once people stop measuring the size of their… I mean once they realize it has more and better power than my ’95 351. Now if you drop the Mustang down to the size of the SN95, you’ll have a screamer! (or just drop the 2.3T into a SN95 like I’d like to)

      • 0 avatar
        Nicholas Weaver

        I agree strongly on the F150’s 2.7. I testdrove one during their roadshow, that engine is a real peach. The start/stop on it is a little disconcerting unless you’ve driven a hybrid before, but it was near instant on restart so it was just a mental thing. Now if it only had a transmission that could match the Ram’s (next year, apparently).

        I need to do the same for the Turbo 4 on the mustang…

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      I had read somewhere, that for the first few months the V8 made up 50% of sales. Early adopters, no doubt willing to pay the premium to get theirs first.

  • avatar
    duffman13

    Well, it makes sense. The V6 is a true bargain even if you can’t get it with any of the cool options. The Ecoboost is an interesting gamble, but given the 2.3Ts relative age and knowledge base since its roots in the 1st generation Mazdaspeed3 it’s a known quantity and valid performance choice with tons of aftermarket potential from some bolt-ons and an AccessPort.

    And then you have the V8 – I ran a truecar search on a manual GT performance pack with Recaros (the exact way I’d buy it) in my area and came out with a response in the $32k range. I don’t car who you are, that’s a bargain. Add in the fact that both the Camaro and Challenger are getting exceptionally long-in-tooth now, and there’s no wonder it’s selling so well.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      I did an “Auto Trader” search within 500 miles of me for V8 Camaro, Challenger, and Mustang any transmission.

      Challenger – $29,000
      Mustang – $30,000
      Camaro – $31,000

      If I needed a V8 coupe with room for 4 I’d get the Dodge but if I wanted more sports in my muscle car I’d get the Mustang.

      Oh and I found an a$$hat dealer listing a Hellcat for $99,000 (MSRP $65,XXX – according to the add.)

      • 0 avatar

        I saw the same thing in the tri-state area on cars.com with someone wanting 6 figures for a Hellcat. From what I have read, they’re only given to specific dealerships, so I’m guessing they’re very low-production vehicles?

      • 0 avatar
        nrd515

        If I was blind, I would buy a Camaro. If I never saw the rear end, I might consider a Mustang. But I have normal vision, and will see the rear end every day, and I have a Challenger, and will probably buy another one, unless the new Camaro has had the best camo ever and won’t look anything like the present one. I don’t think that’s going to happen.

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      I would guess IF my wife would allow me my mid-life crisis, the car I would get myself is a convertible.

      And judging from that cold, steely eyed look (a look deadly and piercing) she gives me, there is no mid-life crisis in my future.

      And IF I was allowed to get myself a convertible, I am thinking the Mustang V6 with its most basic package would be the best choice.
      I would take it over the new up and coming Miata only because I think for the same money…you get more car.

      • 0 avatar
        Secret Hi5

        TT said, “I would take it [Mustang ‘Vert] over the new up and coming Miata only because I think for the same money…you get more car.”
        -Even as a Miata-phile, I agree that the Miata is too pricey.

        • 0 avatar
          clivesl

          I don’t think it’s price so much as size.

          I love the Miata, but I have a kid and a wife and dog and if I have a convertible, you can be certain some combination of them will be with me 90% of the time.

          Of course I could just keep the Sienna and get an older Miata…oh that’s the look TT was talking about.

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        I already have a fun car, but I’m considering replacing the S2k in the future to something with a back seat for my kid once he’s old enough to be in a front-facing one. The only thing that really hits on all cylinders for me is the newest mustang GT, plus I’ve always wanted something with a V8.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        Does she lend you the pants to wear when you step outside the house?

        Just kidding. My mid-life crisis was supposed to be a new GT convertible, but when the finances didn’t work out I got a great deal on an off-lease 9-3 Aero 6-speed. Life lesson is always have a plan B.

  • avatar

    This should come as no surprise to anyone. I’m sure a nice chunk of the EB 4-cyl and convertible is to daily rental fleets, but no shame in that for this is that type of car as well – a stylish image car for the weekend.

  • avatar

    Remember 2007? I think we were at Ford Death watch #50 by then. Glad to see they remembered the Konami code just in time…

  • avatar
    Pch101

    Dumping the retro look was probably a good move.

    Export sales will be important for this Mustang. It might be worth tracking those, too.

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    Buyers know a new Camaro and Challenger, Cuda, Barracuda or whatever are coming so that’s partially why. But regardless, this shows the segment’s strong. Personally, I’m hoping they get so popular we get the Mustang Grande and Camaro Berlinetta back!

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      I don’t think the new Challenger is due until 2017 at the earliest, probably as an ’18 model. That’s probably why Challenger sales are still increasing, while the Camaro, which has been the class sales leader since it came out, has dropped to 3rd place.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        Has the Camaro been the sales leader since it came out? I thought it went back and forth the last few years…

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        I don’t get the Camaro’s success. I mean, I get the LS motor and all that, but I can’t stand the styling, like the new one even less, and the interior and visibility are atrocious. The mustang is leaps and bounds better in those categories.

    • 0 avatar
      BigDuke6

      A Mustang Grande ? Really ? You’re telling us you want to see a new Mustang with a vinyl roof, hubcaps, and whitewalls….? My eyes are burning just thinking of it.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Its no surprise it’s doing this well. It has 95% of the street presence and 60-80% of the performance of an Aston Martin for a tenth of the price. It, along with the rest of the ponycar class, are world class GTs now and legitimate alternatives for folks with 30-40K to spend who don’t want a poverty spec German car or something spicier than an Acura.

    • 0 avatar
      64andahalf

      I’m a fan of Mustangs (note my handle), but comparing it to an Aston Martin is jarring and not really meaningful. And I think the Camaro with the engine and magneto-whateveritscalled suspension should move very well. As a side-note, I used to work at Delco Products and remember them showing off the magneto trick suspension tech in roughly 1987 and MY GOD it took them a long time to get it into any meaningful number of vehicles.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    The new Mustang is a great looking & sounding car, with a dramatically improved interior, better rear suspension, and will be a great seller for Ford.

    It has a certain sophistication that the last gen Mustang lacked, and in fact, I will not be surprised if it “conquests” (aka steals) sales from “premium” badged competitor vehicles purportedly in a different class.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      p.s. – GM, being GM,really screwed the pooch with the chubby, expensive & cheaply finished Camaro.

      Unless the new Camaro is a dramaticaally better vehicle in every way, while rivaling the Mustang is smiles per $s, I doubt it’s going to do that well. GM is a half-in/half-out type manufacturer, never really committing to building the best in class, even as its competitors are all raising the bar.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        I think the combination of alpha and the LT1 will put down some good numbers, probably class leading but I’m not sure how the new wrapper is going to work out?

        The 2016 Camaro looks like they took a heat gun to the out going 5th Gen and shrunk the body over the new bones.

        • 0 avatar
          JMII

          The problem with the Camaro is visibility. And the looks which are subjective. The numbers say its a great car. However I wonder how many that cross shop the Mustang vs Camaro make decisions based on what the car is really like, vs those predetermined Ford or Chevy guys. I lean towards the Ford as most GM products seem to be sub-par and I owned a Mustang long ago (’83). However that said the engineering in the new Camaro seems to be really well done.

          • 0 avatar
            Zackman

            If I were in the market for a “toy” car, it would be a Camaro hands-down. But then I’m a Chevy guy, so guilty as charged!

            All in all, it doesn’t matter because I can’t see out of the thing.

      • 0 avatar
        Secret Hi5

        Dead said, “GM, being GM,really screwed the pooch with the chubby, expensive & cheaply finished Camaro.”
        But isn’t the Camaro a success for GM?

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          Shhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh…

          Don’t point out that the Camaro consistently outsold the Mustang since it’s launch – even as the Mustang was refreshed.

          Everyone knows the Alpha is coming – and we’ve seen similar numbers tank in sports car (cough cough Mustang) when everyone knew a refresh was coming and it was significant.

          Personally, not a fan of the Camaro in hardtop form. Visibility is a joke, the interior is cheap, and it is vastly bigger on the outside than it is on the inside. For a fat girl, she sure can dance, my love of the Zeta platform is well known – and generally well earned praise for the dynamics of the E39 inspired suspension (including the flaws like LCAs and ball joints).

          However, the historical data points to the Camaro being a success, despite the insistence from the usual suspects of the B&B it would flop…along with the Encore, and the Cruze, and the Verano, and the Sonic…

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Both the Camaro and Mustang are excellent cars that punch above their weight. I hope they both continue to be excellent and make Ford and GM push each other. I’m not a huge fan of the Camaro’s styling, but I drove a ZL1, and I was impressed. I wouldn’t buy a Challenger Hellcat over the ZL1.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        From the sounds of it, the new Camaro will probably go back to beating the Mustang.

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      I did love the introduction of the retro look when it came out a few years ago, and think it saved the car. I lusted for it from the sneak shots leaking over the internet before it arrived.
      But it did wear on me. But I think this is because back in MO, the types I saw running around in the muscle cars and seeing how they screwed the looks with aftermarket changes killed the image for me. They became equal to tattoos and bass boats.
      This new look has its charm and elegance….for awhile.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      I think the Mustang is being aimed at those higher-class vehicles in the Euro market. The GT is an extremely quiet car for cruising at highway speeds. The engine makes no noise at all unless you step on it.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      For $40K a Mustang GT is pretty much a better proposition than any other coupe at that price point, aside from the badge.

      There is a 428i at my job, probably optioned up to about $40 or so thousand. It almost looks like a mainstreamer, all underwheeled and slab sided. The Rustang on the other hand looks boss even in base trim. They really hit it out of the park design wise.

      I do think the next Camaro will be a force to be reckoned with though. Visibility will still suck, but it’s gonna lose a ton of weight and hopefully get an LT engine. Actually, if it gets the LT engine and a 4 banger instead of the V6 they might be able to lower the shoulder line and cowl.

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        $40k is a stretch too. Actual transaction prices are more in the mid to low 30s for a GT. I said higher in the thread, I ran some truecar numbers and got one with all the performance goodies for around $32k, and a GT Premium auto rang the bell at $34k.

        I wouldn’t be surprised if you could score one fully loaded for $36k, which is a bargain for what you get.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    The Mustang just doesn’t do it for me. It hasn’t really looked right since the Fox-body, which really resembled the spiritual successor to the original lean runabout.

    Since then the Mustang has been in a confused muddle of pony, muscle, and GT. Even if the physical dimensions aren’t really that out of control, the visual bulk of the thing is really off-putting.

    It’s as if the designers were trying to make it look as big and fat as possible, and they succeeded. I thought this newest generation would address the flabbiness, but it only made it worse.

    All that being said I’m clearly in the minority, as people are vacuuming these up like Wranglers right now.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      The reality is that 95%+ of people buying a new Mustang, Challenger or Cannot are never going to track their car, and a heavier, softer, GT style cruiser that more comfortably deals with the roads and traffic to and fro work & grocery shopping as a daily driver is geared way more towards their wants/needs.

      As long as it looks good, sounds good, can roast the tires just to prove the point, rides reasonably comfortably over broken pavement, has an upscale feeling/looking interior, and is relatively affordable and reliable, it will sell.

      For true enthusiasts, there’s the aftermarket.

      GT Cruisers make more sense to most muscle car buyers than lean, mean, track attacking, hardcore machines.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        I agree other than some of the buyers for the models like the Boss 302 the majority will never take them to the track. Yeah even those that order or take one with the “track pack”. I’m betting most of the Boss 302 type cars will not take them to the track or if they do they will drive it at 8/10ths or maybe 9/10ths. The people who buy them used may be more likely to take them to the track and like you say there is the aftermarket for that crowd.

      • 0 avatar
        Zackman

        “The reality is that 95%+ of people buying a new Mustang, Challenger or Cannot are never going to track their car…”

        Who, exactly, actually takes their car to a track, besides Jack Baruth? Who wants to spend all the money and risk trashing it against a wall because they see themselves as race car drivers but aren’t, let alone the risks one takes leaving their own driveways every day?

        I’d adjust your 95%+ to 99.9%+!

        • 0 avatar
          duffman13

          Well, I do for one, but I am the 1%. I haven’t and don’t intend to ever track a car that I’m still making payments on though. Nor do I plan on tracking a car if I don’t have an alternate daily driver.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    Just how many of these are fleet sales? they’re all over the place now, a friend just rented a rag-top for his B-day and did not like it, only the acceleration of the turbo 4 motor.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      I’ve kind of wondered that also — historically when you find the convertibles, even when the Sebring/200 was around, there were plenty of base model Mustangs to be had. Especially in sunny destinations like Orlando, Honolulu, LA, San Diego, Houston, etc. etc.

      But I doubt the numbers are as big as you think. Generally speaking, the data indicates the average driving American doesn’t want a convertible – so a lot of them go to the rental lots.

      The new Cascadia will be a darling of Avis in the coming months!

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    Not all that surprising to me. I am really not a Mustang fan, other than I am that guy… I love the look of the fox body cars from call it 85-93. My wife, hates them and has declared the persona no grata in our garage. I’ll take a pass in the rest of the lot until now. And yes, the new version is wife approved as well, which in my household is a must as she is the final arbiter of what spends time here.

    The latest iteration is just sexy. To me, it has the lines of a 911 and yes when I am at a stop light and see one nearby with the ubiquitous 5.0 badge, I roll down the window to hear the glorious song from the pipes.

    Perhaps not the most efficient version available, but participating in the average boring morning commute with that sound track has got to make any day better and well worth the cost. I am certain one of these will spend some time in my garage at some point in time here in the near future.

  • avatar
    VenomV12

    It is selling well because it looks fantastic, even the inside is nice. It looks like it was designed by one person unlike the design disaster that is the new Corvette. The stock cars look great so the GT350 should look amazing in person.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      The Corvette looks much better in person. Looks are subjective but for the most part I like it. The rear is a bit jarring though. It’s as if the design team stopped at the rear quarter panel intending to finish the next morning but never did.

      It also seems like the Mustang GTs are lower than the V6 and turbo4 and look better because of it. That might not be the case but that’s what my eyes tell me.

      And I agree the GT350 should look great.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Agreed – the C7 Corvette is a bit meh in pictures but in person is a great looking car – it looks more like a Euro exotic fighter than a fiberglass car assembled by fat guys in Kentucky.

  • avatar
    Alfisti

    Tried pricing one of these out for the father in law and jebus, the Ford Canada site is just an absolute MESS. Packages and options are impossibly complicated, it’s never clear what you have and/or what you’ve given up by going for a certain spec.

    NIGHTMARE.

    He’d like the V6 (can live with the Ecoboost), Coupe, leather seats, heated seats, nav, parking camera/sensors and 18 inch wheels.

    So what am I looking for exactly??

    One last thing, the prices you ‘mericans are quoting are insane, not even close to the prices here.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    I’m hoping the new Camaro is clean-slate. They current’s bold looks hasn’t aged well. I was behind a chick in a Camaro this morning in the drive-thru and man it looks hideous up close. It was funny she couldn’t get drink-holder through the Camaro’s window. Everyone had a good laugh. She had to open the door to snake it through.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      I have some seat time in a ZL1 and I’ve always said I’d buy that car in spite of the deficiencies Chevy saddled it with because it put a smile a mile wide on my face.

      I think the new car will address many of the issues people had with the previous generation while upping the performance quotient. I really think the sixth gen is going to be a show stopper. From what I’ve read, the base SS is slated to have current 1LE performance (which FWIW many buff books stated was a better performer than the S550 ‘Stang) and who knows where the high performance variants will go but if this generation is any indication they’ll be very good.

  • avatar
    Polishdon

    Thing is:

    Looking at the last three month’s totals, there really isn’t that big of a difference between the Mustang and the Challenger. Especially since the Challenger is a 6 year old design and the Mustang is new.

    And if Hellcat supply wasn’t constricted, it would probably be even closer.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    Styling of this generation is much improved, but hood and belt line are still too high, IMHO.

  • avatar
    Gregg

    Wow. The Challenger outsold the Camaro. That is a major change. Now, when the 2016 Camaro is out, all the numbers may change again.

  • avatar
    mkirk

    A Lincoln Mustang would seem to be the obvious answer for Lincoln’s woes.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Give it a wheelbase stretch of 3-5″ so the back seat is not only useable by adults but usable for more than a short ride. Offer it with a folding steel hard top a a Lincoln unique version of the Coyote and yeah they’ve got a good halo car. The only problem is what to call it. It should be the Mark IX but that is to close to the MKX.

      A real name and one with history would be the best but there aren’t any good ones not spoken for.

      Town Coupe, not appropriate for a convertible and too close to Town Car which is now the name for the livery package MKT.

      Capri, No one remembers it as a Lincoln but no one remembered the Zephyr as anything but a Mercury. Yes there is some ironic precedent since the Capri was Mustang based in the best years of its life. However that is likely asking for the jeers of the gussied up Ford crowd.

      Cougar, yeah that was never a Lincoln name but there again the best years of its life were when it was based on the Mustang. But again that would be fodder for the gussied up Ford crowd.

      Premier, again a name that was downgraded to Mercuryville and then as a trim package and no one remembers it as a Lincoln.

      Continental, would be the best option and was at it’s peak as the restart of the Mark names but it appears that Lincoln plans to use that for their upcoming full size car.

      Out of their concept car names the Sentinel is the most promising.

      However their have been absolutely zero rumblings of Ford taking Lincoln in that direction. On the other hand the Continental was kept under wraps pretty well so maybe there is hope.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        There is a newer name associated with Lincoln – Entourage.

        http://goo.gl/rFJCoi

        Except that Hyundai already used the name.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        The best years of the Capri were not the Fox-based ones but the Capri II of 1976.

        I thought Ford should have dolled up the Mustang and made a new Cougar before Mercury disappeared.

        The only problem with a steeled-top convertible Lincoln is that the steel-top format is waning because of the huge amount of cargo space the system requires. Plus they look dorky.

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        The Capri and the Zephyr were both Lincolns first.

  • avatar
    RHD

    Now if Ford were to make a luxurious, stretched Mercury Cougar version of the Mustang and sell it as a Lincoln, then the Lincoln brand could start to post some decent numbers.

    (But what to call it? “Cougar” is our target market segment! Maybe the… Lincoln Milf?)

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      I posted that before reading the previous entry, which had the same idea and put it forward much more eloquently!

      • 0 avatar
        STS_Endeavour

        Versailles?

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          Yeah I thought about bringing that up but it is the one historic name that has serious negative equity. Sure a lot of today’s buyers may not remember it but the rags would certainly bring up that it was a gussied up Granada giving ammo to the Ford in a tux crowd.

          • 0 avatar
            STS_Endeavour

            Yeah, I was half kidding – for that very reason. I remember the Versailles fondly, but even people I know who also knew of the Versailles referred to it as the ultimate old-persons car. Pretty name, shame about the reputation. But what would be a groovy name for a new Lincoln?

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    It’s great to see Ford actually get one of it’s new vehicle right. Ford is almost there in making a vehicle as attractive as a EU performance car.

    The Mustang will sell well in Australia with the V8.

    Now all Ford needs to do is introduce the global Ranger in the US, get rid of that pathetic Explorer and put the Everest (renamed as an Explorer) in it’s place.


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