By on April 23, 2015

2016-bentley-continental-gt-17

After the end of the first phase of a military campaign in Yemen, one Saudi prince decided to reward the pilots with Bentleys for a job well done.

Saudi royal family member Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal tweeted that he would give the 100 pilots involved in the bombing operation 100 Bentleys “in appreciation of their role” in said operation, the BBC reports. The tweet was shared over 28,000 times and favorited by over 5,000, with many praising the prince for his “generosity.”

However, those affected by the bombing weren’t too thrilled by the proposal. One Yemeni chastised the gesture, stating that no ambulances would be coming to the hospitals the pilots likely helped fill. Others noted the disparity between Al-Waleed’s wealth and the poverty among those in Yemen, with one Jordanian saying “100 or 200 lives for a Bentley” was how “cheap” a human life was for the Saudis.

The original tweet was eventually deleted, with Saudi media reporting the account as having been hacked; the prince himself did not claim this happened.

[Photo credit: Bentley]

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39 Comments on “Saudi Prince Offers Bentleys To Pilots In Yemen Bombing Raid...”


  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I wouldn’t want one in Luxe Penny Metallic anyway.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    So brave men flying dated US provided aircraft against a country with no air force well out of range of MANPADs and dropped dumb munitions on Shiite militia using only small arms?

    Let’s have a parade for these cowards, er heroes.

    Who are the “good guys” again?

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      The good guys are the ones with the most oil.

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      Hey, at least the Saudis are finally killing people with their own planes, instead of hijacking ours and flying them into buildings.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I suppose it is nice to see the terrorists bombing the other terrorists for a change.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          And I think that may be the reason this offer is being made because what we’ve got here is Muslims killing Muslims.

          Both factions use the same Quran, but each s!de interprets the writing differently.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The conflict is deeper than religious divide. In the region Shiites are usual of Persian ethnicity while Sunnis are typically Arabs. This is as much a racial conflict as it is religious.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Completely understand. I also understand the threat Iran’s posturing for power and positioning in the area poses to the Saudis.

            Keeping the Saudi military happy also reduces the chances of the Saudi monarchy being overthrown, from within.

          • 0 avatar

            28, are you saying people from Yemen are Persians? What is the actual “racial” Split there? Cultural divide? Sure. Racial? Are you talking ethnicity?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            My limited understanding of the country and conflict is the tribal people of Yemen are mostly Arab and genetically related to Saudis and Omanis. However in Yemen specifically there is a Shiite minority which BBC estimates at between 21-40%. Among this minority the Houthis hail from the Shiite sect, although ethnically whether all of the Shiites in Yemen are ethnic Persians or not I couldn’t tell you (I imagine a percentage are but not all of them). If we refer back to the BBC map, the majority of Shia are concentrated in modern Iran, southern and eastern Iraq, Kuwait, eastern Saudi Arabia, and some of the eastern parts of the peninsula such as Bahrain (ironically all of those regions happen to be oil rich). Thus the dominant Sunni/Arab majority is frequently in conflict with the Shia minority who happen to occupy the land over the oil in which the nations derive their financial power.

            http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-25434060

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Houthi_insurgency_in_Yemen

          • 0 avatar

            There you go, so no racial divide. Tribal (in the sociological sense pls.), religious, yes. Racial? Nah. Arab “supremacy” (for lack of a better word) is not based on racial splits. The religion is all encompassing. The Persian divide has deep, historical roots, even religious (see Zoroastrianism), but it not racial per se. Not everything, and conflict, in this world can be understood using the Anglo-German understanding of the world. The Arab view on race and nationality (in spite of the recent “national Arab” states and lingering tribalism) is much more Roman (in the classical sense) than modern (European).

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Interesting perspective. From what I read on Iraq and the ISIS thing, the Shia (descended from Persians) in the south do feel ethnically divided from the Sunni in the center and the Kurds in the north and the former Shia Prime Minister was being blamed for stoking the divide prior to the ISIS invasion. There have been theories about Iraq ultimately being divided along ethnic lines into three countries (since it is already effectively split this way at present) but time will tell.

    • 0 avatar
      philadlj

      The good guys provide lasting geopolitical stability in the region while securing equal rights for all of its citizens, regardless of gender, race, creed, sexuality, or disability. When I find them, I’ll let you know!

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        “securing equal rights for all of its citizens, regardless of gender, race, creed, sexuality, or disability. ”

        It isn’t working in America. How can we expect it to work anywhere’s else?

  • avatar

    Cars I’d rather have:

    – Both the Challenger and Charger Hellcat
    – Aventador Superveloce
    – W222 AMG
    – Veyron Super Sport (cmon prince, you know you’ve got it)

    Thing is, if I spent my life flying bombing raids against scumbag terrorists, I think just my day job would be reward in and of itself.

    Perhaps the prince could buy me a HARRIER II instead?

  • avatar
    runs_on_h8raide

    Wars for billionaire interests. Send in the sheep. Silly mankind.

  • avatar
    jkk6

    Another one of those Simpson’s Nelson laugh “Ha Ha”.

    Last time the US raided Lybia to kick out the ISIS, 28 year old Iranian Prince and his posse joined US Armed forces side by side in our joy bomb ride.

    This article sounds to me more like a “Me too” tweet.

  • avatar
    panzerfaust

    Its the old way of doing things. Kings and princes have been rewarding their soldiers for millennia. Right after Desert Storm the King offered to pay everyone in the U.S. military who served to defend Saudi Arabia with a cash bonus. General Powell declined the gesture. In the long run it isn’t that big of a deal, most of the pilots in the Royal Saudi Air Force are somewhere in the Saud Royal family tree so even if this isn’t done publicly it will be done privately. In Saudi you’re either a Prince or a Pakistani.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “In Saudi you’re either a Prince or a Pakistani.”

      So one big in-bred petro-mafia state?

      Winning.

      • 0 avatar
        panzerfaust

        That about sums it up. They’ll never do a census because they don’t want anyone to know how many infidels and non Arabs actually live there (and supposedly defile the home of Mecca and Medina) just to keep the place working.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Attn Cameron: Yahoo ran this yesterday which I think is interesting for TTAC unless you ran it and I missed it.

    “GM, Ford, And Others Want to Make Working on Your Own Car Illegal”

    https://www.yahoo.com/autos/s/gm-ford-others-want-working-own-car-illegal-160000229.html

  • avatar
    bullnuke

    Hey, Prince, if you’re reading these comments; I read about your pilots doing their thing with some interest. Does that qualify me for, say, a GTI? Just checking…

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    If I bow before the Prince, will he send me an Audi?

    Maybe a VW? No?

    Generous dude though either way.

  • avatar
    mkirk

    I’ve spent 27 months between the 2 wars and all I got were some medals and ringing in the ears. I did fix my Miata up with money from Iraq though so I guess that counts LOL!

  • avatar
    Roland

    I guess it’s today’s world-class standard of courage. The Saudi regime is just trying to show how much they’re with the program.

    We all love to bomb people who can’t shoot back, and get treated like heroes afterwards. Canadians are as bad as Saudis as far as that goes. Without the Bentleys of course.

    In Canada the Bentleys are strictly reserved for our great heros of financial speculation, who take risks approximately equivalent to those faced by Saudi fighter pilots.

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    They should just do like the US and give medals to drone pilots… I’m sure driving to their local AFB in continental USA entails greivous risks…

    • 0 avatar
      quasimondo

      When a drone operator takes out a target and saves us from having to put boots on the ground to face those “grevious risks” to accomplish the same thing, I think that operator should be failry compensated.

      • 0 avatar
        TonyJZX

        that doesnt make any sense at all

        its not as if the drone operator is even the one who makes the executive decision to take out an ISIS terrorist in a Landcruiser or a shepherd tending his flock… its someone of much higher pay grade

        i doubt a drone operator is likely to facing congressional inquiry if things go wrong

        • 0 avatar
          quasimondo

          The drone operator is the one who’s pushing the FIRE button that launches the missiles. Someone of a much higher pay grade may have told him, “this is the target,” but in the end, it’s the operator that’s ending somebody’s life, even if they’re doing it from an air conditioned room on a stateside airbase on the other side of the world.

      • 0 avatar
        panzerfaust

        Knowing most drone operators, they’d probably prefer to be adequately compensated with a bag of “Chips-ahoy” cookies over a medal anyway.

      • 0 avatar
        mkirk

        Plenty of boots already on the ground at the bases those drones fly out of. Plenty of rocket fire and mortars routinely landing on those bases too. While the drones can certainly reduce the risk in that it is less likely someone will have to kick in a door, it isn’t a free ride by any stretch.

      • 0 avatar
        mkirk

        Also, nobody had issue with giving them medals. The issue was that the medal they were giving them rated higher than the Bronze Star that dudes on the ground were getting.

  • avatar

    Total f**ked-up perversion. Bribe soldiers, while incubating the Wahabbi-ISIS funadmentals within your own state. What a ridiculous country.

  • avatar
    Geekcarlover

    Does the Saudi Air Force have any female pilots? If so, I guess he’ll give the car to their husband or brother.

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