By on March 11, 2015

BMW-2-Series-Active-Tourer

Hoping to drive home in a front-driven BMW 2 Series? You’ll have to settle for the RWD coupe, as the automaker has no plans to sell the former in the U.S.

Automotive News reports the 2 Series Gran Tourer and Active Tourer — both based upon the UKL1 platform also underpinning the third-gen MINI Cooper — won’t be leaving Germany for the U.S. market due to their small size.

Per a representative, the Gran Tourer’s 179-inch length and the Active Tourer’s 171 inches are too small for a three-row minivan meant for the market. Thus, the smallest USDM BMW will be the 175.5-inch X1 crossover, which will become FWD via the UKL1 platform when the next-gen model goes on sale later this year.

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35 Comments on “FWD BMW 2 Series Models Too Small For USDM To Be Sold...”


  • avatar
    RetroGrouch

    “the smallest USDM BMW will be the 175.5-inch X1 crossover, which will become FWD via the UKL1 platform when the next-gen model goes on sale later this year”

    A FWD trucklet is just another nail in the ultimate driving machine’s coffin. Can you take any non-M model to a 3 day track weekend and not have it limp mode itself to sleep?

    • 0 avatar
      S1L1SC

      Nothing wrong with FWD – and there are plenty of non-M models that are fun to drive. (330i for example)

      Most people don’t buy an X1 to take it to track days… Mall parking lot dash-ing for the nearest open spot maybe – guess that could be considered autocrossing ;-)

      • 0 avatar
        RetroGrouch

        There is nothing wrong with building stupid little trucklets that people think they need on cloudy days or to drive through 1/2 inch standing water puddles. The problem is that BMW has given up on the track capable daily driver. It started with the 1996 model year when they dropped real limited slip diffs. It got worse in 2005 with limp mode hell in the E90s. The 3 series is now mechanically incapable of being driven on track for any length of time due to coolant, brake, or trans temperatures.

        I guess Miata is always the answer.

        – I’m RetroGrouch for a reason.

        • 0 avatar
          LeMansteve

          “BMW has given up on the track capable daily driver”

          What about the M5, M6 GC, M3? All dd-capable sedans that are very capable on the track. If you consider coupes to be dd-capable, there’s the highly-regarded M235 and M4, not to mention the M6.

          How do you define “track capable”?

          • 0 avatar
            RetroGrouch

            Sorry, I meant to put non-M in front of that. You used to be able to take any old 318/323/528/etc boring model to the track.

            EDIT – And I have driven several of the older “boring” non-M 3 and 5 series at the track in advanced and instructor run groups.

          • 0 avatar
            RetroGrouch

            – How do you define “track capable”?

            1. Does not break/overheat/shut down
            2. Driver can turn off all electronic nannies

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          If you drive the new cars at the speeds the old cars were capable of on a track (and then some) they will happily circle all day long. If you want modern performance levels on a track, suck it up and buy an M-car. Or at least an M235i with a stickshift. Pilot Sports, big brakes, extra coolers out of the box.

          An e30 is GREAT on a track, because it is really, really slow by modern standards and weighs nothing. Don’t crash one though, you will regret it. The myth that e30s, e36s, and e46s were some kind of amazing track car out of the box it pretty much that, a myth. They cooked their brakes, they understeered, and they overheated just as much as the new ones do, they just weren’t smart enough to save themselves from their owners by going into limp mode.

          Just like in the old days, if you really want to track the car you are going to have to spend some money on upgrades.

          • 0 avatar
            See 7 up

            It has been proven that the largess and weight of a car do not necessarily go hand in hand with poor crash performance.
            Or more clearly, just because a modern car is held to higher safety standards doesn’t necessarily mean it needs to weigh more than its predecessors.

        • 0 avatar
          S1L1SC

          Well, I also have limp home mode issues on my 740iL – but that’s an E32 model (1993). so nthing new there… lol

      • 0 avatar
        See 7 up

        There is nothing wrong with FWD – from a packaging perspective. That is all it has going for it. Take that away and compared to RWD there is something “wrong” with FWD.
        (And before one starts hollering – there are many, many great driving FWD cars out there that can be made very fast, be it on the track or otherwise )

  • avatar
    S1L1SC

    ‘Cause size matters…

    Seriously, there is nothing wrong with bringing this over… If nothing else it might sell to the 60+ crowd that wants the higher seating position and a premium badge.

  • avatar
    kosmo

    If these dummies would just bring over the 5-door hatchback version of the 2 series (or the previous 1 series) they could sell at least one.

  • avatar
    sproc

    This might be real missed opportunity to go after US A3 owners and shoppers who wanted a 5-door and find the Mini offerings too quirky. I would have at least liked to have tried one.

  • avatar
    raph

    Somehow I don’t think anybody in the US is going to shed a tear.

  • avatar
    CoastieLenn

    So the i3 is large enough to sell here but this isn’t?

  • avatar
    VW16v

    It looks like a Hyundai Elantra GT that might have something to do with BMW thinking they would have difficulty selling in North America.

  • avatar
    LeMansteve

    Size-wise, does this car slot between the X1 and Mini Countryman?

  • avatar
    Rod Panhard

    Perhaps the headline should read, “Americans too large for BMW 2-series compacts”

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “too small for a three-row minivan meant for the market”

    Americans. Eating too many hamburgers since 1960.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Beef has it’s own issues but its the artificially added sugar [in everything] we are being poisoned with which creates the obesity (among other things).

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Yeah, most people have no idea how many HFCS calories they’re consuming each day.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Did you also know nearly half of the HFCS used contains traces of the most poisonous non-radioactive element known, Mercury? (not the MGM variety unfortunately)

          “Almost half of tested samples of commercial high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) contained mercury, which was also found in nearly a third of 55 popular brand-name food and beverage products where HFCS is the first- or second-highest labeled ingredient, according to two new U.S. studies.

          HFCS has replaced sugar as the sweetener in many beverages and foods such as breads, cereals, breakfast bars, lunch meats, yogurts, soups and condiments. On average, Americans consume about 12 teaspoons per day of HFCS, but teens and other high consumers can take in 80 percent more HFCS than average.

          “Mercury is toxic in all its forms. Given how much high-fructose corn syrup is consumed by children, it could be a significant additional source of mercury never before considered. We are calling for immediate changes by industry and the [U.S. Food and Drug Administration] to help stop this avoidable mercury contamination of the food supply,” the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy’s Dr. David Wallinga, a co-author of both studies, said in a prepared statement.”

          http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/01/26/AR2009012601831.html

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            That is awful.

            Thank you corn subsidies.

          • 0 avatar
            mike9o

            HFCS is now made via bioenzymes not through chemical processes. While mercury was found in some HFCS samples in 2009, the more modern processes avoid this possibility. Wikipedia

  • avatar
    Monty

    Perhaps BMW doesn’t want to sully the “premium” reputation in the USDM?

  • avatar
    CarnotCycle

    BMW could sell it in US as the emergency escape pod on a 7-series.

  • avatar
    AnotherMillenial

    “Hoping to drive home in a front-driven BMW 2 Series? You’ll have to settle for the RWD coupe, as the automaker has no plans to sell the former in the U.S”

    So we’re not getting a likely overpriced, FWD micro-MPV with German reliability?! Oh no! And you say all we get is a RWD sports coupe? Who wants to “settle” on that? Surely BMW, “The Ultimate Driving Machine”, made the wrong product decision.

    With the slow-selling Mazda 5 gone where will those customers go?!

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