By on March 26, 2015

2016 Chevrolet Malibu Hybrid Lithium-Ion Battery System, 1.8L En

Pulling a few pages from the Volt playbook, Chevrolet will offer a “strong hybrid” version of the 2016 Malibu set to bow in New York next week.

Power for the Malibu Hybrid comes from a 1.8-liter direct-injection four-cylinder paired with a modified two-motor drive unit from the 2016 Volt meant to aid the engine during acceleration. Total horsepower comes to 182, and its estimated combined mileage is projected to be 45 mpg. Electric power comes from an 80-cell lithium-ion pack providing 1.5 kWh to the hybrid system, which can allow the Malibu to travel up to 55 mph on electric-only travel.

The gasoline engine is also Chevrolet’s first to have exhaust gas heat recovery, improving fuel economy and engine warm up as well as providing heat to the cabin. Further fuel economy improves come from exhaust gas recirculation, while its regenerative braking system — also shared with the 2016 Volt — helps maintain charge in the pack

The hybrid will leave Kansas City, Kan. for showrooms next spring.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

39 Comments on “2016 Chevrolet Malibu Hybrid Pulling From Volt Playbook...”


  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    Something’s not right. There’s no way a 1.5kWh battery pack can provide 55 miles of electric-only range. The Volt battery pack is 17.1 kWh.

    • 0 avatar
      wmba

      Right.

      The author has no clue about these things so wrote up a fantasy. To go along with the other artisanal posts. Really not good enough.

      Actually, the battery is 1.5 kWh, and allows the car to go as fast as 55 miles per hour for a mile or two.

      So says the real world.

    • 0 avatar
      RogerB34

      Possibly, the car will travel 55 miles battery and engine charging the battery.
      Beyond 55 miles the engine would power the generator directly.
      The way Volt works.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Yeah, going back to the GM Press release, it says 55 miles per hour.
    Not 55 miles.

  • avatar
    pbxtech

    “The gasoline engine is also Chevrolet’s first to have exhaust gas heat recovery, improving fuel economy and engine warm up as well as providing heat to the cabin.”

    How will GM screw this up? CO poisoning? Fires? Rust out? Will the dealers try to sell add on nitrogen? Intermittent CEL so you can’t pass emissions? Guys, here’s you chance to win GM new technology roulette.

    Post your guesses to keep me from buying one, because I love the idea of a quicker warm up.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy

      The new technology roulette is much the same with almost every manufacturer with the possible exception of Toyota and Honda.

    • 0 avatar
      PonchoIndian

      Why not look up what the exhaust gas heat recovery actually is before making snarky comments like this? If you see what it is you’ll see how off base your comment really is.

      We’re not talking interior heat from the exhaust manifolds (ala air cooled VW’s) here…

      • 0 avatar
        pbxtech

        My direct experience with cutting edge GM technology are as follows:

        Cadillac 4 6 8- had to be disconnected
        Olds Diesel – My friend gave up and converted to gas
        Vega Aluminium block – They gave up and went back to cast iron
        Vega corrosion – After only two years.
        2.8 liter head gasket – so prevalent that my truck sat for two months waiting for parts.
        2.5 liter throttle body injection no start in cold weather – the fix was hotter plugs the burned through plug wires every 10K
        Northstar head gaskets – It will happen to almost all of them.
        Random airbag deployment – Buddy started his car and was knocked into the back seat
        Plastic intake manifold trouble. $800 right before Christmas
        Buick Skyhawk turbo cooling. Wow, great car for the time when they got the cooling right
        Lock up toque converter solenoid trouble. Car transmission gets hot and car stalls when braking

        That said, I hope I’m wrong, they seemed to do well with the Volt. I love GM cars, as does my wife. Our last one was a 2008 Aura with the VVT V6. Great motor until it grenaded at 100K.

      • 0 avatar
        mkirk

        Turbo?

        • 0 avatar
          segfault

          I don’t think the 1.8L is an Ecoboost. It also looks like the hybrid may not have room for a spare tire.

        • 0 avatar
          pbxtech

          In the 80’s they had a 1.8 turbo motor in their J body. They were a blast to drive, but boy did they go through turbos. It may have been the bearings instead instead of a cooling issue. I remember Ford had some trouble with turbo fours too so it wasn’t just GM. It only lasted a couple of years and I still can’t bring myself to buy anything with a turbo. The Regal held up with it’s turbo six, but that was way out of my price range at the time.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      @pbxtech – The 1st Gen Volt has hardly been plagued with new technology problems so I wouldn’t be too worried about this. Unless the bean counters got their hands in it.

      • 0 avatar
        redliner

        Haa! The Volt has indeed had many issues. The funny thing is that almost all the issues are related to old technolgy that should have been perfected years ago.

        All one has to do is take a look at gm-volt .com to see the multitude of problems that owners have experienced. The most prevelant problems seem to be related to the HVAC not working in the winter, issues with the steering rack, and issues with the in car systems and displays randomly crashing or becoming unresponsive.

        The drivetrain is solid… It’s everything else you have to worry about.

        • 0 avatar
          Carlson Fan

          “The drivetrain is solid… It’s everything else you have to worry about.”

          I highly doubt that!…….LOL

        • 0 avatar
          PonchoIndian

          redliner
          go to any website dedicated to a certain model vehicle and it is filled with “typical” problems. Every Toyota, Honda, GM, Mopar, Ford etal website will be filled with people having issues…that is what the sites are there for primarily.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            “That is sort of the story with most GM products isn’t it?”

            Not the ones I’ve owned. Pretty sure my next vehicle purchase will be a used Volt. Guess how worried I am about “everything else”.

        • 0 avatar
          colin42

          One case doesn’t make a trend, but the only real issue I had on my was due to a failed bearing on the transmission

      • 0 avatar
        pbxtech

        I hope you’re right, they are coming off of leases right now and can be had for close to $15K. I think the second generation my be a better bet though.

  • avatar
    Conslaw

    The Prius uses a vacuum bottle to save some engine heat. My C-Max could really use this, the time for engine warm-up and anytime you use the heater is when MPG falls below 40 MPG.

    • 0 avatar
      redliner

      The outgoing Prius does away with the pumped thermos system and instead uses exhaust heat recovery just as this new Malibu. Toyota claims even faster warm up than the old system, lower cost, less weight and higher reliability.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    There isn’t anything “Volt”-like about this car; it’s a regular hybrid.

    The Volt’s 16.5 kWh battery permits it to drive 38 miles or so before the gas engine starts.

    My 13 Optima Hybrid has a 1.6 kWh battery – similar to this Malibu’s – and the gas engine turns on any time it needs to, including at rest. The Malibu won’t be any different, but it will be a first legitimate conventional hybrid car for GM.

  • avatar
    Varryl

    Cameron, I’m not usually one to pick nits, but your title says “Mailbu.” Figured you might want to know earlier than later.

  • avatar
    chainyanker

    Exhaust gas recirculation? What kind of futuristic voodoo technology is this? Genius move to finally hybridize their midsizer during an oil glut.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    Little late to the party as this is old news. The design of the 2nd Gen Voltec is such that it can easily be adapted to a run like a conventional hybrid. Actually pretty smart on GM’s part.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Yep, the gen2 Volt is a regular plug-in hybrid with a big-ass battery pack and some limited selectability in power sourcing.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        Hardly regular. Name me one plug-in hybrid that I can mash the pedal to floor, accelerate up to a 100 MPH and never kick in the ICE? The Volt is still in a class all its own and has the best engineered battery pack of any hybrid or electric car period. Don’t believe me, just wait another 10 years when 2011 Volts are still running around with their original battery packs with little to no performance degradation.

        • 0 avatar
          bumpy ii

          LaFerrari?

          IIRC the gen2 Volt turns on the ICE around 70mph or so, but that sort of thing is really a matter or software control (and electric motor sizing to some extent).

          And the Volt’s batteries aren’t magical. Regular deep discharges will use them up eventually. We’ll just have to wait and see what amount of time “eventually” ends up being.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            Show me a link or something that says the 2nd Gen Volt switches on the ICE with a fully charged battery to help propel it along @70 MPH.

            I’ve had the first Gen Volt up to 80 MPH and it was running on nothing but the battery. So I find it really hard to believe that GM went and changed that with the 2nd Gen. I can’t see that there would be any reason to do it. But I’m wrong all the time, just ask my wife and kids.

            Never said the battery pack was magical. I said it’s the best. Yes time will tell how long they are actually usable.

            Ya the 1.4 million dollar Ferrari. I guess you got me there. Wonder how that would do through a cold snowy Minnesota winter as an everyday driver over the course of 10 years.?

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            Couldn’t find it now; it was something to the effect of one of the motors would overspeed due to the collective gear ratio if something wasn’t declutched at 70. Maybe not?

          • 0 avatar
            87 Morgan

            I have driven a Prius and my business partner has a used Volt, which I have spent a lot of time in including a 400 mile round trip jaunt in one day.

            The Volt is by far the better choice in terms of cabin comfort, seats, lack of road noise. He had one issue which was easily rectified shortly after purchase. At the end of the day, he paid 23.5k for a used Volt that came from the factory as a demo and had yet to have the tax credits redeemed. Which makes the net in his rig 12k for an average of 68 mpg. Not bad.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • SPPPP: Are we suuuuuuuure this is a crossover? Because if this is a crossover, then I think that makes the old Suzuki...
  • SPPPP: Which of these 3 ideas is more wasteful of time and talent … Sending the NSX technicians home without...
  • -Nate: WEll ; You always wanted a convertible, right ? . -Nate
  • SPPPP: If he had kidnapped a Walmart customer FROM WALMART, then I think so.
  • Lightspeed: The roof at the header is rusting on my 2000 Lexus. It’s really irritating because it’s in a...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States