By on February 27, 2015

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Enjoy rowing your own instead of allowing Skynet to do the shifting? If you’re in the United States, your manual transmission options are few.

Jalopnik‘s commentariat-driven Oppositelock recently compiled a list of every vehicle sold in the U.S. that has a manual transmission. Of note, nearly every subcompact and compact model gives the right to shift to the driver, including the Chevrolet Sonic, Fiat 500, Ford Fiesta, Mitsubishi Mirage, Nissan Versa and Kia Soul.

Among the midsizers, only five have manuals: Buick Regal, Honda Accord, Mazda6, and Volkswagen CC and Passat. SUVs, crossovers and trucks didn’t do so well, either, with most offerings found among Jeep, Mazda, Subaru and Mitsubishi models, and only one big truck — the Ram HD — standing with the mid-size pickups in the manual game.

Finally, quite a few sports cars landed on the row-row-your-car list, including the Audi R8, Chevrolet Corvette, Dodge Viper, Mazda MX5 Miata and Porsche 911, while a handful of luxury models — Cadillac’s ATS and Infiniti’s Q60 among them — threw down for the cause.

In total, 50 of 265 models sold in the U.S. come with manuals, making up 20 percent of the market in 2015. Most of the automakers offer them on 30 to 40 percent of their vehicles, while Mazda, Jeep, Subaru, Mitsubishi and Volkswagen offer one on over 50 percent of their respective lineups.

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80 Comments on “Manuals Comprise 20 Percent Of All New USDM Models Available For Sale...”


  • avatar
    danio3834

    I see what you’re saying, but those models that either come with the manual or simply offer it only make up about 6% of the total cars sold in the US.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      Yes, this point will probably confuse some people. The overall take rate is low, and I doubt that there is any individual nameplate that isn’t a sports or sporty car that has a high take rate.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      That’s true, but they are a lot more prevalent in certain segments.

      Very few people want a manual in a pickup, minivan or family SUV. That’s probably 50% of the market right there.

      I foresee manuals becoming a premium option on “driver’s cars” (and Wranglers, obviously). Anything that’s just for commuters, rental agencies and small business will be automatic-only.

      • 0 avatar
        boozysmurf

        I’d agree completely about manuals becoming the premium option, however, the whole “take rate” is skewed by the majority of vehicles that have the manual option only having it in the poverty spec vehicles: I’d have an Elantra Limited 2.0L with a stick in a second, but a 1.8L “L” is less appealing.

        Manuals should be available regardless of trim as long as the engine/trans is certified: why limit it, other than the usual “it’s easier just to offer packages”?

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          “Manuals should be available regardless of trim as long as the engine/trans is certified: why limit it, other than the usual “it’s easier just to offer packages”?”

          Because most people don’t want them.

          “I foresee manuals becoming a premium option on ‘driver’s cars’ ”

          They continue to be offered on some base trim levels of lower priced cars because they allow the automakers to offer an attention-getting low MSRP. Their existence is largely theoretical; they produce just enough of them to avoid accusations of playing bait-and-switch.

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            I hope that the low MSRP no-frills model is a dying breed.

            Then again, the new Fiat 500x has a manual-only base model that doesn’t even come with Bluetooth! I’m surprised it doesn’t have Plymouth badges and come pre-dented.

          • 0 avatar
            redav

            “they produce just enough of them to avoid accusations of playing bait-and-switch.”

            And even then, they typically languish on lots.

          • 0 avatar

            @Heavy Why would you want those of us who don’t like fancy stuff to not be able to have our cars? I intentionally got a 0 option Fiesta Hatch, because that’s exactly what I wanted. I had to drive 2 hours to dealer trade it into my shop. Just because you like nice things and don’t want to pay for them doesn’t mean I should have to have them and then have to pay for them.

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            Franz,

            I’m not saying it’s something that I want to have happen, I’m saying it’s something that is happening, and has been for years. You see it to: you probably drove past 10 Ford dealers that had manual Focus STs in stock to find one that had a base manual Focus in stock.

        • 0 avatar

          Ford is pretty good, you can get manual Fiesta, Focus, and Mustang all the way up through the trim levels. Up through 2014 you could get a manual Fusion SE with leather and most of the nice bits from the Titanium. They should have put that with the 2.0, but still, very few people even inquire about a manual titanium or well equipped SE. We did get a really sweet VW trade in about two years back. TDI, Wagon, Leather seats, Sunroof, Nav, Manual. I wouldn’t really want that car, but it made me smile to know it existed.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        “I foresee manuals becoming a premium option on “driver’s cars””

        fortunately for Mustang at least you have to pay for the privilege of an automatic. IIRC on the 2015 GT the A6 is a 1600 dollar option.

        The take rate on the manual trans V8 Mustang is pretty high (around 60-70% including past Boss and GT500 cars which only came with a manual) the sixxers are mostly auto and drive down the take rate for the entire line to less than 50%.

        Still pretty high though for which I’m glad a lot of Mustang owners opt for the manual.

      • 0 avatar
        smartascii

        “I foresee manuals becoming a premium option on ‘driver’s cars\'”

        This is already happening, to a certain extent. Let’s take BMW as an example. If I want an AWD with a manual, I can only have that on a 335i or 435i. I cannot have it on a 228, 235, 328, 428, or any of the gran coupe things. I presume that this is because BMW has decided that people who want a stick must also want the big engine. What puzzles me is that, having gone to the trouble to certify that particular drivetrain, they still don’t offer it in the 2 series, 4-door-4 series or 5 series. Does anyone in the industry know if there are prohibitive regulatory costs associated with offering a engine/transmission combo that’s approved for one vehicle in another?

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      I think the point is the low takeup is in no way due to a lack of trying on the part of manufacturers. Something like a manual Elantra is just a profit eater, but they continue to make them anyway.

    • 0 avatar
      Richard Chen

      Local Carmax search: 5.6% have manuals, they don’t include clutchless manuals such as DSG in that category

    • 0 avatar
      ect

      IIRC, the actual take rate in the US is under 4%, and has been falling steadily for many years.

      Reality is that modern automatics offer better performance and better fuel economy than manuals, so there is no longer any left-brain reason to prefer a manual, and the overwhelming (near-universal) preference of average buyers is for automatics. OEMs will increasingly find it unprofitable to complicate their lineups with manual transmission offerings.

      I personally prefer a stick, but in North America the writing is on the wall. With a few meaningless exceptions, the stick shift is on its way to oblivion.

      It will last longer in other parts of the world, but in the end manual transmissions are destined to join carburetors and manual chokes on the dustbin of automotive history.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    And folks say the manual is dying….

    Keep in mind, we lost manual on cars that manuals couldn’t save anyway, like (sorry Jack) the Camry. I like to row my own, and barring a very short list of exceptions (i.e. Lexus IS, Acura ILX) there are pretty much no auto-only cars I would want if they had a stickshift option.

    Despite cries otherwise cars today are pretty fcking awesome. I would much rather have a Fiesta ST and auto only Fusions than a weak ass Fusion 1.6 6MT and no Fiesta ST for example. They are putting manuals in cars that benefit from them and leaving them out of cars that don’t and that’s how they should do it IMO.

    • 0 avatar
      Nedmundo

      That’s a good way of looking at it, and I think you’ve nailed the segment that could use more manuals: relatively compact sport sedans, like the ILX and Lexus IS you mention. (I think the AWD Fusion 2.0T and Acura TLX would be great with manuals too. AWD Fusion ST? Oh yes.) This segment attracts enthusiasts looking for their daily drivers, a group that wants manuals at a higher rate than the general public, so it should be economically viable. IMO, the IS 350 F-Sport, in particular, cries out for MT.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      I test drove a manual Camry in 1996 or so. It was surprisingly decent. No reason a sedan, even a Camry, shouldn’t have one, but if they can’t sell them I can’t blame Toyota for dropping them.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    That is a glorious, sensual photo.

    In addition to the alluring, sexy stick shift, there are…like…real dials, knobs & buttons, all clearly marked, legible & comprehensible, to control the heating, air conditioning, defrost and audio functions (it appears based on top slice of photo), too.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      My ex probably would have acclimated to a manual had it come with a gated shifter. As it was, she was challenged trying to reason out which gear she was actually in.

  • avatar
    redav

    The jalop list isn’t that useful by itself. It really needs the percentage of each model that is sold with the manual to be included. Being offered for sale and selling are two very different things.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      Furthermore, seeing take rates for the cars on the list would indicate which cars derive the most benefit from having the manual option. A car with a 50% manual take rate is certainly different than a a car with a 2% manual take rate.

  • avatar
    Fred

    Some cars I want to shift, others I don’t. My biggest disappointment was the new A3 especially the S3 only having the DSG. Especially since the manual and even the hatch was available everywhere except the USA.

    • 0 avatar

      Yes, seriously. That made NO sense to me. Small cars, small engines, perfect for stick. Even the A4 and A5 still have manuals available in the 2.0T and S-level engines. That, in combination with the deletion of the hatchback, means I have zero interest in the new A3.

      The same goes for the new small MBs. No manual for the B-Class, CLS, or GLA means no interest, despite the fact that I’m their target market. I guess that leaves me with the A4, 3-series, or 1-series.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    “…while a handful of luxury models — Cadillac’s ATS and Infiniti’s Q60 among them — threw down for the cause.”

    Story got craaaazy at the Cadillac ATS being a “luxury” model part.

    • 0 avatar

      Oh jesus. Please.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Let’s get it out in the open once & for all:

        You believe the ATS to be a “luxury” vehicle?

        If your answer is a presumed yes, how/why?

        • 0 avatar
          Fred

          Oh please let’s not go there. Let’s talk about how good or bad the ATS manual is. I found it notchy and stiff when I tested it early in the production cycle. I’ve heard others say they improved it.

          • 0 avatar
            cimarron typeR

            I test drove an a 2013 ATS 6mt, it was just slightly notchier than my 10 G37s sedans 6MT.It must have been one of the recalled versions,it had more linear clutch take up than the g37.
            Not a box of rocks by any strech of the imagination,but wasnt on par with my previous ZHP 330i,my best reference point for sporting sedans.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Update: These cars SUCK & Cadillac is now desperate to move both the CTS with $17,500.00 off MSRP, and the equally, if not more sh!tty ATS with $14,000.00 off MSRP!

            http://www.carscoops.com/2015/02/cadillac-has-hard-time-selling-ats-and.html

            This vindicates my position all along that:

            1) All three motors in these SUCK

            2) These ride like sh!t (there’s a non-refined, harsh, non-premium ride with no reward – very un-Cadillac and far less comfortable than 3 Series BMW, Mercedes C Class or Audi A4)

            3) Back seat room and trunk space blows

            4) Gauge cluster sucks

            5) Build quality & reliability sucks

            6) Overpriced

            7) Hideous exterior

        • 0 avatar

          My response has nothing to do with the ATS being or not being a luxury car. It has everything to do with me being tired of the constant harping on it. We get it. We know your opinion, some of us agree and disagree to varying degrees. How about an opinion on something other than the ATS/Cadillac? You can write, you can think, let’s hear about something new.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          An ATS would be preferable to OCD.

      • 0 avatar
        MR2turbo4evr

        Haha. I love it when TTAC mentions Cadillac. I seriously only click on Cadillac articles so I can scroll down and read Deadweight’s comments.

  • avatar
    Beerboy12

    Just because very few people want a manual does not mean no one wants one. There are, as pointed out here, so few options for a person wanting a manual. Then, most of those options are, as some call them, poverty spec. Add to that a dealer trying their best to up-sell you and your options become very limited indeed.
    Another thing dealers will do is talk you into believing that the new auto’s and CVT’s are more economical than a manual. Well… They can be but we know, from various reviews, how that is achieved. You end up with a gutless, soulless pig of a car that never leaves 16th gear.
    If only there were more choices on the market, choices that made sense to actual buyers of cars and not just dealers and manufacturers.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      On the flipside, sometimes the auto is well-ratio’d but the manual has stupidly short gears. Looking at you, Honda!

      • 0 avatar
        Tosh

        Ja, when the 2nd gen TSX came out I went and drove the 6 spd manual, and it revved at about 3400 at 70mph in 6th gear. That’s a noisey difference (never mind the wear) over my 01 CL-S which revs at exactly 2000 at 72mph.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    I will call the ATS a luxury car if we are also classifying the A3, IS, 2 Series, 3 Series, C class/CLA, ILX, etc.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    This list is interesting in that for one, I had no idea they were still selling the G37 Coupe and Sedan as Q40, Q60 in 2015.

    Though the list is useful if you are in the market, quite a few cars which have the manual option are unicorns on dealer lots to the point where they are essentially special factory orders. I recall looking at BMW 3 series and was shocked that not a single example of a manual transmission was available on a dealer lot in the entire state of Michigan for a test drive. Which pretty much verifies what we all knew, that BMW is the ultimate social climbing machine, and very few buyers care about performance.

    I will go out on a limb and say the take rate could be even higher if dealers had at least one example on hand for test drives of models available with a stick. I am not going to put a deposit down to have a car shipped for a test drive to find out I don’t want it. Not only that, you typically lose out on incentives and other spiffs available on dealer inventory if you have to factory order, making it even less attractive for those of us where cost is an object.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      You’re not missing much. I drove a CPO 335i coupe and a new GTI on the same day, both manuals. I greatly preferred the GTI.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      Gamper,

      Buy used or CPO. Relying on dealers to take the risk of selling a new stick shift car is too much to expect. When i bought my used 3, there were only a few stick wagons for sale, but I found what I wanted and 4 years in, am still happy with the purchase.

      It was CPO’d which allowed some additional protection that I didn’t really need.

    • 0 avatar
      Varezhka

      I would probably not want to stock a manual transmission vehicle if I was a dealer, too.
      Not only would the take rate be quite low, the few example that you have would get idiot kids who try to “learn stick” on a dealer lot.

      The last time I went car shopping, many sales people repeatedly checked with me whether I really knew how to drive manual when I wanted to go test drive. I also personally know couple of the “idiots” who actually did this to the dealers. Honestly, it’s great that you want to try MT, but go to a driving school first if you don’t have anyone around you who can teach you.

      • 0 avatar
        kmoney

        I don’t know how people think it can be okay to do this. Is it that hard to bring a friend with you who knows how to drive stick.

        It’s even worse with bikes. When I last sold my last motorcycle on Craigslist I got people who had just passed their written test showing up for a test-ride: “yeah you can test-drive it, but there is a deposit — 100% of the asking price for the bike.”

  • avatar
    FractureCritical

    usually I like oppo, but this was a stupid list.
    sure, 20% of models are ‘available’ with a stick,
    but they poisoned the pill by only offering it on base models or with odd configurations. At best, I’d say 20% of possible configurations of possible models are available with a stick.
    that drops your ‘percentage’ to 4%, which seems more reasonable.

  • avatar
    DevilsRotary86

    I will repeat the post that I made on Jalopnik here for your entertainment.

    I am assuming that the time when a manual transmission is entirely extinct is coming soon. So the moral of the story here is if you have a manual transmission car that you really like, like I do, then take damn good care of it and be careful driving it. Because likely you won’t find another again. Keep it until you are like that weird old guy around the corner still daily driving his Porsche 356.

    Because I am pretty harsh on this. I will not let carmakers tell me what I want. Either they will sell me what I want or I don’t buy. Simple as that.

  • avatar
    happycamper

    In the past there was many advantages to purchase a manual over an auto.
    – The manual was usually cheaper by $500-1000.
    – A manual offered a performance increase, both in acceleration and fuel economy.
    – Manuals were more durable and cheaper, even factoring in clutch replacement.

    Modern automatics have eliminated pretty much all of these advantages, so there is little incentive to purchase a manual.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      That’s the whole point, really. In the future only people who love to drive manuals will get them.

      What gave manuals a bad rep is people who should have had automatics, but couldn’t afford them.

    • 0 avatar
      Kevin Jaeger

      Good points on how automatics now are a match or better for performance and fuel economy. But cost and durability are still very much an issue, especially with non-conventional automatics like DCTs and CVTs.

      But even conventional automatics are now quite complex, full of sensors and electronic controls that are often problematic, especially as they age.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        All that may be true, but it misses the point for those who enjoy shifting for themselves. I still would have bought the stick in my new car even if it was slower, more costly. and had worse durability than the 8 speed auto. There is something magical about the connection between man and machine and a manual transmission is a huge part of that. Flappy paddles simply don’t make the same connection.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    I tend to take a different approach for my desire to have a manual, other than I just like it..

    1. My kids. They will both for sure drive a clutch when the time comes. Anything I can do to keep their hands busy instead of texting is fine by me. Plus, I am willing to bet, their buddies will not know how to use the third pedal so I won’t have to worry about someone else driving.

    2. Auto theft. The mere presence of the DIY tranny drops car theft by an order of 90% or so. Last figures I saw was 2% of cars stolen had a manual. This could have been an internal measure as I work for an insurance co so the national figures may be different.

    • 0 avatar
      kvndoom

      Most of theose 2% were probably old Hondas, I’m sure. Almost ever riced out Civic I see is a 5-speed, bless their juvenile hearts.

    • 0 avatar
      wpaulson

      I recall reading about an attempted car jacking a few years ago. The thief pulled the woman driver out of her car, jumped in, closed the door . . . and then just sat there. Next, jumped out and ran away. Didn’t know how to use a manual transmission.

    • 0 avatar
      DucRam

      Someone after my own heart. Your #1 is exactly what I think when it comes to my 14 year old. She will learn on a stick, and the car she borrows from me will be a stick. It will hopefully keep her hands too busy to text/talk on the phone and I really doubt anyone she knows will actually be able to drive it.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    One thing of note on most of these models – if you want the higher end trim, or the bigger engine option, AND a manual – forget it. A lot offer the manual only with the base engine and/or poverty spec.

    Back in 2005 I would have bought a Mazda Mazda6 5-door if I could have gotten it some rather pedestrian options with the manual. It was a blast to drive, but I had reached the point in my life where I wanted things like heated seats and navigation. No automatic – no navigation. WTF?!?

  • avatar
    badcoffee

    I’m disappointed. I expect more from this site than a straight out link/repost from jalopnik.

    There’s a reason I’m still selective about which by-lines to read

  • avatar
    ccd1

    Nice pic of the R8. The new one won’t have a manual option. On the plus side, the base F-Type and S will have a manual option next year and the GT4 is manual only. On the other hand, new models like the i8, NSX and GT S are auto only.

    The manual is getting killed off in the sports/performance car arena because auto transmissions produce better 0-60 times and track times along with better gas mileage. The pleasure of greater involvement of DIY shifting does not show up in the stats.

    My prediction is that the last great analogue cars, ones with really good manuals and analogue gauges will be in high demand and be highly collectible.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    My past two new cars have been autos only because I wanted mid-level vehicles and manuals were available on base level only. Well, that and stop and go traffic ad nauseum in the big city with a stick shift is a cramp in the ass.

    My Saab garage queen has a 6 speed; that’s reserved for weekends with little traffic and open roads. With retirement and the country beckoning some day in the not-too-distant future, I foresee a return to clutches if any are still available…

  • avatar
    supernova72

    Saw a Chevy Cruze the other day that had 6MT trans in it. Had no idea that was offered in the Cruze.

    Have an E46 M3 with a 6MT. Love that car and trans. No SMG for this hombre. I’ll row my own.

    Did a search on the M235i. Of ~300 cars inventory U.S. only 20 are 6MT. Ugh.

  • avatar
    SunnyvaleCA

    Government regulations could have some effect too. It’s easier to game the EPA ratings with an automatic. (And the 8+ gears can actually be potentially more efficient.)

    Do manual transmission cars have to be crash-tested or can they get a free ride from the more common automatics? Sacrificing 8 cars to crash testing would be a major hurdle to low-volume stick shifts.

  • avatar
    210delray

    I don’t think manual transmission cars have to be crash tested separately, but they definitely require separate emissions and fuel economy testing.

    I really wanted to get a car with a 6-speed manual (the Scion FR-S was very tempting when it first came out).

    But…I recently purchased 2 new cars with CVTs, so I’m holding on to my 1998 Nissan Frontier with 5-speed manual as long as possible!

  • avatar
    Kevin Jaeger

    Like many things when it comes to automotive tastes, this angst about disappearing manual transmissions should come with a disclaimer that we’re only talking about the American market. Americans don’t buy manuals and the government mandates expensive emission testing of every drivetrain combo so manufacturers stop offering them – in the US.

    There’s no shortage of manuals – even from American manufacturers. They’re just not for sale in the US. You can buy your Fusion wagon with a manual transmission – it’s just called a Moneo Estate.

    You can even get a Ford Edge with a manual. You’ll just have to buy it outside America.

    • 0 avatar
      gottacook

      In the case of Subaru, there are new Legacys and Outbacks coming out of its Indiana factory with 6-speed manuals, but they’re not for sale in the United States – just Canada. Dammit.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      I like manual transmissions, but there just isn’t a lot of reason to get one anymore. When I ordered my Challenger, I picked the 8AT because it gets better fuel economy, is faster, and cheaper than picking the 6MT. Literally the only reason to choose the 6MT is if you *really* want to use your left foot to jam a pedal while driving or to show off how much of an enthusiast you are.

      I’ve chosen the manual transmission in the past where available because it was cheaper and the combination got better fuel economy, or was faster than the auto version. Those advantages are quickly disappearing though.

      • 0 avatar
        ptschett

        I enjoyed 4.5 years with my 2010 Challenger R/T (27F, 6-speed manual), but not enough for me to specify the same transmission again for my very-nearly-here 2015 Challenger R/T (28B, 8-speed automatic). I honestly have found a stick-shift in a car to be tremendously over-rated after owning a motorcycle.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      The upcoming Edge will have a manual in Europe? Interesting.

      I actually had to look up the claim that the Edge was sold/will be sold in Europe. I always thought the largest CUV sold in Europe was the Kuga. And it was, but won’t be anymore.

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    This list has a big asterick on it – namely that some of these are only available in select trims and packages. The Versa Note is only available as a no options stripper – and by stripper I mean no cruise control. Cadillac will only sell you a manual with the 2.0t, not the 3.6. The Civic EX sedan is auto only. If you want a V6 with a MT in an Accord, be ready to forgo 2 doors. Kudos to Ford and Mazda for generally letting manual proliferate. When I was car shopping in Fall 2011, I looked at the then new 2012 Focuses and Mazda 3 skyactives. At the time, neither would sell their respecitve top trimiline (Focus Titanium or Mazda 3i Grand Touring) with a stick. Both dealerships told me they couldn’t even make it work as a special order. I bought something else (a used BMW). The next year both changed their offerings. Glad I didn’t compromise, I would’ve been kicking myself.

  • avatar
    focal

    I will enjoy my manuals until the end. I currently drive a RWD 328i because the AWD version was auto only. The one or two days a year where the snow is too much, I take public transit. Small price to pay.

    I put my money where it’s still offered. Have since I started to drive from my ’68 Civic to the REALLY good ’92 Camry, ’97 Jetta GLX VR6, ’01 Jetta 1.8T, ’04 BMW 545i, ’13 BMW 328i and soon Porsche Cayman GT4 (deposit placed).

    I’m less of a purist when it comes to N.A. or Turbo, but looking forward to keeping the GT4 for eternity and trust that I can still get a 3 series or a VW in a 6MT for at least one more generation of cars.

    • 0 avatar
      banker43

      Focal, I was disappointed about the auto-only 328 X-drive too, so I looked at the 2014 A4 Quattro with the six-speed manual. This upstate NY winter has been rough. Drifting the A4 in the snow is about the only good to come out of it! Value vs the 328 was pretty good, too. No regrets.

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