By on February 9, 2015

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I haven’t owned an American car since 1992, but it’s been over 35 years since I’ve even driven a ChevroletIn 1979, my husband bought himself a Caprice, with the biggest V8 engine available. Usually, we owned Chryslers, Dodges and once, a green V8 Mustang, like the one Steve McQueen drove in Bullitt. There was also a Mercury Sable and a Ford Escort – a compact car that was probably smaller than the Chevrolet Sonic I rented in Florida.

When I booked the car, the rental agent told me that I’d be able to get a Honda Civic, but I ended up with this little black Sonic. I remember Derek went to drive the Sonic when it first came out, and he had good things to say about it. I don’t know if I liked it as much as he did.

I definitely like the hatchback style like my Honda Fit. It’s easier to see out of, though the Sonic felt nice and nimble and easy to park. The engine was a little quieter and a little smoother too, but didn’t feel as responsive as the Fit. I also like the way the Honda sits a little higher up.

The trunk space in the Sonic also couldn’t fit both my friend’s walker and the bundle buggy I use to carry my groceries, but it’s not really a fair comparison. The Sonic is a sedan, and can’t be expected to hold as much as a hatchback.

Two things I didn’t like: there’s no release for the fuel filler. You just press the door and it opens. It’s not a bad idea, but it’s very confusing for someone like me. It was also strange using a knob to turn the headlights on and off. It would have been easier if the rental company included the owner’s manual.

After driving the Sonic for a month, I never really warmed up to it. It’s a sharp looking car, and a lot better than what I expected from an American car, but I don’t think I’d want one over my Honda. So far, I have felt that way about both rental cars. Maybe if Derek lets me drive a Jaguar F-Type, I’ll feel differently (hint hint, Derek).

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122 Comments on “Grandma Review: Chevrolet Sonic...”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “The trunk space in the Sonic also couldn’t fit both my friend’s walker and the bundle buggy I use to carry my groceries”

    This is what car buying often comes down to – love it. To heck with 0-60 times.

    • 0 avatar
      Volt 230

      As an older driver, 0to60 who cares, I just want it to be able to keep up with traffic.

    • 0 avatar

      So very true. A friend of mine bought an Altima coupe a few years ago, and the crucial question was whether his bicycle would fit in the trunk/pass-through. It did, sale made,

    • 0 avatar
      Syke

      When I bought my (first gen) Scion xB, prime considerations were the ease of my (now late) wife’s entry and exit, and the ability to limber, unlimber and haul her wheelchair. It came down to the Honda Fit and and xB, and despite the Fit’s magical abilities to reconfigure to haul loads, the xB did what I needed better.

      Driveability was a close second concern, but as I still had my Porsche 924S at the time (Patti rode in it occasionally, and enjoyed those times but it wasn’t easy getting her in and out), I could have put up with some four wheeled stone, just so I could transport the wife.

      Extra points: The sales person at CarMax went to the back room and pulled out their emergency wheelchair, so I could try them, once I explained my needs.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Yep. In our 30s here, so no need for walkers, but my wife struggles with awkward tasks following back surgery. So ease of loading and reconfiguring is paramount. One of the great features in our Forester is the one-click remote-release rear seats (there is a button on each side right inside the hatch). We are also attracted to the Flex because it has power-folding third-row seats and one-touch second-row seats. For a family that has a combination of a much-heavier-than-average 9-month-old and a mom with a balky back, features like that are far more important than image or driving dynamics.

  • avatar
    spreadsheet monkey

    That Cruze looks good in black. Suits it better than insipid pale metallics.

  • avatar
    multicam

    Ma’am, the same thing with the fuel door bothers me too. Anyone can come by, open it and siphon fuel out without even the inconvenience of breaking a locking mechanism!

    Good review, I enjoyed it

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    This is the typical reaction of people who drive this car, nice, pleasant and all, but when it comes to putting down their hard earned money, most prefer something else.

    • 0 avatar
      319583076

      There’s no value and no emotional reason that anyone *has* to have a Sonic. My guess is that most Sonic buyers wander onto a lot knowing they need a car and little else. Circumstances push them into a Sonic. I’m not passing judgment, but anyone aware of what is available for the same payment is probably shopping elsewhere.

      BTW, I enjoyed this review. Keep them coming!

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        Well, reviews I’ve seen of the 1.4T hatchback have been pretty complimentary. One (Edmunds long-term?) said it reminded them of a budget Golf in road manners and solid feel. Not such a bad compliment for a little B-segment hatch. If you’re looking to maximize utility and fuel economy out of your subcompact, though, the Versa Note and Fit probably rule the roost.

        Actually, the Versa may be the perfect example of a car where people “wander onto a lot knowing they need a car and little else”.

        • 0 avatar
          Featherston

          We must read the same reviews, 30-mile fetch. I’ve found the 1.4T to be adequate in the Cruze rentals I’ve had and imagine it performs nicely with a smaller vehicle to haul around.

          Regarding the Versa, the previous-gen “Tiida” hatchback has fantastic back seat room and comfort. It absolutely trounced most of its competition in that regard. The one Versa owner I know did a lot of cross-shopping, and the back seat was a deciding factor for her. (I don’t think the current “Note” generation is quite as well packaged, although it’s still roomy for a car at its price point.)

        • 0 avatar
          st1100boy

          I rented a 1.4T hatchback LTZ Sonic back in October. Drove it from the St Louis area to Cleveland & back over a weekend. I got in about 200 miles of two-lanes and the rest on the interstate, so here’s a quick take.

          Bottom line up front: OK car, not spectacular. Probably wouldn’t buy one, but I wouldn’t criticize someone who did. One thing’s for sure: the Sonic beat the tar out of the Kia Rios (or what my wife calls “the sh*tt*est little car ever”) I’ve rented recently.

          Overall, the 1.4T was a decent engine. Good power on boost, but a bit laggy. Between the turbo and a sluggish transmission, it was a good “2 Mississippi” before things started happening. Once on boost, it was fine. Two lane passes weren’t scary and there was plenty of steam to run 80 up some steep hills west of Louisville.

          Fuel consumption OK. 33 mpg real world, including some bad behavior on empty two lanes. Can’t complain too much, but not “wow” either.

          The ride was better than expected for such a short car. Handling wasn’t that impressive, partly due to the underwhelming Hankook or Kumho tires (I can never keep them straight). Actually, very mediocre grip from the tires, wet or dry. The steering wasn’t terribly communicative either. It just wasn’t a car that egged me on to drive harder and have more fun. The Sonic wasn’t playful.

          The interior wasn’t bad. I like the instrument cluster. Seats were OK, and even at 6’4, I had enough room.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Didn’t what’s-her-name author here get a Sonic? Or was that a Spark.

        I can’t separate the two in my mind, other than to think the Spark is an Aveo.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      93k people bought a Sonic last year – that’s not so bad.

    • 0 avatar
      Richard Chen

      The Sonic’s driving position gave me left hip problems for days after a same-day rental, so never again.

    • 0 avatar
      gearhead77

      I’ve had two Sonics as rentals, one with 42k on the clock and the other nearly new. I was fairly impressed with them, compared to the previous placeholder Chevy had in this class, the Aveo. More impressed overall than with a new Kia Soul, though the Soul had a much nicer interior.

      But the Sonic is quiet and drives better. I drove the one with 42k on it from Cleveland to Pittsburgh on the turnpike and some twisty stuff and it didn’t beat me up. True, it did nearly shut off twice and one of the speakers was blown, but I can attribute that to rental use.

      If it were my money, it’d be an RS trim with an auto (I’ve tried teaching the wife..). But, at sticker, it’s 22k. The interior, even in RS trim, still feels cheap. I imagine with incentives, you’d do much better. But there’s a lot of competition, new and used, to make the Sonic top of my list.

      • 0 avatar
        319583076

        “But there’s a lot of competition, new and used, to make the Sonic top of my list.”

        This is my point. Anyone that shops cars beyond a superficial level is aware that there are many ways to turn that payment into something more a Chevy Sonic. It’s not a bad car per se, but there’s nothing to recommend it.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          “But there’s a lot of competition, new and used, to make the Sonic top of my list.”

          Indeed, because when someone says “You can have a new Sonic, or you can have a used…”

          I cut them off before they say what the used item is, in preference of said used item.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          “This is my point. Anyone that shops cars beyond a superficial level is aware that there are many ways to turn that payment into something more a Chevy Sonic.”

          You’re right, I should get that 10 year old S class instead.

          • 0 avatar
            319583076

            *pushes straw man out of the way*

            When, pray tell, would *you* recommend someone invest their money in a Sonic?

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            I’d say, they should buy a Sonic if they want and like the Sonic. There are lots of choices at this price point in the market. None of them are really any better than others, they are just different. Maybe you work across the street from the Chevy dealer, and the Honda dealer is across town. Maybe you have an irrational dislike of hatchbacks and want a sedan. Maybe you just like the color. Maybe there is so much cash on the hood you can’t say no.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            It was just a goof, man. It’s a running joke around here.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      The Sonic is one of those cars that lives and dies based on pricing.

      Like the Cruze, it does have the differentiating quality of feeling like a bigger, heavier, quieter car than most of its competition. Up to the buyer whether that’s good or bad.

  • avatar
    michal1980

    I wont saying anything, because pointing out the obvious will get me some label, because some groups are protected.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    The turbo manual model would be nice, isn’t there even an RS version? Though I doubt you’ll ever see that on a rental companies lot, and if you are in the market for something like that the Fiesta ST is likely a more attractive option.

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      PrincipalDan, the model shown there is the LTZ version which kind of surprises me that’s in stock at a rental place. I think the LTZ comes with the turbo motor.

      The hatch comes with the RS Turbo goodies, (suspension, body graphics and exhaust mods) but IIRC the sedan does not. And once you spec out the RS turbo hatch, the prices come close to the Fiesta ST which is faster…

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      @PrincipalDan

      Don’t be too sure of that – my ride this past weekend was a fully loaded Cruze LTZ RS from Hertz at IAD. Not a manual, of course. I would not be surprised if they have some equivalent Sonics and Sparks too.

      I actually picked the Cruze off the Hertz Choice lineup, after they tried to stick me with yet another rat-fur lined Maxima. I’ll take a Cruze over that pig any day.

  • avatar

    The Fit has much better visibility than that thing.

    Derek, I say take her hint about the Jag!

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      The problem with the Fit is that it’s kind of noisy and hard-riding by comparison. The Sonic rides like a larger car, while still being small, which some might see as a virtue.

      Caveat: I haven’t driven the third-generation Fit yet.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    I wouldn’t buy this car, I think the sedan is incredibly useless and ungainly looking. The hatch, maybe… However the fiesta seems like a huge upgrade for not much money, especially the 3 cylinder manual version.

    • 0 avatar

      The Fiesta is a much tighter car laterally than the Sonic and not at all comfortable for any prolonged trip with anyone else, imo. I’m a stocky guy and my equally-stocky friend look an ’11 SES hatch we had in stock from Palm Harbor (Tampa Bay) to Daytona Beach once to pick up checks/titles/etc. We had to check to make sure we didn’t end up having intercourse with each other every time we got in.

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        I need one of those emojis that has someone falling down laughing… Thanks, I needed that on a Monday morning…

      • 0 avatar
        nickoo

        Interesting. Im not a huge guy at 6 ft 195 lbs, but I have huge thighs and rear due to all the powerlifting I do. I found that the seats in most modern chevys are ridiculously small and I wouldn’t buy one just because of that reason, I would definitely stay away from the ford if it were even worse! Surprisingly, I’ve found that honda seats, which are firm with good lumbar support, are the best for me.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      From what I recall the backseat and trunk of the Sonic simply wallop the Fiesta. The Fiesta is a solid and enjoyable little car to drive, especially if unintentional intercourse with your passenger is a pleasant surprise rather than a traumatic accident, but it is an utterly useless people-moving device.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    What did she think of the kitschy pseudo-motorcycle gauge pod?

  • avatar

    I’ve never had a Sonic as a rental, but I have had several Cruzes (all of them 2LT or LTZ). I think the Sonic hatch sacrifices some space, but adds youthfulness. It’s one of the few cars aimed at young people that young people actually buy…

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    “The trunk space in the Sonic also couldn’t fit both my friend’s walker and the bundle buggy I use to carry my groceries”

    “there’s no release for the fuel filler. You just press the door and it opens. It’s not a bad idea, but it’s very confusing for someone like me.”

    ” I also like the way the Honda sits a little higher up”

    I’m helping my parents (88 & 87) shop for a new car. These are the kinds of things we talk about and are important to older folks.

    Thanks, Derek’s Grandma for your unique but very important point of view. Car makers will do well to listen, ’cause we all know you’re the folks with the money ;-)

  • avatar

    She makes that car look gigantic

  • avatar

    There is absolutely nothing American about the Sonic. it was engineered and designed in Asia. Heck, there is more American content in the Corolla than the Sonic. The US auto industry must be at a all time low to label the Sonic as an American vehicle.

    We are better than this!

    • 0 avatar
      PonchoIndian

      Actually the Sonic hovers between 65 and 70% NA content. The Corolla is 60%

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      The Sonic is built by the UAW in Michigan, so MURRKA!FK!YEH!

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      FWIW the Sonic is built in the US. Many of the small Chevys (the Spark excepted) are GMEurope engineered, with other inputs from GMKorea. No matter where it’s designed, that’s enough for most Camry-humpers to claim that car as “American”.

      Before long it won’t matter where a car is designed, as they will all be done in the cloud.

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        Edit: I was interrupted by actual work, so my response was delayed… Bummer… I see that others have noted the particulars about the US Sonic…

      • 0 avatar

        Most of the development work for the Cruze was also done by GM Korea (formerly Daewoo), if that’s what you’re referring to. But it hardly matters. All of the automakers seem to be taking a global approach these days. And if GM’s Korean division has strengths in engineering competitive small cars that people want to buy—which the Sonic and Cruze definitely are—then that’s great.

        • 0 avatar
          TMA1

          Seriously. The alternative is Chevrolet unleashing another Cavalier/Cobalt on all of us. And no one wants that!

        • 0 avatar

          Daewoo is considered a bottom feeder among Korean carmakers. If GM can’t do better than that maybe they should not be in the business of making cars.

          Btw, the Cobalt along with the Ion was engineered in Germany.

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            akear,
            give it up dude. I’m not sure why you have so much hate, but it really isn’t relevant anymore.

            Daewoo was considered the bottom of the Korean car market before GM bought them. Now, quite obviously, they are producing some good product.

            When will you get that “Daewoo”, is now a division of GM, like Holden, Chevrolet and Buick.

          • 0 avatar
            bosozoku

            “Btw, the Cobalt along with the Ion was engineered in Germany.”

            Lol, no they were not. Those vehicles rode on the Delta platform which was co-developed with GM’s European division, but that’s where their input ended.

    • 0 avatar
      darex

      I can accept this statement. This very car was sold in S. Korea several years before it commenced manufacturer and sales in North America. It is sold there AS the AVEO. It’s a Korean car that’s also manufactured in Michigan.

      http://www.chevrolet.co.kr/vehicle/aveo-hatchback-style.gm

  • avatar
    roadscholar

    I can understand her fuel filler door confusion since her car has a remote release but if she owned the Sonic instead of the Fit, she might be confused if she rented a car with a remote release. I think it depends what you’re familiar with.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      This seems to be inconsistent across models even within the same brand – some have a door release and others not. After having both, I prefer the auto release. Don’t have to touch a salty winter car to open it, and in case you have many cars, when you pop it open you know which side of the pumps to head to.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    To my knowledge, this is the only dedicated car publication that does grandma reviews. I wish my grandma was still alive so I could submit her reviews, they were always entertaining. “This here Infineetee sure has class, but I think it might be a bit too fancy for a gal like me.”

    Love it, keep em coming.

    • 0 avatar

      Me too. My Grandma drove like she was running drugs. had a 1972 Toyota Corona for 18 years then gave it to me with 180k on it. That’s the car I learned how to work a clutch.

    • 0 avatar

      I’d love to have my 71 year-old father write car reviews, but they would probably be rife with profanity, offend pretty much everyone, be short on factual content, and finish up with “…but it ain’t as fast as my supercharged Bonneville” and how he’d rather have a truck.

      In fact, my father DID drive a Sonic LS sedan for two weeks as a rental last year. I asked him how he liked it and he said, “The speedometer is cute…for a girl. There’s a lot of room inside for being such a small piece of s**t. Good car for a girl or your wife when she goes shopping. It don’t use hardly no gas and its zippy. But it ain’t as fast as my Bonneville. And for $16 grand you could find me a nice truck.”

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I like your family.

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        You say that like it’s a bad thing. I’d read that before Kondapavulur, Braithwaite, Cain, or Jack’s girlfriend of the week.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        “I’d love to have my 71 year-old father write car reviews, but they would probably be rife with profanity, offend pretty much everyone, be short on factual content, and finish up with “…but it ain’t as fast as my supercharged Bonneville” and how he’d rather have a truck.”

        Wow, I didn’t know your dad was a commenter here. That’s weird you live in Florida and he lives in Australia

    • 0 avatar

      I’d be interested in what both of my grandmothers would say about their cars, if they still drive them. My mom’s mom had a 1980s Chrysler minivan last I recall; it was maroon-on-maroon. I don’t know what my dad’s mom drives, though, but whatever it is, it’s definitely enjoying the weather near Tampa, Florida.

    • 0 avatar
      bosozoku

      My grandmother married a very wealthy man later in life who bought her a new car every two year. Her last few cars were: an ’86 BMW 535i, an ’88 Acura Legend sedan, a ’90 Infiniti Q45 (my personal favorite), a ’92 Mercedes 500SL, and lastly a ’94 Buick Riviera.

      She chose all of these herself, and I think she had impeccable taste.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I like her style, except for the last one. She had a string of good cars (including that very impressive 92 SL, one of my favorite designs ever), and then that cost-cut to hell Riviera. I can’t imagine how that felt after an early 90s Benz with a V8!

        What colors was the Q45? Active suspension version? Gold emblems?

  • avatar
    Matt Foley

    If you were plunking down your hard-earned cash on a NEW small hatchback with a manual trans, which would it be…

    The Golf 1.8T, OTD for $18,500?
    The Fit Sport, OTD for $17,500?
    The Focus S, OTD for $16,500?
    The Sonic LT 1.4T, OTD for $16,250?
    The Versa Note, OTD for $14,800?
    The Sonic LS 1.8, OTD for $14,000?

    Anything under 100hp is a non-starter, which leaves out the Spark and Mirage, both of which are available for $12K OTD.

    • 0 avatar

      Sonic LT 1.4 because I really like the one I have now.

    • 0 avatar

      Sonic LT 1.4T. The Versa is just…terrible.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      The Golf.

    • 0 avatar

      I’d figure out how to pony up the $18,500 for the Golf S. It’s not priced far from the *worthwhile* base trims of most compact cars, and the Golf doesn’t have much less usable space than a compact sedan (but it has a much tidier and more handsome package).

      But a lot of people who buy subcompact hatchbacks tend to be firmly in the $13,500-$15,000 range…and if they have to pay $18,000 for a subcompact hatch, it had better be nicely loaded…which would be the case for any of the other vehicles you’ve mentioned…

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      I’d wait for the upcoming Mazda2.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Focus SEs are going for $15,000 OTD around me. Based on your senario, I’d take the Golf. The Golf feels like a midsized car.

    • 0 avatar
      KixStart

      There’s a Yaris hatch with 5-speed and 105hp available.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      That price for the Golf is for a two-door. If you want four doors–standard on all the other cars on your list–the Golf starts at $21K. Those are some spendy doors.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Golf without a second thought if I’m keeping it for three years or less.

      Fit Sport or stretch for a Mazda3 “i” if I’m keeping it longer.

    • 0 avatar
      Eyeflyistheeye

      I managed to snag a 2014 Focus SE 5MT hatchback for $18.4k minus $3,500 in rebates plus 1.9% financing.

      I think part of Mazda’s lack of sales success in America lies with the fact that Chase basically handles financing for them without any incentives or great deals, and aside from that, a comparable 3 would have been $19.5k in the end, a significant difference. Now, the 3 can be had for less.

      And for the Golf, it’s $19,205 for the cheapest one in my area on TrueCar. I drove a launch edition for $1k less they had upon release, but I’m not paying $18k for a car without cruise control.

      Now for a five-door equipped Golf like my Focus, it’s $21,104 and I can’t get it without the stupid sunroof. For that price, screw compacts when I can get an Accord or Mazda6. I’ll say the Golf is better by a slight margin than the Ford and Mazda, but I don’t think the price difference is worth it.

      My next choice after the Focus would have been the Elantra GT. It’s not as sporty as the rest, but has a refined, competent feel like a 1990’s Toyota and can be had for around $14.5k.

      The Fit doesn’t belong in that class. It’s a decent B-segment vehicle (and no, I don’t think it lives up to the nutswinging surround it), but it still sounds and feels like a subcompact with a lot of room and the clutch is infuriating.

  • avatar

    I own one of these, a 2012 Sedan. I purchased it for my wife with her approval with 13 miles on the ODO after our Mercury Villager went to the great timing belt scrap heap in the sky. Ours is the basest of the base models, a 1.8 liter engine with a 5 speed stick, no turbo. No power windows. Just a base 4 speaker stereo, AC, and… well that’s pretty much it. The draw for this car was a used LTZ hatch offered for 5k more than this one new from the dealer. She test drove that one, said it reminded her a lot of my 09 GTI. So we bought it.

    The complaints people make about this car without having one are sort of funny. I’ve driven a Fiesta, a Focus, both generations between 2012 and current. I’ve drive a Cruze too, and a Malibu also new. All rentals for work travel.

    The Sonic is way more fun to drive than it should be. The ride is like a larger car, the steering is light but not uncommunicative, the seats are surprisingly comfortable for effectively the “cheap seats”. The highway ride is nice too, smooth. Much more comfy than the GTI at any speed. I get decent but not outstanding mileage, somewhere around 28 but I drive like I’m being chased by the cops everywhere I go. The stick is just the right throw to really get the most of the limited horsepower, and while understeer can be an issue it’s never kept me from hitting a highway off-ramp at 70. On Star kinda sucks, but it sucks in every GM car. The stereo isn’t great but it’s loud enough to drown out the wind noise from the big mirrors. The only actual complaint that I have with the car is its terrible handing in any kind of snow. The Hankook All Season radials might as well be granite racing slicks and the traction control makes getting around in the slush absolutely impossible. The TC is so bad I am not even going to waste the money on a set of Blizzaks because I don’t think it will make a difference for stopping and starting where the car is most handicapped by the TC system. Even this though makes it better in the snow than the GTI which might as well not even have tires from about Dec 1 to March 31 here in NH.

    interior room is good. I can haul two kids and a dog and all our shit a couple hundred miles at a time without broken bones or strained muscles.

    Cost to purchase? 13k even. Way better than used at that price with a great warranty too. Besides, there’s something about getting the keys to a real new car that puts a smile on a girl’s face better than just about anything and I wanted my wife to smile a lot.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    Take the hint. I’m dying to read a grandma review of a super car.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    There you have it. Who cares about how fast the car goes, just will it hold my stuff!

    I’ve checked these out but haven’t driven any of the styles, but I think the sedan looks best. That’s what I would buy, most likely.

  • avatar
    r129

    My 77 year old grandma drives a 2006 Impala, which she perceives as being small. She would prefer a Buick, because as she says, “Driving a Buick is like drinking Champagne, and driving a Chevy is like drinking beer.” However, since her new car budget of $20,000 hasn’t changed since her 1986 Buick Park Avenue, she has been gradually downgrading. She will not consider a used car, because she had so many problems with that used Rambler. She will not consider a 4 cylinder, because her car is a V6, and it’s too slow. She has expressed a desire for something with a V8.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    I’m surprised she liked the Fit. Most of my elderly customers can’t stand them because of the hard seats, noise, sluggish response when equipped with automatic and the cheap interior furnishings. It’s two big claims to fame are it’s luggage capacity out back and small exterior size/fuel mileage ratio. If Honda’s are talked about it’s usually the CRV that they want to look at.

  • avatar
    Eyeflyistheeye

    I owned a 2013 Chevrolet Sonic LT turbo automatic hatch for 8 months and 11,000 miles until I traded it in for a 2014 Ford Focus SE 5MT hatch, when Ford was slapping down all kinds of discounts that it basically became $1,500 more to get into the Focus in total after taxes and trade-in. I thought it was fair since the Focus was the car I wanted in the first place and an automatic compact car becomes boring.

    After owning the Sonic, I can say that I don’t like B-segment cars in general, but for what it was, I have no complaints about the Sonic. It was reliable, quick, had almost as much room as the Fit, and drove quite well.

    I like the Fiesta’s drive better than the Sonic, but it is ridiculously small. The three-cylinder is also not suited for driving in American conditions. I’ve had enough drive time with the prior Honda Fit, drove the current 2015 one, and I still preferred the Sonic.

    The only thing I miss from owning the Sonic is the Chevrolet dealers I dealt with for service, many of them were much more friendlier and less slimy than the Ford dealers. They were so bad that they would have very much lost the Ford Motor Company my sale had the last dealer I went to before I would have said “Screw it, I’m keeping the Sonic” actually acquiesced to give me all incentives, a good trade-in and 1.9% financing.

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  • MitchConner: Tool Guy (great username by the way — as it fits), Nikola already conceded they fraudulently represented...
  • Inside Looking Out: I always liked the bold futuristic style of end of 1950s American cars given that I saw them only...
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