By on February 26, 2015

2015-buick-verano-model-overview-exterior-938x528-splash-guards_2

Facing growing dealer inventories, General Motors is cutting back production at two of its plants to adjust supply and demand.

Automotive News reports Orion Assembly in Detroit and the Flex line at Oshawa Car Assembly in Oshawa, Canada will be idled in March and April, respectively, each plant to idle for four days. Orion is responsible for the Chevrolet Sonic and Buick Verano, while the Flex line handles the Chevrolet Camaro and Impala, Buick Regal, and Cadillac XTS.

The reduction in production comes amid consumer demand for trucks and crossovers over said vehicles, of which the Sonic and Regal hold the highest inventory levels at 216 and 213 days as of February 1, 2015. The Sonic’s inventory level is the highest since the subcompact’s August 2011 debut, while the Regal jumped to its level from just 96 days back on January 1.

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86 Comments on “General Motors Cutting Production To Relieve Inventory Glut...”


  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    They also idled the LGR plant that produces the Cadillac ATS & CTS for at least 7 weeks now because of the glut in those vehicles.

    Johan is working on a 5 year plan, though.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Those worked so well for Stalin

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Update: These cars SUCK & Cadillac is now desperate to move both the CTS with $17,500.00 off MSRP, and the equally, if not more sh!tty ATS with $14,000.00 off MSRP!

        http://www.carscoops.com/2015/02/cadillac-has-hard-time-selling-ats-and.html

        This vindicates my position all along that:

        1) All three motors in these SUCK

        2) These ride like sh!t (there’s a non-refined, harsh, non-premium ride with no reward – very un-Cadillac and far less comfortable than 3 Series BMW, Mercedes C Class or Audi A4)

        3) Back seat room and trunk space blows

        4) Gauge cluster sucks

        5) Build quality & reliability sucks

        6) Overpriced

        7) Hideous exterior

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      Grand River has been up since 1/26/15 although it shows only 123 cars for that week, I do not see any downtime scheduled. From 2/23 to 3/16 they’re increasing from 600 cars for the week to 940.

      Fairfax is down: Week of 4/6/15 though.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Honda has a glut of Civics on there hands right now.

      Buyers are switching to CUVs in ever larger nos.

      As for the CTS, again – Cadillac honchos messed up by thinking it would sell as well as the E Class, but it was the no. 3 selling midsize lux sedan last year.

      The ATS is a semi-bomb b/c Cadillac’s entry in the segment inexplicably went from just about the largest(the previous CTS) to the one with the tightest interior space – which is a big fail for the typical American buyer.

      Also, the Regal impedes into the ATS’s space/pricepoint.

  • avatar
    Roberto Esponja

    Boy, that thing has the mother of all DLO fails, as San…Sajeev would say. :-P

  • avatar

    It’s unfortunate about the Regal. A good car, that’s simply too expensive in relation to its competition. I wish it was more popular, so that we would at least have a slim chance of getting the next generation.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Had Cadillac slapped the wreath on the Regal/Insignia, with high content standard, and called it the ATS, it would’ve sold 2x as many units, despite being “fail wheel drive.”

      It feels more premium, has a much better ride, and has more traditional Cadillac virtues than the harsh around the edges ATS.

      • 0 avatar

        I’ve driven both and the Regal is good but I don’t know if its THAT good. For starters, they use the same engine (although, note that Buick eliminated the base 2.5 that the ATS still carries). And I seem to recall that you don’t like the 2.0T. They also probably use the same transmissions. The ride may be better, but then the Regal’s ride has always been one of its finer points: not soft and floaty, not harsh, just the right tautness.

        I’m always keeping my eye out for a nicely equipped Turbo with the 6-speed manual or (in the future) a GS.

      • 0 avatar

        So a very middle of the road, large-ish Opel sedan is Cadillac material? That would make a current top of the line Fusion a Bentley then.

      • 0 avatar
        Liger

        The Regal is recommended over the bmw 3 series by Consumer Reports for it’s high quality and the fact that it’s a better car than the 3. However, the creepy unattractive balding 20 something fat guy in my building drives a base Verano (I’ve seen his pig of a mother, she drives a lucerne), so Buick’s creep factor is way high in my book.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      That’s the general problem with GM vehicles. They’re overpriced for what you get. And to bring an Opel to the US and price it so high is insane.

      And then there are the recalls waiting in the wings, years down the road…

      At some point even Gruber’s stupid Americans are going to be looking for a better value.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        The Regal pricing is just silly. It’s more expensive than other semi premium cars of the next size up.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Of the people I know who recently were looking to buy a four-door sedan, and there were several of them, all of them old people my age or older, none ever cons!dered the Regal.

          Money was not at issue here. Value for their money was.

          So what exactly is the demographic the Regal is supposed to entice? I can’t figure it out. Maybe potential buyers can’t either, hence, slow sales for the Regal, regardless of pricing.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            @HighDesertCat

            It certainly won’t appeal to the car by the pound buyer. But I would say it is the closest thing to a Saab 9-3 you can currently buy.

            I do think it is yet another case of a great car being sold with the wrong name on it. The type of buyer who would like it won’t give Buick a look in. I certainly like the Regal better than any of the Japanese entries in this segment, and MUCH more than I like the Volvo S60.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            krhodes1, in my area Saab was never a popular product. In fact, over the years and decades past, many of the GIs who brought back a new Saab from Europe traded them off within six months after hitting this location.

            I’m not a GM fan any longer, but I have no doubt that the current Regal is the best of the breed. I believe it was positioned wrong and priced out of range for all but the most ardent Buick fan.

            I’m all for freedom of choice and the more the merrier. I just can’t see where the Regal fits in.

            (Then again, I don’t see where Buick and GMC are a necessity for GM.)

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          Isn’t the money on the hood fairly epic though? I don’t care what MSRP is, I care what ATP is.

          Ultimately, I don’t blame them for this type of pricing – some suckers will pay it. Most won’t, and if they want the car they will get the price where it needs to be.

          I really like the 2.0T Regal, but I don’t do sedans.

          • 0 avatar

            krhodes1…let’s just, for a moment, dream about the “what-if” scenario of Buick bringing over the wagon and/or hatchback version of the Insignia. *sigh*

            And my family wonders why I’m considering a transition to London from Montreal.

  • avatar
    Thatkat09

    SUVs are up, sedans down. Fords having the same problem, Chrysler has had this problem for awhile.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    GM, please feel free to bump up the rebate on that Sonic I have my eye on.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      We had a 2015 Sonic LT with less than 1K miles as a rental in October. We were shocked – it is a very competent car with good value for what you get. The interior is far roomier than the exterior would have you believe. It’s highway manners (albeit flat lands) was another surprise. No issues rolling along at 75 – 80 MPH with the rest of Louisiana (where they apparently ignore the speed limits, like everywhere else)

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Remarkable. For all the cheer-leading you provide to GM, you’re still shocked when you drive one and you can say that it’s good. Hmm…

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          The I’m a GM cheerleader meme is quite worn out CJ.

          But glad to see you saw my post as trollbait.

          Curious? Did you roast Bark M. earlier this week when he said the Sonic LTZ and Ford Fiesta were his two commended go to compact hatches – even over the Fit?

          See, that’s the part that makes it old. The Sonic is the number two seller in class (behind the cheaper fleet favorite Vetsa) and is generally well praised. How did Bark put it? Oh ya, “they know just enough about cars to be completely and utterly stupid.”

          Here is Bark’s piece, but hey, we know just how much the editorial staff at TTAC is a bunch of GM fanbois. Damn you Jack for your LaCrosse, Epsilon II Impala, and Corvette praise! Damn you to Hell!!!

          …3. They know just enough about cars to be completely and utterly stupid

          This actual exchange happened recently:

          Friend: “Hey, Bark, what new car would you recommend for less than $20,000? I’d like a hatchback with Bluetooth and some other upscale options.”

          Me: “A good friend of mine just bought a Sonic LTZ about a year ago and she loves it. I really liked driving it, too. I just bought a Fiesta—you should check those out, too.”

          Friend: “Americans don’t know how to make small cars. I’m going to get a Fit.”

          Well, thank you for referencing your decade-old knowledge about cars to make your decision. You should also make all your dietary decisions on the food pyramid. Make sure you stretch out thoroughly before you attempt a world-record in the long jump, too. Did you know that smoking reduces stress?

          When I go to my doctor, I assume that he’s more up-to-date on medical information than I am, because it’s his job to be. It’s my job to be up-to-date on the latest information and trends in the car biz. Trust me…

          Yup – why on earth would someone who hasn’t driven an econobox in 30 years be surprised that ANY econobox regardless of brand is actually, roomy for someone 6’1″ tall, and has competent highway manners. /facepalm

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            If you think pointing out that you’re a GM cheer-leader is getting old, imagine how ridiculous it is for you to say you’re shocked that you’re about to praise a GM car. Get a grip on reality. Lots of people pointed out that Bark M is out of his depth advising others on car purchases, and his dismissal of the Fit was his most egregious failure. He isn’t a keeper. He’s a day tripper, so his advice is only useful for other leasers.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          And lets add to this CJ…lets take a look at all my GM cheerleading in the comments. Lets look at just the last 10 days…

          Like here:

          https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2015/02/capsule-review-2015-audi-tts-coupe-competition/

          And here:

          https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2015/02/analysis-epa-revising-fuel-economy-testing-guidelines/#postcomments

          Here:

          https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2015/02/chevrolet-ss-may-gain-camaro-1le-package-suit-abides/#more-1003626

          Oh and here:

          https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2015/02/not-aussiely-influenced-big-chevrolet-sedans-struggle-january-2015/#more-1002890

          Heck – on the same day I recommended a Toyota Sienna as the best used minivan choice, you march this canard out.

          The great thing about the internet is there is a record to go back to and look – my record doesn’t bear out your accusation.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            Audi story – you said an old, failed GM car was as boring looking as a new Audi. = push

            SS story – Your writing there is exactly what GM cheer-leading looks like, if you want help understanding what I’m pointing out.

            Aussie story – You fluff the Buick brand while blaming everything but the product for the SS’s failure.

            Minivan – You also recommended a GM van for the price conscious and you were talking about a market that GM has forfeited. It would be hard to recommend a recent GM minivan that doesn’t exist.

        • 0 avatar
          jacob_coulter

          +1

          GM is the best! I can’t believe how non-sh!tty their latest offerings are.

  • avatar
    ciscokidinsf

    I really think the Regal is already on its last days – I’ve been to 2 separate Buick dealerships this month, and none of them had any used or new Regals. Plenty of Veranos, Lacrosses, and the Buick CUV – but no Regals to be found.

    Smoke’em while you got’em – I would’ve liked to test a 6SP Manual GS Regal with the 260HP engine – hope they are better than the 6SP manual – 2.0T combo found in the last 9-5 Saab, that was a bit underwhelming.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I hear the manual transmission in the Verano is brilliant. ;)

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      It may have been a good idea at some point, but the market is looking for something else these days. If GM had a potent little V6 like the Pentastar 3.6 that cranks out 305hp with twin exhausts, maybe that would beckon the hot-rod dads to buy one. After all, you can still strap the kiddie-seat in the back.

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        GM has the LFX 3.6L which was 305 hp in the Impala.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Maybe a rethink is in order and GM should use the LFX 3.6L as the mainstay V6 of the GM lines, if it is THAT good.

          We had rental 2014 Impala in Mar/Apr 2014 when attending MLB Spring Training in Phoenix, AZ, and none of us who drove it were impressed. With 5 adults on board is was a slug in traffic, a dog when merging on I-10, and a pig when braking. Would much rather have had a Chrysler 300 V6 instead, but none were available.

          Cons!dering what GM wants for the V6-equipped Regal and Impala, and what the buyer gets for their money, my money would be on anything else were I in the market for such a vehicle.

          It looks like other potential buyers may think the same, judging from the slow sales of the Regal.

          It had potential. Just not at the price GM wants to sell it for.

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            Which Impala – W-Body or Epsilon II – there is a huge difference. What you’re describing is the W-Body in your review.

          • 0 avatar
            SC5door

            “Which Impala – W-Body or Epsilon II – there is a huge difference. What you’re describing is the W-Body in your review.”

            Sounds like an EII with the 4 cylinder to be a slug in traffic.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            I don’t know which body. It wasn’t my rental. It was brought to Phoenix by my wife’s sister and her family from Denver, CO, for the get-together in Phoenix. But we all shared cars, depending on which games we went to watch.

            I did notice that when closing the doors even gently, they rang like a church bell and sounded tinny. And when I was in the front passenger seat, the dashboard layout was not conducive to easy access to the 12v plug to plug in the Garmin, among other things.

            The interior materials used were very nice, leather and soft plastic everywhere, but IMO not worth the ~$40K this sedan would have stickered for. ( I looked it up on GM’s site.)

            I’m not in the market for one but if you can tell us more I’m sure it would be appreciated. When friends ask me for my input on recommending a sedan, I gravitate toward the V6 Chrysler 300-series or the Avalon XLE.

            Neither has disappointed anyone I know who ever bought one. A friend from church has two 300s, of different years and different trim levels. Another guy I play poker with recently traded his old Highlander for a second Avalon.

            I don’t know anyone who bought a Regal. I know a guy who bought an Enclave which ran out of gas on I-10 east of Indio, CA, when his gas gauge still showed he had more than 1/4 tank of gas left.

            ___________

            SC5door, it was a V6, for sure.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        300hp V6s are a dying breed. ~2.0T 4s ARE the future, whether you like it or not.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Yeah, I know. And I think it is a shame. As I near the end of my new-car buying days, I ‘will’ buy what I believe to be the best fit and balance in my vehicles.

          Even if that means that I can’t afford it and have to go into debt for it.

          IMO, a robust V8 in a truck or SUV, and a potent V6 in a sedan, SUV or CUV.

          Old habits are impossible to break and this old dog is not going to learn to love squirrel engines.

        • 0 avatar
          NoGoYo

          Can we at least have some bigger ones?

          Ford’s got the right idea with the 2.3T, now GM should make a 2.4T or something.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Why? ~250-275hp 250-300lb-ft of torque is the norm for a modern 2.0T motor. Seems way more than adequate for a grocery getter, even a relatively sporty one. Making it bigger just makes it harder to deal with the NVH.

    • 0 avatar

      “I’ve been to 2 separate Buick dealerships this month, and none of them had any used or new Regals.”

      Well GM has 200+ days of supply…so SOMEBODY’S got them.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Well, they don’t seem to be around the Puget Sound area. I drive by a Buick/GMC dealer twice a day – lots of the crossovers and pick up trucks, and LaCrosse. If they have Regals – they’re buried in the back corner.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    I so wanted to like the Regal. Styling is decent, the standard turbo 4 is reasonably quick, and it’s surprisingly fun to drive, and tomb quiet. I drove a Volvo S60 and Infiniti G37 a few days after driving the Regal, and the Volvo was a complete bore in comparison with utterly dead steering, while the Infiniti G felt wooden and heavy.

    Where the Regal completely lost me is the seats. They are absolutely rock hard, and no matter what I did with the lumbar, I just couldn’t get comfortable. After a half hour test drive, I was already getting a backache. Too bad.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Funny, the G37 is actually slightly lighter than the Regal – Infiniti models are typically quite heavy. But it is somewhat smaller, though I wouldn’t generally think that when putting the two together. The Regal has always looked small to me.

  • avatar
    jacob_coulter

    I actually like the Buicks over the last few years, it’s one of the few GM offerings for a sedan I would consider. Nice interiors, conservative tasteful exterior. I just don’t trust GM quality over the long haul.

    I would hope the “real” price is far less than though than the MSRP, because no way could they compete with other brands on that pricing.
    You’d be better off just buying something like a Lexus ES for just a bit more. I think the Lexus ES350 and a Buick Regal are within about a thousand dollars of their MSRP.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      JD Powers rated the Lexus products higher than Buicks, IIRC.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        At this point the difference between worst and first is rounding error. Buy whatever appeals to you more.

        • 0 avatar
          KixStart

          “At this point the difference between worst and first is rounding error.”

          We’ve been hearing that mantra from Detroit’s fans for years. El Lutzbo claimed that in 2003. It wasn’t true then and it’s not true now.

          “Buy whatever appeals to you more.”

          Not wasting my time visiting the dealer is what appeals to me more.

          • 0 avatar
            jacob_coulter

            We’ve definitely been hearing that the gap in quality was something that MAYBE happened when Jimmy Carter was President, but it was a long time ago and completely overblown.

            Meanwhile, all of my personal experience, friends and family plus actual publications like Consumer Reports shows they still have big issues with this.

            If you buy a new car every 3 years, no, there probably isn’t that much difference.

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            We’ve been hearing that mantra from VW fans for years….

            There, I fixed it for you.

      • 0 avatar
        jacob_coulter

        Of course, I’m sure its not even close, especially when you really put the miles on it. Under warranty, it probably doesn’t matter but 10 years down the road?

        I honestly don’t know who would buy one over the other of the price were the same (unless you fought in the Pacific during WWII)

        I owned a Lexus ES and had around 150k miles on it, I just sold it because I got bored with it but it was insanely reliable.

        It was basically a Japanese Buick. Quiet interior, overboosted steering, plush ride. I loved it.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Would you REALLY recommend someone to hold on to a vehicle for 10 years?

          In this day and age of imposed complicated electronic systems, I’m not sure the electronics will last even close to that period of time.

          • 0 avatar
            jacob_coulter

            It depends on the car, but I’m currently driving a 2004 Lexus and it’s been rock solid.

            I think cars can easily go out for longer than that and still be reliable transportation. None of the “electronics” have gone out on the car. I’ve owned 3 cars in a row that were over 10 years old and the issues I had were pretty common to any age car. Say a window regulator, alternator, etc, I’ve never had an ECM or anything like that go out.

            I will say though, if you don’t have the ability to do repairs at least some of the time yourself, I would probably stick with newer vehicles.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Your rationale is pretty close to why my friend still tools around in his old LS400. It hasn’t been garaged for decades and both the paint and the interior reflect the damage of the high-desert NM sun.

            But as long as it starts up and goes, he’s going to drive it until the wheels fall off of it.

            Since I no longer have the physical flexibility to work on my own cars, I have resolved to trade mine every three to five years, or before the factory warranty expires.

            If we could afford to buy a new Lexus product, I’m pretty sure we would.

          • 0 avatar
            jacob_coulter

            If you can comfortably afford buying new every 3-5 years, more power to you. But I do think the first 7 years are so are pretty trouble free for most “well made” cars (usually Japanese)

            If you want to save some money, buying a 2-3 year old car will still give you most of the “drama free” ownership experience for the next 4-5 years you keep it.

            When things get over 100k miles is you start getting into repairs that may not be worth it for everyone.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            HDC,

            Didn’t you JUST buy a brand new Sequoia Limited? If so, you can certainly afford a new Lexus product. There are at least 3 under the cost of the Sequoia.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            In our case it is more of a realignment of priorities. First and always there is healthcare. Second is that roof over our head. Then, transportation — reliable transportation, meaning usually more than one ride.

            In my association with people over the age of 55, this seems to be what their priorities are.

            One thing we did recently was move into town from the desert, closer to the Regional Medical Center, in case of medical emergency.

            As with all things in life, things change, priorities change, sometimes even if we can’t afford them. We just have to adapt, overcome, and match our needs to what is possible.

            _____________

            CoreyDL, yes my wife’s car is a 2015 Sequoia Premium 4X4 but WE didn’t pay for it. The family business bought it for her in Sept 2014.

          • 0 avatar
            LectroByte

            I always buy a car with the plan to keep it at least 10 years. Sometimes it doesn’t work out, most of the time it does.

            My daily ride is an ’00 Tundra, no problems with the electronics, other than an o2 sensor. I drove a Volvo 850 for 12 years, no electrical problems other than the power antenna motor died.

            But after reading that review of some new Cadiallac here the other day that had all manner of problems in 15k, then I don’t blame you for being skeptical.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            LectroByte, that’s the way it was with me (us) too. Kept the cars going until it was no longer economically feasible to keep them running. Raised four kids and utilized the hand-me-down strategy of cars.

            After the kids left home, I changed my strategy with the purchase of our 2008 Highlander. I resolved to trade our cars every 3-5 years or before the factory warranty expired.

            Then the first thing I did was walk back from that decision when we bought my wife the 2012 JGC. I kept the 2008 Highlander because it had been trouble free, and continues to be trouble free as my 17-yo grand daughter’s daily driver to this day.

            We also still have the 2012 JGC registered in our name, but now my 23-yo grand daughter drives it as her daily driver.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            “Would you REALLY recommend someone to hold on to a vehicle for 10 years?”

            It depends on the vehicle. We’ve kept some cars well into their teens. We’ve dumped others long before the first decade was up.

            The cars that went into their teens saved us a lot of money; I’m buying that brand again and again.

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            The average car on the road is 11.4 years old now – so the answer to your question – well – yes, yes I would.

            Your heated seat might not work anymore and the power trunk closer might be balky – but the core systems are likely fine.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            Would you REALLY recommend someone to hold on to a vehicle for 10 years?

            Yep. Three cars in our fleet are older than 10 years ago, two of which are much older.
            Well worth the sacrifice to retire before 60.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            I find it very interesting that several have responded that they would, indeed, keep their vehicles for at least ten years.

            I have read about the average age of vehicles in America being over 11 years old, but I always attributed that to the owners not having the money to buy a new vehicle.

            There are some people I know who have vehicles more than 10 years old but it is not the only vehicle they own. I, myself, recently bought a 1989 Camry V6 from my best friend for $1 but only because I hated to see it crushed since it was still running and in good shape.

            But to people who need dependable and reliable transportation, I am hard pressed to believe that they would rely on a 10 yo vehicle to satisfy all their transportation needs.

            Maybe that is because I live in the wide open spaces of the Southwest and distances are great and the landscape barren. If I lived in a populated area, maybe I would keep my vehicles longer.

          • 0 avatar

            Highdesertcat (maybe now Urban Cat?) what are you going to do with that 1 dollar Camry? Just curious…

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Hi Marcelo. Urbancat is my brother in Palos Verde, CA, a suburb of Los Angeles, CA.

            Just FYI, my wife is Kitty, my 23yo grand daughter is Tabby, and my 16yo grand daughter is Furball. Seriously! Those are really their nicknames derived from their Christian first names.

            My oldest son is Tomcat. My #2 son is Alleycat (because he was a slutcat before he met his wife.) And my youngest son is now Migracat. Before that he was Polecat but a Mexican beauty nailed his hide to the altar, and got him to put gallon bottles of drinking water out in the desert for the illegals crossing into the US..

            The 1989 Camry V6 is parked at our house in the desert. Once in a while the lady who cleans the house drives it to town to get what she needs.

            My oldest son and his ex-wife (and their 8-yo twins) have set up housekeeping there so she (his ex-wife) can still take care of her folks who live five miles away, rather than commute up to my son’s ranch house 45 miles away.

            His Japanese wife refuses to give him a divorce but she is taking care of her folks near Fukushima, Japan, since she retired from banking.

            Sometimes truth is stranger than fiction! I could write a book but this is not the venue for it. And I seriously doubt anyone would be interested in reading about it since most people have their own weirdness to deal with.

          • 0 avatar

            LOL! Great story highdesertcat! I think it does sound like the beginning of quite an awesome book. I’d read it. American success stories are always so inspiring, seriously.

            As to the Urbancat it was just because you mentioned in another comment you’d moved into town. Hope you don’t feel constrained!

            Abraço!

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Marcelo, I mentioned some time ago that there were many changes in my life, all for the good. Moving was one, for safety reasons.

            When one of our rentals became vacant, my wife and I decided to move into it (1600 sq ft, 70’s-built home, perfect size for two) so we could be close to the Regional Medical Center.

            A friend of ours recently died because it took the ambulance almost 40 minutes to drive to his house in the desert near us and by the time the ambulance got there he had been dead 20 minutes. I mean dead dead. No resuscitation possible.

            My wife and I have medical issues and driving great distances to go to doctor appointments is just not a good idea.

            Would love to live in the solitude of the wide open spaces, but necessity has forced us into town.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            @Highdesertcat

            For a couple decades I drove cars that I bought at 10 years plus old on average. And yes, I did it because I couldn’t afford them new, and I have expensive taste in cars. All European cars that many on here would never dream of having at those ages and mileages. In 2011, I bought a $1000 ’95 Volvo 945 with 212K on it to get me by between selling my Saab and picking up my BMW – drove it every day for six months, all sorts of work trips, never a problem with it. Maintained properly, they gave excellent and reliable service with very few exceptions. For most of that time I had a daily commute plus I drove long distances for work. I did hedge my bets by having more than one car, but the number of times I had an issue on the road are less than the fingers of one hand, in many hundreds of thousands of miles. For many years I was a 30K mile a year driver. Modern cars are MORE reliable than those cars of the ’80s and ’90s, not less. Even if you can’t get the Bluetooth to work with your phone.

            Now I can afford to buy new, but there is very little that interests me anymore. My BMW wagon is now almost 4 years old – I seriously plan to keep it *forever*, baring accidents. I can’t replace it, there is nothing available like it anymore. I put 5500 miles on it last year – it’s going to last a really looong time at that rate. I plan to be “that old dude who still drives the car he bought new way back when”. I’ve had one car 19 years so far – no plans to part with it either. The only thing that kills cars is rust, everything else is fixable relatively easily.

            At the moment, due to the obnoxious weather in Maine, I am driving my 14yo Range Rover 99% of the time. I’m planning to take it on a 500 mile round-trip for work next week to far eastern Maine. It’s been to Boston twice in the past two months – that’s a 250 mile roundtrip. Doesn’t worry me in the slightest. If it does break down, that’s why I pay AAA every year. They will tow it home. I’m not a brain surgeon, if I don’t make it to that client location until a day late, it won’t matter a bit to anyone. I get screwed up by the airlines all the time anyway in my travels. I’ve had more airplane breakdowns in the past month than I have had car breakdowns in the past 15 years! That’s not even including the weather issues.

            Take care of the car, and it will take care of you.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      FWIW – a closer 1:1 comparo to an ES350 is the LaCrosse, not the Regal

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I usually keep my vehicles well over 10 years. I don’t drive as much as I use to and I keep the maintenance up. Keeping a vehicle longer depends on your financial ability to afford a newer vehicle and how you maintain a vehicle. I have owned very few vehicles that have been so bad that I couldn’t keep them for at least 10 years.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Jeff S, but is it your only vehicle or do you have newer ones as well?

      • 0 avatar
        JD-Shifty

        Hi, remember me? I put another 500 miles on my S-10 and turned 381,000 since the last time you said it was too scary to drive.

      • 0 avatar
        JD-Shifty

        It looks like we’re back to that meme of being terrified of a breakdown.

        Hi, remember me? I put another 500 miles on my S-10 and turned 381,000 since the last time you said it was too scary to drive.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        I’ll bite on this one. We have three vehicles. The newest one is an ’09 built in ’08. We have the resources to buy just about any vehicle we want (say $100K or under). We choose to have a motor pool of 6, 9, and 11 years old because we see cars basically as depreciating assets.

        It doesn’t quite disprove your point, but in our neighborhood the uninformed driving by? They’d the one or two visible vehicles in the driveway were for the help.

  • avatar
    namstrap

    A few months ago on a trip to England, I saw lots of stripped down Regals doing taxi service. They looked fairly large compared to most other cars.
    They were actually Vauxhall Insignias, sister of the Opel Insignia, and all of them had the familiar clattering of a diesel engine.

  • avatar

    When the Verano was introduced, I asked one of the GM execs, Jon Lauckner, if there was market space beneath the LaCrosse for two small sedans – wasn’t there the possibility that the Verano would cannibalize sales from the Regal? Now both of them are selling slowly – though some of that can be attributed to the state of sedan sales in general today.

  • avatar
    readallover

    I shopped Regal and ATS and they have something else in common: The back seats are essentially useless. It happened with Malibu, people buying sedans want some usable leg space for the back seat passengers – how can GM not figure this out?


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